Causes Of Uterine Rupture During Labor

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    How rare is it for a woman in labor to get a uterine rupture if she is not induced and has never had a c-sec?
    Someone we know got a ruptured uterus and lost the baby and nearly died. She was not induced and had never had a c-sec. How rare is this?

    • ANSWER:
      What causes uterine rupture?

      Ninety percent of uterine ruptures happen at the site of a scar from a previous c-section. And ruptures are most likely to occur during labor because a scar is more likely to give way under the stress of contractions.

      If you've had one c-section with the typical low-transverse uterine incision and are considered a good candidate for VBAC, most studies estimate the risk of rupture during labor to be less than one percent. On the other hand, if you've had a "classical" c-section, in which the incision extends vertically to the upper, more muscular part of the uterus, you have a much higher risk of rupture and should be scheduled for c-section before the onset of labor. The same is true for women who have had other kinds of uterine surgery, such as an operation to remove fibroids or to correct a misshapen uterus, or repair of a previous rupture.

      It's possible for an unscarred uterus to rupture, but that happens in fewer than 1 in 15,000 pregnancies, almost always during labor. Risk factors include having had five or more children, a placenta that's implanted too deeply into the uterine wall, an overdistended uterus (from too much amniotic fluid or carrying twins or more), contractions that are too frequent and forceful (whether spontaneous or from medication such as oxytocin or prostaglandins, or as the result of a placental abruption), and a prolonged labor with a baby that's too big for the mother's pelvis.

      Trauma to the uterus, from such things as a car accident or a procedure such as an external cephalic version or a difficult forceps delivery, may also cause a uterine rupture, as can a difficult manual removal of the placenta.

      Hope this helps!

  2. QUESTION:
    what if i have had a healthy pregnancy no complications and scheduled for a induction?
    Im 41 weeks and 2 days. I haven't had no complications at all throughout my pregnancy. Baby's healthy. I haven't dilated at all. And im scheduled for an induction at 42 weeks if she don't come on her own. What are my risks and the benefits of this.

    • ANSWER:
      OK, there's a risk of needing a c-section with an induction, but there's new evidence that your risk of needing a c-section due to a failed induction is no higher than it would be if you went into labour by yourself, provided that you've passed your due date. There's a slightly higher risk of uterine rupture because the pitocin they use to induce can cause very strong contractions.

      If you don't give birth soon, the placenta begins to degrade. It actually slowly begins to degrade from 34 weeks onwards. Parts of it begin to calcify and it doesn't do quite as good a job as it was during the rest of the pregnancy. By your due date, your baby is only getting enough nutrients to sustain her. The placenta dies by 44 weeks. Anything beyond 42 weeks compromises the pregnancy and increases your risk of stillbirth significantly.

      There are far more benefits to induction for an overdue baby than there is to wait for natural labour to occur. Induction is safe, the biggest con to it is that you spend more time at the hospital because you don't get to labour at all at home like most women who spontaneously go into labour do. But some women find that their bodies were just ready to go and their labour was very quick regardless.

      You'll be fine, your baby will be fine. Doctors are only inducing to safeguard your and your baby's wellbeing. Best of luck and congrats!

  3. QUESTION:
    What does it feel like when your going into labor?
    I am seventeen and 35 weeks pregnant. I am not asking for people to judge on my age. I am just wondering what it feels like so I will have an idea of what is happening when it happens. And how early do most women have there children. Pretty much any info you have on pregnancy at this far along will be appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      Six Signs that Labor is Within a Few Weeks or Days:
      1. Lightening: You can breathe again! This is an indication that the baby has dropped, settling deeper into your pelvis and relieving some of the pressure on your diaphragm, so you are not so short of breath. You may feel increased pressure on your bladder, which means more trips to the bathroom. Others may comment on your changed appearance, although you might not be aware of it at all.

      2. Bloody show: Loss of mucus plug. During pregnancy, a thick plug of mucus protects your cervical opening from bacteria entering the uterus. When your cervix begins to thin and relax, this plug is expelled. Some women think the plug will look solid like a cork, but it is actually stringy mucus or discharge. It can be clear, pink or blood tinged and can appear minutes, hours or even days before labor begins. Not all women notice this sign.

      3. Rupture of membranes: Your water breaks! Only 1 in 10 woman experience a dramatic gush of the amniotic fluid and even then it usually happens at home, often in bed. Sometimes the amniotic sac breaks or leaks before labor begins. Your uterus is sitting directly on top of your bladder, which can cause you to leak urine. Sometimes it can be quite difficult to distinguish urine from amniotic fluid.

      If your membranes have ruptured and you are leaking amniotic fluid, it will be an odorless fluid. This can occur with a sudden gush or a constant trickle. If you notice fluid leaking, you need to try to determine if it smells like urine or if it is odorless. If it does not seem to be urine, you would want to contact your health care provider.

      Until you see your physician or midwife do not use tampons, have sexual intercourse or do anything that would introduce bacteria to your vagina. Let your health care provider know if the fluid is anything other than clear and odorless, particularly if it's green or foul smelling, because this could be a sign of infection.

      4. Nesting: Spurt of energy. For most of your pregnancy you have probably been fighting the urge to take a nap, so you'll know when you experience this. One day you will wake up feeling full of energy! You'll start making a long list of things to do, things to clean, things to buy and everything you've put off doing will become a high priority. In all your preparations, don't forget that “Labor Day” may be just around the corner so save some energy.

      5. Effacement: Thinning of the cervix. Usually in the last month the cervix begins to stretch and thin. This process means the lower segment of the uterus is getting ready for delivery. A thin cervix will also allow the cervix to dilate more easily.

      Your health care provider may check for effacement in the final 2 months of pregnancy. Effacement is measured in percentages. You may hear your health care provider say,“You are 25% effaced, 50% effaced, 75%...” The Braxton Hicks contractions or “practice contractions” you have been experiencing may play a part in the effacement process. You will not be able to determine your effacement process, this can only be done by a health care provider's exam.

      6. Dilation: Opening of the cervix. Dilation is the process of the cervix opening in preparation for childbirth. Dilation is measured in centimeters or, less accurately, in “fingers” during an internal (manual) pelvic exam. “Fully dilated” means you're at 10 centimeters and are ready to give birth. In the same way that your health care provider may be checking for effacement in the last 2 months, your health care provider may also tell you how many centimeters your cervix has dilated.

      One SURE Sign Labor is Really Happening:
      Consistent Contractions: When you begin to experience regular uterine contractions, this is the strongest indication that you are in labor. This is a good time to get out your notebook to record the exact time each one begins and how long they last. These contractions may feel like menstrual cramps or a lower backache that comes and goes, and during early labor they may be as far apart as 20 to 30 minutes. Over the course of several hours your contractions will typically begin occurring at shorter intervals; and you may notice they start happening every 10-15 minutes or less. When your contractions are consistently 5 minutes apart, it is time to call your health care provider.

  4. QUESTION:
    Can Cytotec have an effect on a 6 wk old baby?
    My cousins baby passed on the 17th, I heard of the drug causing problems when used for inducing labor. The cause of death is unknown, but she was induced with this drug, could it have caused the death of the baby. He was 6 weeks old.

    • ANSWER:
      Let me first say how sorry I am about the loss of the new baby

      I wrote an article about cytotec a while back. http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/227935/some_women_turning_to_cytotec_as_an.html?cat=62 I talked to many women since writing the article and have heard many horror stories about the use of cytotec for abortion. Cytotec is actually a drug that is used for ulcers and doctors use this off label for labor induction and abortion.

      I believe the risk with using cytotec for labor induction refers to uterine rupture and is during the actual delivery.

      With infants, sometimes a cause is just never known concerning their passing. I am sure it must be very hard for your family. I will keep you in my thoughts this holiday.

      Blair

  5. QUESTION:
    Do you need a licence to breed dogs?
    I have wanted to have a dog and I am getting one and I love all animals and I want to breed her once she’s old enough with a male dog and I want to know if you need a license to breed dogs in Canada, Ontario we love all our animals and how old does the dog have to be to breed her?
    Thanks a lot but i just got a cute little boy puppy he is just what i wanted and is so cute thanks for all the answers

    • ANSWER:
      Before becoming a breeder read this website

      http://www.woodhavenlabs.com/breeding/breeder2.html

      i'll paste it just in case you can't get to it.

      ATTENTION ALL NOVICE POTENTIAL BREEDERS!!!!!

      SO YOU WANT TO BE A BREEDER? -

      WHAT IF DURING THE BREEDING

      The stud dog you have chosen is carrying a venereal disease and gives it to your female. She not only doesn't conceive but you have to pay the vet bills to get her infection cleared up and she is now sterile.

      The stud dog you decided to breed your darling to is not experienced. Once the two dogs are joined tightly in a tie, he decides to chase the neighbors cat out of his yard. He bolts for the cat ripping his penis loose and causing your bitch to hemorrhage from within.

      Your modest girl decides she doesn't want the attentions of this gigolo mutt chosen for her without her consent. She snaps at him catching her tooth on his loose cheek and rips it open sending blood flying everywhere. He retaliates by sinking his teeth into her left eye.

      You leave your dog with the stud owner because the breeding is not going very swiftly. In fact , it's been three hours and nothing is happening. The stud owners leave the two dogs alone in the back yard. The dogs get out through a tiny hole in the fence and a truck hits your female.

      You pay the 0-00 stud fee up front figuring you will make that and more back when the pups sell. The breeder guarantees the stud service to work or you can come back again. After 2 months you discover it didn't work and now must wait another 4 months to try again. Of course it doesn't work again, so in another 4 months you take your dog to another male and risk loosing another stud fee.

      You get her bred. Bring her home. She bothers you so you let her out she is still in heat and still receptive to males. You hear a commotion outside there is your girl tied up with the neighborhood mutt. when she whelps there will need to be DNA tests done on the pups.

      You get her bred. Bring her home and let her out. (She is still in heat and receptive to other males) but you do not see the neighborhood mutt breed her. The pups are born but look odd. You call the stud owner he suggests DNA testing (At your expense). You have a litter of mutts! What do you do about the ones you have already sold?

      Or knowing she tied with the neighborhood mutt you decide to terminate the pregnancy and try again being more careful next time. But a few weeks later your female is very sick because you had her given a miss-mate shot creating a hormonal imbalance causing a uterine infection and now she has Pyometra and needs a complete hysterectomy. All plans of getting a litter is gone and your female's life is now in danger if she does not have the operation.

      WHAT IF DURING THE BIRTH

      The puppies are too large for the female. She never goes into labor, the puppies die and she becomes infected by the decaying bodies.

      The puppies are coming breech and they drown in their own sacks before they can be born.

      The first puppy is large and breech. When it starts coming your female starts screaming, and before you can stop her she reaches around, grabs the puppy in her teeth and yanks it out killing it instantly.

      A puppy gets stuck. Neither your female nor you can get it out. You have to race her to the vet. The vet can't get it out either. She has to have an emergency caesarian section of course it is 3:00 am Christmas day.

      A puppy is coming out breech and dry (the water sack that protects them has burst). It gets stuck. Mom tries to help it out by clamping her teeth over one of the back legs. The head and shoulders are firmly caught. Mom pulls on the leg, hard, peeling the flesh from the leg and leaving a wiggling stump of bone.

      A dead puppy gets stuck in the birth canal, but your female is well into hard labor. She contracts so hard trying to give birth that her uterus ruptures and she bleeds to death on the way to the vet.

      WHAT IF DIRECTLY AFTER THE BIRTH

      The mother has no idea what to do with a puppy and she drops them out and walks away, leaving them in the sack to drown.

      The mother takes one look at the puppies, decides they are disgusting droppings and tries to smother them in anything she can find to bury them in.

      The mother gets too enthusiastic in her removal of the placenta and umbilical cord, and rips the cord out leaving a gushing hole pulsing blood all over you as you try in vain to stop the bleeding.

      Or, she pulls on the cords so hard she disembowels the puppies as they are born and you have a box full of tiny, kicking babies with a tangle of guts the size of a walnut hanging from their stomachs. Of course all the babies must be put to sleep.

      What if because of some Hormone deficiency she turns vicious allowing no one near her or the babies, who she refuses to nurse, or you have to interfere with.

      You notice something protruding from her vagina when you let her out to pee. You take her to the vet to discover a prolapsed uterus, which needs to be removed.

      WHAT IF WHEN YOU THINK YOU'RE IN THE CLEAR

      One or more of the puppies inhaled fluid during birth, pneumonia develops and death occurs within 36 hours.
      What if the mother's milk goes bad. You lose three of your four puppies before you discover what is wrong. You end up bottle feeding the remaining pup every two hours, day and night. After three days the puppy fades from infection and dies.

      The puppies develop fading puppy syndrome you lose two. You bottle-feeding or tube feeding the last remaining baby. It begins to choke and despite your efforts to clear the airway, the pup stiffens and dies in your hands.
      Your female develops mastitis and her breast ruptures.
      Your female develops a uterine infection from a retained placenta. Her temperature soars to 105. You race her to the vet, he determines she must be spayed. He does the spay in an attempt to save her life, you pay the hundreds of dollars bill. The infection has gone into her blood stream. The infected milk kills all the puppies and the bitch succumbs a day later.
      All the puppies are fine but following the birth the female develops a hormone imbalance. She becomes a fear biter and anytime anyone tries to touch her she viciously attacks them.
      Mom and pups seem fine, the puppies are four weeks old and are at their cutest. However, one day one of the puppies disappears. You search everywhere but you can't find it. A few days later another puppy is gone. And another. You can't figure how on earth the puppies are getting out of their safe 4' x 4' puppy pen. Finally there is only one puppy left. The next morning you find the mother chomping contentedly on what is left of the last murdered puppy.
      WHAT IF THE NEW HOMES AREN'T SO HAPPY

      You give a puppy to a friend. Their fence blows down so they tie the puppy outside while they go to work. A roving dog comes along and kills the puppy. Your friend calls you up to tell you about the poor little puppy and asks when you are having more puppies.
      You sell a puppy to an acquaintance. The next time you see them you ask how the puppy is doing. They tell you that it soiled their new carpet so they took it to the pound
      You sell a puppy to a friend (you give them a good price and payments). They make a couple of tiny payments. Six months later they move to an apartment. They ask you to take it back. You take it back and of course the payments stop. The dog they returned is so shy, and ill mannered from lack of socialization and training it takes you a year of work providing socializing and training to be able to give it away.
      You sell a puppy to a wonderful home. They love her like one of the family. At a vet check done by their vet it is determined that the puppy has a heart murmur. (Your vet found nothing when he checked the puppy before it was sold.) They love their puppy and want the best for her. They have an expensive surgery done. The puppy is fine. They sue you for the medical costs. They win, because you did not have a contract stipulating conditions of guarantee and so as breeder you are responsible for the puppy's genetic health.
      You give a puppy to your mother. She is thrilled. Two years later the puppy starts developing problems. It begins to develop odd symptoms and is suffering. Hundreds and hundreds of dollars worth of tests later it is finally discovered that the dog is suffering from a terminal condition that was inherited. possibly from your female since you know nothing about her family lines.
      One loving home decides your puppy is untrainable, destructive and wants to return the pup and get a full refund, which you have spent on your vet bills.
      One loving couple calls you and is very upset because their pup has crippling hip dysplasia and want to know what you are going to do about it. You have spayed your female so a replacement is out of the question, looks like another refund.
      THE SALE

      You put your ad in the local paper for your pups at the usual price and get only 2 responses and no sales. You cut the pup's price in half and broaden your advertising to 3 other newspapers in which the advertising totals 0.00 a week.
      You get a few more puppy inquiries from people who ask all about health testing you did before breeding and if the pups are registered. You tell them your dogs are healthy and it was enough and that you could get the papers. The callers politely thank you and hang up.
      The pups are now 4 months old and getting bigger , eating alot and their barking is really beginning to annoy the neighbors who call the police who inform you of the 0.00 noise by-law.
      Your neighbors also call the humane society who comes out to inspect the care of your dogs. You pass inspection but end up feeling stressed and harassed.
      You finally decide to give the rest of the litter away but still have to pay the 00.00 advertising bill and the 0.00 vet bill.
      So you gotta ask yourself: Do I feel lucky? Well, do ya, "breeder?"

      Laura Turner - AUTHOR

  6. QUESTION:
    How is "pressure" supposed to feel when the baby has engaged?
    I've been having preterm signs for 1 month now, no cervical change as of now....

    I don't think I have felt pressure low down..

    But i do feel pressure in my low abdomen when I'm having a Braxton hicks contraction..

    How is pressure supposed to be felt?

    • ANSWER:
      Risks for Preterm Labor
      Women diagnosed with incompetent cervix, uterine abnormalities, or uterine fibroids
      Women with a history of previous preterm labor and/or birth
      Any second trimester bleeding
      Women diagnosed with placenta previa
      If baby has excessive amniotic fluid
      Poor prenatal care
      Poor nutrition or low weight gain during pregnancy
      Smoking, alcohol, or drug use
      Symptoms of preterm labor
      Menstrual like cramps with or without diarrhea - may be constant or intermittent
      Dull backache - may be constant or intermittent
      Leaking or rupture of membranes (i.e., your water breaks)
      Pelvic pressure - feeling like the baby is pressing down
      Any abdominal cramping
      Change in vaginal discharge (i.e., more watery discharge or a change to pinkish discharge, etc.)
      Contractions every 10 minutes or less with or without pain
      If you are at risk for preterm labor, you should be aware of how to monitor for contractions. Contractions are not always painful. Feel your stomach for hardening or tightening. Some women describe this as a balling up sensation. In other words, the baby feels as if it is curling up into a ball. For others contractions may feel more like cramps. During a contraction your belly will feel firm and hard. If you experience contractions every 10 minutes or less or any of the above symptoms of labor contact your health care provider for further instructions.

      Although not all preterm labor can be prevented, there are some steps you can take to prevent preterm labor. Drink plenty of water - 8 to 10 glasses a day. Dehydration can cause contractions so staying well hydrated can help prevent contractions. Empty your bladder frequently, about every 2 to 3 hours. A full bladder can irritate your uterus and therefore cause contractions. Avoid lifting heavy objects and overexertion. If you have other children have them sit on your lap instead of carrying them. Take frequent rest periods throughout the day, preferably laying on your left side. Laying on your left side provides the best blood flow to your baby. Avoid breast stimulation if you are at risk for preterm labor. Sexual activity may need to be avoided by certain women at risk for preterm labor.

  7. QUESTION:
    when you start contractions, how far is your baby?
    Because the doctor send my sister home after saying she has contractions?

    • ANSWER:
      probably, the reason why the doctor sent your sister home is because she is having false labor or what we call "braxton hicks contraction. false labor causes uterine contractions that are not stong enough to open the make the cervix thin and eventually open it, for the expulsion of the baby.. true labor may follow anytime soon. True labor has 2 stages
      The first stage begins with the onset of contractions and ends when the cervix is fully dilated. This stage is divided into two phases, known as early and active labor. During early labor, your cervix gradually effaces or thins out and dilates. That's followed by active labor, when your cervix begins to dilate more rapidly and contractions are longer, stronger, and closer together.
      The second stage of labor begins once you're fully dilated and ends with the birth of your baby. This is often referred to as the pushing stage.
      The third and final stage begins right after the birth of your baby and involves the separation and delivery of the placenta.
      For first-time moms who are at least 37 weeks along, labor and delivery takes an average of 15 hours, although for plenty of women it lasts more than 20 hours, and for a lucky few it's over much sooner. For women who've been through labor before, deliveries average around eight hours.
      just look after your pregnant sister and make sure that her bag of water has not ruptured or leaked because the moment you notice that it is, you should imediately bring her to the hospital for possible induction of labor. premature rupture of membrane poses danger to the newborn baby..

  8. QUESTION:
    What is the effect of smoking during pregnancy?
    What effect does smoking have on an embroy?

    • ANSWER:
      In the United States more than 20 percent of women smoke. According to the World Health Organization, a similar number of women in other developed countries smoke, and about 9 percent of women in developing countries smoke. Many of these women smoke while they are pregnant. This is a major public health problem because, not only can smoking harm a woman’s health, but smoking during pregnancy can lead to pregnancy complications and serious health problems in newborns.

      Statistics from the United States are compelling. If all pregnant women in the United States stopped smoking, there would be an estimated 11 percent reduction in stillbirths and a 5 percent reduction in newborn deaths, according to the U.S. Public Health Service.1 Currently, at least 11 percent of women in the United States smoke during pregnancy.2

      Cigarette smoke contains more than 2,500 chemicals. It is not known for certain which of these chemicals are harmful to a developing baby. However, both nicotine and carbon monoxide are believed to play a role in causing adverse pregnancy outcomes.

      How can smoking harm the newborn?
      Smoking nearly doubles a woman’s risk of having a low-birthweight baby. In 2002, 12.2 percent of babies born to smokers in the United States were of low birthweight (less than 5½ pounds), compared to 7.5 percent of babies of nonsmokers.2 Low birthweight can result from poor growth before birth, preterm delivery or a combination of both. Smoking has long been known to slow fetal growth. Studies also suggest that smoking increases the risk of preterm delivery 37 weeks of gestation). Premature and low-birthweight babies face an increased risk of serious health problems during the newborn period, chronic lifelong disabilities (such as cerebral palsy, mental retardation and learning problems) and even death.

      The more a pregnant woman smokes, the greater the risk to her baby. However, if a woman stops smoking by the end of her first trimester of pregnancy, she is no more likely to have a low-birthweight baby than a woman who never smoked. Even if a woman has not been able to stop smoking in her first or second trimester, stopping during the third trimester can still improve her baby’s growth.

      Can smoking cause pregnancy complications?
      Smoking has been associated with a number of pregnancy complications. Smoking cigarettes appears to double a woman’s risk of developing placental problems. 1 These include placenta previa (low-lying placenta that covers part or all of the opening of the uterus) and placental abruption (in which the placenta peels away, partially or almost completely, from the uterine wall before delivery). Both can result in heavy bleeding during delivery that can endanger mother and baby, although a cesarean delivery can prevent most deaths. Placental problems contribute to the slightly increased risk of stillbirth that is associated with smoking.

      Smoking in pregnancy also appears to increase a woman’s risk of premature rupture of the membranes (PROM) (when the sac inside the uterus that holds the baby breaks before labor begins).1 A woman with PROM may experience a trickle or gush of fluid from her vagina when her water breaks. Usually, she will go into labor within a few hours. When PROM occurs before 37 weeks of pregnancy it is called preterm PROM, and it often results in the birth of a premature baby.

      Does smoking affect fertility?
      Cigarette smoking can cause reproductive problems before a woman even becomes pregnant. Studies show that women who smoke may have more trouble conceiving than nonsmokers.1 Studies suggest that fertility returns to normal after a woman stops smoking.

      Does smoking during pregnancy cause other problems in babies or young children?
      A recent study suggests that babies of mothers who smoke during pregnancy may undergo withdrawal-like symptoms similar to those seen in babies of mothers who use some illicit drugs.3 For example, babies of smokers appear to be more jittery and difficult to soothe than babies of non-smokers.

      Babies whose mothers smoked during pregnancy are up to three times as likely to die from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) as babies of nonsmokers.1

      Can exposure to second-hand smoke during pregnancy harm the baby?
      Studies suggest that babies of women who are regularly exposed to second-hand smoke during pregnancy may have reduced growth and may be more likely to be born with low birthweight. Pregnant women who do not smoke should avoid exposure to other people’s smoke.

      How can a woman stop smoking?
      The March of Dimes recommends that women stop smoking before they become pregnant and remain smoke-free throughout pregnancy and after the baby is born. A woman’s health care provider can refer her to a smoking-cessation program that is right for her or suggest other ways to help her quit. The March of Dimes supports a 5- to 15-minute, 5-step counseling approach called “The 5 A’s,” which is performed by the health care provider during routine prenatal visits. This approach has been shown to improve smoking cessation rates by 30 to 70 percent among pregnant women.4 Even later in pregnancy, a woman can reduce the risks to her baby by stopping smoking.

      Studies suggest that certain factors make it more likely that a woman will be successful in her efforts to quit smoking during pregnancy. These include: attempting to quit in the past, having a partner who doesn’t smoke, getting support from family or other important people in her life and understanding the harmful effects of smoking.

      How does exposure to smoke after birth affect a baby?
      It is important to stay smoke-free after the baby is born. Both mother and father should refrain from smoking in the home and should ask visitors to do the same. Babies who are exposed to smoke suffer from more lower-respiratory illnesses (such as bronchitis and pneumonia) and ear infections than other babies. Babies who are exposed to their parents’ smoke after birth also may face an increased risk of SIDS. A child exposed to smoking at home during the first few years of life also is at increased risk of developing asthma.

      Of course, smoking harms a woman’s own health: smokers have an increased risk of lung and other cancers, heart disease, stroke and emphysema (a potentially disabling and, sometimes, deadly lung condition). Quitting smoking will make parents healthier—and better role models for their children.

  9. QUESTION:
    What are questions to ask an OBGYN on your first visit?
    We are visiting one of two OBGYN for my wife's first pregnancy today. What are some questions I should ask in order to make a good decision on which doctor to choose.
    Thank you :)

    • ANSWER:
      Training & Experience:
      Why did you become an ob-gyn?
      Are you a board-certified ob-gyn?
      Do you have any sub-specialty training?
      How long have you been practicing?
      Are you taking any new patients?
      How many babies have you delivered?
      How many babies do you deliver each month on average?

      Managing My Pregnancy:
      How much time do you allow for prenatal visits?
      On average, how long is the wait in your office?
      What percentage of your own patients do you deliver each month?
      If you are not on call or are delivering another baby, who will deliver my baby?
      If I call with routine questions between visits, how will you handle them?
      Are you on call 24-hours/day?
      How do I reach you in an emergency or if I am entering labor?
      Do you use email to receive and answer questions?
      Do you have a website through which I can get information about your practice or medical information?
      Are you in a SOLO or GROUP practice?
      If Solo: Who covers for you when you are not available?
      If Group: How often will I see other practitioners?
      Do your colleagues share the same philosophy about pregnancy and birth as you?
      At which hospital will I be delivering my baby?
      Do the nurses at the hospital support your birth philosophy?
      Can I choose the hospital in which I will deliver my baby?
      Do you have specialized training or experience to manage any medical, obstetric or gynecologicc conditions that I may have (such as diabtes, endometriosis, etc.)?
      What are your views about recommending alternative, complementary or integrative medical approaches?

      Prenatal Care:
      What is your policy on informed decision making by parents?
      Which prenatal tests do you recommend?
      When would you recommend or perform:
      Ultrasound:
      Nonstress test:
      Contraction stress test:
      Biophysical profile:
      How do you manage my concerns about a specific test?
      What do you consider to be a high-risk pregnancy?
      How much experience do you have with high-risk pregnancy?
      What changes can I expect in my prenatal care if my pregnancy becomes high-risk?
      Should a second opinion be required, who do you consult with?
      Name & Location:
      What situations would cause you to seek consultation?
      Reasons:
      How will you manage my pregnancy if it passes beyond my due date?
      Reasons:
      At what point will you insist on induction?
      Reasons:Do you recommend any prenatal classes?
      Recommendation & Why:
      Will you help me prepare a birth plan?

      Labor & Delivery:
      Will you meet me when I am first admitted to the hospital?
      If no, when:
      Who will manage my care until you arrive?
      Name & Location:
      Will you stay with me throughout my labor, including pushing?
      How much time do you normally spend with mothers in labor?
      What percentage of your patients have hired professional labor assistants (doulas)?
      What views do you hold about professional labor assistants?
      Recommendations:
      Dislikes & Why:
      Would you be comfortable with me having a qualified professional labor assistant stay with me at home and check my cervix for as long as my membranes are intact and bring me to the hospital only when I am in active labor?
      If he/she were to ausculate fetal heart tones with Doppler or fetoscope?:
      If I am attempting VBAC (vaginal birth after cesarean)
      How do you manage ruptured membranes during early labor?
      What are your suggestions to help me manage pain during labor?
      Which of the following procudures do you routinely employ during labor?
      Enemas:
      Continuous Fetal Monitoring:
      IVs
      Episiotomies
      What percentage of your patients have:
      Epidurals:
      Pitocin:
      IVs:
      Confinement To Bed:
      Internal Monitors:
      Continous Fetal Monitoring:
      Intermittent Fetal Monitoring:
      HUAC (remote or home uterine activity monitoring)
      Do you use fetal scalp PH monitoring to confirm fetal distress?
      If yes, why:
      What are your views about episiotomies?
      What percentage of your patients have episiotomies?
      First-time Mothers:
      Second-time Mothers:
      How do you manage labor to reduce the need for episiotomies?
      How often do your patients require stitches to repair an episiotomy?
      What are your thoughts about having a natural childbirth with none of the above?
      What percentage of your patients require assisted delivery (forceps or vacuum extraction)?
      What percentage of your patients require cesarean sections?
      For which situations do you most commonly perform a cesarean section?
      If a cesarean is necessary, can my partner be present?
      Does the hospital have an anesthetist and obstetrician available 24-hours/day in case I want an epidural, need an emergency cesarean section or wish to attempt a VBAC (vaginal birth after cesarean)?
      What are your views about VBAC?
      What percentage of your patients attempt VBAC?
      What is your success rate with VBAC?

      Postpartum Care:
      Will I be separated from my baby following delivery?
      If yes, when:
      If yes, why:
      If yes, for how long:
      Can my baby room in with me?
      Will you, or someone on your staff, teach me how to breastfeed?
      What are your views about circumcision?

      Ask Y

  10. QUESTION:
    What are the arguments for and against C Sections over natural births?
    I'm only 15... so not pregnant or anything, but the idea of a natural birth (squeezing a bowling ball through a hose pipe) just sounds a lot more dangerous and horrible than a Caesarean... what are the for and against arguments?

    • ANSWER:
      First off, being a c-section mom I believe a woman should have a right to decide how she wants to give birth. Whether that be a unsupervised home birth or a c-section, no one should judge her until they walk a mile in her pregnant shoes. I'm happy that at 15 you are already wanting to learn what you can for the future. All women should be well educated about all aspects of pregnancy and birth.

      There are always risks with any surgery, minor or major. There are risks associated with c-sections, but there are also risks associated with vaginal deliveries. Many of the Pros to c-sections are the risks with vaginal deliveries.

      Pros for the Mom

      1)No labor pain, except for emergency c-sections done after labor starts.
      2)A reduction in the complications of labor such as failure to progress, fetal distress, and prolapsed umbilical cords.
      3)The anal sphincter is not subjected to possible tearing. During a vaginal delivery this tearing can occur resulting in an involuntary loss of gas and fecal incontinence.
      4)The pelvic floor is protected from the strain of labor and pushing. Because of this protection there is reduced risk of prolapsed uterus, bulging rectum and a dropped bladder.
      5)A reduction of unexplained/unexpected stillbirth.
      6)A reduction of the risk of urinary stress incontinence.
      7)The convenience of planning for delivery date and circumstances. (with scheduled c-sections)
      8)A reduced fear of painful intecourse after delivery.

      Pros for the Baby

      1)A reduction of mom to baby infections such as HIV and Herpes.
      2)A reduction of fractures and nerve injuries.
      3)A reduction of cerebral palsy.
      4)A reduction of meconium aspiration

      Cons for the Mom

      1)Certain operative complications including blood loss, lacerations of the bladder, bowel, broad ligament, and ureter and rarely occuring; hysterectomy.
      2)Infections of the incision, uterus or bladder.
      3)Thrombo-embolisms that can occur in the legs or lungs.
      4)Bowels that are sluggish (walking helps)
      5)The need for a repeat cesarean.
      6)Risk of uterine rupture when attempting a future VBAC
      7)Longer intial hospital stay of 3-4 days versus a vaginal delivery stay of 1-2 days.
      8)Longer recovery period (does not apply to everyone)

      Cons for Baby

      1)Fetal injury which occurs very rarely caused by the surgeon accidently nicking the baby making the uterine incision.
      2)For term babies there is a higher risk of neonatal respiratory distress that needs oxygen therapy.
      3)Takes away the benefit of fluid being squeezed from baby's lungs as it passes through the birth canal.

      These are just a list of pros and cons and not everyone will consider everything on the list as a pro or a con.

      For instance, as a first time mom I had a c-section, which was also my first surgery. I was not disappointed because I was able to enjoy my sons birth. Also for me the longer hospital stay was NOT an inconveinence because after me and my hubby spent 4 days at the hospital with trained professionals helping us when we needed it. We were more confident and comfortable caring for our son when we went home.

      Sorry this is so long. I just want to really make clear that women SHOULD NOT BE AFRAID OF C-SECTIONS. They should not be disappointed in themselves. NOT EVERYONE'S BODY CAN DO LABOR AND DELIVERY. If we left our bodies to what they do naturally with the technology we have now, there are lots of people who wouldn't survive. God may have designed our bodies, but he also gave us brains and intelligence. With that intelligence we have come so far in all medical aspects.

  11. QUESTION:
    A thin cervix wall Is there away to fix it?
    I had a miscarriage last year and my doctor said I had a thin wall..Does that mean I will have problem with another pregnancy? Is there any way I can fix that problem with a vitamin or is there something else that will help me?

    • ANSWER:
      Sounds like Cervical incompetence:

      Cervical incompetence is a medical condition in which a pregnant woman's cervix begins to dilate (widen) and efface (thin) before her pregnancy has reached term. Cervical incompetence may cause miscarriage or preterm birth during the second and third trimesters.

      CAUSES: Cervical incompetence occurs because of weakness of the cervix, which is made to open by the growing pressure in the uterus as pregnancy progresses. If the responses are not halted, rupture of the membranes and birth of a premature baby can result

      TREATMENT:Cervical incompetence is not generally treated except when it appears to threaten a pregnancy. Cervical incompetence can be treated using cervical cerclage, a surgical technique that reinforces the cervical muscle by placing sutures above the opening of the cervix to narrow the cervical canal.

      Cerclage procedures usually entail closing the cervix through the vagina with the aid of a speculum. Another approach involves performing the cerclage through an abdominal incision. Transabdominal cerclage of the cervix makes it possible to place the stitch exactly at the level that is needed. It can be carried out when the cervix is very short, effaced or totally distorted. Cerclages are usually performed between weeks 14 and 16 of the pregnancy. The sutures are removed between weeks 36 and 38 to avoid problems during labor. The complications described in the literature have been rare: hemorrhage from damage to the veins at the time of the procedure; and fetal death due to uterine vessels occlusion.

  12. QUESTION:
    Can a subchorionic hematoma during second trimester cause preterm labor?
    I had a sch during my pregnancy. I bled the whole pregnancy until at 23 weeks my water broke due to PPROM (preterm premature rupture of membranes) which I think were due to my SCH. Can SCH cause preterm labor?

    thanks

    • ANSWER:
      It could cause it, causing the amniotic sac to detach from the uterine wall and then the waters can break. Most SCH are reabsorbed, but if it doesnt, then yes, PTL can occur.

  13. QUESTION:
    Does An Induction Cause Problems To The Baby?
    I need to know if it is possible for an iduction to hurt my little one. I'm having a girl and my doctor said if I don't give birth by Tuesday 7/22 that he will be inducing me. Can I please get some answers?

    • ANSWER:
      Congratulations on your upcoming birth! I hope that nature takes its course, and your little one comes along on his/her own. But if not, please don't fear an induction! I've had two, and been to plenty (as a Respiratory Therapist and NRP certified therapist). The most common issue with induction is that the labor may end up as a c-section.
      Some side notes though.. there are many types of induction, and you need to fully inform yourself on those types.

      I was induced using pitocin, by IV drip. No problems there. I have heard many horror stories about cytotec, a pill inserted into the cervix to cause dialation. Avoid that if possible. Read the following:

      Risks for Mother

      *

      Increases risk for uterine hyperstimulation.
      *

      Increases risk of uterine rupture.
      *

      Once administered, its effects cannot be stopped.
      *

      No standard safe, effective dose.
      *

      Use of cytotec for labor stimulation is not approved by the FDA.
      *

      Requires continuous monitoring of baby's heart rate which decreases mobility.

      Risks for Baby

      *

      Uterine hyperstimulation can cause abnormal fetal heart rate.
      *

      Increased rates of meconium-stained fluids.

      Cytotec Controversy

      Cytotec for inducing labor is an off-label use. This means the medication, though approved by the FDA, was never approved for use during labor. However, once a medication is approved by the FDA doctors can prescribe it for other things as well. This off-label use of cytotec has lead to some very strong objection among the birth community. Many caregivers feel the use of a medication in labor before it has been studied for safety is unethical.

      So over all, I say there is nothing to fear for an induction, especially using pitocin. But try some "at home" remedies before hand.... Sex, eating spicy food, etc. They are just old wives tales, but it certainly doesn't hurt to try!

  14. QUESTION:
    What can go wrong during Labour & Child Birth?
    What are things that can go bad/wrong during labour & childbirth and how does it affect? and what are illness you get during pregnancy?

    • ANSWER:
      Lots of things can go wrong and unfortunately, some of them are caused by hospital interventions. Not eating during labor can cause you to become too weak to push the baby out and lead to a c-sec. Lying on your back during labor can cause fetal distress. Pitocin used to induce labor can cause fetal distress or even uterine rupture. All these problems can be prevented by having a natural birth.
      There are also some problems which can occur anyway; such as prolapsed cord, breech birth, and heavy bleeding postpartum. Other problems can happen postpartum such as, thyroid crisis, stroke, retained placenta, or infection.

  15. QUESTION:
    Is trying for a baby 6 months after a c-section for the first ok? Are there more risks? Can I do a VBAC?
    I have had one daughter on 10/29/05 and am wanting to try for a second sooner because it took us 2 years and 2 miscarriages to get her. I had a c-section due to her having an infection in utero and being in distress suring labor and would like to have a vaginal birth next time around. I am wondering if it is ok to attempt trying to conceive and a vaginal birth after cesearean so soon?
    My husband any my plan is to try to conceive in June/July, which would make Kenna about 6-7 months old! :)

    • ANSWER:
      Both my sons were born by c-section. I was going to try for a VBAC with my second son, but the risks are far to great for me. My husband and i went through 2 miscarraiegs in the passed, and lost our first to SIDS, so we didnt want to take any risks during the delivary of our second.

      The risk of uterine rupture would be great if you became pregnant this soon after having a c-section. And uterine rupture could cause serious effects, such as you never being able to have children again, or even death to you or the baby. I know this sounds scary, but tis true, and its bestter to be informed than not. Becoming pregnant may be an issue, but it is better to wait to become pregnant, then rush it and risk complications. Becoming pregnant this soon would also put a big starin on your body.

      Conceiving again before you've fully recovered from a recent pregnancy and c-section delivery, (the average amount of time is 6-12 months), puts enouhg strain on your body without your adding the debilitating effects of worry. Though conception in the first 3 months postpartum is rare, it ovbiously can haapen.

      Still, studies indicate that 2 to 2.5 years is the medically ideal space between pregnancies. So, its essential to be aware of the toll 2 closely spaced pregnancies can take, and to do everything possible to compensate, including:

      -Getting the best prenatal care, starting as soon as you think you are pregnant. And you should be scrupulous about following the practitioner's orders and not missing appointments.

      -Following a good diet. It's possible your body has not had a chance to rebuild its stores and you may still be at a nutritional disadvantage, particularly if you are nursing. You may need to overcompensate nutrionally to be sure both you and the baby you are carrying will not be deprived. Pay particular attention to protein ( have at least 75 grams or 3 servings daily), and iron ( you should probablly take a supplement).

      -Adequate weight gain. Your new fetus doesn't care whether or not you've had time to shed the extra pounds from the previous pregnancy. The 2 of you need the same 25-35 pound weight gain during this pregnancy. So dont even think about losing weight, not even early on. A careful monitored gradual weight gain will be relatively easy to take off afterwards, particularly if it was gained on the highest-quality diet. Be certain, too, that you dont let lack of time or energy keep you from eating enough. Feeding and caring for hte child you already have shouldnt keep you from feeding and caring the child you are carrying. Watch your weight gain carefully, and if youre not progressing as you should, monitor your calorie intake more closely.

      -Rest. You need more than may be humanly possible. Getting it will require not only your own determination, but help from others such as a spouse, friends, relatives- who should take over as much of the cooking, housework, and baby care as possible. Set priorities: let less important chores or work go undone, and force yourself to lie down when your baby is napping. If your not breastfeeding, finding a babysitter may help.

      -Exercise. But just enough to keep you in shape and relax you, not enough to overtax you. If you cant seem to find the time for a regualr pregnancy exercise routine, build physical activity into your day with your baby, like going for walks.

      -Eliminating or minimizing all other pregnancy risk factors, such as smokin, drinking, heavy lifting. Your body and the baby in your womb shouldn't be subjected to any additional stress.

  16. QUESTION:
    If you have a high risk pregnancy is there a higher chance you may need a c-section?
    I am very high risk and I will be on bed rest towards the end of my pregnancy. I really want to give birth naturally.... ;

    • ANSWER:
      Let me research this for you so you can get the right answer and put your mind at ease♥

      Yours is a high risk pregnancy and your doctor has advised you to undergo a C-section. Now this has got you worried.

      Sure, it is a surgery and has risks associated with it. But a little homework could help you ease out the unnecessary worrying.

      A c-section is usually recommended when there is a problem with either the baby's development or the mother's health. For instance, if:

      You have problems with your placenta… if the placenta covers the opening of your cervix, known as placenta previa, or if the placenta detaches itself from the uterus, known as placental abruption.
      You have a breech baby.
      Your baby is lying horizontally across the uterus.
      Your labour isn't progressing or there are no labour pains at all.
      You are carrying multiple babies. " Your baby's heart beat is abnormal or the baby shows stress.
      Your baby is large. Some babies can be too big to be delivered vaginally.
      You have had a previous c-section with a vertical scar on the uterus that poses a danger of uterine rupture with a labour.
      Your baby has developmental problems, like retarded growth.
      You have health problems like hypertension, diabetes, heart or lung disease, AIDS, etc.
      Risks During Surgery

      If the surgery is not handled carefully, there are chances of the baby getting hurt or cut. However, this is very rare.

      For the mother, there is a chance of increased bleeding during surgery. It is very rare, but the surgery can be fatal for the mother as well.

      Post-Surgical Complications

      Post surgery, you can develop an infection in the incision, uterus or in other nearby organs.

      The painkillers and the anaesthesia administered during surgery can cause side-effects like nausea and dizziness.

      If administered incorrectly, some of the anaesthetic drugs could harm the baby and make him sluggish or inactive. An overdose can also cause mental retardation.

      The baby could also develop breathing problems.

      Precautions Post Surgery

      For the first 48 hours post-surgery; both mother and child are kept in observation.

      Since the incision is fresh and will take time to heal, you will be advised only semi-solid food.

      Do not bend or scratch the stitches. Keep the area clean and change the incision dressing once in every four days.

      You can take regular baths without any fear of affecting the wound, since there are waterproof dressings available.

      There are no specific precautions while caring for the baby. If your child develops any complications during surgery, you will be advised appropriately by your gynaecologist.

      Some Common Misconceptions About C-sections

      "Once a c-section, always a c-section."

      This is not true. If you underwent a c-section in any of your previous pregnancies, it is not necessary that the next pregnancy will also end in c-section. It will depend upon the nature and position of the incision from the previous surgery.

      If there are no indications of complications, you can deliver naturally.

      "C-section is better than vaginal delivery."

      A c-section is always considered a secondary option to a natural delivery. It is recommended only in emergency cases.

      Going for an elective c-section (a planned c-section, where the due date is identified and the baby is delivered through surgery) therefore is not a good option.

      "C-section is Pain Free."

      You may not feel the pain during the surgery. However, post operation the pain is immense and can last for a few days.

      One has to remember that a c-section is not a painless alternative to vaginal delivery. It is a major surgical procedure with its associated risks and complications.

      Prepare Yourself

      If there are any concerns during your pregnancy that indicates a c-section, speak with your gynaecologist. Be sure to understand all the risks and benefits associated with it.

      Involve your family. Educate them about the surgery and the post operation precautions. Their support is crucial.

  17. QUESTION:
    I just found out my baby is breech at 36 weeks. My doctor is recommending an external cephalic version.?
    Does anyone know how this feels or the complications that might arise?

    • ANSWER:
      http://www.mother-care.ca/breech.htm
      # What are her options in regard to External Version?

      In Obstetric Myths Versus Research Realities by Henci Goer even labor is not too late to attempt an external version.

      External cephalic version for breech presentation is performed at about thirty seven to thirty eight weeks gestation. Most obstetricians skilled in this procedure report an approximate 50 percent success ratio and although there are several supportive studies in medical literature, this procedure has not received widespread acceptance.

      The iatrogenic (doctor caused) results of this procedure may include uterine rupture, premature placental separation, fetal-maternal hemorrhage and failure.

      How External Version is Done:

      An ultrasound diagnosis is done first to confirm fetal presentation and position, and to visualize the site of placental attachment. A non-stress test is routinely performed before and following the version attempt to confirm the well-being of the baby. A tocolytic drug such as Ritodrine, Terbulatine or Relaxin is administered to the Mom to relax the uterine muscle and reduce the risk of preterm labour contractions. The ultrasound is then continued for guidance and to monitor the fetal heart rate as the physician attempts to move the baby by pressing and pushing on the abdomen. Occasionally an epidural is given to both relax the mother and lessen the pain of the external version, but if done correctly, the Mother should only experience mild discomfort.

      Should the baby show signs of distress, the procedure is immediately stopped and in the rare circumstance where the placenta starts to separate during the version or the baby’s distress continues, an emergency cesarean section may be performed. A successful version does not guarantee the baby will remain in the vertex position, but the benefit is that it lowers the cesarean rate for breech presentations.

      http://www.americanpregnancy.org/labornbirth/breechpresentation.html
      Chiropractic Care: The late Larry Webster, D.C., of the International Chiropractic Pediatric Association, developed a technique which enabled chiropractors to release stress on the pregnant woman's pelvis and cause relaxation to the uterus and surrounding ligaments. The relaxed uterus would make it easier for a breech baby to turn naturally. The technique is known as the Webster Breech Technique.

      The Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics reported in the July/August 2002 issue that 82% of doctors using the Webster Technique reported success. Further, the results from the study suggest that it may be beneficial to perform the Webster Technique in the 8th month of pregnancy.
      Natural Techniques:

      The following two techniques often suggested by physical therapist, Penny Simkin, are things you can try at home for free, with no risks involved.

      The Breech Tilt: Raise hips 12" or 30cm off the floor using large, solid pillows three times daily for 10-15 minutes each time. This is best done on an empty stomach, and at a time when your baby is active. Concentrate on your baby and not tensing your body, especially in the abdominal area.

      Using Music: We know that babies can hear sounds outside the womb, so many women have used music or taped recordings of their voice to try to get their baby to move towards the noise! Headphones placed on the lower part of your abdomen, playing either music or your voice, has encouraged babies to move towards the sounds and out of the breech position.

      There are also homeopathic remedies that women have found to be successful in breech situations. Contact your local holistic practitioner about the use of Moxibustion or Pulsatilla in turning breech babies naturally.

      http://www.breechbaby.info/approaches.html
      External Cephalic Version (ECV)

      This is the most frequently practiced turning technique in the West, although it is rather infrequently practiced in the United States . It consists of manually turning the baby by placing hands on the outside of the mom’s belly. Sometimes the mom is given tocolysis to relax the musculature so the turning is thought to be easier. Results are fairly good with this technique and some studies report success in turning does not have to do with level of experience of the person turning the baby. Some physicians and some midwives know how to perform this procedure.

      My perspective is that this procedure is borne from the paradigm of body as machine. The assumption motivating this technique is that something (i.e. the baby) is in the wrong place and should be placed right. My approach is that there are many reasons why the baby may appear to be in the wrong place and rather than simply putting the baby right, a more appropriate solution is to remove the barriers to the baby turning her/himself. I believe removing the barriers to turning may actually help the baby on her/his life course journey whereas simply manipulating position does nothing to resolve underlying issues. Additionally, ECV may occasionally result in adverse side effects such as hemorrhage or fetal heart rate decelerations necessitating immediate cesarean. No deleterious side-effects have been reported in the literature for any of the other interventions presented here.
      Acupuncture or Moxibustion

      Both acupuncture and moxibustion work to balance the chi (i.e. “vital energy”) of the body. Acupuncture balances the chi by inserting needles into specific points on the meridians. Moxibustion balances the chi by stimulating acupuncture points with a hot herb. The studies on acupuncture or moxibustion for breech presentation show treated breech babies become more active and are more likely to turn than are babies who are not treated.
      Webster’s Technique/Bagnell’s Technique

      These chiropractic techniques are very similar and conceptually approach breech presentation as a mechanical problem, although I believe possibly a greater effect is that of regulating the autonomic nervous system. These approaches posit that the baby is not turning due to maternal pelvic constraints. These approaches gently manipulate the pelvis and evaluate relevant connective tissue structures such as the round ligaments. Bagnell’s Technique includes evaluation and treatment of the first cervical vertebrae also.

      While manipulation does help to normalize joint alignment and function, it also helps to optimize autonomic nervous system balance presumably thus allowing turning to occur and vertex presentation birthing.

  18. QUESTION:
    chances and signs of uterine rupture after 3 sections?
    im very worried about having a uterine rupture at home.im 34 weeks pregnant and i am going in for my 4th c section.is there anything that will cause this to happen or signs i should look for that it is happening?what r the odds of this happening?

    • ANSWER:
      It's very unlikely to happen at all, let alone at home. the only real chance would be during labour and even that is not very likely, less than 5%. Good Luck!

  19. QUESTION:
    Does being 5'1" increase your chances of having a c-section?

    I dont think height has anything to do with it either. My sister in law had to have a c-section yesterday, she couldn't get past 3 cm dialated, and for some reason thinks that her height is responsible for the c-section.

    • ANSWER:
      height is not a major factor of delivering in c-section way. here are the most cases where a c-section is necessary:

      1.the baby isn't fitting through the birth canal --
      causes of this include a large baby or a small pelvis, or poor contraction strength. The most common cause is a change in the baby's position, such that he presents a larger diameter of his head to the birth canal and doesn't fit through. For example, it may be something as simple as the baby's head being tipped to one side. This explains why a woman can need a cesarean for one baby and subsequently fit a larger baby through without problems. Technical terms for the reasons in this category include failure to progress in labor, arrested active phase, failure of descent, and cephalo-pelvic disproportion (CPD.)

      2. placenta previa --
      placenta previa (where the placenta lies across the internal opening of the cervix) may be diagnosed at the time of routine ultrasound or if there is vaginal bleeding in the second or third trimester. If the placenta continues to cover the cervical opening (also called the internal os of the cervix), cesarean is necessary to safely deliver the baby.

      3. previous cesarean --
      there was a time when doctors lived by the dictum "Once a cesarean, always a cesarean." When that rule was established, cesareans were less common, and involved a large vertical incision in the uterus that created a weak spot right where the contractions were strongest. The risk of uterine rupture (the scar in the uterus popping open) during a subsequent pregnancy was significant.
      Nowadays, most cesareans are done crossways, in the lower, less contractile part of the uterus. In these "low transverse" cesareans, the risk of uterine rupture is low, and most physicians believe that vaginal birth after cesarean (VBAC) is a safe option, maybe even safer than repeat cesarean.
      Note that the incision in the skin may not go the same direction as the incision in the uterus, and it is the uterine incision that determines the risk of uterine rupture.

      4. the baby isn't coming head first --
      breech babies (coming bottom-first instead of head-first) are often delivered by cesarean section, depending on technical considerations including the baby's size and position of the baby's legs and head, and the obstetrician's experience with vaginal delivery of breech babies.
      Cesarean is always done if the baby is in transverse lie (lying sideways in the uterus) because this position is associated with significant risk of complications if the baby is born vaginally, including injury to the baby and cord prolapse.

      5. infections in the birth canal --
      cesarean is often done to protect the baby if the mother has active genital herpes, or other infections, like untreated human immuno-deficiency virus (HIV), which can be transmitted during delivery.

      6. the baby needs to be delivered quickly --
      emergency delivery can be necessary in fetal distress, in umbilical cord prolapse, in some cases of placental abruption or occasionally if the mother is seriously ill.

      7. requested by the patient

      i am 5feet in height and it has nothing to do with me delivering my baby in c-section last year. mine was because of placenta previa and the baby need to be delivered quickly because of cord coil.

      i guess you should have asked the doctor why. or better yet ask your sister in law, the patients are usually informed why they will be undergoing such major surgery.

  20. QUESTION:
    sex before and after a woman gives birth?
    does it still feel the same for the guy? will it be as t*ght as before? i do apologize for the straightforward questions. i do not know how to ask them otherwise. me and my wife are deciding if we should get her to have a natural birth or cesarrian... she wants cesarrian, i want natural. could anyone please shed light on this? thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      i had a c-section so I don't know.

      I did watch one of those plastic surgery shows before, and a woman had her labia's reduced because of having so much children they were stretched out and caused pain when they were tugged durring sex.

      My C-section was not planned.
      Don't let the sex issue though let it be a reason for your wife to go this route. If there's one draw back to think about isthat she'll have a scar. I don't know if it will be as tight as before, but you think about it.... many couples have multiple children after the fact of having had natural births, so sex must still be good?

      Congrats to you and your wife.

      ok I have an edit. I have to since reading the edit of the lady who had 4 c-sections.
      Yes...I would have not trade my c-section because I needed it. It was a horrible labor because of the postion of the baby, my hip to head relation to the baby's head was off and most importantly, my child was lacking oxygen which made a c-section not a choice, but a necssitity and if your wife has a c-section, it should be for necessity.
      Yes, the scar is below the panty line, but it is there to see when she is in the nude in front of you.
      My incisional line, I had ghost pains for many months after.
      I could not get out of bed to take care my baby at night after giving birth because it felt like my abdomen was going to rip apart, so my husband for 2 weeks had that duty....Believe me, you would want to share this duty with your wife.

      Most importantly, it's a natural human right, to give birth naturaly(if you can), the joyous occassion in that....seeing your child to gether, cutting the cord,....and whatever comes after. I don't know, I was knocked out by morphine right after for hours so I missed out on that. I didn't get to do the first bath, etc...feed my child.... Of course, I was in labor for 2 days as well I could help but sleep.

      My second delivery was by choice, because V-bac's are now conscidered an risk of uterine rupture. Some doctor's may do v-bacs, but with medical law suits on the rise, you may not get this option. So if you have another child and want to experience a natural birth....you may miss that chance.

      Do c-section only if your wife/child needs it.

      again....
      congrats!

      2nd edit.
      I hate to do this...
      Yes, you can cut the cord....dad doesn't miss out, Mom does! Both do miss the natural birthing process. It is a natural life process. Squshed heads-the heads round off eventualy. If they didn't, we'd have a lot of cone heads among us. Which babies are prettier, the c-sectioned or vag....they all are.

      It's a surgical procedure...you've heard the pro's, but another con is such as the v-bac---though low---uterine rupture during pregnacy/or unexpected early labor if your wife goes into labor before her next scheduled procedure.

      And there is endometriosis that can occur having had previous c-sections because of surgical scarring. Not everyone may get, but I had gotton it. It can be very painfull, and debilitating. When it does happen, I go into tears. You would not want your wife to experience this. It doesn't compare to the normal menstrual cramps. I can't even walk when it happens.
      Run "endometriosis cesarean" on the yahoo search engine and read up it.

      I really think you question is a good one and not at all profound. . I will admit, I had the same question myself while I was pregnant.

      I will say My surgical procedure to have my children all went without a glich. I had an awesome doctor.

      Good luck

      I really do hope you get the answer you are looking for though.

  21. QUESTION:
    what are some signs of having an infection in my uterous?
    i had a baby jan 7th and then 4 days after i had a d&c........but i tink i might hvae an infection...what are some signs? and what would happen if i did have an infection??

    • ANSWER:
      Immediately after delivery, the woman's temperature often increases. A temperature of 101° F (38.3° C) or higher during the first 12 hours after delivery could indicate an infection but usually does not. Nonetheless, in such cases, the woman should be evaluated by her doctor or midwife. A postpartum infection is usually diagnosed after 24 hours have passed since delivery and the woman has had a temperature of 100.4° F (38° C) or higher on two occasions at least 6 hours apart. Postpartum infections are rare, because doctors try to prevent or treat conditions that can lead to infections. However, infections may be serious. Thus, if a woman has a temperature of more than 100.4° F at any time during the first week after delivery, she should call the doctor.

      Postpartum infections may be directly related to delivery (occurring in the uterus or the area around the uterus) or indirectly related (occurring in the kidneys, bladder, breasts, or lungs).

      Infections of the Uterus

      Postpartum infections usually begin in the uterus. If an infection of the membranes containing the fetus (amniotic sac) caused a fever during labor, an infection of the uterine lining (endometritis), uterine muscle (myometritis), or areas around the uterus (parametritis) may result.

      Causes and Symptoms

      Bacteria that normally live in the healthy vagina can cause an infection after delivery. Conditions that make a woman more likely to develop to infection include anemia, preeclampsia (see Pregnancy at High-Risk: Preeclampsia), repeated vaginal examinations, a delay of longer than 18 hours between rupture of the membranes and delivery, prolonged labor, a cesarean section, placental fragments remaining in the uterus after delivery, and excessive bleeding after delivery (postpartum hemorrhage).

      Symptoms commonly include paleness, chills, headache, a general feeling of illness or discomfort, and loss of appetite. The heart rate is rapid, and the number of white blood cells is abnormally high. The uterus is swollen, tender, and soft. Typically, there is a malodorous discharge from the vagina, which varies in amount.

      When the tissues around the uterus are infected, they swell, holding the swollen, tender uterus rigidly in place. The woman has severe pain and a high fever.

      The abdominal lining can become inflamed, causing peritonitis. Blood clots may form in the pelvic veins, causing pelvic thrombophlebitis. A blood clot may travel to the lung and block an artery there, causing pulmonary embolism. Poisonous substances (toxins) produced by the infecting bacteria may reach high levels in the bloodstream, leading to toxic shock. In toxic shock, blood pressure falls dramatically and the heart rate is very rapid. Toxic shock may result in severe kidney damage and even death.

      Diagnosis and Treatment

      An infection is usually diagnosed based on results of a physical examination. Samples of urine, blood, and the vaginal discharge are cultured for bacteria.

      If the uterus is infected, the woman is usually given an antibiotic intravenously until she has had no fever for 48 hours. For a few days afterward, she may be given antibiotics by mouth.

  22. QUESTION:
    What can cause maternal death or death during childbirth?

    • ANSWER:
      it is not very common these days in most countries to encounter this however the conditions that arise during birth that can cause maternal death are as follows

      1) Placental Abruption causing severe blood loss
      2) bacterial infections
      3) Uterine rupture causing severe blood loss
      4) Amniotic Fluid Embolus( usually not during labor, but during the pregnancy the death would occur)
      5) reactions to medications given during labor (pain medications etc)
      6) obstruction, as in the child cannot fit through the birth canal and a c-section isn't performed, usually this causes an infection when the water has already broken.

      hope this helps
      6)

  23. QUESTION:
    does the baby die in the Secret Life of the American Teenager?
    Does the baby die in The Secret Life of the American Teenager episode 8?

    Watch this-Amy says,'' I have a complication'' http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GhIxyixDnEA

    Does anybody know what happens in episode 8?

    Please answer!
    I'm dying to know!
    Thanks in advance!

    • ANSWER:
      Just because she's going to be having a complication doesn't mean that the baby is going to die. Amy also never said it was a complication about her pregnancy - it could be a different complication that was edited in a dramatic way to seem like it was relevant to her pregnancy. I think that Amy is going to end up staying in school despite her pregnancy because in the trailer Grace says, "People are going to be able to look at her and tell that she's pregnant." - why would Grace say that if Amy were going to go live with her grandma? People would be able to look at Amy and tell that she's pregnant, but they will be people that don't know Amy or go to school with her so why would Grace care about something so silly? There is also another clip in that trailer where Amy is sitting on a bench with Ben - perhaps on the school grounds - why would Amy go back to school to talk to Ben if everyone was already suspecting she was pregnant? The ending of the trailer also says that the story is just beginning - haha - if the baby died wouldn't that mean the story was ending? That's just my prediction, though.

      Anyways, if the complication is about her pregnancy it could be a number of things..........

      -the umbilical cord could be wrapped around the baby's neck.

      -Amniotic fluid complications (Too much or too little amniotic fluid in the membranes surrounding the fetus may indicate a problem with the pregnancy. Too much fluid can put excessive pressure on the mother's uterus, leading to preterm labor, or can cause pressure on the mother's diaphragm leading to breathing difficulties. Fluids tend to build up in cases of uncontrolled diabetes, multiple pregnancy, incompatible blood types, or birth defects. Too little fluid may indicate birth defects, growth retardation, or stillbirth.)

      -Bleeding during the pregnancy. (Bleeding in late pregnancy may be a sign of placental complications or a vaginal or cervical infection.) However, Amy isn't in the late stages of pregnancy so I doubt that could be it.

      -Ectopic pregnancy. (An ectopic pregnancy is the development of the fetus outside of the uterus. An ectopic pregnancy can occur in the fallopian tubes, cervical canal, or the pelvic or abdominal cavity. The cause of an ectopic pregnancy is usually a blocked fallopian tube. The risk of ectopic pregnancy is increased in women who have had tubal sterilization procedures, especially for women younger than age 30 at the time of sterilization. Ectopic pregnancies occur in about one out of 50 pregnancies and can be very dangerous to the mother. Symptoms may include spotting and cramping. The longer an ectopic pregnancy continues, the greater the likelihood that a fallopian tube will rupture. An ultrasound may confirm the diagnosis. Treatment of an ectopic pregnancy may include medication or surgical removal of the fetus, resulting in an early termination of the pregnancy.)

      -Miscarriage (A miscarriage is the loss of the fetus up to 12 weeks of pregnancy. Most miscarriages occur in the first 12 weeks of pregnancy and are usually due to fetal abnormalities.) If Amy had a miscarriage it would ruin the plot of the show. This show isn't about the "secret life of american teenagers" - it's about the secret life of PREGNANT teenagers and the stress they go through.

      -Placental Abruption (Sometimes the placenta becomes detached from the uterine wall prematurely leading to bleeding and a reduction of oxygen and nutrients to the fetus. The detachment may be complete or partial, and the cause of placental abruption is often unknown. Placental abruption occurs in about one in every 120 live births.)

      -Placenta Previa (Normally, the placenta is located in the upper part of the uterus. However, placenta previa is a condition in which the placenta is attached close to or covering the cervix.)

      -Preeclampsia/eclampsia. (Preeclampsia, also called toxemia, is a condition characterized by pregnancy-induced high blood pressure, protein in the urine, and swelling due to fluid retention. Eclampsia is the more severe form of this condition, which can lead to seizures, coma, or death. The cause of preeclampsia is unknown, but it is more common in first pregnancies. It affects about seven to ten percent of all pregnant women. Other risk factors for preeclampsia include the following: a woman carrying multiple fetuses, a teenage mother, a woman older than 40, a woman with pre-existing high blood pressure, diabetes, and/or kidney disease.) This could very well be what Amy has, considering she's a teenage mother and that increases her risk. I also read a story in a tabloid that this is the complication that Jamie Lynn Spears had (toxemia) when she had her baby. Best of luck!

  24. QUESTION:
    Is this signs that the baby is about to be here?
    I am 36wks and 5 days i have been feeling presure pushing down and i have been having craps like im going to start my period is the signs of my body getting ready to have the baby? I have not been able to have sex for about 2 or more months because of the babys headand when i try it feels like im ganna start my period.

    • ANSWER:
      Probably every woman who tells you about her labor experience, tells you a different story. Your delivery will be just as unique. However, the following information will prepare you for when “Labor Day” is just around the corner.

      Six Signs that Labor is Within a Few Weeks or Days:

      1. Lightening: You can breathe again! This is an indication that the baby has dropped, settling deeper into your pelvis and relieving some of the pressure on your diaphragm, so you are not so short of breath. You may feel increased pressure on your bladder, which means more trips to the bathroom. Others may comment on your changed appearance, although you might not be aware of it at all.

      2. Bloody show: Loss of mucus plug. During pregnancy, a thick plug of mucus protects your cervical opening from bacteria entering the uterus. When your cervix begins to thin and relax, this plug is expelled. Some women think the plug will look solid like a cork, but it is actually stringy mucus or discharge. It can be clear, pink or blood tinged and can appear minutes, hours or even days before labor begins. Not all women notice this sign.

      3. Rupture of membranes: Your water breaks! Only 1 in 10 woman experience a dramatic gush of the amniotic fluid and even then it usually happens at home, often in bed. Sometimes the amniotic sac breaks or leaks before labor begins. Your uterus is sitting directly on top of your bladder, which can cause you to leak urine. Sometimes it can be quite difficult to distinguish urine from amniotic fluid.

      If your membranes have ruptured and you are leaking amniotic fluid, it will be an odorless fluid. This can occur with a sudden gush or a constant trickle. If you notice fluid leaking, you need to try to determine if it smells like urine or if it is odorless. If it does not seem to be urine, you would want to contact your health care provider.

      Until you see your physician or midwife do not use tampons, have sexual intercourse or do anything that would introduce bacteria to your vagina. Let your health care provider know if the fluid is anything other than clear and odorless, particularly if it's green or foul smelling, because this could be a sign of infection.

      4. Nesting: Spurt of energy. For most of your pregnancy you have probably been fighting the urge to take a nap, so you'll know when you experience this. One day you will wake up feeling full of energy! You'll start making a long list of things to do, things to clean, things to buy and everything you've put off doing will become a high priority. In all your preparations, don't forget that “Labor Day” may be just around the corner so save some energy.

      5. Effacement: Thinning of the cervix. Usually in the last month the cervix begins to stretch and thin. This process means the lower segment of the uterus is getting ready for delivery. A thin cervix will also allow the cervix to dilate more easily.

      Your health care provider may check for effacement in the final 2 months of pregnancy. Effacement is measured in percentages. You may hear your helath care provider say,“You are 25% effaced, 50% effaced, 75%...” The Braxton Hicks contractions or “practice contractions” you have been experiencing may play a part in the effacement process. You will not be able to determine your effacement process, this can only be done by a health care provider's exam.

      6. Dilation: Opening of the cervix. Dilation is the process of the cervix opening in preparation for childbirth. Dilation is measured in centimeters or, less accurately, in “fingers” during an internal (manual) pelvic exam. “Fully dilated” means you're at 10 centimeters and are ready to give birth. In the same way that your health care provider may be checking for effacement in the last 2 months, your health care provider may also tell you how many centimeters your cervix has dilated.
      One SURE Sign Labor is Really Happening:

      Consistent Contractions: When you begin to experience regular uterine contractions, this is the strongest indication that you are in labor. This is a good time to get out your notebook to record the exact time each one begins and how long they last. These contractions may feel like menstrual cramps or a lower backache that comes and goes, and during early labor they may be as far apart as 20 to 30 minutes. Over the course of several hours your contractions will typically begin occurring at shorter intervals; and you may notice they start happening every 10-15 minutes or less. When your contractions are consistently 5 minutes apart, it is time to call your health care provider.
      Labor Contractions Have the Following Characteristics:

      * They are regular
      * They follow a predictable pattern (such as every eight minutes)
      * They become progressively closer
      * They last progressively longer
      * They become progressively stronger
      * Each contraction is felt first in the lower back and then radiates around to the front or visa versa
      * A change in act

  25. QUESTION:
    What is the process of induction?
    How do they start, what are the pros and cons
    I am due th 17th being induced the 19th. I have been dialated to 1 cm for over a month now. Last week I had to have stress test done, i think that is why he doesnt want to wait to long to induce me.

    • ANSWER:
      There are several ways they can induce labor. (Foley catheters, IV pitocin, breaking your water etc..).. It kind of depends on your cervix and how ripe it is. The most common induction now days is to hospitalize you the night before. They insert a prostaglandin suppository up near the cervix. This can cause some contractions and sometimes even start labor. It's purpose is to get the cervix ready by softening and ripening it so that it will dilate easier. (This is an artificial means of doing what your body will eventually do normally on its own). The next morning, the doctor will check your cervix and if your not contracting (or not in a good pattern, or strong enough) your doctor will start the IV drip of oxytocin (Pitocin).

      The pros and cons are as follows:
      Pro - You can pretty much be sure your baby will be born the day that the pit starts.
      The con to that is - it may be born via cesarean, because inductions do not always cause your cervix to dilate. Your doctor will break your water and there won't be any turning back.

      Pro- your labor may go faster than a natural labor
      The con to that is that it won't feel like a normal labor. Your contractions will be much harder, sometimes longer, and you may experience more double peaks. Pain medication is almost always requested with an epidural - which also has risks. Somtimes the epidural doesn't work very well at all!

      List of cons:: (cause there simply are more cons - sorry)..

      ~You will need continuous fetal monitoring so you will have to stay in bed - which can cause contractions to hurt more

      ~Pitocin use increases the possibility of a uterine rupture.

      ~Pitocin use increases the likelihood of depressed fetal heart rate patterns. Sometimes a baby can't tolerate the stress of the heavy-duty contractions. When this happens they usually place an internal monitor. (The baby gets a one screwed into his scalp to monitor his fetal heart tones, and you will get one placed in your uterus to gauge contractions better). After about 5 hours of this monitoring, you are at about 50% risk of getting an infection - so you might need antibiotics.

      ~Pitocin is a synthetic form of oxytocin, that your body would produce during normal labor. This hormone made in your body is known as 'the love hormone'. It has many benefits during labor but is especially known to help with immediate bonding and breastfeeding. When artificial (or Pitocin) hormones are used, you do not get these benefits.

      Pro: Induction beats a cesarean when birth should happen soon for sound medical reasons.
      The con is that inductions are done way to frequently without good medical reason

      Links for further research:
      http://hencigoer.com/articles/elective_induction/#table_1

      http://www.transitiontoparenthood.com/ttp/parented/pregnancy/induction.htm

      http://pregnancy.about.com/b/2007/05/04/deadly-risk-of-induction.htm

  26. QUESTION:
    What are all the causes of a pre-mature birth?

    • ANSWER:
      Premature birth Causes
      Some women who go into preterm labor do so for unknown reasons. Other women may have a medical condition that contributes to early labor, such as:

      -Ruptured amniotic sac. Normally, the fluid-filled sac that surrounds your baby in the womb ruptures during labor or just before labor begins. But sometimes the sac may rupture for no apparent reason weeks or even months before your due date. In that case, there's a high risk that labor will begin within a few days. A ruptured amniotic sac also increases the risk of infection for both you and your baby.
      -Certain infections. Infections of the cervix or urinary tract are associated with preterm rupture of the membranes and preterm labor.
      -Weak cervix. In a normal pregnancy, the cervix softens late in pregnancy and opens (dilates) in response to uterine contractions. But for some women, the cervix opens earlier — perhaps due to the weight of the baby and amniotic fluid. This problem can be associated with previous surgery involving the cervix, such as a dilation and curettage (D and C) or a cone biopsy. It's somewhat more likely to occur when you're pregnant with twins or other multiples.
      -Certain chronic diseases. Diseases such as high blood pressure, diabetes, kidney disease and lupus may increase the risk of preterm labor. If complications arise, labor may need to be induced early.
      -Uterine abnormalities. An abnormally shaped uterus may increase the risk of preterm labor.
      -A previous premature delivery. Women who've had a premature delivery are at higher risk of preterm labor. For many women, though, early labor happens only once.
      -Substance abuse. These include smoking, drinking alcohol or using illicit drugs.
      -Malnutrition. Women who are undernourished or anemic are more likely to give birth prematurely.
      -Excess amniotic fluid. Too much amniotic fluid can contribute to early labor.

  27. QUESTION:
    39 weeks pregnant period like blood discharge?
    Hi ,

    I was having a watery discharge last night and had light discharge through out the day, i called my doctor she said its normal. Now Im having period like discharge and light pain.
    Is this the mucous plug , do i have to hospital now?

    • ANSWER:
      Actual blood like a period, could be very bad. It could mean you have a ruptured placenta. This is a cause of hemorrhage during labor. It can mean a lot of blood loss for you, and distress for your baby, due to less oxygen, etc. The baby is supposed to be born BEFORE the placenta detaches from the uterine wall.

      If it really seems like a period, it could be because you are starting to dilate, and it is allowing that blood through. The more you dilate, the heavier it would get. Or, the more you bleed, the heavier it would get. I would go to your labor & delivery floor, and get checked out.

      A mucous plug is gelatin-like. I mean it's like you're losing big pieces of snot (like if you hawk a loogey). It is stretchy, and it can be TINGED with pink, red, or brown (depending on if it contains old or fresh blood). It is not like a period.

      I really would go to L&D ASAP. If it is not concerning to them, they will let you know. If you are going into labor, congratulations (although, they may still send you home for awhile before admitting you). It is always better to be safe than sorry.

      Also, yes, the watery discharge could mean your water already broke and is leaking, in which case they like to deliver the baby within 24 hours after you notice it (due to a risk of infection once the barrier between the baby and the outside world of germs is no longer present).

      So, go to the hospital and get checked out!

  28. QUESTION:
    What are the risks of smokeing while you pregant?

    • ANSWER:
      How can smoking harm the newborn?
      Smoking nearly doubles a woman’s risk of having a low-birthweight baby. In 2002, 12.2 percent of babies born to smokers in the United States were of low birthweight (less than 5½ pounds), compared to 7.5 percent of babies of nonsmokers.2 Low birthweight can result from poor growth before birth, preterm delivery or a combination of both. Smoking has long been known to slow fetal growth. Studies also suggest that smoking increases the risk of preterm delivery 37 weeks of gestation). Premature and low-birthweight babies face an increased risk of serious health problems during the newborn period, chronic lifelong disabilities (such as cerebral palsy, mental retardation and learning problems) and even death.

      The more a pregnant woman smokes, the greater the risk to her baby. However, if a woman stops smoking by the end of her first trimester of pregnancy, she is no more likely to have a low-birthweight baby than a woman who never smoked. Even if a woman has not been able to stop smoking in her first or second trimester, stopping during the third trimester can still improve her baby’s growth.

      Can smoking cause pregnancy complications?
      Smoking has been associated with a number of pregnancy complications. Smoking cigarettes appears to double a woman’s risk of developing placental problems. 1 These include placenta previa (low-lying placenta that covers part or all of the opening of the uterus) and placental abruption (in which the placenta peels away, partially or almost completely, from the uterine wall before delivery). Both can result in heavy bleeding during delivery that can endanger mother and baby, although a cesarean delivery can prevent most deaths. Placental problems contribute to the slightly increased risk of stillbirth that is associated with smoking.

      Smoking in pregnancy also appears to increase a woman’s risk of premature rupture of the membranes (PROM) (when the sac inside the uterus that holds the baby breaks before labor begins).1 A woman with PROM may experience a trickle or gush of fluid from her vagina when her water breaks. Usually, she will go into labor within a few hours. When PROM occurs before 37 weeks of pregnancy it is called preterm PROM, and it often results in the birth of a premature baby.

      Does smoking affect fertility?
      Cigarette smoking can cause reproductive problems before a woman even becomes pregnant. Studies show that women who smoke may have more trouble conceiving than nonsmokers.1 Studies suggest that fertility returns to normal after a woman stops smoking.

      Does smoking during pregnancy cause other problems in babies or young children?
      A recent study suggests that babies of mothers who smoke during pregnancy may undergo withdrawal-like symptoms similar to those seen in babies of mothers who use some illicit drugs.3 For example, babies of smokers appear to be more jittery and difficult to soothe than babies of non-smokers.

      Babies whose mothers smoked during pregnancy are up to three times as likely to die from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) as babies of nonsmokers.1

      Can exposure to second-hand smoke during pregnancy harm the baby?
      Studies suggest that babies of women who are regularly exposed to second-hand smoke during pregnancy may have reduced growth and may be more likely to be born with low birthweight. Pregnant women who do not smoke should avoid exposure to other people’s smoke.

  29. QUESTION:
    Ladies out there that had a vbac with thier second?
    I know I asked this question yesterday, i didn't really get the answer I was looking for. Any of you ladies have a vbac birth with your second child? If so how was ur experience, what should I expect?

    God Bless

    • ANSWER:
      I had a VBAC with #2. She was the only one of my three who was head down so I decided to go for it. It was wonderful and the recovery was much better and I could walk around and do whatever like nothing had happened, which was great.

      Every hospital's protocol is different. Mine would not let me walk around and stuff during labor, so I made sure I stayed home as long as I felt comfortable. I labored at home for about four hours and ate something light, like buttered bread, to keep my energy up. I walked around and even went to the store before heading to the hospital LOL so I could get some things for my labor bag. I showed up to the hospital at 6 cm and my water was ready to break.

      Some doctors might suggest giving you Pitocin to get your labor sped up, and personally I would refuse it. It can increase your chance of uterine rupture, especially because they give an unnecessarily high dosage to laboring women to get their labor sped up (like more than twice the dose). I suspect this is why so many women have c-sections in the first place: because the pain is too great and they need an epidural, which might slow things down, or it causes fetal distress. It can also cause shoulder dystocia and basically cause the baby to get 'stuck.' So if you can avoid having that, you'll probably do just fine.

      Good luck and congrats!

  30. QUESTION:
    if you have had gonorrhea does it make it harder for you to get pregnant?
    if you have had gonorrhea, does that mean it's harder for you to get pregnant?

    • ANSWER:
      Women who have gonorrhea during pregnancy tend to have higher rates of miscarriage, infection of the amniotic sac and fluid, preterm birth, and preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM), although prompt treatment reduces the risk of these problems. An untreated gonorrhea infection makes you more susceptible to HIV and some other sexually transmitted infections (STIs), if you're exposed to them, and raises your risk of a uterine infection after you have your baby.

      If you have a gonorrhea infection when you go into labor, you can pass the bacteria to your baby. Gonorrhea in newborns most commonly affects the eyes, and babies may eventually go blind if left untreated.

      The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force strongly recommends – and most states require by law – that all babies be treated with medicated eye drops or ointments soon after birth as a preventive measure. If the mother is known to have gonorrhea or the baby has a gonorrheal eye infection, he'll be treated with systemic antibiotics as well.

      Less often, an untreated gonorrhea infection can spread to other parts of a baby's body, causing problems such as serious blood or joint infections and meningitis.

      For further details please read from the following link:

  31. QUESTION:
    anyone had a Cesarean, were you awake or unconscious when the procedure was done?
    I am not even pregnant but know for medical reasons if I do or when I do get pregnant, i WILL have to give birth this way and just curious how was it

    • ANSWER:
      The normal cesarean procedure will take an average of 45 minutes to an hour. The baby is usually delivered in the first 5-15 minutes and the remainder of time is used for closing the incision.

      Before surgery, you will be given some type of anesthetic (general, spinal, or epidural) if you have not been given one earlier in your labor. General anesthetic is normally only used for emergency cesareans because it is effective immediately and the mother is sedated, but you most likely WILL REMAIN CONCIOUS. The spinal and epidural anesthesia will numb the area from the abdomen to below the waist (sometimes the legs can be numb also), so that nothing can be felt during the procedure. You will probably receive a catheter to collect urine while your lower body is numb.
      The health care provider will make an incision in the abdomen wall first. In an emergency cesarean this will most likely be a vertical incision (from the navel to the pubic area) which will allow the health care provider to deliver the baby faster. The most common incision is made horizontally (often called a bikini cut), just above the pubic bone. The muscles in your stomach will not be cut; they will be pulled apart so that the health care provider can get to the uterus.

      An incision will then be made into the uterus, horizontally or vertically. The same type of incision does not have to be made in both the abdomen and uterus. The classical incision made vertically, is usually reserved for complicated situations such as placenta previa, emergencies, or babies with abnormalities. A vaginal birth after cesarean (VBAC) is not recommended for women with the classical incision. Another type of incision which is rarely used is the lower segment vertical incision. This would only be used if there were problems with the uterus that would not allow another type of incision to be made. The most common incision made is the low transverse incision. This incision has fewer risks and complications than the others and allows most women to attempt a VBAC in their next pregnancy with little risk of uterine rupture.
      The health care provider will suction the amniotic fluid out and then will deliver the baby. Your babies head will be delivered first so that the mouth and nose can be cleaned out to allow for its first breath. Once the whole body is delivered, the baby will be lifted up so that you can meet your newborn. Most health care providers will then pass the baby on to the nurse for evaluation. The last thing to be delivered will be your placenta (you may feel some tugging) and then the surgical team will begin the close up process.
      Once the surgery is over, you may begin to experience some nausea and trembling. This can be caused by the anesthesia, the effects of your uterus contracting, or from an adrenaline let down. This usually passes quickly and can be followed by some drowsiness. If your baby is healthy, this is usually the time when the baby can rest on your chest and you can begin breastfeeding and bonding. You and your baby will continually be monitored for any complications.

      The recovery process for a C-section is usually unpleasant and painful. I would only reccommend this type of birth if it HAS to be done. The healing process is much longer.

  32. QUESTION:
    If/when I get induced can I tell them NOT to use cytotec?
    I might be induced if I dont go into labor soon my OB said (I am 40 weeks and 5 days). I was reading about induction methods and am fine with pitocin but do NOT want cytotec, the new labor inducing drug. Can I tell them to NOT use cytotec on me, and can I specifically request to be put on Pitocin?
    bella: it can cause uterine rupture.

    • ANSWER:
      Any doctor using Cytotec on a pregnant woman for any reason is open to an expensive lawsuit. Mothers and babies are dying from embolisms during labor from doctors using this off label drug to induce birth.

      Contraindication/Possible Adverse Side Effect:
      1. Cytotec has been known to cause tears in the uterus, called uterine rupture and hyperstimulation of the uterus and fetus, (when the uterus contracts too fast, or too many times in a short period of time and when the baby’s heart beat is too fast or to slow) when it is used to induce labor past the 8th week of pregnancy.
      2. Cytotec should never be used if you have had a prior C-section.
      3. Serious reactions include abortion, miscarriage and teratogenicity (fetal malformation). In rare cases it has been known to cause cardiac arrest, anaphylaxis (life-threatening respiratory distress) Myocardial Infarction (MI) (when the blood flow to the heart is stopped) and irregular heartbeat.
      4. Cytotec can also cause AFE-amniotic fluid embolism (amniotic fluid, fetal cells, hair or other debris enter the mother’s circulation, causing cardio-respiratory collapse leading to the death of both mother and baby).
      5. Cytotec is in the FDA pregnancy category “X”, meaning it is known to be harmful to an unborn baby. Death of mothers and babies have been reported with this drug.
      6. Cytotec is a drug approved only for the prevention of ulcers and to treat chronic constipation. Cytotec is being commonly used for early termination of pregnancy and to induce labor, despite not being FDA approved for use in pregnancy. For this reason, there is inadequate data on the risks and benefits of this drug for use in labor.
      http://tatia.org/index.html

      No one can force you to end or terminate your pregnancy for any reason. Inducing because the baby is not yet ready is not a medical indication. Doctors are becoming too impatient and some are trying to get the baby out at 37 weeks for some reason. These babies are dying shortly after birth because of the trauma they are suffering with the induction drugs and the health risks of prematurity.

      No induction is safe or necessary. Each induction puts you and your baby at great risk. Stand up to your OB and say NO. You don't need or want this procedure. You obviously have some knowledge of what some doctors consider good medical practice.

      It is never hospital policy to induce at any day for any reason. It is an impatient mother or doctor making these kind of decisions. Most babies are born 10 days after an estimated due date anyway. Just wait for your labor to begin automatically for the healthiest baby and mom.

      http://web.mac.com/pregnancysecrets/Site/Labor_Signs.html

  33. QUESTION:
    What is it that makes women die during child birth?

    • ANSWER:
      Hemorrhage, infection, inability to give birth, eclampsia, and complications of Cesarean section.

      Sometimes women bleed a lot after childbirth. Nowadays, it's not that big of a deal since doctors can give her medicines to make her blood clot and blood transfusions to replace the lost blood. They can even remove her uterus if that doesn't work. It's pretty much unheard of for a woman to die of hemorrhage in the industrialized world anymore. But in the past, when interventions were unavailable it was very common.

      Doctors didn't use to know that washing your hands and wearing gloves prevented infection. In fact, the first person who suggested it was laughed at. So doctors would go from dissecting a corpse to delivering a baby without washing their hands. And since doctors stick their hands up your vagina during labor to see how far along you are, a lot of women died of infection introduced from their dirty hands.

      And even observing hygiene practices doesn't always prevent infection. Sometimes women will develop infections in modern hospitals. Before doctors had antibiotics, they often died from them. But now, if a woman shows signs of infection during or after labor, she's given antibiotics immediately, and that kills the infection.

      Sometimes babies aren't positioned correctly in the uterus, and it makes it difficult or even impossible for a woman to give birth vaginally. If that is the case, usually the baby and the mother will both die without surgical intervention. In countries where Cesarean section is a viable option, these deaths are rare.

      The cause of eclampsia is still unknown, but it causes seizures, coma, and death in women who develop it. In developed countries, women are usually tested for pre-eclampsia, which can develop into eclampsia, and presents as high blood pressure and extra protein in the urine. If pre-eclampsia progresses to a certain point, labor is induced in the woman and the baby delivered immediately. In underdeveloped countries, however, no testing is done, and a woman may develop eclampsia. And even if pre-eclampsia is diagnosed, many women in poor countries will not be able to have labor induced if necessary.

      Most maternal death in the western world is caused by complications of Cesarean section. C-section involves cutting into a woman's uterus and removing the baby. This is major surgery and carries all the risks of major surgery. Women may develop severe, life-threatening infections from C-sections, or they may develop blood clots from remaining in a lying position after surgery. If the infection is too advanced, antibiotics may not be able to stop it from killing the woman. And if a blood clot is undetected and it travels to a woman's lungs or brain, she could die.

      Furthermore, having a Cesarean section makes subsequent pregnancies riskier. Women who delivered one child by Cesarean section may develop risk factors that make it necessary to have another one, and many doctors require all women to deliver subsequent children with repeat Cesareans. And women who have had Cesareans are more at risk for complications like uterine rupture, placenta previa, and postpartum hemorrhage; all of which are potentially fatal.

      The rising maternal death rates in the United States are do to increased Cesareans and a failure of the medical system. The World Health Organization says that about 15% of children should be delivered by Cesarean section. In the US, close to 40% are. Many doctors are so concerned about potential lawsuits (and they have reason to be--deliveries where something went wrong with the baby can cost hospitals millions of dollars), that they deliver more babies by Cesarean than is necessary.

  34. QUESTION:
    What does it mean when u have a in larged uterus ?

    • ANSWER:
      One of the most important phases, menopause, is not only a time of change, but also the period in the life of a woman which carries with it a threat of impending disorders in her reproductive system, especially during or at the end of the childbearing period and after passing the age of puberty. An enlarged uterus is something that women tend to overlook justifying the increased size of the abdomen as being obesity. It is the beginning of a serious health condition that can be stopped with initial attention paid towards the symptoms and causes of an enlarged uterus.

      Symptoms of an Enlarged Uterus

      There are a few medical conditions that can contribute toward the enlarged uterus symptoms. They can vary in a huge spectrum of symptoms displayed by an enlarged uterus. Abdominal pain, premenstrual syndrome, severe menstrual cramps, back pain, nausea, depression, painful menstruation, and sudden weight gain to name a few are some mild symptoms of an enlarged uterus. The following are some not-to-be-overlooked enlarged uterus symptoms, so take heed.

      Abnormal Menstruation
      Menorrhagia, also known as profuse or prolonged menstrual bleeding is one of the enlarged uterus symptoms that involves passing of blood clots, having a heavy menstrual flow, irregular menstruation, and noticing blood being discharged between the interval of two periods, all these are indicative of symptoms of an enlarged uterus and fibroids. It also leads to severe and sudden anemia and lack of energy due to excessive blood loss.

      Sudden Weight Gain
      Sudden weight gain without any particular reason is one of the prime symptoms. Sudden increase in the waistline and size of the abdominal region is not a natural phenomenon, hence, that should not be overlooked. Sudden weight gain that leads to obesity can also cause irregularity in menstruation and infertility.

      Types of Pain
      A sudden eruption of pain in the organs that are closely associated with the reproductive system is felt. Most often, menstrual cramps associated leg pain, severe pelvic pain, back pain, lower back pain, and pain in the flank can be observed along with several other sorts like a severe headache, migraine, dyspareunia or pain during intercourse, stomach ache, abdominal pain, flatulence, excessive bloating, and diarrhea. All these signs being associated with enlarged uterus symptoms.

      Reproductive Complications
      When an enlargement of the uterus is observed in childbearing age, it accompanies several other health complications like infertility, premature labor and premature delivery, stillbirths, recurrent miscarriage and many other complications regarding labor and pregnancy. Abdominal distortion that also looks like pregnancy is one of the most visible of all signs that something is wrong with the uterus.

      What Causes This Condition

      There are some phases of the menstrual cycle that can create some complications in the life of a woman and lead to an enlarged uterus. These abnormal developments of the uterus and the other reproductive organs can cause an enlargement of a woman's uterus. Let's take a quick look at the causes of an enlarged uterus.

      Uterine Fibroids
      It is observed that almost 50% of women are experiencing uterine fibroids. Fibroids are a benign growth of several cells and tissues of the uterus. They most commonly occur during the accouchement age of a woman. They can vary from the size of a pea to a watermelon where the symptoms of an enlarged uterus may differ accordingly too.

      Ovarian Cysts
      This is also one of the most common reasons behind an enlarged uterus. Ovarian cysts are cell sacks that are filled with fluid lying in the surface or inside the ovaries. If timely medical attention is not provided, then there are chances of these ovarian cysts getting ruptured and causing serious health complications. There are various types of ovarian cysts which are needed to be evaluated as they create the risk of ovarian cancer.

      Endometrium Cancer
      Cancer of the endometrium, which is the mucous membrane present in the uterus lining can also cause an enlarged uterus. Women at the age of menopause, suffering from obesity, colorectal cancer, undergoing hormone replacement therapy, and/or breast cancer treatment are prone to suffer with an enlarged uterus. Treatment of this cause includes surgical removal of the uterus.

      Adenomyosis
      Adenomyosis simply means the presence of the endometrium in a place other than its respective place. This condition is observed in women in the age group of 30 and above. Adenomyosis is a benign growth that may also be painful at times. It causes irregular menstruation, clotting during menstruation, and menstrual cramps.

  35. QUESTION:
    What are the pros/cons of c-section vs. natural birth?

    • ANSWER:
      Pros of a c-section: if there's something wrong, the baby can be taken very quickly. However, in the case of an emergency, they may have to knock you completely out, and then give you an up and down incision instead of the bikini cut, which is not the friendliest of incisions.

      Other pros: for some women, they want to avoid the anticipation of labor and delivery and think they're saving themselves pain. While some women have good recoveries, not everyone does and it's not pain-free. Plus it's lasting pain for several days and possibly weeks, whereas with a normal vaginal birth the contractions end and that's it.

      I'm sure there are other pros to having one, but I can't really think of too many. I guess it depends on who you ask.

      Risks: you can have excessive bleeding, possible infection, scar adhesions (where the scar tissue literally sticks to itself or other organs, which can cause infertility issues) and it can potentially lower your chances of having a vaginal birth later, depending on your doctor. You can also have a uterine rupture in a subsequent pregnancy without even having a VBAC, even though the risk is very low - about the same rate as having a rupture during a VBAC (vaginal birth after cesarean). Also, if you plan on having more kids, you will build up more scar tissue with each c-section, and your uterus could become compromised in future pregnancies.

      You have greater restrictions on movement - no stairs, no driving, no heavy lifting anything other than your baby. Bending and moving around are usually more difficult, and you generally have to take pain medications for several days, which can be constipating and sometimes habit forming for some people. Some people find it difficult to nurse afterwards because of pressure of the baby on the incision. And in some cases, the spinal can drug the baby, which makes it harder to get it to latch on when it's groggy (this happened to me in the hospital with my first). Also, babies born via c-section can sometimes experience respiratory problems because they haven't come through the birth canal, which acts to 'squeeze' everything out and stimulate breathing, etc.

      In some cases, it can cause injury to the baby by knicking it with the scalpel. And some women, in rare cases, have actually died as a result of having one.

      Pros of vaginal birth: much faster recovery time. You can walk, move around, roll over in bed and drive a lot sooner and with less effort than with a c-section (at least in my experience). You have fewer limitations on activities and it's especially easier to take care of other children, if you have them. You can also lift and hold your baby much easier in the hospital than if you have stitches.

      You also get to go home from the hospital 2 days sooner. I always had a lot of trouble sleeping in the hospital so to me, that was a big deal.

      Sorry, I think I wrote a book here. :)

  36. QUESTION:
    what is the side effect of cytotec when it is taken during the first trimester of pregnancy?tell me the risk?

    • ANSWER:
      You're kidding, right? Cytotec is an abortifacent.

      " Do not take misoprostol for the prevention of stomach ulcers if you are pregnant or if you might become pregnant during treatment. If you do become pregnant during treatment with misoprostol, stop taking the medication and contact your doctor immediately. Misoprostol is in the FDA pregnancy category X. This means that misoprostol is known to be harmful to an unborn baby. Misoprostol can cause miscarriage or spontaneous abortion (sometimes incomplete which could lead to dangerous bleeding and require hospitalization and surgery), premature birth, or birth defects. Misoprostol has also been reported to cause uterine rupture (tearing) when given after the eighth week of pregnancy, which can result in severe bleeding, hysterectomy, and/or maternal or fetal death. A pregnancy test with negative results will be required within 2 weeks of starting treatment with misoprostol, and treatment will begin only on the second or third day of a regular menstrual cycle. Also, appropriate contraception will be needed to prevent pregnancy during treatment and for one menstrual cycle following treatment. In some cases, misoprostol may be used under the supervision of a doctor for the induction of labor and delivery or abortion."
      -- from http://health.yahoo.com/drug/d00303a1

      You'll be, then, wanting to call your doctor _as soon as possible_ to figure out your options.

  37. QUESTION:
    baby#2, previous c-section - IM WORRIED THAT ILL HAVE A UTERINE RUPTURE DURING MY PREGNANCY?
    Well i was alright until i heard you can have a uterine rupture DURING pregnancy, not only when during your pushing your baby out! i did some research & it said that it can also happen during pregnancy? :l i had a c-section 3years ago, what if this happens with baby#2 during my 9months? im really scared & worried now & concerned

    • ANSWER:
      I've had 3 C-sections and the doctor that delivered my last 2 only told me about the risk of rupture during labor. The risk during labor having had one previous C-section is like less than 1%. That's why women are allowed to try V-BAC after only one C-section if all else is normal with the pregnancy. I'm sure you can talk to your doctor about your concerns and they will be able to ease your fears much better than strangers on the internet. I would think that the risk is so low for a rupture to happen that it should not be something that you stress about for the next few months. The stress alone could cause more problems that you would not normally have had. Just relax and enjoy this time. If it will be awhile until your next doctor's appointment, give them a call tomorrow and just ask for a call back to talk about your concerns. Good luck and congrats!

  38. QUESTION:
    If VBAC is somewhat risky because the chance of uterine rupture on the previous surgical incision...?
    Would that mean that merely being pregnant after a c-section would be a risk of a uterine rupture in and of itself because of the amount of stretching/thinning out that occurs late in pregnancy?
    Sarah G that isn't what my question is about.

    • ANSWER:
      as a woman that has had two naturals and two c-section i can say that the reason most drs dont do vbacs is bcause the pushing during labor is what streches the uterine inscision not so much the pregnancy its self. though pregnancy cause streching it is sometimes possible that it can reopen the sight but not likely most drs keep an eye on that during pregnancy anyways i hope this has answered your question

  39. QUESTION:
    Are stomach pains normal when pregnant?
    I'm about 6 weeks pregnant and having stomach pains similar to when you get your period (time of the month) and no bleeding... is that normal?

    • ANSWER:
      Is it normal to have some abdominal pain during pregnancy?
      Occasional abdominal discomfort is a common pregnancy complaint, and while it may be harmless, it can also be a sign of a serious problem. (Severe or persistent abdominal pain should never be ignored.)

      Below we'll describe the most common causes of abdominal pain and discomfort during pregnancy, but don't try to diagnose yourself. If you experience abdominal pain or cramping along with spotting, bleeding, fever, chills, vaginal discharge, faintness, discomfort while urinating, or nausea and vomiting, or if the pain doesn't subside after several minutes of rest, call your practitioner.

      What serious problems can cause abdominal pain during pregnancy?
      Ectopic pregnancy
      An ectopic pregnancy occurs when a fertilized egg implants outside the uterus, typically in one of the fallopian tubes. It usually causes symptoms at about six or seven weeks after fertilization, but symptoms may occur as early as four weeks, before you even know you're pregnant.

      If left untreated, an ectopic pregnancy can rupture and be life threatening. Call your practitioner immediately if you have any of the following symptoms: abdominal or pelvic pain or tenderness, vaginal spotting or bleeding (can be red or brown, copious or scant, continuous or intermittent), pain that gets worse during physical activity or while moving your bowels or coughing, or pain in the tip of your shoulder.

      If you're bleeding heavily or having signs of shock (such as a racing pulse, dizziness, fainting, or pale, clammy skin), call 911.

      Miscarriage
      Miscarriage is the loss of a pregnancy in the first 20 weeks. Vaginal spotting or bleeding is generally the first symptom, followed by abdominal pain a few hours to a few days later.

      The bleeding may be light or heavy. The pain may feel crampy or persistent, mild or sharp, and may feel more like low back pain or pelvic pressure.

      Call your practitioner if you have signs of a miscarriage. If you have severe pain or heavy bleeding, you need to be seen immediately.

      Preterm labor
      You're in preterm labor (also known as premature labor) if you start to have contractions that efface or dilate your cervix before 37 weeks of pregnancy.

      Call your doctor or midwife right away if you're having any of the following symptoms in your second or third trimester (before 37 weeks):

      • An increase in vaginal discharge or a change in the type of discharge (if it becomes watery, mucus-like, or bloody — even if it's just pink or tinged with blood)

      • Vaginal spotting or bleeding

      • Abdominal pain, menstrual-like cramping, or more than four contractions in one hour (even if they don't hurt)

      • An increase in pressure in the pelvic area

      • Low back pain, especially if you didn't previously have back pain.

      Placental abruption
      Placental abruption is a serious condition in which your placenta separates from your uterus, partially or completely, before your baby's born.

      There's wide variation in symptoms. A placental abruption can sometimes cause sudden and obvious bleeding, but in other cases there may not be any noticeable bleeding at first, or you might have only light bleeding or spotting. Or you might see bloody fluid if your water breaks.

      You might have uterine tenderness, back pain, or frequent contractions, or the uterus might contract and stay hard — like a cramp or contraction that doesn't go away. You might also notice a decrease in your baby's activity. Immediate medical attention is a must.

      Preeclampsia
      Preeclampsia is a complex disorder of pregnancy that causes changes in your blood vessels and can affect a number of organs, including your liver, kidneys, brain, and the placenta. You're diagnosed with preeclampsia if you have high blood pressure and protein in your urine after 20 weeks of pregnancy.

      Symptoms may include swelling in your face or puffiness around your eyes, more than slight swelling in your hands, and excessive or sudden swelling of your feet or ankles. (This water retention can lead to a rapid weight gain.)

      With severe preeclampsia, you may have intense pain or tenderness in the upper abdomen, a severe headache, visual disturbances (such as blurred vision or seeing spots), or nausea and vomiting. If you have symptoms of preeclampsia, call your doctor or midwife immediately.

      Urinary tract infections
      Being pregnant makes you more susceptible to urinary tract infections of all kinds, including kidney infections.

      Symptoms of a bladder infection may include pain, discomfort, or burning when urinating; pelvic discomfort or lower abdominal pain (often just above the pubic bone); a frequent or uncontrollable urge to pee, even when there's very little urine in the bladder; and cloudy, foul-smelling, or bloody urine. Call your caregiver if you have any of these symptoms because an untreated bladder infection can lead to a kidney infection and premature labor.

      Signs that the infection has spread to your

  40. QUESTION:
    For people that had preeclampsia did you know before the doctor told you what were some of your symptoms?
    At first they thought I might have problems due to fatty liver but when I saw the liver specialist yesterday he said it normally gets agitated when you gain a lot of weight throughout pregnancy. I have only lost weight I informed him of this. I then told him about my funny blood pressure problems when I stand and walk around or do anything it skyrockets high. When I'm sitting for a while it gets to a very
    normal blood pressure result or just A slight high.

    This is my second pregnancy I had high blood pressure with the first I never felt anything when I had high blood pressure. This time I feel completely exhausted like it's hard to blow dry my hair or hard to do some vacuuming around the house.. I am on blood pressure medication just a mild dose I see my doctor tomorrow. The liver doctor thinks I have the beginning of preeclampsia. Wanted to know some personal stories of how you came to be diagnosed with us. Any stories are great help!

    • ANSWER:
      Usually with preeclampsia your blood pressure is consistently high. I had it with my first and expected it with my second. I had some symptoms with the second but when my bp returned to normal I was discharged every time. I was sent to labor and delivery 3 times. Anyway with my first I did not know but I was only 19 and knew nothing of pregnancy. I had weight gain of 2 or more pounds per week. That was the first symptom. Then I had high blood pressure. I don't remember what my bp was at the time it was 12 years ago but with preeclampsia the high bp symptom is defined as a bp of over 140/90 for 2 consecutive bp readings taken more that 6 hours apart but less than 7 days apart. My third symptom was edema. My feet and ankles were swollen with fluid especially my toes. The last symptom and the one that brought me into the hospital to be induced 11 days before my due date was pain in my side right under my right breast but on the side that radiated across my diaphragm. It ended in an emergency c-section after 10 hours of labor. There is a high rate of c-section with induction. My second pregnancy around 34 weeks my bp started regularly hovering around 130/80 but always came back down with a couple hours of bed rest. I had swelling in my feet and ankles but not bad. My weight gain was normal 1-2 pounds but I had lost 22 pounds in the first trimester and the day of delivery I was only 6 pounds above my pre pregnant weight. At 36 weeks I had the pain right after eating. In fact I had the pain EVERY time I ate. I was tested for preeclampsia (24 hour urine collection and a blood test). I was also given an ultrasound for gall stones. Everything came back negative. I had a c-section at exactly 39 weeks (it was scheduled because of the previous c-section and the thought of uterine rupture during VBAC frightened my spouse). They never did find out what caused my symptoms and they resolved within hours of delivery. It is suspected that my son's feet were agitating my liver and gall bladder causing false gall bladder symptoms (which are very similar to preeclampsia). Hope this helps. Feel better soon. Btw my second baby is only a month old :-)

  41. QUESTION:
    what are the physical changes associated with the stages of childbirth?
    reference please

    • ANSWER:
      Childbirth (also called labour, birth, partus or parturition) is the culmination of a human pregnancy or gestation period with the birth of one or more newborn infants from a woman's uterus. The process of normal human childbirth is categorized in three stages of labour: the shortening and dilation of the cervix, descent and birth of the infant, and birth of the placenta.In many cases, with an increasing rate of frequency, childbirth is achieved through caesarean section, the removal of the neonate through a surgical incision in the abdomen, rather than through vaginal birth. In the US and Canada it represents nearly 1 in 3 (31.8%) and 1 in 4 (22.5%) of all childbirths, respectively.

      Latent phase
      The latent phase of labor, also called prodromal labor, may last many days and the contractions are an intensification of the Braxton Hicks contractions that may start around 26 weeks gestation. Cervical effacement occurs during the closing weeks of pregnancy and is usually complete or near complete, by the end of latent phase. Cervical effacement or Cervical dilation is the thinning and stretching of the cervix. The degree of cervical effacement may be felt during a vaginal examination. A 'long' cervix implies that not much has been taken into the lower segment, and vice versa for a 'short' cervix. Latent phase ends with the onset of active first stage; when the cervix is about 3 cm dilated.

      First stage: dilation
      Progression into and through the first stage of labour is clinically assessed by vaginal examination. There are several factors that midwives and clinicians use to assess the labouring mother's progress, and these are defined by the Bishop Score. The Bishop score is also used as a means to predict whether the mother is likely to spontaneously progress into second stage (delivery).

      The first stage of labor starts classically when the effaced (thinned) cervix is 3 cm dilated. There is variation in this point as some women may have active contractions prior to reaching this point, or they may reach this point without regular contractions. The onset of actual labor is defined when the cervix begins to progressively dilate. Rupture of the membranes, or a blood stained 'show' may or may not occur at or around this stage

      Uterine muscles form opposing spirals from the top of the upper segment of the uterus to its junction with the lower segment. During effacement, the cervix becomes incorporated into the lower segment of the uterus. During a contraction, these muscles contract causing shortening of the upper segment and drawing upwards of the lower segment, in a gradual expulsive motion. This draws the cervix up over the baby's head. Full dilatation is reached when the cervix has widened enough to allow passage of the baby's head, around 10 cm dilation for a term baby.

      The duration of labour varies widely, but active phase averages some 8 hours for women giving birth to their first child ("primiparae") and 4 hours for women who have already given birth ("multiparae"). Active phase arrest is defined as in a primigravid woman as the failure of the cervix to dilate at a rate of 1.2 cm/hr over a period of at least two hours. This definition is based on Friedman's Curve, the gold standard for rates of cervical dilation and fetal descent during active labor. The Friedman curve likely represents an ideal, rather than an average, curve. This study does have limitations (e.g., assessment of cervical dilation is somewhat subjective), and as a result practitioners should use the Friedman Curve as a guideline rather than an absolute indicator of protraction and arrest.[6] Women who do not progress at this rate are in no way "abnormal," as every birth is unique. Some practitioners misdiagnose "Failure to Progress," either out of impatience or inexperience, and perform an unnecessary Cesarean. However, as is the case with any misdiagnosis, doing so is severely discouraged due to the extra expense and healing time involved with Cesarean operations.

      Second stage: expulsion
      This stage begins when the cervix is fully dilated, and ends when the baby is finally born. As pressure on the cervix increases, the Ferguson reflex increases uterine contractions so that the second stage can go ahead. At the beginning of the normal second stage, the head is fully engaged in the pelvis; the widest diameter of the head has successfully passed through the pelvic brim. Ideally it has successfully also passed below the interspinous diameter. This is the narrowest part of the pelvis. If these have been accomplished, all that will remain is for the fetal head to pass below the pubic arch and out through the introitus. This is assisted by the additional maternal efforts of "bearing down" or pushing. The fetal head is seen to 'crown' as the labia part. At this point the woman may feel a burning or stinging sensation.

      Birth of the fetal head signals the successful completion of the fourth mechanism of labour (delivery by e

  42. QUESTION:
    Can uterine fibroids b removed with laproscopy?

    • ANSWER:
      Uterine fibroids are benign smooth muscle tumors in or around the uterine wall.They are commonly found in women during their reproductive years. Fibroids are usually harmless, but in some women may cause abnormal uterine bleeding, pain, pressure, miscarriage, or infertility. There is an extremely small chance that fibroids can develop into cancer. Therefore, it is important that you see your doctor at regular intervals if you are diagnosed with uterine fibroids to decide if therapy is advisable. If you have experienced infertility or a miscarriage because of fibroids, you may feel a vareity of negative emotions. If you are faced with the possibility of losing your uterus, you may feel angry and sad, especially if future pregnancy is desired. It is important for you to discuss these feelings with your physician so that alternatives to hysterectomy, if possible, can be discussed and considered. There are a variety of surgery options available to treat uterine fibroids. If you are experiencing infertility, surgery to remove the fibroids should be considered only after a thorough evaluation of other factors which could be causing infertility.
      Myomectomy (Surgical Removal of Fibroids)
      Fibroids that cause significant symptoms may require surgery. Removal of only the fibroids, rather than the entire uterus, is called a myomectomy. Myomectomy is most often performed in women who desire future pregnancy or avoid hysterectomy. Today, there are several options available for myomectomy. In most cases, the size and location of the fibroids will determine the appropriate surgical technique. Some fibroids may be removed through hysteroscopy or
      laparoscopy procedures, but large, multiple, or inaccessible fibroids usually require laparotomy. Conception rates after any of the surgical techniques used to remove fibroids are generally good but depend upon other factors that influence fertility such as age, previous pregnancy, ovulatory status, the condition of the fallopian tubes, and the male’s semen quality. Abdominal Myomectomy (Laparotomy)
      During a laparotomy, the physician makes an incision in the abdominal wall to remove the fibroids from the uterus. It usually takes about four weeks to six weeks for a complete recovery. If the myomectomy is extensive, a future pregnancy may require a Cesarean section to reduce the risk of uterine rupture during labor.
      Hysteroscopic Myomectomy
      Submucousal fibroids located mainly within the uterine cavity may be removed with operative hysteroscopy. During this procedure, the physician inserts a hysteroscope through the cervix and fills the uterus with fluid to expand the walls. Surgical instruments are then inserted through a channel in the hysteroscope to remove submucous fibroids. Generally, women can return to their normal activities within two days after operative hysteroscopy. Serious complications are uncommon and include damage or scarring to the uterus, electrolyte imbalance, and bleeding. In some cases, operative laparoscopy may be used to remove the fibroids. During operative laparoscopy, the physician places a laparoscope into the abdomen through a small incision near the navel and then uses surgical instruments to remove the fibroids. Recovery time is usually two to seven days. Risks associated with operative laparoscopy include adhesions, trauma to internal organs, and hemorrhage. Women who undergo this procedure for intramural fibroids have an increased risk of uterine rupture in subsequent pregnancies. Until more information is available, this approach should not be considered standard procedure for women who wish to maintain their fertility.
      Uterine Artery Embolization
      Uterine artery embolization is a procedure performed by a radiologist and involves injecting small particles into the uterine blood vessels. These particles clog the small blood vessels that supply the fibroids, cutting down the blood supply and causing the fibroids to degenerate. Patients generally experience several days of pain after the procedure. Fibroid volume shrinks by 40% to 50%, and the majority of patients experience symptomatic relief. Since the procedure has only been available since the early 1990s, information concerning its longterm benefits and risks is limited. At this time, little is known about the effect of uterine artery embolization on future fertility and pregnancy.
      Hysterectomy
      Approximately half of all hysterectomies are performed to treat uterine fibroids. If you have symptomatic fibroids, and future pregnancy is not desired, a hysterectomy or surgical removal of the uterus may be recommended. There are
      three ways to perform a hysterectomy: abdominally, vaginally, and in some cases laparoscopically. Recovery time is usually two to six weeks. It is important to discuss the potential after-effects of hysterectomy, such as issues relating to sexuality, psychological impact, and medical consequences with your physician. If your ovaries are removed at the time of hysterectomy, it is also important to
      discuss issues relating to menopause.
      Alternative Procedures
      Other new techniques including cryomyolysis, myoma coagulation, and endometrial ablation of fibroids have been reported without any significant evaluation of risks and outcome. Until more information is available, these approaches should not be considered standard treatment for women who wish to maintain their fertility.

  43. QUESTION:
    What are signs that labor is near?
    OKAY I AM 37 WEEKS AND 4 DAYS PREGNANT AND I KEEP HAVING THE FEELING THAT MY BABY IS TRYING TO COME!! THIS IS MY FIRST PREGNANCY SO IM NOT REALLY SURE OF WHAT IS SUPPOSED TO BE HAPPENING!! CAN SOME ONE GIVE ME A FEW HINTS ON WHEN THEIR BABY WAS ABOUT TO ARRIVE WHAT WAS GOING ON WITH YOU AND YOUR BODY??? THANKS!

    • ANSWER:
      Six Signs that Labor is Within a Few Weeks or Days:
      1. Lightening: You can breathe again! This is an indication that the baby has dropped, settling deeper into your pelvis and relieving some of the pressure on your diaphragm, so you are not so short of breath. You may feel increased pressure on your bladder, which means more trips to the bathroom. Others may comment on your changed appearance, although you might not be aware of it at all.

      2. Bloody show: Loss of mucus plug. During pregnancy, a thick plug of mucus protects your cervical opening from bacteria entering the uterus. When your cervix begins to thin and relax, this plug is expelled. Some women think the plug will look solid like a cork, but it is actually stringy mucus or discharge. It can be clear, pink or blood tinged and can appear minutes, hours or even days before labor begins. Not all women notice this sign.

      3. Rupture of membranes: Your water breaks! Only 1 in 10 woman experience a dramatic gush of the amniotic fluid and even then it usually happens at home, often in bed. Sometimes the amniotic sac breaks or leaks before labor begins. Your uterus is sitting directly on top of your bladder, which can cause you to leak urine. Sometimes it can be quite difficult to distinguish urine from amniotic fluid.

      If your membranes have ruptured and you are leaking amniotic fluid, it will be an odorless fluid. This can occur with a sudden gush or a constant trickle. If you notice fluid leaking, you need to try to determine if it smells like urine or if it is odorless. If it does not seem to be urine, you would want to contact your health care provider.

      Until you see your physician or midwife do not use tampons, have sexual intercourse or do anything that would introduce bacteria to your vagina. Let your health care provider know if the fluid is anything other than clear and odorless, particularly if it's green or foul smelling, because this could be a sign of infection.

      4. Nesting: Spurt of energy. For most of your pregnancy you have probably been fighting the urge to take a nap, so you'll know when you experience this. One day you will wake up feeling full of energy! You'll start making a long list of things to do, things to clean, things to buy and everything you've put off doing will become a high priority. In all your preparations, don't forget that “Labor Day” may be just around the corner so save some energy.

      5. Effacement: Thinning of the cervix. Usually in the last month the cervix begins to stretch and thin. This process means the lower segment of the uterus is getting ready for delivery. A thin cervix will also allow the cervix to dilate more easily.

      Your health care provider may check for effacement in the final 2 months of pregnancy. Effacement is measured in percentages. You may hear your helath care provider say,“You are 25% effaced, 50% effaced, 75%...” The Braxton Hicks contractions or “practice contractions” you have been experiencing may play a part in the effacement process. You will not be able to determine your effacement process, this can only be done by a health care provider's exam.

      6. Dilation: Opening of the cervix. Dilation is the process of the cervix opening in preparation for childbirth. Dilation is measured in centimeters or, less accurately, in “fingers” during an internal (manual) pelvic exam. “Fully dilated” means you're at 10 centimeters and are ready to give birth. In the same way that your health care provider may be checking for effacement in the last 2 months, your health care provider may also tell you how many centimeters your cervix has dilated.

      One SURE Sign Labor is Really Happening:
      Consistent Contractions: When you begin to experience regular uterine contractions, this is the strongest indication that you are in labor. This is the time to get your notebook to record the exact time each one begins and how long it lasts. These contractions feel like menstrual cramps or a low backache that comes and goes at 20 to 30 minute intervals. Gradually, the aching or cramping becomes stronger and lasts longer. When your contractions are consistantly 5 minutes apart, it's time to call your health care provider.

      Labor Contractions Have the Following Characteristics:
      They are regular
      They follow a predictable pattern (such as every eight minutes)
      They become progressively closer
      They last progressively longer
      They become progressively stronger
      Each contraction is felt first in the lower back and then radiates around to the front or visa versa
      A change in activity or position will not slow down or stop contractions
      There may be bloody show
      Membranes may rupture
      Your health care provider will notice cervical changes, such as effacement (thinning), or dilation

  44. QUESTION:
    I am 5 weeks pregnant. I went in for an abortion but had a change of heart.?
    I took the medicine perscribed before an abortion. I want to know if the fetus is in any dander from the Valium and misoprostol

    • ANSWER:
      I found this on a website

      "Do not take misoprostol for the prevention of stomach ulcers if you are pregnant or if you might become pregnant during treatment. If you do become pregnant during treatment with misoprostol, stop taking the medication and contact your doctor immediately. Misoprostol is in the FDA pregnancy category X. This means that misoprostol is known to be harmful to an unborn baby. Misoprostol can cause miscarriage or spontaneous abortion (sometimes incomplete which could lead to dangerous bleeding and require hospitalization and surgery), premature birth, or birth defects. Misoprostol has also been reported to cause uterine rupture (tearing) when given after the eighth week of pregnancy, which can result in severe bleeding, hysterectomy, and/or maternal or fetal death. A pregnancy test with negative results will be required within 2 weeks of starting treatment with misoprostol, and treatment will begin only on the second or third day of a regular menstrual cycle. Also, appropriate contraception will be needed to prevent pregnancy during treatment and for one menstrual cycle following treatment. In some cases, misoprostol may be used under the supervision of a doctor for the induction of labor and delivery or abortion. Do not share this medication with anyone else. Misoprostol has been prescribed for your specific condition, may not be the correct treatment for another person, and would be dangerous if the other person were pregnant."

      I would definately get to a doctor

  45. QUESTION:
    what could cause my fiance to go into labor?
    she is 30 weeks..... and we were wondering what could cause premature labor so we know to avoid that

    • ANSWER:
      Here is some information I was able to locate hope it helps:)

      What causes premature birth?
      Most premature births are caused by spontaneous preterm labor, either by itself or following spontaneous premature rupture of the membranes (PROM). With PROM, the sac inside the uterus that holds the baby breaks too soon. Preterm labor is labor that begins before 37 completed weeks of pregnancy. The causes of preterm labor and PROM are not fully understood.

      The latest research suggests that many cases are triggered by the body’s natural response to certain infections, including those involving amniotic fluid and fetal membranes. However, in about half of all cases of premature birth, providers cannot determine why a woman delivered prematurely.

      About 25 percent of premature births are caused by early induction of labor or c-section due to pregnancy complications or health problems in the mother or the fetus (6). In many of these cases, early delivery is probably the safest approach for mother and baby.

      However, the March of Dimes is concerned that some early deliveries may occur without good medical justification or may be done at the request of the mother. In some cases, this can lead to late-preterm birth, with potential risks to the baby. Women should wait until at least 39 weeks to schedule an induced labor or a c-section, unless there are medical problems that make it necessary to deliver earlier (7, 8).

      Which women are at increased risk for premature birth?
      Any woman can give birth prematurely, but some women are at greater risk than others. Researchers have identified some risk factors, but providers still can’t predict which women will deliver prematurely.

      Three groups of women are at greatest risk for premature birth:

      1. Women who have had a previous premature birth
      2. Women who are pregnant with twins, triplets or more
      3. Women with certain uterine or cervical abnormalities

      Certain lifestyle factors may put a woman at greater risk for preterm labor. These include:

      * Late or no prenatal care
      * Smoking
      * Drinking alcohol
      * Using illegal drugs
      * Exposure to the medication DES
      * Domestic violence (including physical, sexual or emotional abuse)
      * Lack of social support
      * Extremely high levels of stress
      * Long working hours with long periods of standing

      Certain medical conditions during pregnancy also may increase the likelihood that a woman will have preterm labor. These include:

      * Infections (including urinary tract, vaginal, sexually transmitted and other infections)
      * High blood pressure
      * Diabetes
      * Clotting disorders (thrombophilia)
      * Being underweight before pregnancy
      * Obesity
      * Short time period between pregnancies [One study found that an interval of less than 18 months between birth and the beginning of the next pregnancy increased the risk of preterm labor, though the greatest risk was with intervals shorter than 6 months (9). A woman should discuss with her provider the best pregnancy spacing for her.]
      * Being pregnant with a single fetus after in vitro fertilization
      * Birth defects in the baby (10)
      * Bleeding from the vagina

      Certain demographic factors also increase the risk:

      * Non-Hispanic black race
      * Younger than age 17, or older than age 35
      * Low socioeconomic status

      Even if a woman has one or more of these risk factors, it does not mean that she will have preterm labor. However, all women should learn the signs of preterm labor and what to do if they have any of them.

  46. QUESTION:
    At 31 weeks pregnant can you take castor oil to make your baby come out faster and if you do what will happen ?

    • ANSWER:
      NO it's dangerous for pregnant women to take and it's a laxative also having our baby at 31 weeks is a risk because of lung development! DO NOT try to induce labor. not this early.. wait until you're past the preterm then try sex.. or pineapples STAY away from caster oil!!

      "Dangers

      Alicia Huntley, CNM, MSN, claims that one of the dangers of using castor oil during pregnancy is that it can cause contractions so severe that it puts stress on the baby itself. Also, there is some belief that it can facilitate uterine rupture.

      Read more: Is Castor Oil Safe in Pregnancy? | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/facts_5910536_castor-oil-safe-pregnancy_.html#ixzz23elaCEo5
      "

      Expert Insight

      David Barrere, M.D. is not a proponent of castor oil as a labor induction tool. He opines that using this method carries too much danger of dehydration and electrolyte malfunctions in the birthing woman as well as her child.

      Read more: Is Castor Oil Safe in Pregnancy? | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/facts_5910536_castor-oil-safe-pregnancy_.html#ixzz23elgiI4a
      "

  47. QUESTION:
    Difference between Induction and Natural?
    Since I've been pregnant before, my sister is currently 34 weeks pregnant and keeps asking for advice on how labour starts and how it progresses, what she can expect, etc...All I can tell her is what happened with me, but I was induced with my first.

    Is there any major difference between going into labour naturally and being induced? Such as the progression of the labour?

    I'm pregnant with #2 now, so this would help me as well...thanks in advance!

    • ANSWER:
      Yes a HUGE difference.

      I have experienced both.

      The biggest difference is that in an induction they use man made synthectic hormones that are not superior to our own naturally produced ones.

      Labor is brought on by a strong hormone cocktail of sorts, naturally produced by the mother the placenta and the baby. And your body knows the correct amount to provide and when, where as during an induction, the hormones are just given to you and your body can be quite thrown off.

      Induction also increases your risk of uterine hyperstimulation, which can cause amniotic fluid embolism or uterine rupture. Both very dangerous condidtions. While things can go worong in a natural setting, most of the time your body does not want to harm itself, and so complications are more rare when labor is left alone.

      Natural contractions usually start small and gro bigger and stronger over time allowing the mothers body to release other hormones and body chemicals that allow the mother to go somewhat into an altered state and to cope with the labor, and for labor to continue. Often during inductions, the pain is so intense , all of a sudden that pain medications are needed for the mother to be able to cope, because she hasn't had adequate time to let her body naturally cope. That is when the cascade begins...Induction drugs=unusually painful contractions=pain medications=slows labor down= more induction drugs, etc. etc. Until the mother is so pumped full of stuff that the baby goes into distress!

      Induction is also a leading cause in unnecessary c-sections. Which pose their own risks.

      All in all it is absolutley best to let your body and baby do what is NATURAL, when everyone is healthy.

      Inductions like c-sections should be respected and used only in cases of medical emergency, or compromised health. Our bodies know what they are doing, after all we didn't have to tell them how to grow the baby, they just did!

  48. QUESTION:
    what can cause your water to break?
    can rough sex cause your water to break?

    what things can cause it to break?

    im terrified that my water will break this early on.

    thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Several things can make your water break.
      I have an article I sended a friend months ago... but I can find the link so I'll have post the whole article.

      1. FORMATION OF FOREWATERS:
      As pregnancy progresses the lower part of the uterus stretches and allows a part of fluid from the sac to fill the area. Later the fetal head snuggles into the pelvis and lies over the cervix cutting the water in front of the head from which that surrounds the body. The former is known as the forewaters and the later is known as the hindwaters. The forewaters prevents any uneven pressure that the head of the fetus may cause. When head creates an increased uneven intra-uterine pressure over the forewaters, it causes the waters to break.

      2. GENERAL FLUID PRESSURE:
      This actually helps in maintaining the intra-uterine pressure during false contractions at the third trimester. The pressure is equalized throughout the uterus and over the fetal body because of the fluid content. Thus any alteration in the general fluid pressure will cause the waters to break.

      3. DILATATION OF CERVIX:
      When the cervix becomes fully dilated, it no longer supports the bag of forewaters leading to rupture of membranes.

      4. CONTRACTIONS:
      Sometimes the uterine contractions are severe that it will cause the waters to break. This happens usually at the end of pregnancy.

      5. ABNORMAL PRESENTATION:
      If for any reason there is a badly fitting presenting part, the forewaters are not cut off effectively and the membranes tend to rupture early.

      6. HEAVY LIFTING:
      Though normal activities are encouraged during pregnancy, lifting heavy objects and carrying heavy things may lead to rupture of membranes. Sitting down to clean the floor or bath tub have also caused waters to break in some women.

      7. TRIAL OF LABOR:
      When the women is involved in extreme activies or exercise, including walking several miles and climbing up and down stairs several times tend to break waters early which is called the trial of labor. Women in post dates are encouraged to do so before they go ahead for induction of labor.

      8. INFECTIONS:
      It is believed that certain infections during pregnancy may cause waters to break early. This is the reason stated for the birth of many premature babies.

      9. CERTAIN CONDITIONS IN PREGNANCY:
      Certain disease process during pregnancy can also make the waters to break early. They are gestational diabetes, twin or multiple pregnancy and pregnancy induced hypertension.

      10. SEX:
      It is said that the seminal fluid has pitocin that could induce labor by making the uterus to contract and break the waters. But the level of pitocin in seminal fluid is very low that it will not lead to break of waters. Instead, attaining frequent orgasms during sexual intercourse causes severe contraction of uterus leading to waters to break.

      There are many other factors like eating spicy food, drinking castor oil, pouring warm water over the abdomen or back that are listed to cause waters to break and initiate a normal labor, but they are not been proved scientifically. One truth is, if everything is perfect with the mother and the baby, waters rupture exactly when it is term.

  49. QUESTION:
    Sex Hurts 2 months after giving birth, what can be used?
    if the vaginal walls are still to thin for sex and it's been 2 months after giving birth through c-section, is there any type of medication that can be used?
    Lub doesn't seem to work either

    • ANSWER:
      A newborn in its mother's arms is the result of an incredible orchestration of numerous events, many of which are primarily the result of the vital role hormones play in pregnancy. Regardless of how this baby was birthed – either naturally or through C section, the woman's body has had many changes in the past 9 months and has many to look forward to as it heals and repairs.

      During childbirth, the muscles and skin of the birth canal (vagina) are stretched and sometimes torn. They heal over time but are never exactly the same. A long second stage of labor may also weaken these tissues.

      Low levels of estrogen (resulting from hormonal changes after birthing and when entering menopause) weaken the vaginal walls.( Estrogen helps to keep the tissues toned. )
      The uterus naturally thins during labor, so if a Dr says "Boy, your uterus was so thin we could see right through it!." Don't let that alarm you at all. It is normal and our uteruses are VERY strong and stretch to the limit. However, a thin uterine scar IS cause for concern – if you have one from your C section. Scar tissue is not designed by nature to stretch that is why burn victims and the elderly have "contractures" and can break if the injured joints or tissues are moved beyond their limit. A thinned uterus is sometimes a perforated uterus (or an incomplete rupture) so if you have any concerns – go and see your specialist.

      While lubricant can assist with easing friction, it will not address the issue of natural lubrication and the hormones in charge of the production of it. See either a medical or alternate/ natural practitioner for more info on supporting your hormonal levels through supplementation.

      While sexual activity may decrease, your need for love and understanding from each other increases. Showing your love and support are especially during the first few months of being a parent. My advice is to keep an open and honest communication link with your partner and take things slowly – with little pressure – and connect again with yourself as a sensual being, before attempting to touch another. Remember you love each other. Remember to say so.

  50. QUESTION:
    is it possible to have a natural birth after having a c-section?
    ok so i had a c-section with my 1st baby (which i prayed for)i was wondering what are the chances of me having a vbac with my next child

    • ANSWER:
      The medical establishment is under pressure from hospitals to not do VBACs. Is it because after 15 years, they've suddenly been deemed "unsafe" because a uterus might rupture? Maybe if the doc uses cytotec and "enough pitocin to push that uterus to it's limits", it might cause a 3cm window in the uterine incision site. The real reason lies in the almighty dollar. Thousands of dollars. Hospitals make nearly 4 times more for a c-section than a vaginal birth. Money talks, especially in medicine.

      Even if you didn't dilate with your previous baby or the baby didn't descend past a certain point, that doesn't mean you can't give birth vaginally. Quite often, the position you are in during the second stage of labor has a lot to do with baby being able to descend. Lying flat or semi-reclining on a bed is not the best position to labor or deliver in, especially when CPD is suspected.

      I would go to www.ican-online.org and educate yourself about VBAC.
      Then you are empowered to make an informed choice about your healthcare. Best wishes!

causes of uterine rupture during labor