Do Uterine Fibroids Cause Frequent Urination

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What are the symptoms of uterine fibroids?
    There are three people has been diagnosed by uterine fibroids in my family. I’m afraid if I will have it. So I want to know something about the disease and the symptoms of it. Thanks in advance.

    • ANSWER:
      How do you know if you have uterine fibroids? Probably you do not know. Most fibroids do not cause any symptoms and do not require treatment other than regular observation by a physician. Fibroids may be discovered during routine gynecologic examination or during prenatal care. Some women who have uterine fibroids may experience symptoms such as excessive or painful bleeding during menstruation, bleeding between periods, a feeling of fullness in the lower abdomen, frequent urination resulting from a fibroid that compresses the bladder, pain during sexual intercourse, or low back pain. Although reproductive symptoms such as infertility, recurrent spontaneous abortion, and early onset of labor during pregnancy have been attributed to fibroids to any of these symptoms. In rare cases, a fibroid can compress and block the fallopian tube, preventing fertilization and migration of the ovum. After surgical removal of the fibroid, fertility is generally restored.

  2. QUESTION:
    What causes frequent urination and what helps for it?
    I'm not sure if I'm getting MS or what. I pee quite often. I never had kids, my blood sugar is in check, and I don't have uterine fibroids. (I'm female so I don't have an enlarged prostate) So what is wrong with me? Is this the beginning of MS or something else? Are there any alternative therapies for this? Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      There are many different reasons for this and since i don't know you or the condition of your health...just off the top of my head the herb nettles is good for this problem, but it may not be a remedy for everyone.

  3. QUESTION:
    What are the symptoms of uterine fibroids?
    I want to get some knowledge about uterine fibroids.

    • ANSWER:
      •Heavy and prolonged periods
      •Bleeding between periods
      •Lower back or leg pain
      •Pain during sexual intercourse
      •Need for frequent urination caused by bladder pressure
      •Feeling of fullness in the lower abdomen
      You can visit http://www.nobleherb.com/goods-19.html for more details.

  4. QUESTION:
    What are some of symptoms of uterine fibroids?
    I had a late miscarriage in January. I lost the baby because some sort of tissue has wrapped around the umbilical cord and cut it off. Since the miscarriage I have had light periods, been constantly looking and feeling bloated, and I am very sensitive to touch around where my uterus is. I know I sound crazy but I have been ignoring how I feel for a long time and I just want to know if I have any cause for concern. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      heavy or painful periods, abominal discomfort, bloating, painful defecation, backache, and frequent urination.

  5. QUESTION:
    When is an uterine fibroid considered big?
    When is an uterine fibroid considered big? Mine was 2,5 cm but I've been feeling a constant pressure in the pelvic area that makes me think it has grown a bit.
    I can't wait for menopause. For the last month month it seems that my bladder is always full, even at night. I'm living in the bathroom!

    • ANSWER:
      I guess when the fibroid is causing lifestyle problems like frequent urination, its considered too big.

  6. QUESTION:
    What is the average size of a human uterus ??
    I have been scanned and found to have two large fibroids but not sure how their size compares to the size of my uterus. Or what the treament may be.

    • ANSWER:
      The uterus varies in size depending on the woman's age and whether she has had previous pregnancies. The average adult uterus is about 3 inches long, 2 inches wide, and 1 inch thick. After menopause, the uterus shrinks to the pre-adolescent size.

      Uterine fibroids are tumors or growths, made up of muscle cells and other tissues that grow within the wall of the uterus (or womb). Although fibroids are sometimes called tumors, they are almost always benign (not cancerous). The medical term for fibroids is uterine leiomyomata (you-ter-in lie-oh-my-oh-mah-tah). Fibroids can grow as a single growth or in clusters (or groups). Their size can vary from small, like an apple seed (or less than one inch), to even larger than a grapefruit, or eight inches across or more.

      Uterine fibroids are the most common, benign tumors in women of childbearing age, but no one knows exactly what causes them. They can be frustrating to live with when they cause symptoms. Not all women with fibroids have symptoms, but some have pain and heavy menstrual bleeding. Fibroids also can put pressure on the bladder, causing frequent urination.

  7. QUESTION:
    i am having a small sharp pain that lasts about 20 seconds after i reach an orgasam any reason why?
    the pain will last for about an hour after wards but its not as intense its more like a dull pain. The pain i have right when i orgasm is a sharp pain and its very painful! any one know why am i having this?

    • ANSWER:
      oh hun. I'm really sorry you're dealing with that!

      Sounds like it could be something like uterine fibroids or possibly endometriosis to me but it sounds like a good reason to visit the OBGYN.

      Hugs!

      ***********************

      Endometriosis - Symptoms

      Some women with endometriosis do not have symptoms. Other women have symptoms that range from mild to severe.

      Endometriosis symptoms are often most severe just before and during the menstrual cycle and get better as the menstrual period is ending. But for some women, pain is ongoing and does not improve during the menstrual cycle.3 Ongoing pain is especially common in teens with endometriosis.

      Symptoms may include:

      * Pain, which can be:
      o Pelvic pain.
      o Severe menstrual cramps.
      o Low backache 1 or 2 days before the start of the menstrual period (or earlier), becoming less during the period.
      o Pain during sexual intercourse.
      o Rectal pain.
      o Pain during bowel movements.

      *******************
      Uterine fibroid symptoms and problems include:

      * Abnormal menstrual bleeding. Up to 30% of women with fibroids have menstrual period changes, such as:23
      o Heavier, prolonged periods that can cause anemia.
      o Painful periods.
      o Spotting before or after periods.
      o Bleeding between periods.
      * Pelvic pain and pressure, such as:
      o Pain in the abdomen, pelvis, or low back.
      o Pain during sexual intercourse.
      o Bloating and feelings of abdominal pressure.
      * Urinary problems, such as:
      o Frequent urination.
      o Leakage of urine (urinary incontinence).
      o Kidney blockage following ureter blockage (rare).
      * Other symptoms, such as:
      o Difficulty or pain with bowel movements.
      o Infertility. Sometimes, fibroids make it difficult to become pregnant.
      o Problems with pregnancy,

  8. QUESTION:
    What is Fybroid Tumors on the uterus?
    Why have an hysterectomy?

    • ANSWER:
      What are fibroids?
      Fibroid tumors are usually benign (non-cancerous) tumors found, most often, in the uterus of women in their 30's and 40's, although they occasionally develop on other organs which contain smooth muscle cells.
      Fibroid tumors are solid tumors which are made of fibrous tissue, hence the name 'fibroid' tumor. Most often fibroids occur as multiple tumor masses which are slow-growing and often cause no symptoms.

      The size of fibroids varies immensely among women and some are so small that a microscope is required to see them. However some women experience a single large fibroid tumor the size of a grapefruit or a fibroid which is so large it encompasses the entire abdominal area. Such large tumors can weigh as much as 50 pounds; the largest, reported, fibroid ever recorded weighed in at 140 pounds.

      No one is sure why fibroid tumors develop, but some facts are quite clear-- they do not develop before the body begins producing estrogen during the onset of menstruation-- estrogen, such as in birth control pills and taken for menopausal symptoms, does cause fibroid tumors to grow and fibroid tumors will grow very quickly during pregnancy when the body is producing extra estrogen-- they often shrink and disappear after menopause when the body stops producing estrogen--a woman will almost never develop fibroid tumors after menopause.

      The estrogen connection appears to be quite clear, although there are still some who doubt the role estrogen plays in the development of fibroid tumors because women with fibroids often have blood levels which reveal normal amounts of estrogen.

      Types of Fibroid Tumors
      Submucous Fibroids

      These fibroids occur just below the lining of the uterus and can cause menstrual problems, including pain as they grow and move around the pelvic area.

      Intramural Fibroids

      A round fibroid most often within the uterine wall which can cause enlargement of the uterus as they grow.

      Subserous Fibroids

      This fibroid grows on the outer wall of the uterus and usually causes no symptoms until it grows large enough to interfere with other organs.

      Pedunculated Fibroids

      These fibroids develop when a subserous fibroid grows a peduncle (stalk), as they grow larger they may become twisted and cause severe pain.

      Interligamentous Fibroid

      A fibroid which grows sideways between the ligaments which support the uterus in the abdominal region. This type of fibroid is especially difficult to remove without the possibility of interfering with the blood supply or other organs.

      Parasitic Fibroid

      The rarest form of fibroid tumor occurs when a fibroid attaches itself to another organ.

      Diagnosis of Fibroid Tumors
      Diagnosis of fibroids is generally made by your physician during your annual gynecological exam when your physician feels a mass, they often are found when your physician is looking for something else or may never be discovered if you do not experience symptoms. However larger fibroids may make examination of your ovaries impossible if they grow near your ovaries.

      An ultrasound scan is often ordered when such masses are felt by your physician to determine the cause of the mass, however some fibroids appear on sonograms as ovarian tumors and surgery is the only way an accurate diagnosis can be made.

      Although most fibroids cause no symptoms, the estimated 25 percent of women who do have symptoms may have abnormal bleeding, pain during menstruation, and as the fibroid tumors grow larger, women will often experience a swollen abdomen.

      Larger fibroids may cause frequent urination or an inability to control your bladder, either the ability to control the urge or in severe cases, a women may find that she is unable to urinate at all. If a fibroid extends towards a woman's back it may push on the bowels, causing constipation and a backache.

  9. QUESTION:
    What do you know about fibrods?
    What are the consequences? Symptoms? Treatment? Is there any way to get rid of them?

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroids

      Fibroids, or myomas, are growths or benign tumours that form inside the uterus (womb). Around four in 10 women over the age of 40 will have fibroids. No one knows why fibroids develop, but it is suspected that the sex hormones – oestrogen and progesterone – play significant roles. This is because fibroids rarely grow in prepubescent girls and postmenopausal women. Pre-existing fibroids stop growing, and may even shrink, once a woman passes the menopause.

      Symptoms
      Most women with fibroids have no symptoms. When present, symptoms may include:

      Heavy periods
      Lengthy periods
      Period pain
      Spotting between periods
      Painful intercourse
      A sensation of heaviness or pressure in the back, bowel and bladder
      Frequent urination
      A lump or swelling in the lower abdomen.

      Fibroids often cause no problems, but may occasionally be associated with infertility, miscarriage and premature labour. Other possible problems include heavy, lengthy and painful periods. Treatment depends on the size, number and location of the fibroids, but may include drugs, procedures performed under local anaesthetic and surgery. Fibroids rarely turn cancerous.

      Treatment
      Treatment depends on the location, size and number of the fibroids, but may include:
      Monitoring – if the fibroids are causing no symptoms and are not large, a ‘wait and see’ approach is usually adopted.
      Drugs – such as hormones, used in combination to shrink the fibroids prior to surgery.
      Arterial embolisation – under local anaesthetic, a fine tube is passed via an artery in the arm or leg into the main artery supplying the fibroid with blood. The whole process is monitored by x-ray. Fine particles (like sand) are then injected into the artery to block the blood supply to the fibroid. The fibroid slowly dies and symptoms should settle over a few months.
      Hysteroscopy – the fibroids are removed via the cervix, using a hysteroscope.
      Laparoscopy – or ‘keyhole surgery’, where a thin tube is inserted through the abdomen to remove the fibroids.
      Open surgery – larger fibroids need to be removed via an abdominal incision. This procedure weakens the uterine wall and makes Caesarean sections for subsequent pregnancies more likely.
      Hysterectomy – the surgical removal of some, or all, of the uterus. Pregnancy is no longer possible after a hysterectomy.

  10. QUESTION:
    What can be the cause of frequent urination besides having a UTI (Urinary Tract Infection)?

    • ANSWER:
      Caffeine, diabetes, nerves, pregnancy, cold, fibroids, cystocile (sp? that's when the uterine wall weakens and the bladder bulges into the uterus), tipped or prolapsed uterus, irritatoin from detergent residue in your underwear, etc. If the urination is painful or has an unusual color or smell it's most likely a UTI, possibly sexually transmitted. If it's bothersome see a doc. If you can't see a doc because of financial reasons, you can go to Planned Parenthood and they'll examine you for free or on a sliding scale if you say you think you might be pregnant.

  11. QUESTION:
    Do I have endometriosis or what?
    I get *really* bad cramps for the first 2 to 3 days of my period, & my period lasts for about 5 to 7 days. Also, my first 3 to 4 days I bleed pretty heavy, and big globs of stuff come out too now & then (the lining shedding in globs I guess). My cramps have been describes as "labor like pain" by some people, but I've never been in labor so I don't know. Someone told me I might have endometriosis is this true? Yes, I'm going to go see a doc soon, so don't give me any "go see a doc" answers.
    I'll be more specific. Taking Aleve doesn't get rid of the pain completely (@ 1 point it did but the pain kept getting worse over the months), or taking 800 milligrams of ibuprofen doesn't do much either (Aleve seemed to do a better job). I started taking "OOna 2PMS" 3 months ago along with 600 or 400 mg of ibuprofen that helps a bit more, but my friend gave me all these other herbs & they worked well to the point where I could function finally (I can't function while in pain). But this month I'm all out of those herbs & kinda broke. The pain & swelling is so bad I don't like anything touching my tummy area, most of my pants make the pain worse. The pain sometimes comes like lightning shocks, but it's usually a twisting pain inside that's constant with an additional worse pain that goes in & out within every 3 to 5 min or so.
    oh and the pain or contractions are so bad they make me go #2 to the bathroom a lot. Not sure if that's important to notice or not. Also, the pain feels better when I either lay down or sometimes when I sit down.
    oh and b4 my period I get gooey discharge like big snotty looking things a few or so days before my period. Also, I lightly spot *sometimes* after my period, and it's kinda brownish sometimes when I spot. When I'm on my period it's bright red and the clumps are a dark red.
    "Oöna" sorry couldn't figure out how to do the o with the dots.
    http://www.oonahealth.com/whatPMS2.html
    OMGosh "HeptaDragon"
    “very painful menstrual cramps”
    yes
    “pain with periods that gets worse over time”
    yes
    “chronic pain in the lower back and pelvis”
    Yes during my period.
    “pain during or after sex”
    Don’t know, c0z I’m still a virgin.
    “intestinal pain , painful bowel movements”
    Yes during my period.
    “heavy and/or long menstrual periods”
    Yes I bleed heavy for like the first 3 to 4 days, and it lasts for 6 to 7 days.
    “spotting or bleeding between periods”
    Once in a while, but not really.
    “infertility”
    Don’t know, never tried to get pregnant.
    “fatigue”
    Only from taking the medicine.
    “You are more likely to develop endometriosis if you began getting your period at an early age”
    Yes, I started right before turning 9 years old. But I didn’t have cramps till like around 12 years old.
    “have heavy periods”
    yes
    “have periods that last more than seven days”
    No
    “have a short monthly cycle (27 days or less)”
    Not sure, I don’t know.
    “and have a close relative (mother, aunt, sister) with endometriosis.”
    yes
    “experienced physicians may be able to find signs of endometriosis on pelvic exam. The two most common imaging tests for diagnosing endometriosis are ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); the only way to know for sure if you have endometriosis is to have laparoscopy.”
    When I go next Tuesday I’ll ask for these tests, thanks for telling me about them.
    "lizstar78" Yeah I just got back from the doc they didn't run tests c0z I'm on my period (I went c0z my Mom is in town and she made me, I was just gonna reschedule).
    They did put me on Birth Control though, "Progestin/Estrogen Contraceptive - Oral" They and me are hoping that'll calm down my cramps in the mean time they gave me a prescription strength ibuprofen.
    "ashleytabeling" thx 4 letting me know about the other things, I'll ask about them during my next visit. k.

    • ANSWER:
      IN most women there is cramping in the lower abdomen, usually in the first or second day of the menstrual cycle.

      These are caused contractions of the uterus as your body sheds adn get rid of what it does not need.

      Ibuprofen or other pain relievers like midol can sometimes reduce the severity of cramps. Exercise can also help in some cases.

      With that being said, severe menstrual cramps, particularly if paired with excessive bleeding or passage of large blood clots, can occasionally be a sign of endometriosis or other disorders

      Endometriosis

      Endometriosis is the growth of cells similar to those that form the inside of the uterus (endometrial cells), but in a location outside of the uterus. The cells attach themselves to tissue outside the uterus and are most commonly found on the ovaries, the Fallopian tubes, outer surfaces of the uterus or intestines, and on the surface lining of the pelvic cavity.

      Uterine Fibroids

      Fibroids can cause a number of symptoms depending on how big they are, where tjey are , and how close they are to pelvic organs. Large fibroids can cause: sever pelvic pain, pressure, frequent urination, pain when havigna bwoel movement and very heavy bleeding, longer than normal periods and breakthrough bleedign between periods.

      Pelvic Infalmmatory Disease

      This is a general term for infection of the lining of the uterus, the fallopian tubes, or the ovaries. Some of the symptoms of PID are abnormal vaginal discharge
      with an abnormal color, consistency and odor, abdominal pain and fever ( which is not always present)

      I hope this help sand wish you the best of luck!!!

  12. QUESTION:
    Symptoms of Uterine Fibroids?
    What are the symptoms of uterine fibroids? How about the treatment of uterine fibroids?

    • ANSWER:
      Uterine fibroids are noncancerous growths of the uterus that often appear during your childbearing years. Also called fibromyomas, leiomyomas or myomas, uterine fibroids aren't associated with an increased risk of uterine cancer and almost never develop into cancer.
      The symptoms of uterine fibroids are: Heavy and prolonged periods; Bleeding between periods; Lower back or leg pain; Pain during sexual intercourse; Need for frequent urination caused by bladder pressure; Feeling of fullness in the lower abdomen.
      The treatment of uterine fibroids:
      The first thing you should do is check your family history for fibroids. There has been speculation that genetics may play a role in women who get them. Researchers are currently doing genetic studies to find out who's likely to develop fibroids. Sceond, pay attention to your lifestyle. As women, we have to be careful of what we eat. Consuming foods that are high in fat, sugar, and caffeine can encourage the growth of fibroids. Excess sugar and fat consumed can also interfere with the liver's ability to remove excess estrogen, which stimulates fibroid growth. Many women consume high-fat and high-sugar foods when stress leads to emotional eating. A solution would be to find other ways to relieve your stress such as exercise, meditation, or some other hobby. Also, eat less high-fat and high-sugar foods and ass healthier foods to your diet such as fresh fruits and vegetables, nuts, and whole grains.

  13. QUESTION:
    Do Uterine fibroids cause mid cycle spotting.?
    If not, what are the causes of mid cycle spotting?

    • ANSWER:
      Some women are genetically predisposed to developing uterine fibroids. This condition is believed to run in families. Thus, if you have female members on your mother's side who have this condition, your chances of developing this condition increase manifold. Generally, it has been found that daughters and sisters of women with this condition invariably develop fibroids at some point of time during their lives.

      Race
      For unknown reasons, black women are found to have 2 to 3 times more likelihood of developing fibroids than women of other races. Women of African-American descent are also likely to develop fibroids at a much younger age. Caucasian women are least likely to have uterine fibroids.

      Hormones
      Fibroids have more estrogen receptor sites than endometrium. As estrogen is a dominant female reproductive hormone, its presence often triggers the fibroid growth. This phenomenon becomes more pronounced during pregnancy, especially in the first trimester, when female hormones are rampant in the body. However, post childbirth, the fibroids shrink back, owing to hormone deficiency. Hormones in the contraceptive pills also contribute to growth and enlargement of uterine fibroids.

      Nulliparity
      Nullipara is a term given to a woman who has never given birth in her life. Nulliparity is somehow associated with development of uterine fibroids.

      Early Menarche
      Onset of menarche before the age of 10 also elevates your risk of developing uterine fibroids during your later years.

      Symptoms and Treatment

      Symptoms of uterine fibroids are almost absent if the fibroid mass is very small. However, multiple or large fibroids may cause symptoms that are detectable. Given below are a few common symptoms of uterine fibroids.
      •Enlarged uterus
      •Very heavy menstrual bleeding, sometimes with clots
      •Frequent periods or bleeding between periods
      •Painful urination or inability to urinate
      •Pain during sexual intercourse
      •Pressure on rectum, if the mass is large
      •Urgency to urinate, if the mass is large
      •Infertility
      •Increase in waist/abdominal size
      Size, number and nature of fibroids can be detected using abdominal or transvaginal ultrasound. Usually, a surgery is the only option to remove fibroids. Treatment options are discussed with the patients after taking into account her general health and desire to have children in future. Hysterectomy may be recommended for women who suffer from very heavy bleeding and have no desire to have children.

      If you belong to any of the risk groups mentioned above, it is imperative that you get a routine pelvic exam done to rule out the possibility of uterine fibroids.

  14. QUESTION:
    other causes of frequent urination aside from diabetes?

    • ANSWER:
      :
      *Premenstrual syndrome
      *Type 2 diabetes
      *Urinary stones
      *Uterine fibroids
      *urinary tract infection

  15. QUESTION:
    Does it sound like I have Uterine Fibroids?
    I've been having some problems since like July of this year. I'm 23 and I have had 2 kids. I have very heavy bleeding during my periods with awful cramps, pelvic pain every so often, backaches, and starting a couple weeks ago frequent urination and I haven't been drinking anymore than usual, I even stopped drinking anything 3 hours before bed and I still have to wake up in the middle of the night to go, and everytime I do have to go it feels like I've been holding it for hours when I haven't. I didn't really think anything of it til the frequent urination, I thought maybe I was pregnant but I started my period yesterday and things are just coming together like uterine fibroids. I'm going to the dr. next week when I'm off my period but just wanted other's opinions. I'm terrified that's what it is because I read if it's too bad you have to have a hysterectomy and I am not wanting to stop having kids yet, I love mine to pieces but I really would like a couple more.
    Can someone explain to me the difference of fibroids if it doesn't sound like it because I have all the symptoms except for period lasting 7 days or longer
    I forgot to mention also pain during intercourse
    I've been checked for diabetes before, and I'm not diabetic

    • ANSWER:
      No, it does not sound like fibroids....I have had them all my adult life...I am a grmother, it sounds more like kidney or bladder problems. Diabetes also causes frequent urination....just go get it all checked out...you will feel better.

  16. QUESTION:
    i would like to know all the symptoms of a pregnancy?
    and if the breast hurt, if thats one. thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      POSSIBLE SIGNS OF PREGNANCY:

      SIGN: Amenorrhea (absence of menstruation)* WHEN IT APPERS: Following Conception OTHER POSSIBLE CAUSES: Travel, fatigue, stress, fear of pregnancy, hormonal problems, illness, extreme weight loss, going off the pill, brestfeeding.

      SIGN: Morning sickness (nausea, with or without vomiting, Any time day or night)^ WHEN IT APPERS: 2-8 weeks after conception OTHER POSSIBLE CAUSES: Food poisoning, emotional stress, infection, a variety of illnesses.

      SIGN: Frequent urination WHEN IT APPERS: As early as 2-3 weeks after conception OTHER POSSIBLE CAUSES: Urinary tract infection, diuretics, stress, diabetes.

      SIGN: Tingling, tender swollen breasts WHEN IT APPERS: As early as a few days after conception OTHER POSSIBLE CAUSES: Birth control pills, impending menstruation

      SIGN: Darkening of the areola (area around the nipple) and elevation of tiny glands around the nipple WHEN IT APPERS: First trimester OTHER POSSIBLE CAUSES: Hormonal imbalance or effect of prior pregnancy.

      SIGN: Blue and pink lines under skin on breasts and later on abdomen WHEN IT APPERS: First trimester OTHER POSSIBLE CAUSES: Hormonal imbalance or effect of prior pregnancy

      SIGN: Food Cravings WHEN IT APPERS: First trimester OTHER POSSIBLE CAUSES: Poor diet, stree, impending menstruation

      SIGN: Darkening of line from navel to pubis (Linea nigra) WHEN IT APPERS: 4th or 5th month OTHER POSSIBLE CAUSES: Hormonal imbalance or effect of prior pregnancy

      *Some women have periodic staining or bleeding during the first months of pregnanc; others may have some bleeding during implatation of the embryo in the uterus.
      ^More than half of all women experience morning sickness.

      SIGN: Changes in color of vaginal and cervical tissue to bluish violet* WHEN IT APPERS: First trimester OTHER POSSIBLE CAUSES: Impending menstruation.

      SIGN: Softening of the cervix and uterus* WHEN IT APPERS: About 6 weeks OTHER POSSIBLE CAUSES: A delayed mentrual period.

      SIGN: Enlarged uterus* and abdomen WHEN IT APPERS: 8-12 weeks after conception OTHER POSSIBLE CAUSES: Fibroids, tumor

      SIGN: Palpable uterine artery pulsation* WHEN IT APPERS: Early in pregnancy OTHER POSSIBLE CAUSES: Fibroids, tumors.

      SIGN: Fluttering sensation in lower abdomen (fetal movement) WHEN IT APPERS: First noted at 16-22 weeks of pregnancy OTHERPOSSIBLE CAUSES: Gas, bowel contractions

      *Signs of pregnancy looked for in medical examination.

  17. QUESTION:
    Please tell me more about fibroids?
    I had an ultrasound scan today. I was referred for the scan because I've been trying to conceive and nothing has happened in a year and a half of trying.

    It turns out I have 3 fibroids in my womb. The woman who did the scan said that 2 were "fairly big". She also said it was the reason I've always had very heavy, painful periods.

    Does anyone else have fibroids? I'd like to hear other people's experiences, and find out more information (e.g. useful websites etc.).

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroid tumors are usually benign (non-cancerous) tumors found, most often, in the uterus of women in their 30's and 40's, although they occasionally develop on other organs which contain smooth muscle cells.

      Fibroid tumors are solid tumors which are made of fibrous tissue, hence the name 'fibroid' tumor. Most often fibroids occur as multiple tumor masses which are slow-growing and often cause no symptoms.

      The size of fibroids varies immensely among women and some are so small that a microscope is required to see them. However some women experience a single large fibroid tumor the size of a grapefruit or a fibroid which is so large it encompasses the entire abdominal area. Such large tumors can weigh as much as 50 pounds; the largest, reported, fibroid ever recorded weighed in at 140 pounds.

      No one is sure why fibroid tumors develop, but some facts are quite clear-- they do not develop before the body begins producing estrogen during the onset of menstruation-- estrogen, such as in birth control pills and taken for menopausal symptoms, does cause fibroid tumors to grow and fibroid tumors will grow very quickly during pregnancy when the body is producing extra estrogen-- they often shrink and disappear after menopause when the body stops producing estrogen--a woman will almost never develop fibroid tumors after menopause.

      The estrogen connection appears to be quite clear, although there are still some who doubt the role estrogen plays in the development of fibroid tumors because women with fibroids often have blood levels which reveal normal amounts of estrogen.
      Types of Fibroid Tumors

      Submucous Fibroids

      These fibroids occur just below the lining of the uterus and can cause menstrual problems, including pain as they grow and move around the pelvic area.

      Intramural Fibroids

      A round fibroid most often within the uterine wall which can cause enlargement of the uterus as they grow.

      Subserous Fibroids

      This fibroid grows on the outer wall of the uterus and usually causes no symptoms until it grows large enough to interfere with other organs.

      Pedunculated Fibroids

      These fibroids develop when a subserous fibroid grows a peduncle (stalk), as they grow larger they may become twisted and cause severe pain.

      Interligamentous Fibroid

      A fibroid which grows sideways between the ligaments which support the uterus in the abdominal region. This type of fibroid is especially difficult to remove without the possibility of interfering with the blood supply or other organs.

      Parasitic Fibroid

      The rarest form of fibroid tumor occurs when a fibroid attaches itself to another organ.
      Diagnosis of Fibroid Tumors

      Diagnosis of fibroids is generally made by your physician during your annual gynecological exam when your physician feels a mass, they often are found when your physician is looking for something else or may never be discovered if you do not experience symptoms. However larger fibroids may make examination of your ovaries impossible if they grow near your ovaries.

      An ultrasound scan is often ordered when such masses are felt by your physician to determine the cause of the mass, however some fibroids appear on sonograms as ovarian tumors and surgery is the only way an accurate diagnosis can be made.

      Although most fibroids cause no symptoms, the estimated 25 percent of women who do have symptoms may have abnormal bleeding, pain during menstruation, and as the fibroid tumors grow larger, women will often experience a swollen abdomen.

      Larger fibroids may cause frequent urination or an inability to control your bladder, either the ability to control the urge or in severe cases, a women may find that she is unable to urinate at all. If a fibroid extends towards a woman's back it may push on the bowels, causing constipation and a backache. Treatment of Fibroids

      If your fibroid tumors are severe enough that they cause certain symptoms, surgery is often, the required treatment. Symptoms which justify surgery include: extremely heavy bleeding during your menstrual cycle, which causes anemia that does not respond to treatment; pain, which has become intolerable to the woman or discomfort caused by the pressure of the fibroids on another organ; or when the location of the tumors is likely to cause further problems.

      Surgery for fibroid tumors includes, myomectomy and hysterectomy. Myomectomy is the surgical removal of each individual tumor without damage to the uterus, preserving a woman's ability to conceive. However, fibroids will often grow back and although it is possible to have a myomectomy repeated, multiple myomectomies can cause other problems such as the walls of the uterus sticking together due to scarring.

      Women should also consider uterine artery embalization. Uterine artery embalization leaves the uterus intact in a non-surgical procedure.
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      Polyvinyl particles are placed into the uterine artery at a point just before the nexis of vessels spread out into the uterine tissue. The particles flow into the vessels and clog them. This prevents the fibroids from receiving the constant blood supply they require and causes the fibroids shrink overtime. However, almost immediately the symptoms of heavy bleeding and pelvic pain are significantly reduced.

      The sad fact is that because fibroids do grow back, most women will eventually have to face a hysterectomy. Removing the uterus is the only permanent way to effectively relieve most women of fibroids.

      Hysterectomy is, most often, the procedure of choice for fibroid tumors when a women with severe symptoms, has completed her family and her uterus has grown to the size of a uterus at twelve weeks of pregnancy; a women has excessively large fibroid tumors; severe abnormal bleeding occurs; or when the fibroids are causing problems with other organs such as the bladder and bowels.

      Science is starting to evaluate other options for treating fibroids, including the use of Lupron which may be beneficial for those who want to become pregnant or for women approaching menopause when fibroids often shrink naturally. Lupron shrinks fibroids in most women with continued use, but one drawback is that the fibroids will quickly grow back once treatment is stopped.

      If you have fibroid tumors, investigate your options before deciding what treatment you want to try. There are many alternatives to hysterectomy currently available, and science is creating more options for women everyday.

  18. QUESTION:
    can fibroids in the uterus cause the lining in the uterus to be thick????
    My mom has been in menoause for quite some time now, and she has had no pain or bleeding. I'm just curious to know. She also had to get a biopsy done to.

    • ANSWER:
      you can get this and other info at www.webmd.com

      Sexual Health: Your Guide to Uterine Fibroids
      Uterine fibroids are benign tumors that are made up of the muscle and connective tissue from the wall of the uterus (womb). Fibroids may grow as a single nodule or in clusters and may range in size from 1 mm to more than 20 cm (8 inches) in diameter. They may grow within the wall of the uterus or they may project into the interior cavity or toward the outer surface of the uterus. In rare cases, they may grow on stems projecting from the surface of the uterus.

      What Causes Uterine Fibroids?
      The causes of fibroids are not known. Most fibroids occur in women of reproductive age, and according to some estimates, they are diagnosed in black women 2-3 times more frequently than in white women. They seldom are seen in young women who have not begun to menstruate, and they usually stabilize or go away in women after menopause.

      According to the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), at least 25% of women suffer from uterine fibroids.

      Are Fibroids Cancer?
      No. Fibroids are not associated with cancer. They are benign tumors that almost never develop into cancer.

      Who Is at Risk for Uterine Fibroids?
      No risk factors have been found for uterine fibroids other than being a female of reproductive age. However, some studies suggest obese women are at increased risk of having fibroids. (A person is considered obese if he or she is more than 20% over his or her ideal body weight.)

      What Are the Symptoms of Uterine Fibroids?
      Most fibroids do not cause any symptoms and do not require treatment other than regular observation by a doctor. Fibroids may be discovered during routine gynecologic examinations or during prenatal care. Some women who have uterine fibroids may experience the following symptoms:

      Excessive or painful bleeding during menstruation.
      Bleeding between periods.
      A feeling of fullness in the lower abdomen.
      Frequent urination resulting from a fibroid that compresses the bladder.
      Pain during sexual intercourse
      Low back pain.
      How Are Uterine Fibroids Treated?
      More and more, doctors are beginning to realize that uterine fibroids may not require any intervention or, at most, limited treatment. For a woman with uterine fibroids that are not causing symptoms, the best therapy may be watchful waiting. Some women never exhibit any symptoms nor have any problems associated with fibroids, in which case no treatment is necessary.

      If a woman is experiencing anemia caused by heavy, prolonged menstrual bleeding, moderate to severe pain, infertility or urinary tract or bowel problems, she will require therapy. Treatment options include:

      Medications. For women who experience occasional pelvic pain or discomfort, a mild, over-the counter anti-inflammatory or pain-killing drug such as Aleve or Motrin, often will be effective. More bothersome cases may require stronger drugs available by prescription.
      Some fibroids are treated with hormones that reduce the amounts of the hormone estrogen. Doctors believe that fibroids grow best when there are high levels of the female hormone estrogen.
      Birth control pills can be used to treat the bleeding symptoms of uterine fibroids because they decrease the production of female hormones and prevent ovulation. Birth control pills (oral contraceptives) do not reduce the size of uterine fibroids and may in fact increase their size. For more on oral contraceptives, see the article on the Pill.
      Surgery. Fortunately, a woman now has a number of surgical and less invasive options for treatment of uterine fibroids that can control symptoms, preserve the uterus, and preserve fertility. In the past, a woman with growing uterine fibroids was only considered a candidate for hysterectomy (the surgical removal of the uterus). Performing hysterectomy in a woman of reproductive age means that she will no longer be able to have children. Hysterectomy also may have other effects, both physical and psychological. Today, many women and their doctors are considering other treatment options, based on symptoms and not the idea that uterine fibroids will continue to grow until it becomes necessary to perform a hysterectomy.
      If a fibroid is particularly troublesome, the surgeon often can remove only the tumor, leaving the uterus intact. This procedure is called myomectomy. This is done when a woman wants to be able to have children.
      There are a number of techniques that can be used to perform a myomectomy:
      Laparoscopic myomectomy involves the use a thin, telescope-like instrument attached to a small video camera called a laparoscope inserted through a tiny incision at the belly button. The surgeon uses specialized surgical instruments inserted through this incision and two or three additional small incisions in the abdomen to remove the fibroids.
      Hysteroscopic myomectomy is a procedure where some fibroids are removed through the vagina using a surgical instrument called a hysteroscope - a thin, telescope-like instrument inserted through the cervix and into the uterus.
      Laparotomy involves an abdominal incison to remove all fibroids, no matter what size or location of the tumors.
      Fibroid embolization. This treatment works by decreasing the blood supply to the fibroids, causing them to shrink. It is a minimally invasive procedure performed by an interventional radiologist. Patients are typically able to return home the same day of the procedure.
      MRI-guided ultrasound. This is the newest technique available to remove fibroids. The treatment uses MRI images to plan and guide focused ultrasound waves that destroy fibroid tissue.

  19. QUESTION:
    uterine fibroids?
    I am 20 years old and I think that I might have fibroids... what can you tell me about them?

    • ANSWER:
      Uterine fibroids are scientifically termed leiomyomata; i.e, they are smooth muscle tumors of the uterus. They are nearly always benign.

      It is highly doubtful at your age that you have uterine fibroids as they tend to occur in the 30's and the peri- and postmenopausal years. However, it is not impossible for you to have them.
      They are best diagnosed by ultrasound of the pelvis. Imaging the uterus and ovaries in this manner is a common and fairly inexpensive procedure.
      Leimyomata can range from being single, small and asymptomatic to being large, multiple and significantly symptomatic.

      While certainly not all inclusive, the following are common symptoms of uterine fibroids:

      1. Abnormal uterine bleeding.
      2. Difficulty or inability to become pregnant.
      3. Dyspareunia (painful intercourse)
      4. Obstruction of one or both ureters.
      5. Pelvic Pain.
      6. Frequent urination.

      The treatment is predicated on the number of lesions present, where they are located (near the lining of the uterus, in the middle of the muscle mass of the uterus or near the surface, perhaps rupturing through same) and the symptoms or complications being caused by them. Treatment also takes into account the age of the woman, her gravid history (pregnancy history), whether she wants further pregnancies and comorbidities (other active disease processes).

      There are a number of treatment options, dependent primarily on the number of tumors, their location and again the desire or lack of same to become pregnant.

      1. Localized myomectomy. This is a procedure where the tumor and a minimal amount of surround muscle are removed leaving the uterus intact and functional.
      2. Multiple myomectomies.
      3. Laser surgery if it is a single lesion protruding in to the uterine canal.
      4. Hysterectomy; that is, removal of the uterus in its entirety.

      The treatment choice is a joint decision between the patient and the operating gynecologist (or general surgeon).

      I hope this is helpful!

      DrEarp

  20. QUESTION:
    Maybe Uterine Fibroids or Endemetriosis? Help Please?
    I'm 23 and have had 2 kids. My symptoms: lots of pain during intercourse, very heavy bleeding during periods, pelvic pressure/pain, frequent urination and it's like I've been holding it forever...there's no way I would be able to hold it any longer when I have to go. I'm making an appointment with my doctor for next week. Just wanted other opinions. If so what are all the treatments because I'm really afraid that if it's too bad I will have to get a hysterectomy and I do not want that because I'm not done having children.

    Also my periods are usually always right on target but I've been having these problems since July, they are just getting worse and the past 3 months I've either started a week early or a week late except this month only a day early.
    I've never had a c-section. Thanks for answering though, I'm curious to what is going on.

    • ANSWER:
      I'm glad you are going to the doctor because you have described many sypmtoms that I had. In addition to fibroids and endemetriosis, I had scar tissue wrapped around some organs from c-section. If you had a c-section this may be a cause too.

      Best of luck and stick with what your dr. tells you...and oh, I had scar tissue removed laproscopically and was able to still have another child.

  21. QUESTION:
    sereve abdominal pain?
    I have been having lower abdominal pain for a few years now and doctors do not seem to know what it is. I have had blood tests done and i was positive for H.pylori and had 2 courses of the treatment, but i still have the same pain. I had an abdominal ultrasound but nothing showed up

    My symptoms are extreme stomach bloating/swelling, low back pain, pelvic pain on my periods, frequent urination

    P.s. I'm 17

    Anyone have any ideas?

    • ANSWER:
      Abdominal/pelvic pain that is similar to that of period cramping may indicate a problem in a reproductive organ (like the pain around your ovaries or uterus).

      This includes conditions such as endometriosis (when tissue from the uterus is displaced to somewhere else like the pelvic wall or ovaries), uterine fibroids (thick bands of muscular and fibrous tissue in the uterus), ovarian cysts, ovarian cancer (rare), or pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) infection of the reproductive organs, usually from a sexually transmitted disease.

      If you have pain in your ovary area, you might have an ovarian cyst. I have experienced that same type of pain whenever I have had an ovarian cyst. I was also diagnosed with endometriosis in 2007 which caused me severe pelvic pain and intense and painful period cramping.

      If a gynaecological reason cannot be found for the pain you are experiencing, then it could be a gastroenterology problem which could be caused by excessive gas, chronic constipation, viral gastroenteritis (stomach flu), IBS (Irritable bowel syndrome), heartburn or indigestion, gastroesophageal reflux, ulcers, cholecystitis (inflammation of the gallbladder) with or without gallstones, appendicitis (inflammation of the appendix), diverticular disease, including inflammation of small pouches that form in the large intestines (diverticulitis), bowel obstruction (in addition to pain, this causes nausea, bloating, vomiting, and inability to pass gas or stool), food allergies, food poisoning (salmonella, shigella), hernia, kidney stones, UTI’s (urinary tract infections), pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas) or dissecting abdominal aortic aneurysm (bleeding into the wall of the aorta).

      Based on your symptoms and what you wrote, I would recommend that you should see your doctor/gynaecologist, and if nothing is found that you see a gastroenterologist just to rule out any serious GI causes.

      Good luck :)

  22. QUESTION:
    What are symptoms of fibroids?

    • ANSWER:
      When signs and symptoms of uterine fibroids are present, the most common include:
      Heavy menstrual bleeding
      Prolonged menstrual periods or bleeding between periods
      Pelvic pressure or pain
      Urinary incontinence, frequent urination or urine retention
      Constipation
      Backache or leg pains
      Fibroid location influences your signs and symptoms. Fibroids that grow into the inner cavity of the uterus (submucosal fibroids) are thought primarily responsible for prolonged, heavy menstrual bleeding. Fibroids that project to the outside of the uterus (subserosal fibroids) can press on your bladder or ureters, causing you to experience urinary symptoms. If fibroids bulge from the back of your uterus, they can press either on your rectum, causing constipation, or on your spinal nerves, causing backache.

  23. QUESTION:
    Ovarian pain on and off, bloated ,frequent urination?
    Someone in the name of Oceansayako posted the below a while back, I have exactly the same problems and symptoms and doctors can't find anything I was wondering if you or anybody with the same problem found a solution or found out what this is? Please help! This was Oceansayako's posted question;

    "hello everyone could anyone give me any information about ovarian cancer or pelvic pain at 23 i have had on again off again right sided pelvic pain feels like my ovary i have had frequent urination for 2 years i recently for 2 months had urgent urination i have back pain,pain during sex deep shrp stabbing pain not all the time, fatigue bloating and other symptoms but they could be from so many different things i had an ultrasound a year ago or so and the results came back fine so my dr dissmissed the pain thing told me it is nothing to worry about. my dr just did a manual pelvic axam and a pap smear both fine "

    Any help would be appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      Abdominal/pelvic pain that is similar to that of period cramping may indicate a problem in a reproductive organ (like the pain around your ovaries or uterus).

      This includes conditions such as endometriosis (when tissue from the uterus is displaced to somewhere else like the pelvic wall or ovaries), uterine fibroids (thick bands of muscular and fibrous tissue in the uterus), ovarian cysts, ovarian cancer (rare), or pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) infection of the reproductive organs, usually from a sexually transmitted disease.

      If you have pain in your ovary area, you might have an ovarian cyst. I have experienced that same type of pain whenever I have had an ovarian cyst. I was also diagnosed with endometriosis last year which caused me severe pelvic pain and intense and painful period cramping.

      Based on your symptoms and what you wrote, I would recommend that you should see your doctor/gynaecologist, just to rule out any serious causes.

      Good luck :)

  24. QUESTION:
    Uterus falling out!!!?
    I'm looking for support and advice from other females who have gone through or are going through similar symptoms. Last month I had an early miscarriage or chemical pregnancy which caused an infection in my system called Bacteria Vanginitis. I was given antibiotics by my OBGYN which fixed the problem within a week. I was feeling very healthy. My husband and I did have intercourse once I was feeling better not with the notion to conceive. I was scheduled to start my period early November. I ended up getting 4-5 days of spotting and 1-2 day of light bleeding followed by a dry spell; which isn’t normal for me. I usually get a heavy period. On Thursday my symptoms started: 1) Irritation of the vulva and inside of vaginal region. 2) Pressure on my vaginal wall like it’s going to drop or fall out. 3) Very tense uterine muscles with muscle spasm and pain. 4) Cramping but very different then menstrual cramping. 5) Hurts to press down on lower belly. 6) Emotional distress and imbalance as in frequent crying spells and mood swings.
    It mostly feels like my uterus is heavy and dropping but I’m still trying to decipher if my bladder feels heavy as well. My urination doesn’t hurt when peeing and my frequency of urination is normal. I do not have an STD because there is no need to worry about that but in addition I have also had my yearly pap smear one month ago and it was negative for STD’s or cancer.
    I went to the doctor yesterday. The doctor took note of symptoms, did a pelvic exam, pap smear and pregnancy test. She told me that she didn’t see anything abnormal and pretty much looked at me look I had three eyes. The prego test was negative and she said I didn’t look to have an infection either. Told me to take Motrin and gave me a slip to see Ultra Sound Tech. Ultrasound are closed during the weekend, so here I am uncomfortable and going crazy wondering what is wrong with me and how I can make it stop. I’m not in severe pain but just very, very, very uncomfortable. Nothing is helping and it’s only getting worst.
    I’m thinking that this could be due to hormones, uterine fibroids, cyst or pelvic floor syndrome. Please share anything useful.

    • ANSWER:

  25. QUESTION:
    What causes abdomen pain, white-ish discharge, etc? ?
    I'm having these following symptoms:

    *Abdomen pain, it hurts really bad! I felt it on my upper left abdomen first but then it started moving to the middle of my stomach.

    *Dry lips and I'm always thirsty!

    *Frequent urination, usually in smaller amounts. 1/4 the amount.

    *White discharge! With a spot of blood. (happened only once)

    * A bit of nausea

    *Feeling bloated and sick after I eat.

    Anyone have any idea what could this be a symptom of? I read up on pregnancy and appendicitis. I'm not sure if it's pregnancy because I took four pregnancy tests and all came out negative. It's been roughly a month since I had sex. I got my period on the 17th but I'm not really sure if it's my period or implantation bleeding because it was irregular. The first day of my period, I felt an excruciating pain on my abdomen again. I'm confused. Hope you guys can help.
    It doesn't hurt when I pee. Do you guys think I'm pregnant though? I don't want to go to the doctor to find out I'm pregnant.. I haven't told my parents that I might be so I don't want it to be a huge surprise when it turns out I'm getting all these symptoms because I'm pregnant.

    • ANSWER:
      Abdominal/pelvic pain that is similar to that of period cramping may indicate a problem in a reproductive organ (like the pain around your ovaries or uterus).

      This includes conditions such as endometriosis (when tissue from the uterus is displaced to somewhere else like the pelvic wall or ovaries), uterine fibroids (thick bands of muscular and fibrous tissue in the uterus), ovarian cysts, ovarian cancer (rare), or pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) infection of the reproductive organs, usually from a sexually transmitted disease.

      If you have pain in your ovary area, you might have an ovarian cyst. I have experienced that same type of pain whenever I have had an ovarian cyst. I was also diagnosed with endometriosis last year which caused me severe pelvic pain and intense and painful period cramping.

      If a gynaecological reason cannot be found for the pain you are experiencing, then it could be a gastroenterology problem which could be caused by excessive gas, chronic constipation, viral gastroenteritis (stomach flu), IBS (Irritable bowel syndrome), heartburn or indigestion, gastroesophageal reflux, ulcers, cholecystitis (inflammation of the gallbladder) with or without gallstones, appendicitis (inflammation of the appendix), diverticular disease, including inflammation of small pouches that form in the large intestines (diverticulitis), bowel obstruction (in addition to pain, this causes nausea, bloating, vomiting, and inability to pass gas or stool), food allergies, food poisoning (salmonella, shigella), hernia, kidney stones, UTI’s (urinary tract infections), pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas) or dissecting abdominal aortic aneurysm (bleeding into the wall of the aorta).

      Based on your symptoms and what you wrote, I would recommend that you should see your doctor/gynaecologist, and if nothing is found that you see a gastroenterologist just to rule out any serious GI causes.

      Good luck :)

  26. QUESTION:
    What is a "weak uterus"?
    I was reading about something that listed a weak uterus as a symptom, but what is it?

    • ANSWER:
      How does it work for women?
      This external massage gently lifts and guides the uterus into its optimal position in the lower pelvis. The uterus is held in position by over 10 ligaments. These ligaments, when stressed or strained, can cause the uterus to become malpositioned. If the uterus is malpositioned, women experience a multitude of symptoms.

      What are the symptoms of a displaced uterus?

      Difficulty getting pregnant/fertility issues
      Chronic miscarriages
      PMS/ depression
      Painful, irregular periods or ovulation
      Dark or brown blood at the onset and at the end of menstruation
      Painful intercourse
      Difficult menopause
      Headache or migraine with period
      Varicose veins of the legs and/or tired, weak or numb legs
      Low backache
      Endometriosis, Uterine Fibroids
      Frequent urination; bladder infections, incontinence
      Recurrent vaginal infections
      Chronic constipation

      What could cause a displaced uterus?

      Trauma to the sacrum or tailbone from a fall or car accident
      Pelvic ligaments that have weakened due to overstretching during pregnancy and birth
      High impact exercise, running on cement surfaces, high impact aerobics
      Lifting & carrying heavy objects before or during menstruation and too soon after childbirth
      Time and gravity
      Past surgeries
      Weak pelvic floor muscles
      Chronic muscle spasm around the low back and sacrum
      Emotional armoring from abuse

  27. QUESTION:
    Why is my period so heavy?
    Normally my periods are very light. So light that I can barely tell I have them. Since October, my periods have all been 5-7 days late (some being 2 weeks late). I always think I'm pregnant cause I usually get symptoms (headache, nausea, heartburn, frequent urination, cramps, a pukey feeling) but then I either take a test after its been a few days late and it comes up negative or my period starts. Anyways, this period (was supposed to start Monday but started Friday) is really heavy. I have to change my tampon at least every 4 hours and I even use a liner too cause sometimes itll leak if I don't change it soon enough. Why is this period so heavy when I normally have light ones? (I've had my period for three years and have never had one this heavy.)

    Sorry it's long, but thanks for reading and hopefully answering!
    I'm 19 years old. My period used to come every 28 days, like clockwork. I never used to get cramps (I've had them with this one) and I never got sore breasts (I have them with this one too). I had like the 'perfect' period. It was light, only lasted 5 days instead of 7, and I really never had any symptoms with it.

    • ANSWER:
      Causes of Heavy Bleeding

      Heavy bleeding in women may be experienced for various reasons. Some of these have been mentioned below. Read them and then you may be able to figure out why you're experiencing the same.

      Hormones: Generally, a woman nearing menopause or a young girl may experience heavy bleeding at least once within the first year of getting her period. This is a normal situation resulting from hormonal changes, but should be monitored closely because if either loses too much blood, it may lead to other complications.

      Uterine Fibroids: Some women may develop uterine fibroids as a result of the excessive or quick production of estrogen in the body. It is important to note that a fibroid tumor is benign and non cancerous. However, it can lead to heavy bleeding which causes much discomfort. Since it is caused due to estrogen, the tumor develops quickly during menstruation and pregnancy when estrogen is produced more.

      Lochia: It is natural to experience heavy bleeding during period after pregnancy. This bleeding after a normal delivery or a c-section is termed as Lochia. It is the body's way of discharging any excess fluids like mucus or placental tissue that remains inside you before childbirth. It begins almost immediately after delivery and lasts for about 6 weeks.

      Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID): PID is caused due to an infection in the uterine lining, the ovaries or the fallopian tubes. The causes of PID can be unprotected sex, surgical procedures like abortion or cesarean delivery etc. This is a very serious problem and many sexually active teens are falling prey to PID without realizing its dangers.

      Polyps: Uterine polyps are small in growths on the lining of the uterus. Polyps are generally caused by hormonal changes in a woman's body. Women in their late 20s to mid 40s have a greater tendency of experiencing polyps in the uterus, which is also a cause of heavy blood flow during one's period.

      Medications: Some women may experience heavy flow while on birth control pills or some medication for some other ailment. Other medications for inflammations may also cause heavy and continuous flow for quite some time. Hence, women must take care of what medications they're taking and take them only if prescribed.

      Most Common Symptoms Experienced

      The amount of blood flow experienced even during a heavy period varies from woman to woman. So, it is necessary to know what exactly are the symptoms of heavy flow so that you can identify if you indeed are bleeding in excess. They are given below.
      •Generally, a discharge of more than 80 ml of blood from the body during a single period (that is the 5 day period) is considered heavy bleeding.
      •Another symptom is when you experience a period that lasts more than the usual duration of a period. For instance, a normal period lasts for 4 to 5 days. If you are bleeding for a continuous period of more than 10 days, then it is advisable to consult a doctor.
      •If you feel the need to keep changing your tampon or your sanitary napkin almost an hourly rate, then it is a sign that you're bleeding more than normal. Also, make sure that you change your protection at least twice a day to prevent any possible infection.
      •Some women also happen to discharge blood clots along with blood during their period. This is another symptom of heavy bleeding.
      •Are your clothes getting stained more often during your period lately? It could be after a night's sleep or after a long day of sitting in one position. Sometimes, you may not realize it, but this too could be a sign of heavy bleeding.
      •Heavy bleeding, in some cases, is also accompanied by severe abdominal cramps. In such a situation, you may also begin to feel dizzy and weak. This happens due to the excess blood loss from your body.

  28. QUESTION:
    What's all about?
    What are fibroids? What are the causes and are they curable?

    • ANSWER:
      A uterine fibroid is the most common benign (not cancerous) tumor of a woman’s uterus (womb). Fibroids develop with the uterine wall or attach to it. They may grow as a single tumor or in clusters. Uterine fibroids can cause excessive menstrual bleeding, pelvic pain, and frequent urination.

      These growths occur in about 25% of all women and are the leading cause of hysterectomy (removal of the uterus) in the United States. Of every woman older than 35 years, 1 in 5 has a uterine fibroid. An estimated 600,000 hysterectomies (removal of the uterus) are performed in the US annually, and at least one-third are for fibroids. Medications and newer, less invasive surgery can control the growth of fibroids.

      Fibroids start in the muscle tissues of the uterus. They can grow into the uterine cavity, into the thickness of the uterine wall, or on the surface of the uterus into the abdominal cavity. Although these tumors are called fibroids, this term is misleading because they consist of muscle tissue, not fibrous tissue.

      -----------------------------------------------------------
      Fibroids Causes

      Fibroids are stimulated by the hormone estrogen, produced naturally in your body. These growths can show up as early as age 20 and shrink after menopause when your body stops producing large amounts of estrogen.

      Fibroids can be tiny and cause no problems, but they can also grow to weigh several pounds. They grow slowly. Some women with many fibroids may have an inherited tendency toward developing them.

      The following factors have been associated with the growth of fibroids:

      -Being overweight, obesity
      -Never having given birth to a child (called nulliparity)
      -Onset of your period prior to age 10
      -African American heritage (occurring 3-9 times more often than in Caucasian women)

      ----------------------------------------------

      Fibroids Treatment

      Treatment for fibroids depends on your symptoms, the size and location of your fibroids, your age (how close you are to menopause), your desire to have children, and your general health.

      Here is a link to treatments: http://www.emedicinehealth.com/uterine_fibroids/page9_em.htm

      Good luck.

  29. QUESTION:
    I wanna die. I think im suffering frm LIVER OR KIDNEY DISEASE. Plz help me :'( IM BEGGING YOU...I WANT TO LIVE?
    Im 18yrs old boy, i stopped masturbating. Im non-diabetic but im suffering from
    1. FREQUENT URINATION
    2. STICKY URINE
    3. WEIGHT LOSE
    4. ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION
    I went to doctor, I have no UTI. And my sugar is nil. Im confused,wat z happening 2 me. IS DAT LIVER DISEASE OR KIDNEY DISEASE ? Plz help me, plzzz!!!

    • ANSWER:
      HOW TO DIAGNOSE LIVER DISEASE
      http://www.ehow.com/how_2002522_symptoms-liver-disease.html

      HOW TO DIAGNOSE KIDNEY DISEASE
      http://www.ehow.com/how_2051922_diagnose-kidney-disease.html

      Sounds to me more like Interstitial Cystitis

      Interstitial Cystitis, otherwise known as “IC” or “Painful Bladder Syndrome,” is a condition which continues to elude and evade a large number of physicians. Unfortunately, patients too often suffer significantly before receiving the proper diagnosis and care. People who suffer from IC deserve due care from medical professionals. One way that patients can help their physician is by being aware of their own symptoms and having the ability to identify Interstitial Cystitis.

      Instructions.

      List Your Symptoms and Details

      1
      Write down the specific symptoms that you are experiencing. Examples might include urinary urgency, urinary frequency, difficulty urinating, pain with urination, burning with urination, pelvic pain and gastrointestinal problems.

      2
      Write down (next to each symptom) the approximate date that the symptom started, how long it has lasted and whether it is constant or intermittent. For example, you may experience urinary frequency all day, every day; or, you may experience it twice a week. IC symptoms may vary from person to person, and the more you are able to describe your symptoms, the better a physician will be able to help you.

      3
      Place a number, using a scale of 1-10, next to the symptom, dates and duration. Let 1 signify, “This symptom only bothers me a little bit,” and 10 mean, “This symptom is virtually intolerable.” When you see a physician, he will probably ask you to fill out a questionnaire that requires you to list your symptoms and how much they bother you, using the same scale of 1-10.

      See a Licensed Health Primary Care Doctor and Specialist
      1
      Make an appointment with your primary care physician. Bring your diary of symptoms (that you created in section one). Ask for a Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) Test. IC symptoms often mimic UTI symptoms. The difference between a UTI and IC is that a UTI manifests when a bacterial infection is detected. UTI’s can also usually be cured. IC patients test negative for the bacteria found in UTI patients.

      2
      Get a recommendation for a urologist or gynourologist, if you do not have a UTI. Make sure to contact your health insurance company to see if you need a referral. You can also ask your doctor to recommend someone he knows, preferably someone with experience in identifying interstitial cystitis.

      3
      Make an appointment with the recommended specialist. Tell the medical staff how serious your symptoms are.

      Rule out other Causes and Conditions
      1
      Request another UTI test from your specialist. More than likely, he will order another test anyway.

      2
      Consult with the specialist about what other tests should be performed to rule out other causes. Examples of potentially necessary tests are ultrasounds, pelvic exams (for women), STD tests, CT scans and cystoscopy (with or without bladder distention). An ultrasound can identify cysts or other causes. A pelvic exam can identify conditions that share some symptoms with IC, such as Pelvic Inflammatory Disease. A CT scan may identify uterine fibroids in women, or kidney stones in men or women. A cystoscopy, which can rule out bladder cancer, is an invasive procedure. A cystoscopy without bladder distention can rule out bladder cancer. A cystoscopy with bladder distention can rule out cancer and also check for bladder wall inflammation or lesions.

      3
      Consult with your physician about your diagnosis, and whether or not the two of you have identified interstitial cystitis as the cause of your symptoms. If no other causes for your symptoms have been found, and you have had a cystoscopy without bladder distention, your physician may give you what is called a “diagnosis of exclusion.” Otherwise, a cystoscopy with bladder distention will more assuredly identify interstitial cystitis.
      .

  30. QUESTION:
    This question is for women only! I have been having alot of bleeding....?
    I have been having alot of problems with my period. Well lately it doesn't seem like a period at all. Lately it just seems like I'm gushing blood. This is a serious question and nothing to joke about. I have been changing my tampon like once every hour or every two hours. I am afraid that I may be losing to much blood. And it seems like there is some clotting as well. My stomach is cramping bad too. Has anyone else ever experienced something like this? Do you think that that is too much blood to lose?

    • ANSWER:
      YOu really should see a doctor to find out why you are bleeding. But I will speak from my own experience: How old are you? The reason I ask is because this sounds alot like something I had called Uterine Fibroids. Uterine fibroids are the most common, benign tumors in women of childbearing age, but no one knows exactly what causes them. They can be frustrating to live with when they cause symptoms that include pain and heavy menstrual-type bleeding. Fibroids also can put pressure on the bladder, causing frequent urination.

      The good thing is that fibroids are treatable! See your gynecologist to see what treatment is appropriate for you.

  31. QUESTION:
    sharp tummy pains 4 days after period?
    it comes and goes it gets stronger or weaker its in my lover tummy this has been happining since yesterday, iv had bowl movements fine but the pain is still there, any suggestions? im 22 and healthy.
    i meant in my lower tummy lol

    • ANSWER:
      Causes of Pain in the Lower Abdomen

      Pain in the lower section of the abdomen could be attributed to several medical conditions. Here are some of the health problems that could be responsible for abdominal pain.

      Appendicitis
      Pain in the lower part of the abdomen could be caused due to appendicitis. The appendix is a narrow tube or a finger-like pouch that is located on the lower right quadrant of the abdomen. This close ended narrow tube is situated at the ileocecal junction, the place where the ileum from the small intestine and the cecum from the colon come together. It could become inflamed due to inflammatory bowel diseases, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, infection in the gastrointestinal tract or trauma to the abdomen. Besides pain in lower right abdomen, an inflamed appendix could also give rise to symptoms such as nausea, loss of appetite and abdominal swelling. Those who have been experiencing pain that starts from the belly button and moves on to the lower right abdomen, must consult a doctor soon. If left untreated, the appendix may burst giving rise to an infection. Sometimes such complications can even lead to death.

      Cystitis
      Cystitis is a medical condition associated with the inflammation of the lining of the bladder. It is one of the most common types of urinary tract infection. Though both men and women can suffer from cystitis, women are more vulnerable. The symptoms of interstitial cystitis include swelling in the abdomen, burning sensation while urinating, a feeling of pressure in the lower abdomen, blood in urine and pain in the lower section of the abdomen. An early diagnosis is important because lack of medical treatment can lead to complications. If left untreated, this might cause an infection in your kidneys. Pain in the lower abdominal region could also be caused due to gallbladder problems. The obstruction of the passage of bile out of the gallbladder is one of the common causes of gallbladder disease. The symptoms of gallbladder disease also include a feeling of fullness in the abdomen, nausea, heartburn, fever and vomiting.

      Kidney Stones
      Abdominal pain could also be caused due to kidney stones. When the minerals and salts such as calcium, struvite, cystine or uric acid present in the urine get crystallized, it leads to the formation of kidney stones. When the stones become large, a sharp abdominal pain is felt when these move through the ureter. Besides the abdominal pain, affected individuals are also likely to experience symptoms such as pain during urination, back pain and frequent urge to urinate.

      Stomach or Intestinal Disorders
      Medical conditions such as Crohn's disease, peptic ulcers, irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel diseases, colon cancer or digestive health problems can also cause pain in the abdomen. Constipation, diverticulitis, pelvic inflammatory disease, celiac disease, food poisoning and bowel obstruction are some of the diseases wherein the patient may experience pain in the lower part of the abdomen after eating.

      Conditions Associated with Reproductive Organs
      Pain and cramps in the lower abdomen might also be experienced by women during menstruation. Women who suffer from dysmenorrhea, ovarian cysts, uterine fibroids and endometriosis could also experience pain in lower abdomen. Ectopic pregnancy is a condition that is caused due to implantation of fertilized egg in the fallopian tube or the ovary. When the egg develops, the tube starts stretching. If left undetected, the embryo will continue to develop in the fallopian tube. This causes lower right abdominal pain. Men can also suffer from pain in the abdomen due to testicular torsion or seminal vesiculitis.

      Treatment for Pain in the Lower Abdomen

      The treatment options will depend on its underlying cause. It is extremely important to identify the underlying cause. The earlier the diagnosis, the better will be the chances of recovery. Doctors generally conduct some diagnostic tests such as blood test, urine analysis and imaging procedures such as ultrasound, endoscopy, X-ray and CT scan to ascertain the underlying cause. Many a time, pain might be attributed to unhealthy dietary habits. Under these circumstances, one might find relief by changing one's dietary habits. If abdominal pain is associated with medical conditions such as appendicitis, cystitis, gallbladder diseases, kidney stones, hernia or peptic ulcers, the treatment will generally involve the use of prescription drugs, lifestyle changes or surgery.

  32. QUESTION:
    Irregular Periods, Feeling Nauseous, Urinating Frequently, Tired, Whats wrong?
    Okay so for the past couple months my periods have been super irregular, this time I skipped a whole month, and just got it today. I had cramping about two days prior to getting it too. In the afternoon I get extremely hungry, but in the morning and the night when I lay in bed I feel naseous. And not to gross anyone out but I've had very frequent soft stools, and very frequent urination. And the past month on weekends and days off or late days I can go to bed early and still easily sleep until noon or later. What could be going on?

    • ANSWER:
      Irregular periods are actually much more common than you might think. Most irregular periods are benign - nothing to worry about. Missed periods, too frequent periods, spotting, light periods, or bouts of heavy clotting and bleeding are usually caused by an underlying hormonal imbalance that is easily treated.

      A wide variety of factors can be responsible for irregular periods, among them:

      Significant weight gain or loss
      Over-exercise
      Poor nutrition (or a diet too high in carbohydrates)
      Smoking
      Drug use
      Caffeine
      Excessive alcohol use (interfering with how the liver metabolizes estrogen and progesterone)
      Eating disorders
      Increased stress
      Polycystic ovarian syndrome/estrogen dominance
      Uterine abnormalities (fibroids/cysts/polyps/endometriosis)
      Hormonal imbalance related to perimenopause
      Medications
      Chemotherapy
      Recent childbirth, miscarriage, or D&C
      Breastfeeding

      Check here for more information.

      http://www.womentowomen.com/menstruation/irregularperiods.aspx

  33. QUESTION:
    I have a uterine tumor.?
    I have been twice to the ER for bleeding and very painful cramps. Last night my legs were hurting, I was nauseous, my back lower back was hurting, I have been constipated and my blood went back to being bright red. My periods last weeks. Both times they've done ultrasounds the tech is worried and can not make out what is inside the tumor and says it's growth is abnormal. What does all this mean? They won't tell me anything until I get an MRI done. When I google my symptoms Uterine and endometrial cancer comes up.

    • ANSWER:
      Well, they won't tell you anything without an mri because they don't know anything else without the mri. Could be a tumor. Could be a large fibroid and yes, if it's large, it could cause some problems like, heavy bleeding or painful periods, feeling of fullness in the pelvic area, enlargement of the lower abdomen, frequent urination,
      pain during sex and lower back pain.

  34. QUESTION:
    I have fibroids?
    I have fibroids. My ob/gyn says they are not a health risk, as they're small. What causes them, why do they grow, and are there ways to eliminate them without surgery?

    • ANSWER:
      What are fibroids?

      Uterine fibroids are tumors or growths, made up of muscle cells and other tissues that grow within the wall of the uterus (or womb). Although fibroids are sometimes called tumors, they are almost always benign (not cancerous). The medical term for fibroids is uterine leiomyomata (you-ter-in lie-oh-my-oh-mah-tah). Fibroids can grow as a single growth or in clusters (or groups). Their size can vary from small, like an apple seed (or less than one inch), to even larger than a grapefruit, or eight inches across or more.
      Why should women know about fibroids?

      Uterine fibroids are the most common, benign tumors in women of childbearing age, but no one knows exactly what causes them. They can be frustrating to live with when they cause symptoms. Not all women with fibroids have symptoms, but some have pain and heavy menstrual bleeding. Fibroids also can put pressure on the bladder, causing frequent urination.
      Who gets fibroids?

      More research is being done to figure out who is at risk for fibroids. But it is known that:

      * Most of the time, fibroids grow in women of childbearing age.
      * African American women are more likely to get them than women of other racial groups.
      * African American women tend to get fibroids at a younger age than do other women.
      * Women who are overweight or obese also are at a slightly higher risk for fibroids than women who are not overweight.
      * Women who have given birth appear to be at a lower risk for fibroids.

      Where can fibroids grow?

      Doctors put fibroids into three groups based on where they grow, such as just underneath the lining of the uterus, in between the muscles of the uterus, or on the outside of the uterus. Most fibroids grow within the wall of the uterus. Some fibroids grow on stalks (called peduncles) that grow out from the surface of the uterus, or into the cavity of the uterus.
      What are the symptoms of fibroids?

      Most fibroids do not cause any symptoms, but some women with fibroids can have: heavy bleeding or painful periods, bleeding between periods, feeling of fullness in the pelvic area (lower abdomen), urinating often, pain during sex, lower back pain, reproductive problems, such as infertility, having more than one miscarriage, or having early onset of labor during pregnancy

      What causes fibroids?

      No one knows for sure what causes fibroids. Researchers have some theories, but most likely, fibroids are the result of many factors interacting with each other. These factors could be hormonal (affected by estrogen levels), genetic (running in families), environmental, or a combination of all three. Because no one knows for sure what causes fibroids, we also don't know what causes them to grow or shrink. For the most part, fibroids stop growing or shrink after menopause. But, this is not true for all women with fibroids.
      Can fibroids turn into cancer?

      Fibroids are almost always benign, or not cancerous, and they rarely turn into cancer (less than 0.1 percent of cases). Having fibroids does not increase a woman's chances of getting cancer of the uterus.
      How do I know for sure that I have fibroids?

      Your doctor may find that you have fibroids when you see her or him for a regular pelvic exam to check your uterus, ovaries, and vagina. Often, a doctor will describe how small or how large the fibroids are by comparing their size to the size your uterus would be if you were pregnant. For example, you may be told that your fibroids have made your uterus the size it would be if you were 8 weeks pregnant.

      Your doctor can do imaging tests, or tests that create a "picture" of the inside of your body without surgery, in order to confirm that you have fibroids. These tests might include:

      * ultrasound - uses sounds waves to produce the picture.
      * magnetic resonance imaging or MRI - uses magnets and radio waves to produce the picture.
      * x-rays - use a form of radiation to see into the body and produce the picture.
      * cat scan or CT - makes many pictures of the body from different angles to provide a more complete image.

      Besides imaging tests, you also might need a surgery to know for sure if you have fibroids. These could include:

      * laparoscopy - surgery with general anesthesia in which your doctor makes a small cut in the abdomen and places a small tube with a light inside to see any fibroids.
      * hysteroscopy - surgery in which your doctor inserts a long tube with a camera into the vagina and directly into the uterus to see any fibroids. It also shows any growths or problems inside the uterus.

      What is the treatment for fibroids?

      Talk with your doctor about the best way to treat your fibroids. She or he will consider a number of things before helping you choose a treatment. Some of these things include:

      * whether or not you are having symptoms from the fibroids
      * if you might want to become pregnant
      * the size of the fibroids
      * the location of the fibroids
      * your age

      If you have fibroids, but do not have any symptoms, you may not need any treatment. But your doctor will check during your regular exams to see if they have grown.

      Medications
      If you have fibroids and have mild symptoms, your doctor might only suggest pain medication. Over-the-counter anti-inflammatory drugs, such as ibuprofen, or other painkillers such as acetaminophen can be used for mild pain. If pain becomes worse, your doctor can prescribe a stronger painkiller.

      Other drugs used to treat fibroids are called gonadotropin releasing hormone agonists (GnRHa). These drugs can decrease the size of the fibroids. Sometimes they are used before surgery, to shrink the fibroids, making them easier to remove. Side effects can include hot flushes, depression, not being able to sleep, decreased sex drive, and joint pain. Anti-hormonal agents, such as a drug called mifepristone, also can stop or slow the growth of fibroids. These drugs only offer temporary relief from the symptoms of fibroids; once you stop the therapy, the fibroids often grow back.

      Surgery
      If you have fibroids with moderate or severe symptoms, surgery may be the best way to treat them. Here are the options:

      * Myomectomy - a surgery to remove fibroids without taking out the healthy tissue of the uterus. There are many ways a surgeon can perform this procedure. It can be major surgery (with an abdominal incision) or minor surgery. The type, size, and location of the fibroids will determine what type of procedure will be done. Talk with your doctor about the different types of this surgery.
      * Hysterectomy - a surgery to remove the uterus. This surgery is the only sure way to cure uterine fibroids. This surgery is used when a woman's fibroids are large, or if she has heavy bleeding, and is either near or past menopause and does not want children. There are various types of hysterectomy that differ in how invasive they are. Sometimes, if the fibroids are large, a woman might need a hysterectomy that involves cutting into the abdomen to remove the uterus. If the fibroids are smaller, the surgeon might be able to reach the uterus through the vagina, instead of making a cut in the abdomen.
      * Endometrial ablation – the endometrial lining of the uterus is destroyed. This surgery controls very heavy bleeding, but afterwards a woman cannot have children.
      * Myolysis – a procedure in which an electrical needle is inserted into the uterus through a small incision in the abdomen to destroy the blood vessels feeding the fibroids.

      Uterine Fibroid Embolization (UFE)
      Uterine fibroid embolization (UFE) is a treatment that cuts off the blood supply to the uterus and the fibroids so they shrink. UFE is proving to be an alternative to hysterectomy and myomectomy. The recovery time is also shorter, and there is a much lower risk of needing a blood transfusion than for these surgeries. Many women can have UFE and go home the same day. There is a small risk of infection in the treated fibroid, but these are usually managed with antibiotics. Recent studies also suggest that most fibroid tumors are not likely to re-grow after UFE, although more long-term data is needed.

      Not all fibroids can be treated with UFE. All patients must first be evaluated with ultrasound or MRI to make sure the fibroids will respond well to this treatment. Doctors called interventional radiologists perform UFE. The best candidates for UFE are women who:

      * have fibroid tumors that are causing heavy bleeding
      * have fibroid tumors that are causing pain or pressing on the bladder or rectum
      * don’t want to have a hysterectomy
      * don’t want to have more children

      Sometimes after UFE, the particles that are put into the fibroids to cut off their blood supply have traveled to the ovaries. In a few women, the ovaries then stop working for a short time or permanently. Although researchers know that UFE may affect how ovaries function, they are unsure of how exactly UFE affects fertility. If you want to have children in the future, you should talk with your doctors about the small, but definite risk of UFE causing you to go into early menopause. Too few women have gotten pregnant after UFE for researchers to know if there is an increased risk of pregnancy complications.

      ExAblate® 2000 System
      ExAblate® 2000 is a medical device that uses magnetic resonance image guided focused ultrasound to target and destroy uterine fibroids. The device is intended to treat women who have completed child bearing or do not intend to become pregnant. ExAblate® 2000 is non-invasive surgery. It spares the uterus and is an alternative to myomectomy, hysterectomy, watchful waiting, hormone therapy, or uterine fibroid embolization.

      ExAblate combines two systems – a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machine to visualize patient anatomy, map the volume of fibroid tissue to be treated, and monitor the temperature of the uterine tissue after heating, and a focused ultrasound beam that heats and destroys the fibroid tissue using high frequency, high-energy sound waves.

      The treatment requires repeated targeting and heating of fibroid tissue while the patient lies inside the MRI machine. The procedure can last as long as three hours.

      The new device can be used to treat some – but not all – fibroids. Fibroids close to sensitive organs such as the bowel or bladder and those outside the image area cannot be treated.

      InSightec, the manufacturer, is conducting more research to assess the long-term safety and effectiveness of the treatment.

  35. QUESTION:
    At What Age?
    At what age should you have a complete and total hisdirectomy? I am having alot of problems and a lot of sickness but everyone says I am to young but I am tired of fightin things all my life. If I get my tubes tied for now will I still get my period?

    • ANSWER:
      There is no set age for a hysterectomy. It all depends on your medical condition. Having your tubes tied will just ensure that you don't get pregnant, you'll still have periods. My sister had hers done after the birth of her second child and it had no effect on her periods.

      If you're having painful periods then the problem may be fibroid growths. The most common uterine fibroids symptoms include:

      Heavy menstrual bleeding
      Prolonged menstrual periods or bleeding between periods
      Pelvic pressure or pain
      Urinary incontinence or frequent urination
      Constipation
      Backache or leg pains

      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/uterine-fibroids/DS00078/DSECTION=2

      The most common reason for a hysterectomy is fibroid tumors growing in the muscle of the uterus, which can sometimes cause heavy bleeding and pain. More hysterectomies are done because of fibroids than for any other problem of the uterus. Endometriosis, which can cause painful menstrual periods, abnormal vaginal bleeding, and sometimes loss of fertility (ability to get pregnant), is the second leading reason for hysterectomies. Uterine prolapse, a condition in which the uterus moves from its usual place down into the vagina, accounts for about 16% of all hysterectomies. Cancers affecting the pelvic organs account for about 10% of all hysterectomies. Other reasons why it may be necessary to have a hysterectomy include chronic pelvic pain, heavy bleeding during or between periods, and chronic pelvic inflammatory disease.

      For some conditions of your uterus and ovaries, a hysterectomy is the only treatment option. Read more about fibroids; endometriosis, uterine prolapse, uterine, endometrial, and cervical cancer, abnormal uterine bleeding, and your treatment options for these conditions.

      If you get a hysterectomy you will have to have hormone replacement therapy particularly as you mention you are young.

      I hope you can find a doctor to help you make your decision.

      To address your concerns for post hysterectomy expectations you might want to check out the following web site which has a discussion group and message board. http://www.hystersisters.com/vb2/forumdi...

  36. QUESTION:
    bladder pressure and frequency?
    I've been having frequent bladder and kidney infections. For the last few months however, I've been feeling pressure on my bladder that seems to be getting worse, esp. at night or when I'm laying down. It feels like I have to urinate right after I empty my bladder. I'm also having pelvic pain (esp. on rough roads on a 4wheeler or tractor), nausea, and frequency - I have to go an ave. of 30 times/day, sometimes only a little comes out, but mostly normal amount. Also, I don't know if it matters, but my periods are changing. Worse pain, heavier bleeding and clots this last time. Any ideas?
    thanks for you answer. I am 26 yrs old.
    Thanks for the reply! If I was having a miscarraige I couldn't still be preg. could I? My last pelvic exam was just last week, a follow-up exam for the LEEP procedure I had done a little over a month ago. While I was healing from that is when my last kidney infection was. I asked the gyn about the pressure on my bladder but she was too busy rushing me out the door to look into it. What kind of dr. should I see? My cycles have been getting more painful and the bleeding not consistant but I don't know if they're connected. I don't know wht to do! I'm so frustrated and tired of being in pain!

    • ANSWER:
      I'd be concerned too, some people are more prone to urinary tract infections, which can advance to kidney infections. Make sure you are wearing undergarments that breathe, wiping from front to back, emptying your bladder before and after having intercourse. Certain positions during intercourse will predispose you to an increase in UTI's, cystitis as well. Drink lots of water, cranberry juice or cranberry tablets will keep the bladder wall acidic, bacteria do not adhere as well. Are your periods changing because you may be premenopausal? If you have concerns for tumors, masses, fibroid, cancer, request a pelvic Ultrasound, this will show any abnormalities of your Uterus, Ovaries, Fallopian Tubes, Bladder, Ureters. I hope this helps.

      I saw your edit so I wanted to add on as well...you are not premenopausal, but have a change in menstrual flow, and pelvic fullness and pressure with frequent urination, first check that you are not pregnant (home urine pregnancy test), sometimes you bleed heavily when you are miscarrying and don't know that you are pregnant, pelvic bloating and frequent urination go along with pregnancy. If the pregnancy test is negative, I would pursue the Ultrasound, you have DUB (Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding), which could cause all of the above, secondary to fibroids, mass. Get it checked out, when was your last pelvic exam? Also get a urine test done as well. Let me know what happens.
      Add On after Edit
      BINGO, so now you tell me LEEP Procedure....Okay,
      What were the results of your LEEP Procedure? They do this procedure to evaluate a abnormal PAP Smear, Dysplasia. This will be the reason for the pelvic pressure and abnormal bleeding. Follow up with Gyn, get the pathology results, also make sure you do not have a pelvic infection secondary to the procedure.

  37. QUESTION:
    please help my lower abdomen hurts?
    a few things to add i cant get up or lay down without it hurting ,i do aerobics at school,i have been coughing alot and no period yet,dont think i am pregant even though dreamed about it the other day what could be wrong
    hmm...i am 22 not a teen

    • ANSWER:
      Hello,

      Causes of Pain in the Lower Abdomen

      Pain in the lower section of the abdomen could be attributed to several medical conditions. Here are some of the health problems that could be responsible for abdominal pain.

      Appendicitis
      Pain in the lower part of the abdomen could be caused due to appendicitis. The appendix is a narrow tube or a finger-like pouch that is located on the lower right quadrant of the abdomen. This close ended narrow tube is situated at the ileocecal junction, the place where the ileum from the small intestine and the cecum from the colon come together. It could become inflamed due to inflammatory bowel diseases, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, infection in the gastrointestinal tract or trauma to the abdomen. Besides pain in lower right abdomen, an inflamed appendix could also give rise to symptoms such as nausea, loss of appetite and abdominal swelling. Those who have been experiencing pain that starts from the belly button and moves on to the lower right abdomen, must consult a doctor soon. If left untreated, the appendix may burst giving rise to an infection. Sometimes such complications can even lead to death.

      Cystitis
      Cystitis is a medical condition associated with the inflammation of the lining of the bladder. It is one of the most common types of urinary tract infection. Though both men and women can suffer from cystitis, women are more vulnerable. The symptoms of interstitial cystitis include swelling in the abdomen, burning sensation while urinating, a feeling of pressure in the lower abdomen, blood in urine and pain in the lower section of the abdomen. An early diagnosis is important because lack of medical treatment can lead to complications. If left untreated, this might cause an infection in your kidneys. Pain in the lower abdominal region could also be caused due to gallbladder problems. The obstruction of the passage of bile out of the gallbladder is one of the common causes of gallbladder disease. The symptoms of gallbladder disease also include a feeling of fullness in the abdomen, nausea, heartburn, fever and vomiting.

      Kidney Stones
      Abdominal pain could also be caused due to kidney stones. When the minerals and salts such as calcium, struvite, cystine or uric acid present in the urine get crystallized, it leads to the formation of kidney stones. When the stones become large, a sharp abdominal pain is felt when these move through the ureter. Besides the abdominal pain, affected individuals are also likely to experience symptoms such as pain during urination, back pain and frequent urge to urinate.

      Stomach or Intestinal Disorders
      Medical conditions such as Crohn's disease, peptic ulcers, irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel diseases, colon cancer or digestive health problems can also cause pain in the abdomen. Constipation, diverticulitis, pelvic inflammatory disease, celiac disease, food poisoning and bowel obstruction are some of the diseases wherein the patient may experience pain in the lower part of the abdomen after eating.

      Conditions Associated with Reproductive Organs
      Pain and cramps in the lower abdomen might also be experienced by women during menstruation. Women who suffer from dysmenorrhea, ovarian cysts, uterine fibroids and endometriosis could also experience pain in lower abdomen. Ectopic pregnancy is a condition that is caused due to implantation of fertilized egg in the fallopian tube or the ovary. When the egg develops, the tube starts stretching. If left undetected, the embryo will continue to develop in the fallopian tube. This causes lower right abdominal pain. Men can also suffer from pain in the abdomen due to testicular torsion or seminal vesiculitis.

  38. QUESTION:
    Lower Stomach / Uterus Pain?
    For the past few days I feel like my lower stomach/uterus is sore. Kind of like if I pulled a muscle in that area. I have not done any exercise so I know it's not that and my next period isn't until June 18th. And when I stretch in the mornings after waking up it feels like if I did a 100 crunches. Any ideas on what is causing this pain?

    • ANSWER:
      Causes of Pain in the Lower Abdomen

      Pain in the lower section of the abdomen could be attributed to several medical conditions. Here are some of the health problems that could be responsible for abdominal pain.

      Appendicitis
      Pain in the lower part of the abdomen could be caused due to appendicitis. The appendix is a narrow tube or a finger-like pouch that is located on the lower right quadrant of the abdomen. This close ended narrow tube is situated at the ileocecal junction, the place where the ileum from the small intestine and the cecum from the colon come together. It could become inflamed due to inflammatory bowel diseases, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, infection in the gastrointestinal tract or trauma to the abdomen. Besides pain in lower right abdomen, an inflamed appendix could also give rise to symptoms such as nausea, loss of appetite and abdominal swelling. Those who have been experiencing pain that starts from the belly button and moves on to the lower right abdomen, must consult a doctor soon. If left untreated, the appendix may burst giving rise to an infection. Sometimes such complications can even lead to death.

      Cystitis
      Cystitis is a medical condition associated with the inflammation of the lining of the bladder. It is one of the most common types of urinary tract infection. Though both men and women can suffer from cystitis, women are more vulnerable. The symptoms of interstitial cystitis include swelling in the abdomen, burning sensation while urinating, a feeling of pressure in the lower abdomen, blood in urine and pain in the lower section of the abdomen. An early diagnosis is important because lack of medical treatment can lead to complications. If left untreated, this might cause an infection in your kidneys. Pain in the lower abdominal region could also be caused due to gallbladder problems. The obstruction of the passage of bile out of the gallbladder is one of the common causes of gallbladder disease. The symptoms of gallbladder disease also include a feeling of fullness in the abdomen, nausea, heartburn, fever and vomiting.

      Kidney Stones
      Abdominal pain could also be caused due to kidney stones. When the minerals and salts such as calcium, struvite, cystine or uric acid present in the urine get crystallized, it leads to the formation of kidney stones. When the stones become large, a sharp abdominal pain is felt when these move through the ureter. Besides the abdominal pain, affected individuals are also likely to experience symptoms such as pain during urination, back pain and frequent urge to urinate.

      Stomach or Intestinal Disorders
      Medical conditions such as Crohn's disease, peptic ulcers, irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel diseases, colon cancer or digestive health problems can also cause pain in the abdomen. Constipation, diverticulitis, pelvic inflammatory disease, celiac disease, food poisoning and bowel obstruction are some of the diseases wherein the patient may experience pain in the lower part of the abdomen after eating.

      Conditions Associated with Reproductive Organs
      Pain and cramps in the lower abdomen might also be experienced by women during menstruation. Women who suffer from dysmenorrhea, ovarian cysts, uterine fibroids and endometriosis could also experience pain in lower abdomen. Ectopic pregnancy is a condition that is caused due to implantation of fertilized egg in the fallopian tube or the ovary. When the egg develops, the tube starts stretching. If left undetected, the embryo will continue to develop in the fallopian tube. This causes lower right abdominal pain. Men can also suffer from pain in the abdomen due to testicular torsion or seminal vesiculitis.

      Treatment for Pain in the Lower Abdomen

      The treatment options will depend on its underlying cause. It is extremely important to identify the underlying cause. The earlier the diagnosis, the better will be the chances of recovery. Doctors generally conduct some diagnostic tests such as blood test, urine analysis and imaging procedures such as ultrasound, endoscopy, X-ray and CT scan to ascertain the underlying cause. Many a time, pain might be attributed to unhealthy dietary habits. Under these circumstances, one might find relief by changing one's dietary habits. If abdominal pain is associated with medical conditions such as appendicitis, cystitis, gallbladder diseases, kidney stones, hernia or peptic ulcers, the treatment will generally involve the use of prescription drugs, lifestyle changes or surgery.

      These were the causes and treatment options for lower abdominal pain. If you have been experiencing recurring bouts of pain in your lower abdomen, don't ignore it. Consult a doctor immediately

  39. QUESTION:
    sex pain? could be prego? what do u think?
    ok, so me and my fiance had unprotected sex, the last day of my period twice, and then the next day once. i always over analyze things like im pregnant , but i never am, and stuff. but just this month i might be. well last sunday may 2nd i just woke up and had diarrhea and was vomiting literally all day. i caouldnt even take a sip of water with out feeling nauseous. anywho that only lasted 24 hrs though. well my face the past week has started to break out alot which it doesnt do normally until 2 days before my period. im not due for aunt flo until may 18th. i am regular so thank goodness i'll know soon if im pregnant or not, anywho. ive noticed ive been cravign those 89 cent beefy five layer burritos from taco bell and coke, like constantly. i had one today but a few hours later i want one again but im not hungry for mexican at all. i just want the burrito. anywho , those are the signs so far, oh and i pee kinda alot but i do over analyze that too much too cause ill have days i pee alot then days i dont. so ya. well anywho today me and my fiance tried to have sex, but it hurt so bad like on my right side and at one point like up close to my stomach. and we couldnt do it in our normal position cause it really hurt me. im wondering if that happened to anyone when they where pregnant? or if anyone knows why sex hurts sometimes. its not the first time sex hurt me but normally it doesnt kill, its just a pain. i know i prolly have lots of issues but i cant afford a doctor at the moment. so any advice? opinions?

    • ANSWER:
      This can be anything, try to see the doctor as soon as you can.

      You wouldn't be getting symptoms like that this soon. Cravings and changes in senses don't happen until second Trimester and that starts from week 13. Morning sickness starts after 4-6 weeks. And peeing frequently occurs after 6-8 weeks.

      Your frequent peeing and craving for sugary foods can be a sign of diabetes.

      Painful sex isn't a sign of pregnancy. Painful sex can be: vaginal infections, such as vaginal yeast infections and trichomoniasis, or genital herpes; Vaginal Irritation which can be caused by certain products such as scented tampons, vaginal sprays, contraceptive foams, jellies and creams etc; Vaginal Dryness; Vaginal Tightness or more severe case such as Vaginismus where the vaginal involuntarily goes into muscles spasms; Pelvic Pain which can be experienced through deep thrusting, This is normally a sign of a tear in the ligaments that support the uterus, Pelvis Inflammatory disease (cervix, uterine and tubal infections) Pelvic Adhesion's, Endometriosis (take note of this one this could be what you have) Ovarian Cysts, Uterine Fibroid Tumors, and Vulvodynia (painful/stinging of the vulva and the vagina)
      http://womenshealth.about.com/cs/pelvicpain/a/painfulsexualin.htm

      It also sounds a bit like Inflammatory Bowel Disease or Crohns Disease.

      I would go to the Sexual Health Clinic if you can. These symptoms could also be dysmenorrhea, other more serious forms of STI/Ds, even a miscarriage (with these symtoms) Or if it is prenancy then it could just be how YOUR pregnancy is going to be as every woman is different. Take a pregnancy test in a couple of weeks. Please see your doctor asap, or talk to a doctor over the phone. I also suggest you try talking to these http://www.justanswer.com/medical

      Like I said before I personally think it could be Endometriosis as the symptoms are:
      Pain before and during periods
      Pain with intercourse
      General, chronic pelvic pain throughout the month
      Low back pain
      Heavy and/or irregular periods
      Painful bowel movements, especially during menstruation
      Painful urination during menstruation
      Fatigue
      Infertility
      Diarrhea or constipation
      Headaches
      Low grade fevers
      Depression
      Hypoglycaemia (low blood sugar - you coke cravings)
      Anxiety
      Susceptibility to infections, allergies
      http://www.endo-resolved.com/symptoms.html

  40. QUESTION:
    If a ct scan showed a ovarian cyst and enlarged uterus but not ultra sound is this good?
    TO TRY TO FIGURER OUT WHAT THEY WHERE THINKING I SAID BOY THAT IS LONGER AND BIGGER THEN NORMAL FOR MY UTERUS SHE SAID NOT IT IS JUST THE RIGHT SIZE. SO NOW I AM STUMPED IF IT WAS LARG ON CT AND NOT ULTRA SOUND DOSE IT MEAN IT STILL MIGHT BE FIBOID OR A CHANCE SOMETHING ELSE MAYBE WRONG, BUT WHEN SHE WENT TO CHECK MY CYST SHE BLOCKED THE SCREEN????? CONFUSED HELP TELL ME WHAT YOU THINK. AND WHAT IS FIBROID IN ENGLISH?

    • ANSWER:
      What are fibroids?
      Fibroid tumors are usually benign (non-cancerous) tumors found, most often, in the uterus of women in their 30's and 40's, although they occasionally develop on other organs which contain smooth muscle cells.
      Fibroid tumors are solid tumors which are made of fibrous tissue, hence the name 'fibroid' tumor. Most often fibroids occur as multiple tumor masses which are slow-growing and often cause no symptoms.

      The size of fibroids varies immensely among women and some are so small that a microscope is required to see them. However some women experience a single large fibroid tumor the size of a grapefruit or a fibroid which is so large it encompasses the entire abdominal area. Such large tumors can weigh as much as 50 pounds; the largest, reported, fibroid ever recorded weighed in at 140 pounds.

      No one is sure why fibroid tumors develop, but some facts are quite clear-- they do not develop before the body begins producing estrogen during the onset of menstruation-- estrogen, such as in birth control pills and taken for menopausal symptoms, does cause fibroid tumors to grow and fibroid tumors will grow very quickly during pregnancy when the body is producing extra estrogen-- they often shrink and disappear after menopause when the body stops producing estrogen--a woman will almost never develop fibroid tumors after menopause.

      The estrogen connection appears to be quite clear, although there are still some who doubt the role estrogen plays in the development of fibroid tumors because women with fibroids often have blood levels which reveal normal amounts of estrogen.

      Types of Fibroid Tumors
      Submucous Fibroids

      These fibroids occur just below the lining of the uterus and can cause menstrual problems, including pain as they grow and move around the pelvic area.

      Intramural Fibroids

      A round fibroid most often within the uterine wall which can cause enlargement of the uterus as they grow.

      Subserous Fibroids

      This fibroid grows on the outer wall of the uterus and usually causes no symptoms until it grows large enough to interfere with other organs.

      Pedunculated Fibroids

      These fibroids develop when a subserous fibroid grows a peduncle (stalk), as they grow larger they may become twisted and cause severe pain.

      Interligamentous Fibroid

      A fibroid which grows sideways between the ligaments which support the uterus in the abdominal region. This type of fibroid is especially difficult to remove without the possibility of interfering with the blood supply or other organs.

      Parasitic Fibroid

      The rarest form of fibroid tumor occurs when a fibroid attaches itself to another organ.

      Diagnosis of Fibroid Tumors
      Diagnosis of fibroids is generally made by your physician during your annual gynecological exam when your physician feels a mass, they often are found when your physician is looking for something else or may never be discovered if you do not experience symptoms. However larger fibroids may make examination of your ovaries impossible if they grow near your ovaries.

      An ultrasound scan is often ordered when such masses are felt by your physician to determine the cause of the mass, however some fibroids appear on sonograms as ovarian tumors and surgery is the only way an accurate diagnosis can be made.

      Although most fibroids cause no symptoms, the estimated 25 percent of women who do have symptoms may have abnormal bleeding, pain during menstruation, and as the fibroid tumors grow larger, women will often experience a swollen abdomen.

      Larger fibroids may cause frequent urination or an inability to control your bladder, either the ability to control the urge or in severe cases, a women may find that she is unable to urinate at all. If a fibroid extends towards a woman's back it may push on the bowels, causing constipation and a backache.

  41. QUESTION:
    Is there something wrong with me?
    I have this weird sensation in my very low abdomen, it's not "painful" it just kinda weird and very hard to explain, my mom told me it could be a cyst but it's not at all painful and the feeling only lasts like a second. I don't even know where it's comming from i don't know if it's my ovaries or what but its so weird cuz its not like it actually hurts.
    I do not think it's a Uterine Fibroid. I not really having any symptoms. I mean I have bad cramps and heavy period my they never last more than 5 days.

    • ANSWER:
      A uterine fibroid is the most common benign (not cancerous) tumor of a woman’s uterus (womb). Fibroids develop with the uterine wall or attach to it. They may grow as a single tumor or in clusters. Uterine fibroids can cause excessive menstrual bleeding, pelvic pain, and frequent urination.

      These growths occur in about 25% of all women and are the leading cause of hysterectomy (removal of the uterus) in the United States. Of every woman older than 35 years, 1 in 5 has a uterine fibroid. An estimated 600,000 hysterectomies (removal of the uterus) are performed in the US annually, and at least one-third are for fibroids. Medications and newer, less invasive surgery can control the growth of fibroids.
      Fibroids start in the muscle tissues of the uterus. They can grow into the uterine cavity, into the thickness of the uterine wall, or on the surface of the uterus into the abdominal cavity. Although these tumors are called fibroids, this term is misleading because they consist of muscle tissue, not fibrous tissue.

  42. QUESTION:
    health problem. what's wrong with me?
    so Iv had irregular periods for nearly a year, sometimes they are every 2 weeks sometimes I only have a few days off. also I can sometimes feel this lump quite low down in my belly on the right hand side, but I cant feel it all the time. I recently lost about a stone in weight without trying but I think Im slowly putting it back on now so I dont know if that has anything to do with it.
    when I went to the doctors she thought I had a std (i don't think she really listened to me though) and I got checked out and I don't have anything. so what could it be?
    Im 19 and yes Im on the pill, but this problem started about 4 months before I started on the pill.

    • ANSWER:
      A good physician listens to the patient!
      My first bit of advice to you: seek a second opinion from a gynaecologist, (a specialist in women's reproductive organs).

      There are a few medical conditions that could be the cause of your irregular periods and weight loss. Below is a list of some of the conditions and a few of the symptoms which may be present. This is by no means a diagnosis of any kind, just some of the possibilities.

      1) Uterine Fibroid- symtoms include - excessive menstrual bleeding
      - vaginal bleeding between periods
      - frequent urination
      - frequent urge to urinate
      - low back pain
      - worse during menstruation
      2) Ovarian Cysts- some symptoms - irregular periods
      - low back pain
      - worsened by physical movement
      3)Endometriosis- symptoms include- vaginal bleeding between periods
      - bloating
      - constipation or diarrhea
      - worse during menustration
      4)Mittelschmerz- symptoms include- vaginal bleeding between periods
      - pain on one side of abdomen
      5)Menorrhagia- symptoms include - excessive menstrual bleeding
      - irregular periods
      6)Endometrial Cancer- symptoms - excessive menstrual bleeding
      - vaginal bleeding between periods
      - bleeding during menopause
      - change in vaginal discharge.

      I suggest you speak to a specialists regarding your concerns and if you are certain that something is definitely wrong with you, do not let a doctor tell you differently. If they do, seek out another opinion.
      Not all doctors are as proficient as they should be, and non are perfect!

      I do hope you find out it is nothing serious to worry about. :)
      please go get a second opinion.
      take care.

do uterine fibroids cause frequent urination