Difference Between Fibroids And Polyps

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    what is the difference between uterine polyps, fibroids and cysts?
    I was told I have fibroids and polyps.....I really don't understand the difference...

    • ANSWER:
      An endometrial polyp or uterine polyp is a sessile mass in the inner lining of the uterus. They may have a large flat base (sessile) or be attached to the uterus by an elongated pedicle (pedunculated). Pedunculated polyps are more common than sessile ones. They range in size from a few millimeters to several centimeters If pedunculated, they can protrude through the cervix into the vagina. Small blood vessels may be present, particularly in large polyps.

      Fibroids are the most common benign tumors in females and typically found during the middle and later reproductive years. While most fibroids are asymptomatic, they can grow and cause heavy and painful menstruation, painful sexual intercourse, and urinary frequency and urgency. Some fibroids may interfere with pregnancy although this appears to be very rare.

      A vaginal cyst is a closed sac on or under the vaginal lining that contains fluid or semisolid material. Cysts occur when a gland or duct is clogged and liquid collects in a sac.
      When a cyst is inside the vagina, they are usually painless. Their size can range from the size of a pea to that of an plum.

      I hope I helped.

  2. QUESTION:
    What could be causing my late period?
    I know I am not pregnant. I had scarlet fever toward the end of last month and had two large steroid shots, a round of steroids, and a z pack. Could that make my period late? I am also currently sick, I don't know if that would make a difference.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, here are some facts about irregular menstrual cycles. I hope this helps you to answer a few of your questions. Take care.
      Cycles between 23–35 days are very common. A woman may get her period only one to four times a year. Or she might have periods that occur two to three times in a month and involve spotting or extremely heavy flow. Alternatively, she may have heavy episodes of bleeding every two to three months. Irregular periods are simply what is irregular for you.

      For the most part, we don’t worry at the clinic about a missed period or two over the course of a year. More variation than that may indicate to us the beginning of perimenopause or a disruption of the natural chain of hormonal events that controls menstruation. A wide variety of factors can be responsible for irregular periods, among them:

      Significant weight gain or loss
      Over-exercise
      Poor nutrition (or a diet too high in carbohydrates)
      Smoking
      Drug use
      Caffeine
      Excessive alcohol use (interfering with how the liver metabolizes estrogen and progesterone)
      Eating disorders
      Increased stress
      Polycystic ovarian syndrome/estrogen dominance
      Uterine abnormalities (fibroids/cysts/polyps/endometriosis)
      Hormonal imbalance related to perimenopause
      Medications
      Chemotherapy
      Recent childbirth, miscarriage, or D&C
      Breastfeeding

      As you can see, there are many different ways a woman can be irregular for as many different reasons, and it can be very confusing when it happens.

      http://www.womentowomen.com/menstruation…

  3. QUESTION:
    Wat is the difference between vaginal bleeding an a period?

    • ANSWER:
      Normal menstrual flow lasts about 4 days, produces a total blood loss of 30 to 80 ml (about 2 to 8 tablespoons), and occurs normally every 28 days (plus or minus 7 days).

      Vaginal bleeding that occurs between periods or after menopause sometimes may be due to cancer or precancer, and should be evaluated promptly. The risk of cancer increases with age.

      Causes can include:- Uterine fibroids or polyps
      Vaginal dryness due to lack of estrogen after menopause
      Stress
      Stopping and starting birth control pills or estrogens
      Underactive thyroid (low thyroid function) Use of blood thinners (anticoagulants)

  4. QUESTION:
    Will my period cause problems trying to get pregnant?
    My period usually lasts 7-8 days and is heavy the first 2, then pretty light for the rest. I don't have endometriosis or fibroids. Will this make it harder for me to get pregnant and will I ovulate later?

    • ANSWER:
      if your actual time of menses is long, it won't make much of a difference on your ovulation time. if your entire cycle is 28 days, then you should ovulate in the middle of your cycle, between days 12 and 16. Just to be sure, test with ovulation test kits and check your cervical mucus. I (and all the doctors i work for) don't reccomend testing with basel body temperature because you are more likely to miss your acutal ovulation.

      Basically, as long as your cycle is normal and this flow is the regular flow for you, then it won't prevent you from getting pregnant or decrease your fertiltiy. If the bleeding increases or your menses is shorter or longer, then that means you could be having an irregular cycle or developing a hormonal imbalance or maybe even developing a polyp or fibroid. If your cycle changes, talk to your doctor.

  5. QUESTION:
    Is it abnormal to have pieces of coagulation in the menstrual blood?

    • ANSWER:
      yes.

      Menstrual clots are normal for many women, but they can also signal changes that may or may not be significant. In this article, I'll try to explain the whys and wherefores of clots.
      What Are They?
      Clots are the natural result of your body taking care of you. They are a natural way of controlling bleeding. Scientifically, it is a complicated and involved process that leads to fibrin being formed into a matrix.

      On a scraped knee, this mechanism leads to scab formation. But inside the uterus, the process results in a clot. Because blood in the uterus is mixed with many other cells and endometrial tissue, there is a difference between this clot and those seen on the skin.

      Whenever blood pools or is retained inside the uterus it is likely to clot. When menstrual blood and cells pass immediately outside the body, clots are less likely . As a general rule, the redder the blood is, the faster it has reached the outside. The blacker it is, the longer it took to exit the body. If the blood is accumulating faster than the body’s ability to transfer it out of the uterus, clots are the result.

      Are Clots Ever Normal?
      Yes. Many women routinely have some clotting during menses. Factors that determine whether clots will occur include:

      the size of the uterus
      the ability of the uterine myometrium (muscle) to contract
      fibroids
      adenomyosis
      the diameter of the cervical canal through which the blood must flow
      any obstruction to the outflow of menstrual products such as polyps, adhesions, etc.
      How Should Clots be Evaluated?
      The most important indicators are the blood count (hematocrit) and the duration of clotting. If a woman can maintain a normal blood count without developing anemia, and the clotting does not last more than the length of her normal period, it is usually considered within acceptable limits.

      What Else Can it Mean?
      When there is a significant change in the amount or duration of clotting, we should consider several possible explanations.

      Pregnancy: When pregnancy is a possibility, it should always be tested for. Problem pregnancies, miscarriages, and ectopic pregnancies can all be associated with clotting.

      Hormonal Changes:
      Short term: Hormone production can vary for many reasons. Some of these include failure to ovulate, ovarian cysts, and medication. It is not uncommon for any woman to experience an occasionally bizarre menses with unusual clotting. The majority of these occurrences are short-lived and followed by normal periods.

      Chronic: Other factors that can change hormone production on an ongoing basis include peri-menopausal changes, chronic illness, significant weight gain or loss, and use of certain long term medications such as steroids, or prolonged failure to ovulate.

      Changes in the Uterus:
      Fibroids: Called leiomyomata, fibroids are very common. They are benign growths of muscle that form spheres occupying space within the normal muscle of the uterine wall. They can grow into the inside of the uterus (submucous), stay within the wall (intramural), or grow from the outside surface (subserosal). Sometimes they grow on a stalk (pedunculated). If they interfere with the ability of the entire uterus to contract, bleeding will increase and clots are likely to form.

      Adenomyosis: When this abnormality occurs, it is commonly associated with a reduction in the ability of the muscle fibers in the uterine wall to contract. This, in turn, can result in clotting. (For more information on adenomyosis, please see Dr. Albee's newsletter on it.)

      Large Uterus: After multiple pregnancies or multiple births, the uterus may remain larger than it was pre-pregnancy. If the cavity of the uterus enlarges, more pooling of menstrual blood may occur. This results in an increase in clotting.

      Polyps: Polyps or other growths inside the uterus can act as an obstruction to the outflow of blood during menses. This can increase clotting. These growths can also bleed themselves.

      Outflow Obstruction: Anything that can partially block the outflow of fluid from the uterus during menses can contribute to clotting. The most common form of outflow obstruction results from natural changes after menopause when hormone levels drop. Without estrogen stimulation, the cervical canal may atrophy, or shrink. This can restrict the flow of blood, so clots are likely to form. This problem does not surface unless there is some reason for the post-menopausal woman to bleed. Then she may notice that the bleeding is not at all like her menstrual period used to be.

      Does Endometriosis Cause Clotting?
      In my experience about 30-40% of endometriosis patients experience abnormal bleeding, which may or may not include clotting. In general, I feel this is an indirect effect and not a direct one. For example, a woman who develops a large endometrioma may find that it interferes with normal ovulation. This could indirectly lead to abnormal bleeding and possibly influence clot formation.

      In Summary
      Clots in and of themselves are generally not harmful. One menstrual cycle that is different from your normal pattern probably doesn’t mean anything. But if changes continue, you should bring them to the attention of your physician.

  6. QUESTION:
    Im having my period and just passed a blood clot that would fit in the entire palm of my hand. Any ideas why?
    I am 41 and last 2 - 3 years have heavier periods and a few late at times. I am not pregnant.

    • ANSWER:
      Dark, chunky clots of blood can be perfectly normal. Many women get them during their menstrual period when they have days of heavy cramping and heavy bleeding. Your body usually makes things called "anti-coagulants," that keep your blood from clotting as it moves to your vagina and out of your body. But during days of heavy bleeding and cramping, your body is pushing blood so quickly out of you that your body does not have time to release these anti-coagulants. Your blood then clots. If you have clots that are bigger than a quarter, it is a good idea to talk with your health care provider.

      Menstrual clots are normal for many women, but they can also signal changes that may or may not be significant. I'll try to explain the whys and wherefores of clots.
      What Are They?
      Clots are the natural result of your body taking care of you. They are a natural way of controlling bleeding. Scientifically, it is a complicated and involved process that leads to fibrin being formed into a matrix.

      On a scraped knee, this mechanism leads to scab formation. But inside the uterus, the process results in a clot. Because blood in the uterus is mixed with many other cells and endometrial tissue, there is a difference between this clot and those seen on the skin.

      Whenever blood pools or is retained inside the uterus it is likely to clot. When menstrual blood and cells pass immediately outside the body, clots are less likely . As a general rule, the redder the blood is, the faster it has reached the outside. The blacker it is, the longer it took to exit the body. If the blood is accumulating faster than the body’s ability to transfer it out of the uterus, clots are the result.

      Are Clots Ever Normal?
      Yes. Many women routinely have some clotting during menses. Factors that determine whether clots will occur include:

      the size of the uterus
      the ability of the uterine myometrium (muscle) to contract
      fibroids
      adenomyosis
      the diameter of the cervical canal through which the blood must flow
      any obstruction to the outflow of menstrual products such as polyps, adhesions, etc.
      How Should Clots be Evaluated?
      The most important indicators are the blood count (hematocrit) and the duration of clotting. If a woman can maintain a normal blood count without developing anemia, and the clotting does not last more than the length of her normal period, it is usually considered within acceptable limits.

      What Else Can it Mean?
      When there is a significant change in the amount or duration of clotting, we should consider several possible explanations.

      Pregnancy: When pregnancy is a possibility, it should always be tested for. Problem pregnancies, miscarriages, and ectopic pregnancies can all be associated with clotting.

      Hormonal Changes:
      Short term: Hormone production can vary for many reasons. Some of these include failure to ovulate, ovarian cysts, and medication. It is not uncommon for any woman to experience an occasionally bizarre menses with unusual clotting. The majority of these occurrences are short-lived and followed by normal periods.

      Chronic: Other factors that can change hormone production on an ongoing basis include peri-menopausal changes, chronic illness, significant weight gain or loss, and use of certain long term medications such as steroids, or prolonged failure to ovulate.

      Changes in the Uterus:
      Fibroids: Called leiomyomata, fibroids are very common. They are benign growths of muscle that form spheres occupying space within the normal muscle of the uterine wall. They can grow into the inside of the uterus (submucous), stay within the wall (intramural), or grow from the outside surface (subserosal). Sometimes they grow on a stalk (pedunculated). If they interfere with the ability of the entire uterus to contract, bleeding will increase and clots are likely to form.

      Adenomyosis: When this abnormality occurs, it is commonly associated with a reduction in the ability of the muscle fibers in the uterine wall to contract. This, in turn, can result in clotting.
      Large Uterus: After multiple pregnancies or multiple births, the uterus may remain larger than it was pre-pregnancy. If the cavity of the uterus enlarges, more pooling of menstrual blood may occur. This results in an increase in clotting.

      Polyps: Polyps or other growths inside the uterus can act as an obstruction to the outflow of blood during menses. This can increase clotting. These growths can also bleed themselves.

      Outflow Obstruction: Anything that can partially block the outflow of fluid from the uterus during menses can contribute to clotting. The most common form of outflow obstruction results from natural changes after menopause when hormone levels drop. Without estrogen stimulation, the cervical canal may atrophy, or shrink. This can restrict the flow of blood, so clots are likely to form. This problem does not surface unless there is some reason for the post-menopausal woman to bleed. Then she may notice that the bleeding is not at all like her menstrual period used to be.

      Does Endometriosis Cause Clotting?
      In my experience about 30-40% of endometriosis patients experience abnormal bleeding, which may or may not include clotting. In general, I feel this is an indirect effect and not a direct one. For example, a woman who develops a large endometrioma may find that it interferes with normal ovulation. This could indirectly lead to abnormal bleeding and possibly influence clot formation.

      In Summary
      Clots in and of themselves are generally not harmful. One menstrual cycle that is different from your normal pattern probably doesn’t mean anything. But if changes continue, you should bring them to the attention of your physician.

  7. QUESTION:
    Difference?
    What is the difference between breakthrough bleeding and an actual period? How can you tell the difference?
    I had a 17 day cycle this month and it is discouraging me so much because we have been TTC our first child for 30 months. Looking back at my charts, the same thing happened in December and January... I'm not on any kind of birth control. What could cause this?

    • ANSWER:
      Break through bleeding only pertains to women taking birth control.

      What the bleeding or spotting can be depends on when it is happening in your cycle. If you chart your waking temperature, you can get a better idea of what the bleeding may be.

      Sometimes, some woman have ovulatory spotting. Some woman have light bleeding right around ovulation. This spotting is normal. Its usually result of the sudden drop of estrogen just before ovulation.

      There is also anovulatory bleeding. This is a cycle in which you do not ovulate. If you are charting your waking temperatures, then you can tell if you did ovulate or not. You would see a range of low temps prior to ovulation and a range of high temps after ovulation.

      If you experience brown spotting either before your period or from 6 days onward in your cycle, it could be an indication of a problem with your luteal phase. This should be brought to your doctors attention. Spotting before menstruation can be considered normal if it follows at least 10 days of high temps without spotting. Otherwise, it can be an indication that your body is not producing progesterone long enough- which causes a premature shedding of the capillaries in the uterine lining. Doctors can use progesterone cream, HCG injections or clomid to increase and support your luteal phase.

      Regardless, if your spotting consistently lasts longer than a few days, you should see your doctor. Your doctor would need to check to investigate and determine if you have any of the following: thyroid problem, fibroids, endometritis or endometrial polyps.

      Edited to add:
      I just read your additional info. If your cycle is only 17 days long then you are most likely not ovulating. One cause of anovulatory cycle is that you do not reach a high enough level of estrogen to trigger ovulation. "Estrogen withdrawl bleeding" is when estrogen will slowly build up to a point below the threshold then drop suddenly, trigering bleeding. There is also "estrogen breakthrough bleeding" but I do not think that pertains to you because your cycles are to short (17 days).

      There are many reasons you may not ovulate: illness, travel, strenuous exercise, weight gain or loss, stress or a variety of medical conditions (excessive prolactin, PCOS, premature ovarian faliure, thyroid disorder, etc).

      Since you have been trying to conceive for so long, if you don't already you need to see a reproductive endocrinologist. They will be able to help you much better than a regular OBGYN.

  8. QUESTION:
    Bleeding during ovulation?
    I am currently ovulating and have noticed a small amount of bright red blood on the toilet paper after using the bathroom. I generally experience some pain when I ovulate, but today it seems the pain has been more intense. I have never bled during ovulation before. Does anyone know why this is happening? Should I be concerned? I'm 17 and not sexually active if it makes any difference. Also, I noticed the blood shortly after finishing a two-mile run.

    • ANSWER:
      Hello Aorta,

      Ovulation Bleeding is different from menstrual flow. The color of Ovulation Bleeding varies from pink to red, is light and for 1 or 2 days duration. If bleeding occurs at 2 weeks interval then it is due to lack of ovulation and can be due to irritation to cervix or polyps in cervix or uterus. A clinical examination with an ultrasound image of pelvic organs can confirm the cause of Ovulation Bleeding.

      The exact cause of bleeding during ovulation is not clear and could be due to emerging follicles. Hormones prompt ovaries to produce around 20 follicles that contain an immature egg, and out of this only one follicle matures. It is during this process of maturing and bursting out from the follicle that pain or bleeding occurs. Few women are discomfited by bleeding, as it is a signal of ovulation, or they bleed slightly in middle of their cycle. Severe or long-lasting bleeding during ovulation is sometimes symptomatic of certain gynecological conditions, including endometriosis. It is prudent to consult a doctor because if left untreated can affect health. Also if bleeding is heavy during ovulation or lasts longer than 3 days then take medical advice.

      Women with regular menstrual bleeding can differentiate between Ovulation Bleeding and the menstrual period. If periods are irregular, or it is uterine bleeding, then she is not ovulating regularly. A physical examination of the uterus helps detect causes of abnormal bleeding. An ultrasound examination or a diagnostic hysteroscopy helps detect sub-mucous fibroids, polyps and other problems. During a diagnostic hysteroscopy, it is possible to remove polyps for examination and take a sample of the uterus lining.

      One needs to remember that bleeding during mid-cycle does not indicate menses. If Ovulation Bleeding is accompanied by pain or acute discomfiture, then start worrying. Take precautions and get medical help before the condition is further aggravated.

      Take care! Mama Bear

      Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/140742

  9. QUESTION:
    after a total hysterectomy, what are the risks of not taking hrt or the necessities of taking them?

    • ANSWER:
      This is not an easy to answer question based on the limited information you give.

      If you had a hysterectomy (total with removal of ovaries) and it was due to a cancerous environment, then you may NOT be the best candidate for HRT.

      If you had a hysterectomy due to fibroids in the uterus, prolapse of the uterus or reoccuring polyps with a proliferative endometrial lining, then you MAY be a candidate for HRT.

      The Women's Health Initiative (WHI) is the largest study to date conducted on HRT.

      However I caution you...the first part of the WHI study was conducted on women who were on combination estrogen/progesterone pills. This is the part of the study that found a small increase in breast cancer, as well as concluding that there is NO protection from heart disease on HRT, rather finding that cholesterol levels in women did increase on HRT, thus leading to increased heart disease.

      Since you no longer have a uterus, you do NOT need a combination of estrogen/progestin. You only need the estrogen component. WHI did do a second study on ERT (Estrogen Replacement Therapy), but stopped the study early based on the inconclusive and confusing results of the HRT (combination pill) study.

      Here is a good link for you to check out...
      http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/whi/

      There are risks and benefits associated with every drug and even supplements that we take. Figuring out what is more benefical then risky for you needs to be done between you and your physican.

      I also recommend that if you don't have a gyne that knows about hormones, that you invest the time to finding one to consult with you who does. It can make a huge difference.

      Really, HRT or ERT is not the enemy it's made out to be...again...risk must outweigh benefit in taking medications.

      Know your risks and your benefits and ask ALOT of questions.

  10. QUESTION:
    Missed/late period but unsure why?
    I had my first period when I was 12, I am 21 now. My periods have ALWAYS been "perfect". I always start within a day or 2 of the same date every month. A few years ago, I lost 35 pounds in 2 months, which made my period be a couple of weeks late for one month, but then after that my period was right back on track and perfect. This was the one and only time my period has been off until recently.

    In March, my period was a little over a week late. I usually start around the 22-23 of each month, but in March I started around the 29th-30th. This being unusual I took a pregnancy test and it came out negative. In April, I didn't have my period at all -- It is the 7th of May and I still haven't had my period. This is the first time my entire life I have had a missed period. So, last week I took a second pregnancy test. After 10 minutes the line that shows up just to tell you the test is working never showed up which means the test is bad. I still left it out (even though it says to not accurately check it after 10 minutes) and checked it after about 30 minutes, and the 1 line had showed up but not the pregnant line.

    I'm not stressed, my diet hasn't changed, I'm not even "worried" about the fact that my period has been weird (which can sometimes CAUSE it to be late or miss). I'm just very contently curious about what other people think might be causing it.

    Thanks for any help <3

    (I also want to note that the period I had in March WAS a period, not spotting. It lasted for 6ish days, I cramped the same, it looked the same, etc.. I've had my period for going on 10 years -- I know the difference between my period and spotting.)

    (As second note, I have Interstitial Cystitis. I don't know if it can cause any complications with my period, but I've had IC for around 3 years and have never had any period complications from it. Just thought it might be worth noting.)

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, here are some facts about irregular menstrual cycles. I hope this helps you to answer a few of your questions. Take care.
      Cycles between 23–35 days are very common. A woman may get her period only one to four times a year. Or she might have periods that occur two to three times in a month and involve spotting or extremely heavy flow. Alternatively, she may have heavy episodes of bleeding every two to three months. Irregular periods are simply what is irregular for you.

      For the most part, we don’t worry at the clinic about a missed period or two over the course of a year. More variation than that may indicate to us the beginning of perimenopause or a disruption of the natural chain of hormonal events that controls menstruation. A wide variety of factors can be responsible for irregular periods, among them:

      Significant weight gain or loss
      Over-exercise
      Poor nutrition (or a diet too high in carbohydrates)
      Smoking
      Drug use
      Caffeine
      Excessive alcohol use (interfering with how the liver metabolizes estrogen and progesterone)
      Eating disorders
      Increased stress
      Polycystic ovarian syndrome/estrogen dominance
      Uterine abnormalities (fibroids/cysts/polyps/endometriosis)
      Hormonal imbalance related to perimenopause
      Medications
      Chemotherapy
      Recent childbirth, miscarriage, or D&C
      Breastfeeding

      As you can see, there are many different ways a woman can be irregular for as many different reasons, and it can be very confusing when it happens.

      http://www.womentowomen.com/menstruation…

  11. QUESTION:
    Saline sonogram vs. HSG?
    I had an HSG an d bot tubes were open, now a new doc wants to do a saline sonogram.. what is the difference? and won't he find the same results?

    • ANSWER:
      A saline infusion sonogram (saline sonography or SIS) is routinely performed to make sure that the endometrial cavity (inside of the uterus) appears normal. Benign uterine growths, such as endometrial polyps or uterine fibroids, may develop in the cavity and create an environment that is hostile for implantation. Scar tissue may also be identified with the saline infusion sonogram. This procedure may be done as part of an evaluation for recurrent pregnancy loss or done prior to an IVF cycle. It may also be done to evaluate causes of irregular or very heavy menstrual cycles and some types of chronic pelvic pain. The saline infusion sonogram is scheduled early in a menstrual cycle, just after your period stops but before ovulation – usually between days 5-12 of the cycle.

      The procedure is simple and usually takes 10 to 15 minutes to complete.

      v A speculum is inserted into the vagina and the cervix is cleansed with an antiseptic solution.

      v A special catheter approximately 1mm in diameter (about the size of a single strand of spaghetti) is inserted and slides through the cervical canal.

      v The ultrasound probe is placed in the vagina.

      v Sterile salt-water solution (saline) flows through the catheter into the uterine cavity. This distends the endometrial cavity and allows the physician to see the entire cavity on the ultrasound monitor. You may experience mild cramping at this point.

      v Several images of your uterus will be taken during the procedure, pictures of your ovaries may also be taken.

      v You will need to schedule an appointment with your physician to discuss any abnormalities that are seen during the procedure.

      After the procedure you may continue to have mild cramping for a few hours. You may also experience light spotting or watery discharge for as long as 24 hours after the procedure. You should refrain from intercourse for approximately 48 hours

      So a HSG is an xray where they have dye flow through the uterus to see the organs better and a SIS is ultrasound with saline solution.

  12. QUESTION:
    Implantation bleeding or period?
    My period is very irregular and always lasted 3 days. Then i had a pregnancy scare about my boyfriend fingering me with precuum ( i know kind of ridiculous and a small possibility from getting pregnant from that but i get extremely paranoid) but four days after later i got my period or what i think is my period..how do you tell the difference. It wasn't light though it was heavy like always and i used pads. I read about it and its didnt have a pink or brownish color. I also got a pregnancy test two weeks after this and its negative should i be worried what if its implantation bleeding :O

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, here are some facts about irregular menstrual cycles. I hope this helps you to answer a few of your questions. Take care.
      Cycles between 23–35 days are very common. A woman may get her period only one to four times a year. Or she might have periods that occur two to three times in a month and involve spotting or extremely heavy flow. Alternatively, she may have heavy episodes of bleeding every two to three months. Irregular periods are simply what is irregular for you.

      For the most part, we don’t worry at the clinic about a missed period or two over the course of a year. More variation than that may indicate to us the beginning of perimenopause or a disruption of the natural chain of hormonal events that controls menstruation. A wide variety of factors can be responsible for irregular periods, among them:

      Significant weight gain or loss
      Over-exercise
      Poor nutrition (or a diet too high in carbohydrates)
      Smoking
      Drug use
      Caffeine
      Excessive alcohol use (interfering with how the liver metabolizes estrogen and progesterone)
      Eating disorders
      Increased stress
      Polycystic ovarian syndrome/estrogen dominance
      Uterine abnormalities (fibroids/cysts/polyps/endometriosis)
      Hormonal imbalance related to perimenopause
      Medications
      Chemotherapy
      Recent childbirth, miscarriage, or D&C
      Breastfeeding

      As you can see, there are many different ways a woman can be irregular for as many different reasons, and it can be very confusing when it happens.

      http://www.womentowomen.com/menstruation…

  13. QUESTION:
    long, Heavy, depressing periods?
    I am 15 and have been on my period sense i was 13 but for the past year or so i have had the WORST period. I have it for 9 days, heavy except for the last two days. And when i say heavy i mean changing my tampon every 3 hours... i dont like supers so i wear regulars. Also there are only about 20 days in between. And a week before im so depressed and angry my friends have to walk on tip toes around me. And cramps are just constant the first 4 days and 2 days before it hits. You might be thinking im overweight or inactive, but i work out every day and im 100 pounds. i dont know what to do but im tired of living with this. does the pill help? or what else works? im desperate.

    • ANSWER:
      Your period actually isn't that heavy at all, but PMS symptoms and cramps are an issue.

      The pill is not a good option, it suppresses your cycles which means it stops menstruation (bleeding you get on the pill is withdrawal bleeding, not the same as menstruation) at best it may hide the problem rather than cure whatever is causing all this, at worst it may make things worse and risk side-effects, not to mention there are concerns about using the pill at your age as it would prevent you learning from your cycles and may effect development. There are far less extreme options.

      My suggestions;

      See your doctor.
      Check for problems; hormonal imbalance, endometriosis, polyps, fibroids, cysts or tumors. Demand treatment - this is easier said than done because often they will use the pill as a quick-fix, if you have a good doctor though they will work with you to find the cause and treatment options, if not then seek care elsewhere. If open to it you may also want to look into complimentary therapies such as acupuncture or chiropractic care.

      Medication.
      If everything checks out okay with the doctor then I suggest taking tranexamic acid for the heavy bleeding and then an anti-inflammatory drug such as Mefenamic acid to block the the synthesis of prostaglandin F2 alpha for the cramps. You take three of each tablet a day for the first few days of your period and it can lessen your flow and length of your periods by up to half.

      Diet.
      Make sure to eat healthy. Get iron to make up for blood loss and help lessen flow. Zinc and calcium for menstrual health, and vitamins A and C to regulate estrogen levels to lessen flow. Seaweed is also known to help as it is a source of iodine, which helps to revitalize the endocrine system, however if not up for eating seaweed then you can just take kelp capsules. Omega 3, flaxseed oil (approx. 500Mg 2-4 times a day), B vitamin complex with 100mg of vitamin B6, Magnesium (100mg every 2 hours during menstruation), and vitamin E in d-alpha tocopherol form (50mg 3 times a day).

      Herbal.
      Coffee is a good way to lessen flow as it is a vasoconstrictor so constricts blood vessels in the uterus preventing heavy blood loss, it isn't a huge difference and for some it can cause things to get worse, but it does give a fairly immediate effect either way so worth a try. Look into taking herbal treatments daily throughout your cycle, particularly helpful are; chaste tree (tincture is best), evening primrose oil or black cohosh, these will help to regulate hormones to help prevent heavy periods, also drinking either vitex tea or a women's tea blend may help too. For cramps go for teas such as yarrow, lemon balm, black haw, chamomile, red raspberry, wild strawberry, valerian, and raspberry leaf all help - my foster daughter swears by raspberry leaf. Try the Chinese medicine Bupleurum (xiao yao wan) you take 3-4 tablets 4 times a day a few weeks periods.

      Don't use tampons, they're widely known as a major contributing factor to cramps as by absorbing fluids they're essentially tugging on vaginal walls, chemicals may cause allergy adding to discomfort, and they can expand into your cervix. Use menstrual cups instead, they can be worn any time of your period for 12 hours, they don't leak like tampons so better for heavy flow and can lessen your cramps and flow too - best method to lessen flow and can stop cramps.

      For cramps also go for cell salts every 5-10 minutes until the pain stops, or Clary Sage oil (dilute in carrier oil) - rubbed into your tummy it works better than painkillers, plus supports estrogen production and acts on pituitary gland to prevent cramps.

      Improve your attitude towards menstruation, women are constantly bombarded with negative messages about menstruation and rarely hear about the positives of menstruation. This effects how you feel about menstruation and how you experience menstruation - research shows if you have a positive attitude not only are you more likely to learn more thus be able to deal better with menstruation, but that menstrual problems are lessened.

  14. QUESTION:
    No period, no signs of pregnancy or period?
    I have a somewhat regular cycle that I track, it jumps between 28-30 days. Usually when it's late I at least get period symptoms still. This time it's almost a week late and... Nothing. I'm just going about my life. The only difference is I'm having INTENSE sweet cravings and I'm more easily irritated. The only thing I've changed in my life is I've been drinking Damiana tea every day to raise my libido and have been sleeping more regularly.

    I had unprotected sex with two male friends in the same day a day before I ovulated. (I have paragard)

    I doubt I'm pregnant, but is this anything I should worry about?

    • ANSWER:
      RANDOM REASONS FOR IRREGULAR PERIODS:

      Significant weight gain or weight loss is one of the reasons for irregular periods. Even though low body weight is the most common cause of irregular periods, obesity also causes various irregularities in your menstrual cycle.

      If you are a victim of severe emotional stress, then you can possibly experience irregular or missed periods. This is due to the reason that stress will have very serious impact on your reproductive health. So, if you are aware you experience severe emotional stress, you may suffer from irregular periods.

      Various eating disorders such as anorexia or bulimia nervosa can also have influence on your regular menstrual cycle. So, if you have any kind of eating disorder, you can certainly experience irregular periods.

      Excessive exercising or body straining activities can also lead to irregular menstrual cycle. This is the reason why most of athletes encounter missed periods.

      Many new mothers do not resume their regular periods until they have completed their breast feeding. So, they can possibly have irregular menstrual cycle.

      Alcohol consumption can also disturb your hormonal metabolism. As a result, you’ll certainly end up with irregular or missed periods.

      Certain uterine abnormalities such as cervical polyps, uterine fibroids and endometriosis also cause irregular periods, too.

      Certain STDs also show irregular periods as a symptom.

      One of the common causes is stress. It is one of the main culprits for this problem. If you have been worried, over worked or angry before your period, chances are that you will experience an irregular menstrual cycle.

      Girls who have just begun menstruation, experience irregular menstruation for up to one year or more. Missed periods after menarche are nothing to worry about, it's part of the normal body process.

      Pregnancy can be another reason for a missed period. So if you missed a period after sexual intercourse, its best to first rule out pregnancy. To prevent unplanned pregnancy, it is wise to use contraceptives. There can be changes in the menstrual cycle after pregnancy.

      These are quite a few reasons that may cause you to experience irregular periods. So, if you are really concerned about your missed periods, make sure you consult any experienced gynecologist and find out the root cause of it.

      And remember to always consider healthy liquid intake such as beverages, natural fruit juices, and herbal teas. These can also help to cleanse and regulate or relieve lower abdominal pains. Always see a professional if there are serious complications.

      Womenshealthzone
      buzzle

  15. QUESTION:
    A fleshy blob produced during my period?
    I've been on the contraceptive pill microgynon for the past 3 months without having the week off for my period for the past 3 packets. i have been on it previously with no ill effects. i took my last pill on monday 20th march but on tuesday night found i was on my period already. I went to the toilet this morning to find a pink like what i can only describe as a pink skin like 3D blob about the size of a £2 coin in my knickers. It had a yellow and dark brown area. This had come through past my tampon??
    I have been having intercourse throughout these 3 months and I am still menstruating

    I am confused because my period came on so soon - only a day after and also passed this fleshy blob. I am 19 and didnt have any symptoms of pregnancy other than an increased appetite and boob size increase which i presumed was due to the pill anyway. I havent had any symptoms like this when using the pill previously and i did use it last year 2011 during the summer. Could this have been a miscarriage?
    ive had light-medium regular periods my whole menstruating life
    im on microgynon
    i havent spoken to my doctor
    i had lower back pain which i normally get when on my period anyway

    • ANSWER:
      Hi,
      If you were previously pregnant, then it might have been a miscarriage. Those symptoms you had mentioned for the pill were signs before you get your period (increased appetite, and sore/enlargement of breasts). I think its just the clotting of the blood that is produced during your period.

      According to a previous Yahoo! post:

      "Dark, chunky clots of blood can be perfectly normal. Many women get them during their menstrual period when they have days of heavy cramping and heavy bleeding. Your body usually makes things called "anti-coagulants," that keep your blood from clotting as it moves to your vagina and out of your body. But during days of heavy bleeding and cramping, your body is pushing blood so quickly out of you that your body does not have time to release these anti-coagulants. Your blood then clots. If you have clots that are bigger than a quarter, it is a good idea to talk with your health care provider.

      Menstrual clots are normal for many women, but they can also signal changes that may or may not be significant.Clots are the natural result of your body taking care of you. They are a natural way of controlling bleeding. Scientifically, it is a complicated and involved process that leads to fibrin being formed into a matrix.

      On a scraped knee, this mechanism leads to scab formation. But inside the uterus, the process results in a clot. Because blood in the uterus is mixed with many other cells and endometrial tissue, there is a difference between this clot and those seen on the skin.

      Whenever blood pools or is retained inside the uterus it is likely to clot. When menstrual blood and cells pass immediately outside the body, clots are less likely . As a general rule, the redder the blood is, the faster it has reached the outside. The blacker it is, the longer it took to exit the body. If the blood is accumulating faster than the body’s ability to transfer it out of the uterus, clots are the result. Many women routinely have some clotting during menses. Factors that determine whether clots will occur include:

      the size of the uterus
      the ability of the uterine myometrium (muscle) to contract
      fibroids
      adenomyosis
      the diameter of the cervical canal through which the blood must flow
      any obstruction to the outflow of menstrual products such as polyps, adhesions, etc.

      How Should Clots be Evaluated?
      The most important indicators are the blood count (hematocrit) and the duration of clotting. If a woman can maintain a normal blood count without developing anemia, and the clotting does not last more than the length of her normal period, it is usually considered within acceptable limits. When there is a significant change in the amount or duration of clotting, we should consider several possible explanations. pregnancy,hormonal changes, chronic factors, changes in the uterus,etc.

      In Summary
      Clots in and of themselves are generally not harmful. One menstrual cycle that is different from your normal pattern probably doesn’t mean anything. But if changes continue, you should bring them to the attention of your physician."

      Suzan

difference between fibroids and polyps