Bleeding After Removal Of Polyps In Uterus

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Why Am I bleeding during sex and there is no pain?
    This guy who I have recently started dating, and I have sex relatively often and it seems like I bleed during sex more often than not. There is no pain involved with the bleeding and the bleeding stops immediately after sex, also it only seems to happen when I'm on top. The first few times there wasn't much blood so I wasn't worried.. but the last time presented a significantly larger amount of blood so now I am slightly worried. Because there is no pain during or after sex, I am confused where this blood is coming from. Any suggestions?

    • ANSWER:
      This may be caused by cervical erosion http://womenshealth.about.com/od/cervicalerosion/f/cervicalerossio.htm

      Your cervix is the opening to your uterus http://www.pennmedicine.org/health_info/pregnancy/graphics/images/en/19726.jpg. Although it can't actually "erode", sometimes its cells change so that the cervix looks velvety and will bleed easily, especially in sexual positions that allow deeper penetration.

      This bleeding doesn't hurt because the cervix has no nerve endings and you cannot feel pain there.

      Another possibility would be cervical polyps http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001494.htm, which are not cancerous but which may require removal. If you suspect you have these, you may want to see a gynecologist.

      Yet another possibility is an STD, so you would want to talk honestly with your partner about this possibility.

      Since I don't know your age, health history, medications, etc., there may be other possibilities, but these are the three most common causes of signs like yours.

  2. QUESTION:
    Would a doctor perform a hysterectomy at the age of 23?
    Ive had two children and desire no more. My periods are horrible, ive tried countless birthcontrol hormone methods and none have worked. Is it ethical to have the procedure done at such a young age?

    • ANSWER:
      I was 29 when I had a total hysterectomy and kept both ovaries so I would not need any artificial hormones. The term hyster refers to the removal of the uterus and when it includes the cervix it's termed total hysterectomy. When the ovaries and tubes are taken it's called a bilateral (for both) salpingo (tubes) oopherectomy (ovaries).I urge you to check out www.hystersisters.com They were a life saver for me. I stayed on the site for about a year before I decided I wanted to go through with it. Really if someone has cancer at say age 15 and they need a hysterectomy to save their life then the doctor will do it. You can write down how bad they are, how much pain you are in as far as if anything over the counter works. Before mine I would go through super plus tampons in 20 minutes and I was on Tylenol #3 and then got switched over to Vicodin when it didn't work. I was miserable and could not be away from the house long.

      I'll be back to edit the post when I get some info for you.

      Take a look at these hystersister links. There are many who say docs won't do a hysterectomy on someone as young as you and if you have been checked and have done other options such as checking for fibroids, polyps, adenomyosis, hormone abnormalities, and other things a hysterectomy should be your last option. If you have adenomyosis (endometriosis inside the uterine muscle) then the only cure is a hysterectomy. I had a pre-op diagnosis of it but only the real diagnosis can be made after the uterus is out and pathology examines it. I'm very glad I went through the surgery but there have been women who have not been so happy that they had to have it done. I still today have a very high sex drive and because I'm not bleeding all the time and in pain I can enjoy my life.

      A hysterectomy is not like having a baby it's MAJOR surgery with lots of cutting and stitching and women who have had vaginal hysterectomies can have many stitches. It can take about six weeks to recover from a hysterectomy depending on what type is done. If you are really that miserable and nothing has worked then you can decide for yourself if you really want to go through with the surgery. Feel free to contact me if you have any questions. I know a ton. I would not have your ovaries removed if you can keep them.

      But you're so young!
      http://www.hystersisters.com/vb2/showthread.php?s=&threadid=49415&highlight=young

      Lots of information for you. Look at some of the posts links there as well.
      http://www.hystersisters.com/vb2/showthread.php?t=152640&highlight=baby

      Women share how old or young they were when they had their hysterectomy at this next link.
      Age when you had your hysterectomy
      http://www.hystersisters.com/vb2/showthread.php?s=&threadid=35903
      "View Poll Results: How old were you when you had your hyst?
      18-25 38 4.33%
      26-30 98 11.17%
      31-39 299 34.09%
      40-49 370 42.19%
      50-59 69 7.87%
      over 60 3 0.34% "

      Also feel free to look at the correct terms for hysterectomy. To many people think that a total hysterectomy includes removal of the ovaries and it is not so.

      http://www.hystersisters.com/vb2/view_hysterectomy_defined.htm

      "During a hysterectomy the uterus is completely or partially removed. The fallopian tubes and ovaries may also be removed depending on the health needs of the woman.
      Total Hysterectomy
      A total hysterectomy is removal of the entire uterus which includes the cervix. A radical hysterectomy is the removal of the uterus, the tissue on both sides of the cervix (parametrium), and the upper part of the vagina.
      Partial Hysterectomy
      A partial (or supracervical) hysterectomy is removal of just the upper portion of the uterus, leaving the cervix intact."

      Today there are multiple treatments for heavy bleeding and many options. I would try other options first before deciding if a hysterectomy is the last thing you need. For fibroids they can do a myomectomy where the doc basically cuts out the fibroid but the recovery is still long and it does preserve the woman's fertility. There's also something called uterine artery embolization which was an option discussed with me but after my hysterectomy it was discovered that it would not have helped me anyway. There is also an options and alternative to hysterectomy message board at hystersisters at this next link.
      http://www.hystersisters.com/vb2/forumdisplay.php?f=4

  3. QUESTION:
    What can a ob/gyn in do to help me with my horrible cramps and heavy bleeding.Is there a surgical procedure?
    I've already tried to take birth control and can't .

    • ANSWER:
      Depends on the cause of you heavy bleeding, aka menorrahgia. You could have endometriosis or another disease that causes pain and heavy bleeding. You can have cysts and lesions caused by endometriosis removed by laparoscopic surgery.

      If you do not want (more) children in the future, there are several procedures to "thin" the lining of the uterus. It's not surgery but it is a procedure only a qualified doctor can perform. The thinner living will either bleed less or not at all.

      Drug therapy for menorrhagia may include:
      Iron supplements. If the condition is accompanied by anemia, your doctor may recommend that you take iron supplements regularly. If your iron levels are low but you're not yet anemic, you may be started on iron supplements rather than waiting until you become anemic.
      Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). NSAIDs, such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others) or naproxen (Aleve), help reduce menstrual blood loss. NSAIDs have the added benefit of relieving painful menstrual cramps (dysmenorrhea).
      Oral contraceptives. Aside from providing effective birth control, oral contraceptives can help regulate menstrual cycles and reduce episodes of excessive or prolonged menstrual bleeding.
      Oral progesterone. When taken for 10 or more days of each menstrual cycle, the hormone progesterone can help correct hormonal imbalance and reduce menorrhagia.
      The hormonal IUD (Mirena). This type of intrauterine device releases a type of progestin called levonorgestrel, which makes the uterine lining thin and decreases menstrual blood flow and cramping.

      If you have menorrhagia from taking hormone medication, you and your doctor may be able to treat the condition by changing or stopping your medication.

      You may need surgical treatment for menorrhagia if drug therapy is unsuccessful. Treatment options include:
      Dilation and curettage (D&C). In this procedure, your doctor opens (dilates) your cervix and then scrapes or suctions tissue from the lining of your uterus to reduce menstrual bleeding. Although this procedure is common and often treats menorrhagia successfully, you may need additional D&C procedures if menorrhagia recurs.
      Operative hysteroscopy. This procedure uses a tiny tube with a light (hysteroscope) to view your uterine cavity and can aid in the surgical removal of a polyp that may be causing excessive menstrual bleeding.
      Endometrial ablation. Using a variety of techniques, your doctor permanently destroys the entire lining of your uterus (endometrium). After endometrial ablation, most women have little or no menstrual flow. Endometrial ablation reduces your ability to become pregnant.
      Endometrial resection. This surgical procedure uses an electrosurgical wire loop to remove the lining of the uterus. Both endometrial ablation and endometrial resection benefit women who have very heavy menstrual bleeding. Like endometrial ablation, this procedure reduces your ability to become pregnant.
      Hysterectomy. Surgical removal of the uterus and cervix is a permanent procedure that causes sterility and cessation of menstrual periods. Hysterectomy is performed during anesthesia and requires hospitalization. Additional removal of the ovaries (bilateral oophorectomy) may cause premature menopause.

      Except for hysterectomy, these surgical procedures are usually done on an outpatient basis. Although you may need a general anesthetic, it's likely that you can go home later on the same day.

      When menorrhagia is a sign of another condition, such as thyroid disease, treating that condition usually results in lighter periods.

  4. QUESTION:
    What kind procedures are done to stop having period at over age 50?
    I have heard that some people who are over age 50 and still having a heavy period can get some kind of "thing" in their uterus. So that would stop the period until they get their menopause..do you all know what that is exactly? and how does it work? any link regarding this would be a help too..thanks :)

    • ANSWER:
      Here's a list of what can be done.
      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/menorrhagia/DS00394/DSECTION=treatments-and-drugs
      Dilation and curettage (D and C). In this procedure, your doctor opens (dilates) your cervix and then scrapes or suctions tissue from the lining of your uterus to reduce menstrual bleeding. Although this procedure is common and often treats menorrhagia successfully, you may need additional D and C procedures if menorrhagia recurs.
      Operative hysteroscopy. This procedure uses a tiny tube with a light (hysteroscope) to view your uterine cavity and can aid in the surgical removal of a polyp that may be causing excessive menstrual bleeding.
      Endometrial ablation. Using a variety of techniques, your doctor permanently destroys the entire lining of your uterus (endometrium). After endometrial ablation, most women have little or no menstrual flow. Endometrial ablation reduces your ability to become pregnant.
      Endometrial resection. This surgical procedure uses an electrosurgical wire loop to remove the lining of the uterus. Both endometrial ablation and endometrial resection benefit women who have very heavy menstrual bleeding. Like endometrial ablation, this procedure reduces your ability to become pregnant.
      Hysterectomy. Surgical removal of the uterus and cervix is a permanent procedure that causes sterility and cessation of menstrual periods. Hysterectomy is performed under anesthesia and requires hospitalization. Additional removal of the ovaries (bilateral oophorectomy) may cause premature menopause in younger women.

      A hysterectomy can be done but it doesn't mean the ovaries have to be removed with it and it should be the last resort because a hysterectomy is major surgery that involves major cutting and stitching. A woman who has a vaginal hysterectomy can have over 200 internal stitches and the minimum recovery is six weeks. The term hysterectomy refers to the removal of the uterus. If the ovaries are taken it's called a bilateral salpingo oopherectomy. When the entire uterus is taken it includes the cervix which is the neck or bottom of the uterus and is termed a total hysterectomy. It's possible to have a total hysterectomy and keep both ovaries. I had a TVH and kept both ovaries. There's also another procedure that may be able to be done in an outpatient setting but I think it's similar to ablation usually with all of them it's recommended that women don't have kids after them. While some may not be a guarantee it's also important to know the causes of heavy bleeding. Some cases may not respond to the other things and a hysterectomy would be the only choice which could work. If there's endometriosis or adenomyosis (endometriosis inside the uterine muscle) a hysterectomy is the only cure.

      Edited: About what the previous responder Mike said about a hysterectomy not intended to stop periods...When the uterus and cervix are removed there shouldn't be any bleeding at all even if both ovaries are present. It's the linning of the uterus and sometimes the linning left in the cervix that builds up every month which causes bleeding. Women who have a tubal ligation simply don't pass the eggs into their uterus and they still have periods because of the uterine linning that builds up from hormones and such. Because I kept my ovaries with my total hysterectomy (see note at bottom for definition of total hysterctomy) my doctor said the eggs would just disinigrate into my body but because I don't have a uterus or cervix anymore I don't get anymore periods. I don't need any hormone replacement therapy because my ovaries are still providing enough hormones until I go into menopause. There have been women who have had both ovaries removed and still have the uterus although it's not as common to leave the uterus in when both ovaries are out and they still get periods or messed up cycles because of the unbalanced amount of hormones. It's the linning from the uterus that sheds every month.

      Here is a list of the different types of hysterectomies and please do not confuse the term partial and total hysterectomy.
      Note: The term hysterectomy refers to the removal of the uterus not the ovaries. A total hysterectomy is when the cervix is removed with the uterus which is the bottom part or neck of the uterus and is about the size of a coat button. It can still contain a linning and shed every month for women who opt to keep their cervix. Some women have had to go back in and have the cervix removed because it bled so much. One can have a total hysterectomy while keeping both ovaries and tubes.

      http://www.hystersisters.com/vb2/view_hysterectomy_defined.htm
      Total Hysterectomy
      A total hysterectomy is removal of the entire uterus which includes the cervix. A radical hysterectomy is the removal of the uterus, the tissue on both sides of the cervix (parametrium), and the upper part of the vagina.

      Partial Hysterectomy
      A partial (or supracervical) hysterectomy is removal of just the upper portion of the uterus, leaving the cervix intact
      Removal of the ovaries and the fallopian tubes (bilateral salpingo oopherectomy) may also be done at the same time.

      Hysterectomy Types
      A hysterectomy may be done through an abdominal incision - Abdominal Hysterectomy

      A hysterectomy may be done through a vaginal incision - Vaginal Hysterectomy

      A hysterectomy may be done completely through laparoscopic incisions (small incisions on the abdomen -- Laparoscopic Hysterectomy.

      A hysterectomy may be done completely through the use of a robotic surgical device through small incisions in the abdomen - da Vinci® Hysterectomy.

      Your physician will help you decide which type of hysterectomy is most appropriate for you, depending on your medical history and the reason for your surgery.

  5. QUESTION:
    is my period heavy enough for me to see a doctor?
    My period usually lasts about 7-9 days. It is very heavy in the beginning and i go through one Super size tampon in 1 hour or 1 1/2 for about 2 days and then it starts to get lighter until it stops. A regular size would last me about 45 minutes during the 1-3 days. But it is very regular and comes once a month. Should I go see a doctor about this and what could be causing it?
    and i am 20 and got my first period when i was 12/13.

    • ANSWER:
      Yes not only is going through something within an hour considered heavy but the fact that you go beyond 7 days would concern me. I'd get seen for sure. I had bled 10 days to two weeks and previously was diagnosed with endometrioss at the age of 19. Pain would be a symptom of a problem. I ended up with a hysterectomy at 29 due to the bleeding and pain but there are other options out there and it's best to find out what's going on or what's causing the heavy bleeding.

      Here's some information
      http://www.healthsystem.virginia.edu/uvahealth/adult_gyneonc/menor.cfm
      "In general, bleeding is considered excessive when a woman soaks through enough sanitary products (sanitary napkins or tampons) to require changing every hour. In addition, bleeding is considered prolonged when a woman experiences a menstrual period that lasts longer than seven days in duration."

      "What causes menorrhagia?
      There are several possible causes of menorrhagia, including the following:

      hormonal (particularly estrogen and progesterone) imbalance (especially seen in adolescents who are experiencing their menstrual period for the first time and in women approaching menopause)
      pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)
      uterine fibroids
      abnormal pregnancy (i.e., miscarriage, ectopic)
      infection, tumors, or polyps in the pelvic cavity
      certain birth control devices (i.e., intrauterine devices, or IUDs)
      bleeding or platelet disorders
      high levels of prostaglandins (chemical substances which help to control the muscle contractions of the uterus)
      high levels of endothelins (chemical substances which help the blood vessels in the body dilate)
      liver, kidney, or thyroid disease

      The following are the most common (other) symptoms of menorrhagia. However, each individual may experience symptoms differently. Symptoms may include:

      spotting or bleeding between menstrual periods
      spotting or bleeding during pregnancy
      The symptoms of menorrhagia may resemble other menstrual conditions or medical problems. Always consult your physician for a diagnosis."

      "Treatment for menorrhagia may include:

      iron supplementation (if the condition is coupled with anemia, a blood disorder caused by a deficiency of red blood cells or hemoglobin)
      prostaglandin inhibitors such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs), such as aspirin or ibuprofen (to help reduce cramping and the amount of blood expelled)
      oral contraceptives (ovulation inhibitors)
      progesterone (hormone treatment)
      endometrial ablation - a procedure to destroy the lining of the uterus (endometrium).
      endometrial resection - a procedure to remove the lining of the uterus (endometrium).
      hysterectomy - surgical removal of the uterus."

  6. QUESTION:
    If my mom has cancer, how advanced could it be by now?
    She's had abnormal vaginal bleeding for over 6 months, possibly even a year. She's just getting a biopsy done now after a transvaginal ultrasound revealed a polyp and an enlarged uterus/thickening of the endometrial lining. After almost a year of these symptoms, how advanced could the cancer be if that's what it is? She is 47 years old, pre menopause.

    • ANSWER:
      I had simillar symptoms prior to my hysterectomy at age 40.

      The whole of my uterus was biopsied after removal and there was no sign of cancer.

      Wait until you get a diagnosis before you worry about "what if's".

  7. QUESTION:
    Any woman out there that had endometrial ablation?
    How did it go for you? Was it worth it?

    • ANSWER:
      FOR THE LATEST ON TREATMENT OF HEAVY MENSTRUAL PERIODS click here to see Dr. Indman's new web site "All About Heavy Menstrual Bleeding and Endometrial Ablation" (will open in new window).
      Endometrial ablation is a quick outpatient treatment for heavy bleeding.
      Endometrial ablation is the removal or destruction of the endometrium (lining of the uterus). It does not require hospitalization, and most women return to normal activities in a day or two. Ablation is an alternative to hysterectomy for many women with heavy uterine bleeding who are wish to avoid major surgery. After a successful endometrial ablation, most women will have little or no menstrual bleeding. Patient selection and physician experience is essential to a good outcome.

      How is endometrial ablation done?
      Endometrial ablation has traditionally been done using a hysteroscope. The procedure was developed by Dr. Goldrath in 1979 using a Nd:YAG laser. I did the first endometrial ablation in Northern California in 1985 using the laser. My results using the laser were excellent, but because of research done by myself and others, I switched to an instrument called a resectoscope. The resectoscope is a special type of telescope that allows me to see inside the uterus. It has a built in wire loop that uses high-frequency electrical energy to cut or coagulate tissue.

      The resectoscope has the advantage of being able to remove polyps and some fibroids at the time of ablation. In results reported to the FDA where resectoscopic endometrial ablation was done by experts, the success rate was approximately 95%, with 40% of women having no bleeding whatsoever in 1 year. In my own patients treated with the resectoscope as part of those trials, 58% of women had no bleeding at all after 1 year. It takes extensive experience and skill to be able to safely use the resectoscope, and obtain this degree of success.

      What is a "balloon ablation?" What about other devices?
      Although the resectoscope provides excellent results in experienced hands, the technique is difficult to master. Other methods of ablation have been investigated. The first to obtain FDA approval was the Thermachoice™ balloon. This uses a balloon placed in the uterine cavity through the cervix. Hot water is circulated inside the balloon to destroy the endometrium. Some experts are concerned about the balloon's ability to reach the cornual areas (the "top corners") of the uterus. Although the balloon's "success" rate in FDA studies was reasonable, the it had a much lower rate of amenorrhea the other currently available device — only 13%. I see no advantages and many disadvantages to it's use, so do not recommend this device.

      The HTA Hydrothermablator® also uses hot water, but allows it to circulate freely in the endometrial cavity. It is done under direct vision through a hysteroscope. Once the proper temperature is reached, the hot water circulates for 10 minutes. Once of the original concerns was about the possibility of fluid leaking out the fallopian tubes and burning intestines. Although this did not happen in clinical studies, a case of an intestinal burn is being reviewed by the FDA.

      There are other devices available in this country and other countries, but I think that their disadvantages outweigh their advantages.

      The Novasure System
      Another new device, the Novasure System™ , is now available, and has a number of advantages over other systems. It only takes a few minutes and has an excellent safety record.

      Recovery from endometrial ablation
      Most women are able to go home within an hour after the an endometrial ablation. There may be mild cramping, which can usually be relieved by ibuprofen. Occasionally stronger medicine may be needed. It is normal to be tired for a few days, but most women are able to return to most normal activities in a day or two. Intercourse and very strenuous activity is usually restricted for 2 weeks. It is normal to have a increased discharge for 2 to 4 weeks afterward, as the lining is shedding. I normally do the first check-up 4 weeks afterwards.

      Who should consider endometrial ablation?
      Women who have menstrual bleeding that is impacting their life, and do not have other problems that require a hysterectomy should consider endometrial ablation.

      You limit your activity because of your periods.

      Bleeding is causing you to be anemic and tired

      Bleeding limits your intimate time with your partner?
      You do not desire to retain fertility

      Risks of endometrial ablation
      As with any surgical procedure, there are risks, which should be compared to the risks of things we do in every day life. A number of things can be done to reduce these risks. Some of the risks of endometrial ablation procedures are perforation of the uterus, absorbing excess fluid, bleeding, infection, injury to organs within the abdomen and pelvis, and accumulation of blood within the uterus due to scarring. Another rare, but important, concern after any endometrial ablation procedure is that it might decrease your doctor's ability to make an early diagnosis of cancer of the endometrium. Abnormal bleeding should be evaluated whether or not you have had an ablation.

      A small percentage of properly selected women having an ablation will still eventually need a hysterectomy, but the vast majority will not. Having done endometrial ablation since 1985, I can often identify women who will have a successful ablation and those who would be better off with other treatment.

      Who shouldn't have an endometrial ablation?
      Since an endometrial ablation destroys the lining of the uterus, endometrial ablation is not for anyone who desires to keep her fertility. Women who have a malignancy or pre-malignant condition of the uterus are not candidates for ablation. Women who have severe pelvic pain, unless the pain is coming from an intracavitary myoma, may be better served by alternative treatments. Although pregnancy is unlikely after ablation, serious complications could arise. It is essential for to use reliable contraception after an endometrial ablation.

      Who can help me decide if an endometrial ablation is for me?
      It is helpful to see a gynecologist who is familiar with, and who is able to provide all of the alternatives for the treatment of your problem. A physician who does not do endometrial ablation on a regular basis is unlikely to have the experience to help you make the best decision. The physician should be expert at vaginal-probe ultrasound and at diagnostic hysteroscopy, and should consider non-surgical treatments, as well as discussing the advantages and disadvantages of all the options available. While the physician can provide you with information, the decision is ultimately yours.

      Other Abnormal Bleeding topics:
      Diagnosis
      Hysteroscopy
      The Resectoscope
      Fibroids
      Menopausal Bleeding

      Information about Dr. Indman's office
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      15195 National Avenue, Suite 201; Los Gatos, CA 95032
      Telephone : 408 358-2788 ; FAX : 408 356-5526

  8. QUESTION:
    What are top causes of heavy menstruation?

    • ANSWER:
      A hormonal imbalance during adolescence or menopause is the most common cause of heavy menstrual bleeding. During adolescence after girls have their first periods, and for several years before the onset of menopause when menstruation ceases, our hormones levels are fluctuating which often leads to excessive uterine bleeding during our periods. It’s often possible to treat menorrhagia caused by hormonal imbalances with birth control pills or other hormones

      Uterine fibroid tumors are another very common cause of excessive menstruation. It’s important to understand that fibroid tumors are usually benign (non-cancerous) tumors that often occur in the uterus of women during their thirties or forties. While the cause of uterine fibroid tumors is unclear, it is clear that they are estrogen-dependent. Several surgical treatments are available for treating fibroid tumors of the uterus including myomectomy, endometrial ablation, uterine artery embalization, and uterine balloon therapy, as well as hysterectomy. Non-surgical pharmacological treatments for fibroid tumors include GnRH agonists, oral contraceptives, androgens, RU486 (the abortion pill), and gestrinone. Some women find natural progesterone to be an effective treatment for uterine fibroid tumors. Often, when symptoms are not severe or troublesome, a “wait and see” approach is taken. Once menopause occurs, uterine fibroid tumors typically shrink and disappear without treatment.

      Cervical polyps are small, fragile growths that begin in either the mucosal surface of the cervix, or the endocervical canal and protrude through the opening of the cervix. The cause of cervical polyps is not clear; however, they are often the result of an infection and many times associated with an abnormal response to increased estrogen levels or congestion of the blood vessels located in the cervix. Women most commonly affected by cervical polyps are those over the age of twenty who have had children. A simple out patient office procedure that removes the growth, along with antibiotics, is the usual treatment for cervical polyps.

      Endometrial polyps are typically non-cancerous, growths that protrude from the lining of the uterus. The cause of endometrial polyps is unclear, although they are often associated with an excess of estrogen following hormone treatment or some types of ovarian tumors. Treatments for endometrial polyps include hysteroscopy and D&C. A pathology lab will evaluate endometrial polyps for cancer following removal.

  9. QUESTION:
    What does it mean when your iron is low?
    What am I lacking?

    • ANSWER:
      Excellent website to find info on your question:
      http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/dci/Diseases/ida/ida_all.html

      What Causes Iron-Deficiency Anemia?
      Iron-deficiency anemia occurs when there is too little iron in the body. A person can have a low iron level for three reasons:

      Blood loss, either from disease or injury
      Not getting enough iron in the diet
      Not being able to absorb the iron in the diet
      Iron-deficiency anemia also can develop when the body needs higher levels of iron, such as during pregnancy.

      Loss of Iron Through Blood Loss
      In general, when blood is lost, iron is lost. If the body does not have enough iron reserves to make up for the iron loss, a person will develop iron-deficiency anemia.

      Blood is lost in a number of ways. In women, iron and red blood cells are lost when bleeding occurs from very long or heavy menstrual periods as well as from childbirth. Women also can lose iron and red blood cells from slowly bleeding fibroids in the uterus.

      Blood also is lost through internal bleeding. Most often this loss of blood occurs slowly and can be due to:

      A bleeding ulcer, colon polyp, or colon cancer
      Regular use of aspirin or other pain medicine such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (for example, ibuprofen and naproxen)
      Hookworm infection
      Urinary tract bleeding
      A more rapid loss or removal of blood that can cause iron-deficiency anemia occurs in situations such as:

      Severe injuries
      Surgery
      Frequent blood drawing
      Lack of Iron in the Diet
      Meat, poultry, fish, eggs, dairy products, or iron-fortified foods (that is, foods that have iron added) are the best sources of iron found in food. Eating patterns that exclude these foods or food supplements may lead to iron-deficiency anemia. For example, some vegetarians do not eat enough foods with iron. Other people get iron-deficiency anemia because of eating poorly due to alcoholism or aging. Following a diet that has an imbalance of food groups also can lead to this type of anemia. Examples of diets that can lead to iron-deficiency anemia include:

      Low-fat diets. Following a low-fat diet over a long period of time may limit sources of iron from animal foods.
      Diets high in sugars. These types of diets are often low in iron.
      High-fiber diets. These types of diets can slow the absorption of iron.
      Infants who are fed cow's milk in the first year are at risk for iron-deficiency anemia because cow's milk is low in iron. The same is true for infants who are breastfed after 4 months of age. These infants need iron supplements.

      An Increased Need for Iron
      People may need more iron at some periods in their lives. If they do not get more iron at these times, they may develop iron-deficiency anemia. Periods of rapid growth or growth spurts in children and teens are a good example of an increased need for iron. Pregnancy also is an example. The need for iron doubles during pregnancy due to an increased blood volume, the growth of the fetus, and the blood loss that occurs during childbirth.

      Inability To Absorb Enough Iron From Food
      Certain factors make it hard for the body to absorb enough iron from food. These factors include:

      Intestinal surgery or diseases of the intestine, such as Crohn's disease or celiac disease
      Prescription medicines that reduce acid in the stomach
      Low levels of folate, vitamin B12, or vitamin C in the diet
      How Iron-Deficiency Anemia Develops
      First, iron is lost from the body by one of the ways listed above. Usually, this happens slowly over a period of time. Most often, the person is not taking in enough iron to meet the needs of the body.

      Next, the body starts to use iron that it has stored. When the stored iron is used up, new red blood cells have less hemoglobin than normal, and fewer red blood cells are produced. Finally, when the number of red cells is too low, iron-deficiency anemia develops.

  10. QUESTION:
    Is having a heavy period a problem?
    Every month I have heavy periods I was wondering if that was a problem for the future if I wanted to have babies.. It's so heavy I always have to stain myself because it's just so much when I go to sleep I use a clean pad but by the time I wake up its full. I just think its too much is there something wrong with me will I not be able to have babies?

    • ANSWER:
      Let’s take a look at the most common causes of menorrhagia or heavy menstrual bleeding:

      A hormonal imbalance during adolescence or menopause is the most common cause of heavy menstrual bleeding. During adolescence after girls have their first periods, and for several years before the onset of menopause when menstruation ceases, our hormones levels are fluctuating which often leads to excessive uterine bleeding during our periods. It’s often possible to treat menorrhagia caused by hormonal imbalances with birth control pills or other hormones.

      Uterine fibroid tumors are another very common cause of excessive menstruation. It’s important to understand that fibroid tumors are usually benign (non-cancerous) tumors that often occur in the uterus of women during their thirties or forties. While the cause of uterine fibroid tumors is unclear, it is clear that they are estrogen-dependent. Several surgical treatments are available for treating fibroid tumors of the uterus including myomectomy, endometrial ablation, uterine artery embalization, and uterine balloon therapy, as well as hysterectomy. Non-surgical pharmacological treatments for fibroid tumors include GnRH agonists, oral contraceptives, androgens, RU486 (the abortion pill), and gestrinone. Some women find natural progesterone to be an effective treatment for uterine fibroid tumors. Often, when symptoms are not severe or troublesome, a “wait and see” approach is taken. Once menopause occurs, uterine fibroid tumors typically shrink and disappear without treatment.

      Cervical polyps are small, fragile growths that begin in either the mucosal surface of the cervix, or the endocervical canal and protrude through the opening of the cervix. The cause of cervical polyps is not clear; however, they are often the result of an infection and many times associated with an abnormal response to increased estrogen levels or congestion of the blood vessels located in the cervix. Women most commonly affected by cervical polyps are those over the age of twenty who have had children. A simple out patient office procedure that removes the growth, along with antibiotics, is the usual treatment for cervical polyps.

      Endometrial polyps are typically non-cancerous, growths that protrude from the lining of the uterus. The cause of endometrial polyps is unclear, although they are often associated with an excess of estrogen following hormone treatment or some types of ovarian tumors. Treatments for endometrial polyps include hysteroscopy and D&C. A pathology lab will evaluate endometrial polyps for cancer following removal.

      •Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is an infection of one or more organs that affects the uterus, fallopian tubes, and cervix. PID is, most often, a sexually transmitted disease; however, it sometimes occurs following childbirth, abortion, or other gynecological procedures. The recommended treatment for pelvic inflammatory disease is antibiotic therapy.

      •Cervical cancer is a type of cancer that occurs when cells in the cervix become abnormal, multiply out of control, and damage healthy parts of the body. The human papillomavirus, or HPV, is the cause of over ninety percent of all cervical cancers. Treatments for cervical cancer include surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy.

      •Endometrial cancer occurs when abnormal cells in the uterus or the endometrium (the lining of the uterus) multiply out of control and damage to the uterus and other organs. While the cause of endometrial cancer is unknown, it is known that women diagnosed with this type of cancer tend are usually over fifty, often have endometrial hyperplasia, or many times use hormone replacement therapy (HRT). The first treatment for endometrial cancer is usually a hysterectomy, possibly followed by chemotherapy and/or radiation treatments.

      •IUDs or intrauterine devices used for contraception are a potential cause of heavy menstrual bleeding or menorrhagia. Women who experience prolonged or heavy periods while using the IUD should have the device removed and choose an alternate method of birth control.

      •Bleeding disorders occur when it is hard for a person to stop bleeding. While there are several types of bleeding disorders, the most common type in women is von Willebrand Disease or VWD. Treatments for von Willebrand Disease involve the release of stored clotting factors in the blood, or in extreme cases the replacement of the clotting factor with IV treatment or with prescribed nasal spray.

  11. QUESTION:
    Continuous bleeding from the uterus after a sudden jerk?
    My mom , while travelling in bus started to bleed continuously (after a sudden jerk on passing over a gutter) from the uterus for about 4 hours. she was taken to the hospital and the doctors gave her medicines. She was asked to take an ultrasound scan and the result suggested that she has multiple fibrosis less than 1cm in the uterus. After one day she started to have a small abdominal pain. Why is this happening? What is the next step after this? Can this be harmful. plz help.

    • ANSWER:
      1 cm is actually very small and if the doctor didn't suggest surgical removal, your mum should calm down and take her medication. If the pain is not too severe, ordinary painkillers will do like paracetamol. Some women have cysts/polyps in their uterus and they just ignore them. One gynae told me that unless the cyst gives trouble, you can actually wait till it grows to the size of a baby's head before it needs to be surgically removed. You didn't say how old your mum is, but if she's nearing menopause, the drop in oestrogen level can sometimes shrink the cysts. If your mum does ok after the medication, she can go for another checkup in 6 months just to monitor the size, but for now, 1 cm is really nothing to worry over.

  12. QUESTION:
    I have heavy periods i'm to young for surgery or medician how can i stop them???(Dose exersize help)?
    I am trying to find ways to stop it i don't want blood to soak thru my cloths at school hhhhhhhhhhhheeeeeeeeeeeeeeellllllllllllllllpppppppp

    • ANSWER:
      What are heavy periods?

      The correct medical definition of heavy periods is the passage of more than 80ml of blood each period. It is seldom realistic or practical, however, to actually measure the blood loss and so doctors rely on the woman's description of her period.

      Periods are considered heavy when:

      a woman bleeds for more than 8 to 10 days, especially if this is repeated month after month.

      a woman bleeds so much that it is difficult for her to attend her job. She may be forced to plan her holidays and leisure time according to the timings of her period.

      the bleeding is continuously so heavy that the woman becomes anaemic.

      the presence of other than small clots for more than one or two days suggests heavy periods.

      'flooding' describes the sudden, unexpected onset of periods, like turning on a tap, and indicates heavy periods.

      Why do some women have heavy and long menstrual flows?

      The causes of prolonged and heavy bleeding are given below.

      In younger women heavy periods are most often due to a temporary hormone imbalance, which eventually corrects itself.

      In the years close to the menopause, (45 years of age onwards) heavy periods are usually a sign of hormone imbalance. However, the possibility of heavy periods being caused by an underlying disease increases with age.

      The following conditions are associated with heavy periods:

      fibroids.

      endometriosis.

      pelvic inflammatory disease.

      polyps of the lining of the womb.

      the commonest cause is a condition called dysfunctional uterine bleeding (DUB). This refers to heavy bleeding with no apparent explanation.

      Is it necessary to consult a doctor?

      If a woman is experiencing heavy or irregular periods that are interfering with her quality of life, then she should consult a GP or gynaecologist.

      What will the doctor do?

      A pelvic examination is usually necessary. If the woman is over 40 years of age, then a pelvic ultrasound scan or a biopsy of the lining of the womb is appropriate. This is to ensure that there is no abnormality with the cells of the lining of the womb.

      An examination called a hysteroscopy is often suggested. This involves placing a fine telescope through the neck of the womb so that the lining of the womb can be seen. Most hysteroscopies are performed without the need for general anaesthesia.

      How are heavy periods treated?

      If there are no signs of an underlying abnormality, treatment is not absolutely necessary but most women prefer to have something to help them cope more easily each month.

      If the problems are severe, bleeding may be regulated by tablet treatment. These may be hormonal or non-hormonal.

      Hormonal treatments include the contraceptive pill and danazol (eg Danol).

      Progestogens are effective in making a woman's periods more regular but do not reduce the monthly flow.

      Non-hormonal treatments include tranexamic acid (eg Cyklokapron), which reduces the blood loss by up to half.

      Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) reduce monthly loss by about a third.

      Alternative approaches include the use of a hormone containing contraceptive coil (Mirena), which is suitable for most women.

      Surgical alternatives include destroying the lining of the womb with a laser or applying heat treatment to the lining of the womb with hot water in a balloon. Hysterectomy - the removal of the uterus - is commonly performed for heavy periods. These two surgical procedures are only appropriate for women who do not wish to have any more children.

      If a diagnosis of an underlying condition is made, then the treatment will be tailored towards that condition.

      If the woman is anaemic, iron or folic acid supplements may be needed.

      Hope tobe useful for you

  13. QUESTION:
    Is anyone on Tamoxifen having side effects and what are you doing about them?

    • ANSWER:
      The following side effects are associated with Tamoxifen Oral:

      Infrequent side effects:
      Discharge from the Vagina Less Severe
      Irregular Periods Less Severe
      "Change of Life" Signs Less Severe
      Genital Itching Less Severe
      Dry Skin Less Severe
      Rash Less Severe
      Weight Gain Less Severe
      Head Pain Less Severe
      Feel Like Throwing Up Less Severe
      Throwing Up Less Severe

      Rare side effects:
      Disease of the Retina of the Eye Severe
      Cataracts Severe
      Disease of the Cornea of the Eye Severe
      Sudden Blindness and Pain Upon Moving the Eye Severe
      Blood Clot in Lung Severe
      Blood Clot Severe
      Hepatitis caused by Drugs Severe
      Polyps of the Lining of the Uterus or the Endometrium Severe
      Overgrowth of the Uterine Lining Severe
      Drowsiness Severe
      Feeling Weak Severe
      Cancer in the Lining of the Uterus Severe
      Confused Severe

      Side Effects

      Tamoxifen's unwanted side effects depend on whether you have any personal history of blood clots or endometrial cancer, your susceptibility to hot flashes associated with menopause, and the ups and downs of depression. Add to these the cost of the medication, the fact that some women have real trouble sticking to the routine of taking a daily dose of pills, and many women's philosophical objection to taking any regular medication except perhaps for vitamins.

      Although most side effects are not life threatening, the lesser side effects may diminish your quality of life, sometimes to a considerable degree.

      Blood Clots

      One potentially serious side effect of tamoxifen is blood clots, also known as thrombosis. The most common place for a clot to form is in the leg veins. These clots are dangerous because they can break loose, travel to the lung, and clog a vital blood vessel; this is called a pulmonary embolism. If you have had any history of blood clots, tamoxifen will probably not be an option for you. The possibility of pulmonary embolism is less than 1%, meaning that it's likely to affect less than one woman in a hundred taking tamoxifen. Tamoxifen can also cause inflammation of a blood vessel. Call your doctor if you notice any new swelling, redness, discomfort, or warmth in your legs.

      Endometrial Cancer and Other Uterine Effects

      Another serious risk associated with tamoxifen treatment is cancer of the lining of the uterus (endometrial cancer) in a woman beyond menopause who still has her uterus. Regardless of tamoxifen use, women affected by breast cancer are at increased risk of developing endometrial cancer; tamoxifen, however, does make this slightly higher risk a little higher still. Here, the risk is two women in a thousand, and there are usually -- but not always -- clear early warning signs of trouble. The longer a woman takes tamoxifen, the higher her risk of developing a tamoxifen-induced endometrial cancer. (But the risk is still low, even for women taking tamoxifen for 10 years.) If an endometrial cancer is diagnosed within the first two years of taking tamoxifen, the cancer was most likely there before treatment with the drug began.

      Endometrial cancer -- related or unrelated to tamoxifen use -- can usually be detected in the early stages, and it is usually curable with surgery. Unexpected vaginal bleeding is usually the first sign of trouble, and should be reported to your doctor immediately. You should also have a gynecologic exam every six months. The routine Pap smear, however, is not adequate for detecting endometrial cancer, because it assesses only the health of the cervix (the mouth of the uterus). Ultrasound testing or a uterine tissue sample obtained by biopsy are the most effective ways of evaluating the endometrium, but experts claim no benefit to routine endometrial ultrasounds and biopsies unless you have symptoms. Discuss this issue with your doctor.

      If you have had a hysterectomy (removal of the uterus) because of endometrial cancer, tamoxifen may be contraindicated for your treatment of breast cancer. If, however, you have had a hysterectomy for a benign cause, such as fibroids, endometrial hyperplasia (an overgrowth of normal endometrial cells), or endometrial polyps (finger-like projections made up of normal cells), you don't have to worry about endometrial cancer. Or if you are still menstruating, shedding your endometrial lining every month, then you are not at risk for endometrial cancer.

      Tamoxifen can stimulate the benign changes in the endometrium mentioned previously, and it can also exacerbate underlying endometriosis, in which normal endometrial cells grow outside the uterus in the belly cavity, on the ovaries, or on the bladder.

      Tamoxifen can also affect the uterus wall, which can lead to uneven thickening of the muscle and supportive tissues within the wall. Fibroids, ball-like overgrowths of these tissues, can result, or there can be lumpy bumpiness in one area or throughout the uterine wall. These changes can confuse ultrasound assessment of the endometrium. The ultrasound study can show a thickened or uneven endometrium, when in reality the change is in the underlying uterine wall. No increase in uterine wall cancers has been observed in women taking tamoxifen.

      The benefits of tamoxifen as a breast cancer preventive still outweigh the risk of its contributing to development of an endometrial cancer.

      Hot Flashes

      Tamoxifen can produce menopausal side effects that include vaginal dryness, mood changes, and hot flashes. These sudden flushes can make you miserable and undermine your quality of life, but they do not endanger your life. Most women find hot flashes the worst side effect from tamoxifen. About half the women on tamoxifen are affected by them. Leslie: "I'll be sitting at a meeting, flushed and perspiring. It's damned embarrassing, as well as uncomfortable. Almost as bad is waking up in the middle of the night with those sweats."

      You may find that a regular course of exercise helps moderate the problem. Some women adjust to the hot flashes from tamoxifen; others grow to tolerate the problem, expecting it to diminish over time, and over a number of months it usually eases somewhat. One tip is to figure out how long it takes between taking the dose and the appearance of the hot flash. Then determine what time of day is the least inconvenient for you to have a hot flash, and time your medication to suit your schedule. Most of my patients choose to take their full 20 mg dose at night before going to bed.

      If you're experiencing severe hot flashes despite reasonable solutions, and tamoxifen therapy is strongly indicated, talk with your doctor about two possibilities suggested by Dr. John Eden at the 1996 American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting:

      (1) start with 5 milligrams of tamoxifen and slowly increase the dose up to 20 milligrams daily, or

      (2) try a short-term course of low-dose hormone therapy to ease the transition period. The course should last no more than a few months because the estrogens in hormone therapy are not known to be safe for women with breast cancer.
      Premature Menopause and Fertility Issues

      The menopausal symptoms brought on by tamoxifen tend to be more intense in premenopausal women than in older women. Tina, 35, stayed on tamoxifen for two years, but the hot flashes and other menopausal symptoms, the fear of side effects, and the stress of feeling so out of step with normal women her age finally were too much for her. "I gave it up. I want to try some alternatives, be a little kinder to my body, and enjoy my 30-something age a while longer." Tamoxifen alone does not produce permanent premature menopause. (If you were menstruating regularly before tamoxifen, and tamoxifen stopped or disrupted your menstrual cycles, then your cycles will probably return to your pre-treatment pattern when you discontinue the medication.) But the closer you are in age to menopause, the more likely you are to slide into menopause a little sooner if you are taking tamoxifen.

      If you are on tamoxifen and are premenopausal, you may still be fertile. If you do not want to get pregnant, you must use a barrier form of birth control. Oral contraceptives contain estrogens, which, as I have noted, are not known to be safe for women who have had breast cancer. (One of my patients on tamoxifen was asked what birth control method she was using. "Possum." "Possum? What's that?" "As soon as I hear him coming up the stairs, I play dead.")

      It's also important to stick to your daily dose schedule of tamoxifen; if tamoxifen is taken intermittently, it can actually stimulate the ovaries like a fertility drug. If you want to get pregnant, stop the tamoxifen before you start trying, because the drug should not be taken during any stage of pregnancy. However, if you do get pregnant while on tamoxifen and you want to keep the pregnancy, stop the tamoxifen and don't drive yourself crazy worrying about the effect that a month or so of tamoxifen might have had on the baby. There are no reported birth defects in people attributable to tamoxifen (just in an occasional laboratory rat).

      Vaginal Changes

      You may have noticed a watery or malodorous discharge, or dryness, irregular periods, or thinning of the vaginal wall while on tamoxifen. As many women note an increase in vaginal discharge (an estrogen-like effect) as report dryness (an anti-estrogen effect). Infrequently, intercourse may become painful, which can diminish your sexual activity or bring it to a halt. Discuss any changes with your physician. Again, any new pattern of vaginal bleeding requires immediate medical attention to rule out cancerous change of the endometrium.

      Nausea and Vomiting

      Reported by about 10% of the women on tamoxifen, this problem generally resolves itself in a couple of weeks. It's uncommon to have it last more than a few months. This can be another unpleasant experience, even if it poses no danger.

      Weight Gain

      Chemotherapy, and the steroids that are given with it, cause weight gain in many women, and that weight gain may be perpetuated by tamoxifen. Like many women, you may be certain that tamoxifen makes you gain weight and makes it nearly impossible to lose weight (as long as you are on it). One woman after another tells me about this unending battle with weight gain. "I put on 25 pounds, and it's real hard to get it off. It's been three years and I'm still trying!" It's not known why this weight gain occurs. Perhaps tamoxifen affects your metabolism and the way you process calories.

      Loss of Energy

      You may experience loss of energy with tamoxifen in the same way that you may experience loss of energy with menopause. In both situations, there is less estrogen, estrogen that seems to provide the "go-go juice" of energy for some women. Betsy, on tamoxifen for just a few months, said she had to talk herself into getting up off the sofa and out of the house to walk the short block to the beach. "The only other time I felt like such a cow was when I went on birth control pills. I'm determined to move myself around. I've always been someone who gets things done, and I'm not giving up on that image. If I can't shake this lethargy, I may stop taking tamoxifen." (Eventually Betsy did stop taking tamoxifen and got back her zip.)

      Actually, a whole list of things other than tamoxifen can steal your energy away: lack of exercise, weight gain, pain, hot flashes, fear, uncertainty, anxiety, depression---are all examples.

      Some content was adapted from the book Living Beyond Breast Cancer by Marisa C. Weiss, MD, and Ellen Weiss

  14. QUESTION:
    why would I have another period right after one?
    I have endometriosis, I know this. but, for the last six months or so, I have had consistenlty two periods a month. exactly two weeks in between. recently, I just finished my period and went in for an exam and the next day I started my period again. it started as a trickle and then became like a normal period after that. I have noticed in the past sometimes intercourse could also start my period. does this mean I have scar tissue in the vaginal region? or should I worry about cancer. My mother had uterine cancer. and I am a smoker. all the women I know who have had such irregular bleeding has had cancer. I have had my paps done regularly.

    • ANSWER:
      Dysfunctional uterine bleeding, specifically Metrorrhagia, can be caused by a number of reasons in both women with Endo and those who do not have the disease. Aside from Endo and adhesions, polyps, fibroids and infection, the most common reason for Metrorrhagia is hormonal imbalance. It can almost always be treated effectively based on the underlying cause, once the cause is diagnosed with certainty. You may need to undergo any of the following tests in order for your doc to have a better understanding of what the actual cause is:

      Endometrial biopsy: sample of tissue from the inside of the uterus. The tissue is then examined under a microscope.

      Ultrasound scan: Sound waves are used to get pictures of the uterus, ovaries, and pelvis. The ultrasound probe may be placed on your lower abdomen or into your vagina (AKA "transvaginal").

      Sonohysterogram: an ultrasound scan is done after fluid is injected through a tube into your uterus. This test allows your provider to look for problems with the lining of the uterus.

      Hysteroscopy: Your health care provider inserts a thin metal tube with a light and tiny camera through the vagina and cervix and into the uterus. This allows your provider to see the inside of the uterus.

      Hysterosalpingography: Dye is injected into the uterus and fallopian tubes through the cervix. X-rays are then taken. The dye outlines the shape and size of the uterus and tubes.

      Treatments aside from hormonal medication and laparoscopy to treat Endometriosis include a D&C, hysteroscopy (to remove a polyp, for example), and rarely, depending on the cause, a hysterectomy, which is removal of the uterus. In cases where cancer is found, it is treated accordingly (i.e., surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy).

      Good luck and hope all turns out well for you.

  15. QUESTION:
    I had a polyp inside the uterus Doc adviced me to remove it by laseer treatment, is it neccessary to remove it?

    • ANSWER:
      It is absolutely necesssary to remove it.
      You have not mentioned your age and the problems it is giving you.
      It may give one irregular bleeding, difficulty in conceiving, or if left can grow and become malignent.
      the treatment is very simple,it is not laser but hysteroscopic removal where we insert a small tube into the uterus and remove it and send it for histology.
      so wish you good luck

  16. QUESTION:
    what if i start my period for the 4th time this month?
    i don't know whats wrong with me but i had 4 periods this month i don't know what to do at all

    • ANSWER:
      Normal menstrual bleeding occurs every 21 to 35 days, lasts two to six days and does not occur in the middle of the menstrual cycle. Bleeding that occurs for prolonged periods of time or on and off all month is called menorrhagia. Abnormal menstrual bleeding is considered dysfunctional uterine bleeding, or DUB. Dysfunctional uterine bleeding occurs more frequently when women first start having menstrual cycles and at the end of the menstrual reproductive cycle.

      Anovulation
      Ovulation is the release of an egg each month. Anovulation is lack of ovulation and is most often the cause of DUB, according to Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, or LSUHSC. In a normal menstrual cycle, estrogen rises until an egg releases from a follicle. The leftover shell of the follicle produces progesterone, which maintains the uterine lining for a potential embryo. If no pregnancy occurs, progesterone levels drop, and the menstrual lining is shed. Continuously high estrogen levels stimulate endometrial lining growth until parts begin to break down and bleed. Since different areas are being stimulated and breaking down continuously, constant bleeding occurs.

      Endometrial cancer must be ruled out in every case of DUB, LSUHSC reports. Around 75 percent of cases of endometrial cancer don't occur until after menopause. Obesity, diabetes, a history of polycystic ovary disease, never having had children, and later-than-normal onset of menopause all increase the chances of endometrial cancer. A family or personal history of ovarian cancer or breast cancer, particularly if the woman took tamoxifen, also increases the risk of endometrial cancer.

      Fibroids
      Fibroids, which are common benign growths either inside or outside the uterine walls, often cause heavy bleeding along with bleeding or spotting between periods. Fibroids can be seen on pelvic ultrasound exams. Fibroids occur more frequently in black women and those with a family history of fibroids. Obesity may also increase the risk of fibroids, MayoClinic.com reports. Fibroids may be surgically removed if they're causing excessive bleeding. Pelvic pain, constipation, difficulty urinating and back or leg pain may also occur in women with fibroids.

      Polyps
      Polyps, which are fleshy growths inside the uterus, may cause frequent spotting and constant bleeding. Rarely, polyps may grow to the size of an orange. Frederick R. Jelovsek, MD, of Women's Health Resource reports that polyps may be diagnosed through hysteroscopy -- looking into the uterus with a lighted scope -- or with a sonohysterogram, a procedure involving dye being injected into the uterus and then tracked via X-ray. Surgical removal or medical treatment with drugs that decrease estrogen levels and shrink polyps help control excessive bleeding. Polyps occur more frequently up to menopause, and then they shrink. Between 10 and 24 percent of women undergoing endometrial biopsy or hysterectomy are found to have polyps, according to MDGuidelines.

      Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/257540-what-are-the-causes-of-constant-menstrual-bleeding/#ixzz1w4XSvR3T

  17. QUESTION:
    My period lasts for two weeks?Is this normal?
    I'm 19 years old and I've had my period since I was 8.My period was gone for 3 months and it came back on two weeks ago and it's still on.Is this normal?This has never happened.

    • ANSWER:
      The correct medical definition of heavy periods is the passage of more than 80ml of blood each period. It is seldom realistic or practical, however, to actually measure the blood loss and so doctors rely on the woman's description of her period.

      Periods are considered heavy when:

      a woman bleeds for more than 8 to 10 days, especially if this is repeated month after month.

      a woman bleeds so much that it is difficult for her to attend her job. She may be forced to plan her holidays and leisure time according to the timings of her period.

      the bleeding is continuously so heavy that the woman becomes anaemic.

      the presence of other than small clots for more than one or two days suggests heavy periods.

      'flooding' describes the sudden, unexpected onset of periods, like turning on a tap, and indicates heavy periods.

      Why do some women have heavy and long menstrual flows?

      The causes of prolonged and heavy bleeding are given below.

      In younger women heavy periods are most often due to a temporary hormone imbalance, which eventually corrects itself.

      In the years close to the menopause, (45 years of age onwards) heavy periods are usually a sign of hormone imbalance. However, the possibility of heavy periods being caused by an underlying disease increases with age.

      The following conditions are associated with heavy periods:

      fibroids.

      endometriosis.

      pelvic inflammatory disease.

      polyps of the lining of the womb.

      the commonest cause is a condition called dysfunctional uterine bleeding (DUB). This refers to heavy bleeding with no apparent explanation.

      Is it necessary to consult a doctor?

      If a woman is experiencing heavy or irregular periods that are interfering with her quality of life, then she should consult a GP or gynaecologist.

      What will the doctor do?

      A pelvic examination is usually necessary. If the woman is over 40 years of age, then a pelvic ultrasound scan or a biopsy of the lining of the womb is appropriate. This is to ensure that there is no abnormality with the cells of the lining of the womb.

      An examination called a hysteroscopy is often suggested. This involves placing a fine telescope through the neck of the womb so that the lining of the womb can be seen. Most hysteroscopies are performed without the need for general anaesthesia.

      How are heavy periods treated?

      If there are no signs of an underlying abnormality, treatment is not absolutely necessary but most women prefer to have something to help them cope more easily each month.

      If the problems are severe, bleeding may be regulated by tablet treatment. These may be hormonal or non-hormonal.

      Hormonal treatments include the contraceptive pill and danazol (eg Danol).

      Progestogens are effective in making a woman's periods more regular but do not reduce the monthly flow.

      Non-hormonal treatments include tranexamic acid (eg Cyklokapron), which reduces the blood loss by up to half.

      Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) reduce monthly loss by about a third.

      Alternative approaches include the use of a hormone containing contraceptive coil (Mirena), which is suitable for most women.

      Surgical alternatives include destroying the lining of the womb with a laser or applying heat treatment to the lining of the womb with hot water in a balloon. Hysterectomy - the removal of the uterus - is commonly performed for heavy periods. These two surgical procedures are only appropriate for women who do not wish to have any more children.

      If a diagnosis of an underlying condition is made, then the treatment will be tailored towards that condition.

      If the woman is anaemic, iron or folic acid supplements may be needed.

  18. QUESTION:
    does anyone know what your cervix should be like in early pregnancy?
    i am 4 days late,and my cervix is really high,closed and its quiet soft. We are ttc with our first baby so i am new to all this. I do know though that just before my af my cervix is low.
    I did a hpt this morning and it showed negative :o /.
    My cycle is usually between 29 and 32 days, i am now on cd36!!

    • ANSWER:
      In the biological make up of human species, the reproductive system is one major factor that differentiates men from women. The women's reproductive system is the harbor of human life. The womb, specifically, is where a potential human life is nestled. The women's unique body serves as the breeding ground for the next generations of human race. Thus, the well-being of a woman's reproductive system is crucial not only for women themselves, but for the human race as a whole. Aside from instances of inability to conceive a child, diseases like cancer of the uterus and cancer of the cervix are major threats to women's overall health care condition.

      The cervix is an important part of women's reproductive system. It is the bridge that connects the vagina to the uterus. Its primary role is being the passageway of the blood coming from the uterus and going out of the vagina (menstruation). Also, the cervix is responsible for the production of mucus that aids the travel of sperm cells from vagina to the uterus. But most importantly, the cervix keeps the fetus inside the womb as the cervical canal closes during pregnancy.

      Cancer of the cervix happens when a tumor grows in it. Tumor is a mass of tissues. It is the amalgamation of the unnecessary cells produced in the cervix. Tumor in the cervix can either be benign or malignant. A benign tumor is one that are not cancerous. Benign tumors are not life threatening and can be removed easily without the probability of growing back again. Examples of benign growths that can happen in the cervix are polyps, cysts, and genital warts. Malignant tumor, on the other hand, is the kind that is considered a cancer. Malignant tumors are a great threat to life and can grow back after removal. Malignant tumor is characterized by cells that can travel and spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body. When these cancer cells invade other body parts, they form new tumor and pose equally great harm as that of their threat to the cervix.

      It still remains unexplainable why some women develop cancer of the cervix while others do not. Cervical cancer's main cause still remains a missing piece of the puzzle. What are known by medical experts are things or elements that can increase the probability of women developing this kind of cancer--risk factors. Prolonged use of birth control pills, several childbirths, and cigarette smoking are the most prevalent risk factors. Having multiple sex partners and having a partner who had many sexual partners are also high risk factors. A deteriorated immune system is another very high risk factor for developing cancer of the cervix. Infections from human papillomaviruses and infection of sexually transmitted diseases or HIV are the most prevalent factors that can deteriorate the immune system and increase the chances of having a cancer of the cervix.

      Women suspected to have cancer of the cervix show symptoms like painful sexual intercourse, abnormal bleeding of the vagina, and painful pelvic area. Symptoms that are more indicative of a potential cervical cancer are experienced in between normal menstrual period bleeding, douching or post-intercourse bleeding, and post-menopause bleeding. An early diagnosis is the best way to identify whether the existence of any of these symptoms is already at a cancer stage or not. Colposcopy and biopsy are the modes of diagnosis for suspected cervical cancer cases.

      The staging of cervical cancer proves to be a very complex matter. Five stages (stage 0, stage 1, stage 2, stage 3, and stage 4) are identified levels of cervical cancer. The appropriate treatment for a particular patients depends on what stage the case falls into. The treatment options being administered to most cases are surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, radiation therapy and chemotherapy, or a combination of all these three methods. In surgery, total hysterectomy (cervix and the uterus removal) is done. Radical hysterectomy (removal of uterus, cervix, and other parts of the vagina) is administered to women with grave cases. Lymph nodes around the area of the tumor may also be removed to prevent the spread of cancer cells. In chemotherapy, cancer-killing drugs are entered into the bloodstream for faster treatment and prevention of further spread. Radiation therapy is the use of high-energy rays to hinder the growth of cancer cells. It can be internally (insertion of small radioactive implants) or externally (use of machines outside the body) applied.

  19. QUESTION:
    Do you know anyone who had a polypectomy (removal of a polyp from the uterus)?
    Did she get pregnant afterwards? What was her experience with the procedure (i.e., painful)?

    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      I had several polyps removed a year ago. It was my first ever operation of any sort. You will enjoy the sleep (if your having a d&c) and as far as the pain goes, it's just like waking up with a bad period cramps and maybe some bleeding. I had very bad pain about 2 day's afterwards and heavy bleeding, so be sure to take it easy and rest no matter how good you feel. I felt normal the next day but the pain sure got me later on. Everyone is different so you might not have the same pain as I did. As far as getting preggers, well I have been trying ever since (1 year) with NO LUCK! I have just started taking Ovulex a few day's ago to try and regulate my periods. I hope all goes well with your Opp and it's really not that bad. Baby Dust to all TTC.

  20. QUESTION:
    Anyone else with Endometriosis know how a D&C can help?
    I gave birth to a beautiful baby boy on Nov 4th, 2001. Ever since then I've not been able to concieve, I've had horbile cramps, before, during and after my periods, pain during sex, pain going to the bathroom, exhaustion, the whole 9 yards. My doctor VERBALY diagnosed me in 2001 and I've not been to the doctor since, nor have I had any surgery to find out FOR SURE if I have it. I want to have SOMETHING done about this. But I don't want to have laprascopic surgery. What is a D&C and how is it different from lap surgery? How much could it REALLY help? PLEASE!!! I'M IN PAIN!!!

    • ANSWER:
      A D&C is not appropriate for Endometriosis on any level and has zero role in the diagnosis and treatment algorithm. Dilation and curettage (literally the enlarging and scraping the cervical canal and uterine lining) is helpful for first line treatment of abnormal uterine bleeding, to remove uterine polyps, to remove an IUD, to remove retained placenta after birth, to remove a miscarriage, and in some cases, to perform an abortion or remove an incomplete, missed, or induced abortion. The key here is that D&C is for pathology *inside* the uterus; Endometriosis is the presence of aberrant tissue similar to the lining of uterus found *outside* in other areas of the abdomen (and in other extrapelvic locations for many women, i.e., pleura, etc.). D&C for Endo is a little bit like trying to fix the roof from the basement of the house.

      You can only determine if you have Endo through surgery like the laparoscopy, which is far different from a D&C and involves the entire pelvis. Laparoscopy also enables treatment of the disease through surgical removal during the procedure. If you are totally against having surgery to determine the cause of your pain and infertility - and subsequently allow for definitive treatment of it - you could embark on a course of hormonal suppression through oral contraceptives, depo Provera or even GnRH therapy like Lupron (which is absolutely not indicated for use without an accurate diagosis first, but some doctors do use it as a diagnostic measure). While those may *temporarily* help your painful symptoms, they all come with side effects and will all delay your chances for conception, as you must not become pregnant on them.

      My advice to you is to consent to the surgery, but do it with a doctor who actually understands the disease and doesn't think a D&C is the answer to Endometriosis. Some helpful links:

      http://www.endocenter.org/pdf/2006ScreeningEducationKit.pdf
      http://www.centerforendo.com/
      http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/erc
      http://www.endocenter.org/pdf/PreDiagnosisGnRH.pdf
      http://www.endocenter.org/pdf/surgery%20vs.%20gnrh.pdf
      http://www.drcook.com

      Good luck to you.

  21. QUESTION:
    What does it mean to have a D&C?
    Why would someone have to get 6 D&C's before having a hysterectomy?

    • ANSWER:
      One reason women have a D&C is to clean out the uterus, it may have developed polyps that are causing irregular bleeding. The D&C will take them out. If they come back they can be removed again. The procedure is done for other reasons too. So if the problem that person has persisted then it is a good idea to have a hysterectomy, which is the removal of the uterus. Problem solved.

  22. QUESTION:
    can you die from uterine polyps?

    • ANSWER:
      no
      Uterine polyps are growths attached to inner wall of the uterus and protruding into the uterine cavity. Overgrowth of cells in the lining of the uterus (endometrium) leads to the formation of uterine polyps. The sizes of uterine polyps range from a few millimeters — no larger than a sesame seed — to several centimeters — golf ball sized or larger. They are attached to the uterine wall by a large base or a thin stalk.

      You can have one or many uterine polyps. They usually stay contained within your uterus, but occasionally, they may slip down through the opening of the uterus into your vagina. Although they can happen in younger women, uterine polyps most commonly occur in women in their 40s and 50s.
      It's possible to have uterine polyps without signs or symptoms.

      Signs of uterine polyps include:
      Irregular menstrual bleeding — for example, having frequent, unpredictable periods of variable length and heaviness
      Bleeding between menstrual periods
      Excessively heavy menstrual periods
      Vaginal bleeding after menopause
      Infertility

      Uterine polyps can develop in pre- or postmenopausal women. Postmenopausal women may experience only light bleeding or spotting.

      When to see a doctor
      Seek medical care if you have:
      Vaginal bleeding after menopause
      Bleeding between menstrual periods
      Irregular menstrual bleeding

      Whether uterine polyps lead to infertility remains controversial. However, if you have uterine polyps and you've been experiencing infertility, removal of the polyps might boost your fertility. In one study, infertile women who underwent surgical polyp removal (hysteroscopic polypectomy) had much higher pregnancy rates — 63 percent versus 28 percent — after intrauterine insemination (IUI) than did women with uterine polyps who underwent IUI alone.

      Uterine polyps also may present an increased risk of miscarriage in women undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF). If you're undergoing IVF treatment and you have uterine polyps, your doctor will probably recommend polyp removal before embryo transfer.
      Your first appointment will likely be with either your primary care provider or a gynecologist.

      Because appointments can be brief, and it can be difficult to remember everything you want to discuss, it's a good idea to prepare in advance of your appointment.

      What you can do
      Write down any symptoms you're experiencing. Include all of your symptoms, even if you don't think they're related.
      Make a list of any medications and vitamin supplements you take. Write down doses and how often you take them.
      Have a family member or close friend accompany you, if possible. You may be given a lot of information at your visit, and it can be difficult to remember everything.
      Take a notebook or notepad with you. Use it to write down important information during your visit.
      Prepare a list of questions to ask your doctor. List your most important questions first, in case time runs out.

      For uterine polyps, some basic questions to ask include:
      What could be causing my symptoms?
      What kinds of tests might I need?
      Are medications available to treat my condition?
      What side effects can I expect from medication use?
      Under what circumstances do you recommend surgery?
      Could uterine polyps affect my ability to become pregnant?
      Will treatment of uterine polyps improve my fertility?
      Are there any alternative treatments I might try?

      Make sure that you understand completely everything that your doctor tells you. Don't hesitate to ask your doctor to repeat information or to ask follow-up questions for clarification.

      What to expect from your doctor
      Some potential questions your doctor might ask include:
      How long have you been experiencing symptoms?
      How often do you experience these symptoms?
      How severe are your symptoms?
      Does anything seem to improve your symptoms?
      Does anything seem to make your symptoms worse?
      Have you been treated for uterine polyps or cervical polyps in the past?
      Have you experienced any issues with infertility? Do you wish to become pregnant?
      I

  23. QUESTION:
    Health question concerning ex. excessive vaginal bleeding. don't read if u get grossed out easy.?
    started @ 13yrs. all was fine til 16 then started missing periods. @ 20 wasn't having hardly any, took meds to have it. took over 5yrs. to get pregnant. now it won't stop. it comes whenever/wherever. in nov. i had a d&c cuz indometrem tissue was thick. was ok 4 a few wks. dr. said i have poly cyst, no tumors, harmons r fine, etc.. been taking metformin to help, but is not helping. at times it's light & other times, i'm flooding. it's not just reg. bleeding, it's huge clots. can't even bathe w/o using a tampon. sometimes a super plus kotex tampon will be full in 10 min. at times i have to wear a tampon & a pad. don't understand why all the bleeding & huge clots when i just had a d&c in nov. it's wearing me down, don't feel like doing anything, no energy r anything. plus it's driving me crazy, not to mention it's killing my hubby to not have sex. if it does stop a few days, time i have sex, it comes right back.
    does anyone have/had this prob. or know what's going on or what i can do?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi,

      your condition is called Menorrhagia and there are many causes; I am listing the main ones here:

      Hormonal imbalance
      fibroid of uterus
      Polyps
      Ovarian cyst
      dysfunction of ovaries
      adenomyosis
      pregnancy complication
      intrauterine device
      cancer
      medical conditions
      medicines

      Treatment
      Specific treatment for menorrhagia is based on a number of factors, including:

      Your overall health and medical history
      The extent of the condition
      The cause of the condition
      Your tolerance for specific medications, procedures or therapies
      Your doctor's expectations for how the condition will progress
      Effects of the condition on your lifestyle
      Your opinion or personal preference
      Drug therapy for menorrhagia may include:

      Iron supplements.
      Prostaglandin inhibitors. These include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others) to help reduce cramping and blood flow.
      Oral contraceptives.
      Progesterone. The hormone progesterone can help correct hormonal imbalance and reduce menorrhagia.
      If you have drug-induced menorrhagia from taking hormone medication, you and your doctor may be able to treat the condition by changing or stopping your medication.

      You may need surgical treatment for menorrhagia if drug therapy is unsuccessful. Treatment options include:

      Dilation and curettage (D and C) which you already had done.
      Operative hysteroscopy. This procedure uses a tiny tube with a light (hysteroscope) to view your uterine cavity and can aid in the surgical removal of a polyp that may be causing increased menstrual bleeding.

      Endometrial ablation. Using ultrasonic energy, your doctor permanently destroys the entire lining of your uterus (endometrium). After endometrial ablation, most women have normal menstrual flow. However, some women have little or no menstrual flow after the procedure. Endometrial ablation negatively affects your ability to become pregnant.

      Endometrial resection. This surgical procedure uses an electrosurgical wire loop to remove the lining of the uterus. Both endometrial ablation and endometrial resection benefit women who have very heavy menstrual bleeding but don't have other underlying uterine problems such as large fibroids, polyps or cancer. Like endometrial ablation, this procedure negatively affects your ability to become pregnant.

      Hysterectomy. This surgical removal of the uterus and cervix is a permanent procedure that causes sterility and cessation of menstrual periods.

      Ideally, you should seriously look at the three options mentioned last; hopefuly you will get well with endometrial ablation or endometrial resection and will not have to go for hysterectomy, which is done only as a last resort. But you definitely can resort to appropriate medication to ensure that your health is maintained and you recoup enough blood in the interim.

      I am sure you will recover and be well soon. all the best.

  24. QUESTION:
    EXTREMELY HEAVY BLEEDING on my period. huge blood clots...going on eight days...?
    For eight days or so I have had horrible horrible cramping and bleeding. Im worried Im losing to much blood. I can litterally sit on the toilet and it comes out. I only have a period like three times a year but I have never been through anything like this. I took the Depo Shot in Nov. But havnt had any problems. Tell me if this is normal.. I have been through 1 1/2 boxes of regular tampons (i completely soaked through one in 10 mins) A box of 8 super tampons.. And Starting on my second box of super plus tampons with 18 in them. and now Im wearing pads and tampons to control the bleeding. I figured the 7th day it would slow down but it hasnt slowed down at all and isnt acting like it wants to. Is there something wrong with me? could it be something serious? Im 18 no insurance and Im getting scared.
    this was my ? I asked a about four days ago and some of the answers and a little more input of whats been going on.

    http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index;_ylt=ApCAnhp.IYIXto_.3Fec4lrsy6IX;_ylv=3?qid=20091221214636AAa2VBP

    • ANSWER:
      You need to see a gynecologist. It may be from the shot and your hormones may be messed up but anytime someone goes through things within and hour it's considered menorrhagia. When you see the doctor don't just say you have heavy bleeding because that's a general term. You have to tell him/her how many supplies you go through. Until I did my doctor didn't look into what could be causing it. I had a pre-op diagnosis of fibroids and adenomyosis (endometriosis in the uterine muscle). I had 10 day to two weeks of bleeding and couldn't be away from a bathroom more than 20 minutes at a time. The pain was controlled with Tylenol 3 then Vicodin after the pain got worse until my hysterectomy at age 29.

      There are some things that can be done but if you want kids you're kind of limited. Any ablation for heavy bleeding is usually done for women that are finished having kids. A myomectomy can be done to preserve fertility of someone who has fibroids and heavy bleeding from them. It could also be polyps that need to be diagnosed and treated. If there's any chance of pregnancy it may be a miscarriage but either way you should see a doctor. Because you don't have insurance you may save money better by seeing a doctor in an office or going to an urgent care center. An Emergency room will bill minimum of 1,000.00 where I live. Good luck and feel better.

      Edited: I looked at your other post where you said you had black or dark clots. To me when I heard that I was thinking of adenomyosis. With adenomyosis it can cause that but it's usually seen in women who have had a baby. Since you said you have been on the shot I would ask the doctor about it because the shot may make your body think it's pregnant. Here's some more info I dug out of my previous responses that may help you.

      "Adenomyosis-endometriosis in the uterine muscle that can sometimes cause heavy bleeding going through more than one supply within an hour and you may also pass clots. It can only be truly diagnosed after a hysterectomy(removal of the uterus) but an ultrasound may show an appearance of what can look like adenomyosis and on exam the doctor may feel a soft and/or boggy uterus. The uterus may also be enlarged on exam. It can also cause many small clots (I had some about the size of a dime to larger) that are very dark in color like black looking or bigger ones the size of a strawberry, fist, or you get the idea can be a symptom of adenomyosis. You may also have a lot of cramps not just during your period but also may feel bloated and have crampiness other times when you aren't having your period

      Fibroids-not cancerous tumor in the uterus that can be removed or shrunk. They can be diagnosed on ultrasound. If you want to preserve your fertility there's something called a myomectomy. If you don't want any kids they can shrink them with somethings and one I know of is where a dye is injected into the arteries of the uterus and they end up shrinking. Fibroids may be a cause of heavy bleeding or enlarged uterus and if they aren't causing any symptoms or preventing pregnancy usually they are left alone.

      Hormonal imbalances- anything that may not be right even if your ovaries are functioning. Sometimes women who get near menopause may have heavier periods but I'm not exactly sure why."

      "HYPERMENORRHEA

      M—Malformations include bicornate uterus, congenital ovarian cysts, endometriosis, ectopic pregnancies, and retained placenta.
      I—Inflammation recalls cervicitis, endometritis, and pelvic inflammatory disease.
      N—Neoplasms include fibroids, carcinoma, and polyps of the cervix and endometrium. One should also not forget choriocarcinoma, hydatidiform moles, and hormone-producing tumors of the ovary.
      T—Trauma includes perforation of the uterus, excessive intercourse during the menses, and introduction of foreign bodies into the uterus.
      S—Systemic diseases include anemia and the coagulation disorders such as hemophilia, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, and scurvy. Also in this category are lupus erythematosus and endocrine disorders, especially hypothyroidism and dysfunctional uterine bleeding from disproportion in the output of estrogen and progesterone by the ovary.
      Approach to the DiagnosisThe diagnosis includes a thorough pelvic examination, CBC, coagulation studies, thyroid function tests, and perhaps other endocrine tests. Ultrasonography is ordered next. If all these are normal, a trial of estrogen or progesterone supplementation or a dilatation and curettage (D & C) may be indicated. Culdoscopy, peritoneoscopy, and a hysterosalpingogram may be necessary before performing an exploratory laparotomy and, if necessary, a hysterectomy. A gynecologist or endocrinologist will be helpful in solving the diagnostic dilemma in many cases."

      What does it mean if your period lasts for 2 weeks?http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index;_ylt=Avwu.vmuuhUphmRBdS9YMnQjzKIX;_ylv=3?qid=20091114131239AA4TE6K

      Is it healthy for a women to clot so much when she has her period?
      http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index;_ylt=AoAmo.R_57kcNWro3J9VLj8jzKIX;_ylv=3?qid=20090123182235AAZjh3n

      (not mine but more info)
      Why does my mom get her period for 2 weeks straight?
      http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index;_ylt=AgmPKuYQOLKZiSiOm_d9D64jzKIX;_ylv=3?qid=20090613110740AAu8szk

  25. QUESTION:
    fibroids in uterus?
    yesterday i found out i had fibroids in my uterus actually a year ago i was diagnosed thru ultra sound then six months ago another ultrasound came back showing no more,now again i have them do they cause infertility?my DR. says no but i really don't like him i'm looking for a female gyno.my periods are very long and heavy with lots of pain he says fibroids do not cause pain well what does he know he's a man.test also showed polyps in to parts of my colon and are alot scattered he says that's what's most likely causing my pain and i think it's a female problem that's causing my pain is he just trying to throw me back to my regular DR. or do you think that he's wright that i should be worried about my polps then anything else wright now,he says i'm fine in the female dept why can't i believe it?buy the way i'm 35 and it just seems impossible to have so may polyps in my colon.

    • ANSWER:
      I had Fibroid removal surgery in April and it took care of a lot of the problems. I have always had them but pregnancy made them get bigger.

      I was also in the process of being a Surrogate and found out that Estrogen makes them get bigger. Mine got so big that the doctor said that if I was to get pregnant that there would not be enough room for me to carry a baby to full term. Subsequently I had a miscarriage with my couple because of their size.

      Go to another doctor because yours does not seem to know his A$$ from his hand (excuse the lang.)! They cause heavy bleeding, clotting and bad cramping. They, YES, can cause infertility unless taken care of.

      My doctor now (whom is male) is a second opinion doctor that I went to because my original doctor (a female) said that I should get a complete hysterectomy at the age of 31. NO WAY! I AM TOO YOUNG! My new doctor said that I would be better off having a hysteroscopy and that my uterus was the size of a womans whom would be 8-10 weeks pregnant. They ended up taking out one that was 6mm by 6 1/2mm and becoming neucrotic along with 2 medium sized ones and 5 smaller ones. Now I am completely healed and feel better than ever! I look thinner now too!

      A lot of women have them but they usually don't cause any problems. My doctor said that by menopause most women have them but don't feel them because menstration has stopped. Also by that time some are getting hysterectomys and they go away at that time.

      Please if you only remember one thing about my letter, is that above all else, get a second opinion. And a third if you are not satisfied with what you are hearing.

      Good luck to you! :)

      P.S. I looked on www.webmd.com to get info on fibroids and their treatment. Maybe it will help you in making an informed decision.

  26. QUESTION:
    Bleeding after D & C and polyp removal?
    My sister and I both have PCOS she has been bleeding since July of 2011.Last year they did an ultrasound found nothing and put her on Provera.Just this February she went to GYN and they admitted her to the hospital because of how long she was bleeding and how heavy.Her blood count was low.She had an ultrasound done they found polyps.She had D & C done and had the polyps removed do not remember if they were uterine or cervical.She was given 2 units of blood.She was having trouble on provera so the doctor took her off.She came home and is still bleeding has not stopped.Her GYN put her on Sprintec she was taking 1 a day then they told her double up take 2 a day she was getting sick so they started her back on one a day.She said it is doing like the provera did helping during the day but at night she bleeds bad.The GYN has been see her regulary running her CBC and it keeps dropping again and they told her she is anemic.They did a biopsy during the D & C came back fine.Now she is on the sprintec and they have her on folic acid.She says her legs hurt her all the she still is bleeding has not stopped.I know she has signs of endrometriosis but they have never diagnosed her with it.They said her lining is thin is why she was bleeding for so long but she has not stopped.I am becoming worried about her because she is my twin.I have read that endrometrial cancer does not always show up on first biopsy or pap smear.I am really worried about her.I was reading abouth other pills that might help since she has been on provera did not work or the sprintec came acorss the mini pill which is just progestin was reading think it be better for her.I just wonder if nayone has an insight to whats going on with her.She had D & C, had polyps removed and has been told he rlining is thin.I was thinking maybe early menopause or just bleeding from being backed up from when she has no periods.I myself get a period every 3 or 4 months because of PCOS I have had a pap smear came back fine and was told my uterus is abnormally thick from not having enough periods.I am just really concerned about my ssiter bleeding htis long and has not stopped.Are the doctors overlooking something.

    • ANSWER:

  27. QUESTION:
    can you please?
    tell me what, polyps are, i dont know if i have spelled it right, because i have never heard of them before, the reason i want to know is, my brother has to go into hospital to have some removed, have i got reason to worry, blue

    • ANSWER:
      A polyp is an abnormal growth of tissue (tumor) projecting from a mucous membrane. If it is attached to the surface by a narrow elongated stalk it is said to be pedunculated. If no stalk is present it is said to be sessile. Polyps are commonly found in the colon, stomach, nose, sinus(es), urinary bladder and uterus. They may also occur elsewhere in the body where mucous membranes exist like the cervix[1] and small intestine

      Colorectal polyp
      Main article: Colorectal polyp
      Colon polyps are uncommonly associated with symptoms. Occasionally rectal bleeding, and on rare occasions pain, diarrhea or constipation may occur because of colon polyps. Colon polyps are a concern because of the potential for colon cancer being present microscopically and the risk of benign colon polyps transforming with time into colon cancer. Since most polyps are asymptomatic, they are usually discovered at the time of colon cancer screening with either digital rectal exam (DRE), flexible sigmoidoscopy, Barium enema, colonoscopy or virtual colonoscopy. The polyps are routinely removed at the time of colonoscopy either with a polypectomy snare (P.Deyhle, 1970) or with biopsy forceps. If an adenomatous polyp is found with flexible sigmoidoscopy or if a polyp is found with any other diagnostic modality, the patient must undergo colonoscopy for removal of the polyp(s). Even though colon cancer is usually not found in polyps smaller than 2.5 cm, all polyps found are removed since the removal of polyps reduces the future likelihood of developing colon cancer. When adenomatous polyps are removed, a repeat colonoscopy is usually performed in three to five years.

      Most colon polyps can be categorized as sporadic.

      It would help if you could define what type of polyp it is. Have a look on the link. I hope your brother is better soon.

  28. QUESTION:
    What are exactly Cervical polyps?
    Hi...well after no period since December of last year, and after 2 blood tests, 2 home tests, 2 urine tests (doctor's office as well as the blood tests) The doctor then sent me to make me a pelvic ultrasound and well they made the ultrasound then the doctor asked me if I was trying to have a baby or If I wanted a baby, and also asked me If I was sexually active so I said I didn't want a baby now, and yes I was sexually active, but the question about the baby scared me, why did he ask that? Anyways, after those questions they inserted something inside to check the cervix I think and it kinda hurt, and I asked so many times if there was something wrong because they looked suddenly so serious, but they didn't tell me anything! Then they told me that my doctor was going to call me in a few days to tell me the results, but while I was putting my pants on I heard one of the nurses say "how do you you spell polyps" (or something like that)...Can my lack of periods be related to polyps?
    Btw...I'm 21 years old, and also...has anyone been in a similar situation? Thank You

    • ANSWER:
      Yes it is possible that they are the reason you're not regular. My sister has the same condition and they had to surgically remove hers.Cervical Polyp is a projectile growth originating which that start on the surface of the cervix or endocervical canal. The cervix is the lower part of the uterus (womb) and is often called the neck of the womb. Cervical polyp can be associated with Chronic inflammation, increase estrogen levels that the body does not respond well with, or local congestion of cervical blood vessles. Cervical polyps are small, soft, growths that protrude from the mouth of the cervix. Cervical Polyp are very common. They occur most often during pregnancy. Women of any age may have cervical polyps. A polyp that arises from the glandular epithelium of the cervix.Cervcal polyps is very common in the ages of 20 and over who had children. It is fairly common to find one single polyp and in some cases 2 more are found. Large polyps often produce symptoms. When symptoms are present, the most common symptoms are:

      Bleeding between periods.
      Abnormal, heavy bleeding during your menstrual cycle.
      Bleeding after menopause.
      Discharge, which can be foul-smelling if there is an infection.
      Abnormally heavy periods ( menorrhagia ).
      White or yellow mucous discharge (leukorrhea).
      Between menstrual periods.
      After menopause.
      After douching.
      Cervial Polyp Disease are not related to transmitted diseases but are very rarely related to cancer. Cervical polyps are non-cancerous which can block the cervix and cause problems getting pregnant. The cause of cervical polyps is not well understood, but they are associated with inflammation of the cervix. Only a single polyp is present in most cases, but sometimes two or three are found. They are rare in females who have not started menstruating. They can also result from long-term (chronic) inflammation, an abnormal response to an increase in estrogen levels, or congestion of blood vessels in the cervical canal, the causes of Cervical polyp are :

      A hormonal imbalance during adolescence or menopause is the most common cause of heavy menstrual bleeding.
      Uterine fibroid tumors are another very common cause of excessive menstruation.
      Cervical polyps are small, fragile growths that begin in either the mucosal surface of the cervix, or the endocervical canal and protrude through the opening of the cervix.
      Endometrial polyps are typically non-cancerous, growths that protrude from the lining of the uterus.
      Cervical polyps need to be removed which are surgery best traetment options. Polyps can be removed during a simple, outpatient procedure, the main treatment are below :

      Removal of the polyp. It is done as an outpatient procedure.
      electrocautery or laser vaporization.
      Antibiotic therapy is usually prescribed because many polyps are infected.
      Most cervical polyps are benign, the excised tissue is usually sent to a pathologist for microscopic examination (some cervical cancers may have appeared as a polyp )
      He or she may put a type of paste on the cervix to control any bleeding.
      Removal of the polyp's base is done by electrocautery or with a laser.
      Large polyps and polyp stems that are very broad usually need to be removed in an operating room using local, regional or general anesthesia

  29. QUESTION:
    Missed my period, but i dont think im pregnant, what else could it be?
    I just recently found out I have a polyp in my uterus. It is least than 1 cm. I found out because i was having alot of pain and they did an ultrasound..my doctor then told me that i shouldnt be having pain from this. but i have been having period cramps for a month and no period. also i researched uterine polyps and it said that you bleed heavly when you have them. my last period was very light and lasted 2 days and this month i just didnt get it.. does this mean there could be something esle wrong with me?
    i had blood work done about 2 weeks ago so dont think im pregnant.

    • ANSWER:
      consult a gynaecologist.let you be examined thoroughly.exclude polyp ,fibroid adenomyosis ,endrometriosis.when polyp is found ,you need D C and removal .simple pregnancy test exclude preganancy.just guidelines are given .take care .need notget worried.

  30. QUESTION:
    What is a D&C?(after miscarriage?)?

    • ANSWER:
      Dilation and Curettage (D&C) Introduction
      The dilation and curettage procedure is called a D&C. The D stands for dilation, which means enlarging. Curettage (the C) means scraping. Together, this procedure involves expanding or enlarging the entrance of a woman’s uterus so that a thin, sharp instrument can scrape or suction away the lining of the uterus and take tissue samples.

      Today, the procedure is routine and considered safe. It is minor surgery performed in a hospital or ambulatory surgery center or clinic. D&C is usually a diagnostic procedure and seldom is therapeutic. It may stop bleeding for a little while (2-6 months), then the prior abnormal bleeding tends to return.

      A generation ago, many women were not given this option for so-called female problems. Instead, they were left with the option of hysterectomy (complete removal of the uterus/womb) or other major surgery.

      A D&C is seldom done as a lone procedure anymore. It is most frequently done as an adjunct procedure to a hysteroscopy and/or polypectomy. A D&C is often used for the following conditions:

      Irregular bleeding: You may experience irregular bleeding from time to time, including spotting between periods. If the spotting develops into continuous midcycle bleeding, your health care provider may perform a D&C to investigate the cause of bleeding.

      Too much bleeding: Bleeding with long, heavy periods, or bleeding after menopause, can signal a number of problems. These symptoms may not need immediate investigation. You may observe and record them. At some point, though, your doctor may look for a cause that is best detected with a hysteroscopy.

      Fibroids and polyps: These conditions are very common. In fact, they are thought to occur in about 20% of all women. Fibroid tumors are noncancerous growths appearing in and on the uterus. Some even grow out from the uterine wall on a stalk. Fibroids can cause chronic pain and heavy bleeding. Polyps, like fibroids, are noncancerous growths and are a common cause of irregular bleeding. Polyps and fibroids can have symptoms that resemble other more serious causes of bleeding. Your doctor may still want to perform a hysteroscopy.

      Endometrial cancer: Cancer is a scary word, especially when it is said about you. A D&C and hysteroscopy are often performed to make certain your symptoms are not caused by uterine cancer. It is, of course, important to detect cancer in its earliest, most curable stages.

      Therapeutic D&C: A D&C is often planned as treatment when the source of the problem is already known. One situation is an incomplete miscarriage or even full-term delivery when, for some reason, the uterus has not pushed out all the fetal or placental tissue inside of it. If tissue is left behind, excess bleeding can result, perhaps even life–threatening bleeding. This is an important reason why your doctor will want to remove any remaining tissue with a D&C.

      Your health care provider will avoid D&C in the following situations, except when absolutely necessary:

      Pelvic infection: If you have an infection involving your reproductive tract, there is a chance the surgical instruments that will enter the vagina and cervix can carry the bacteria from your vagina or cervix into your uterus. There is also an increased risk of injury to infected tissue. For these reasons, your doctor may prefer to wait until after the infection is cleared up with antibiotics before performing the D&C.

      Blood clotting disorders: Doctors depend on the body's natural ability to clot to stop bleeding after curettage. Women with certain blood disorders are usually not given this surgery.

      Serious medical problems: Heart and lung disease, for example, can make general, and sometimes local, anesthesia risky.
      In fact, D&C is no longer performed as commonly as it was even a decade ago, thanks to advances in diagnosis (e.g., ultrasound and hysteroscopy) and nonsurgical hormonal (e.g., oral contraceptives) and antihormonal (e.g., Lupron) therapies.

      Good Luck...

  31. QUESTION:
    omg im going nuts... need help?
    ok so i had polyps removed in feb. i started my cycle in march 06, 2012lasted for 5 days then started my april cycle on the 2nd of april lasted 6 days. then i started the Nuva ring on 4/10/12. took it out on the 27th of april since i was experiencing horrible mood swings. I started my cycle again on the 1st of may. then I had unprotected sex on 5/13/12 and had spotting on 5/14/12. then i had unprotected sex on the 15th. No spotting no blood. Then on the 17th of May I had a full blown period bleeding. Which lasted 4 days. Kept having unprotected sex. 5/31 started cramping bad... 6/11 I started my cycle again. ended 6/16/12. Didnt have intercourse at all since 6/1/12.. Then on 6/25 had unprotected sex. After us. on 6/26 I had stringy egg white type of mucus with some blood in it. 6/27 I had bad cramping and some pink spotting... Any ideas of what may be going on. I do have a bi-cornuate uterus and I have had 4 healthy babies just never had this type of stuff happen to me. I used to be very regular and now after the polyp removal everything is so crazy... any help please.

    • ANSWER:
      It could be a combination of the polyp removal and hormonal residue from the Nuva ring.

      If you are concerned you should contact your gynacologist.

  32. QUESTION:
    What are these large blood clots? Possible miscarriage?
    I think I might have had a miscarriage, but I'm not sure. I'm going to the doctor in the morning to get a blood test and an exam, but it's freaking me out.

    My period ended on September 11 and it was normal with no clots or anything. I've been having breast soreness for the last 3 weeks and fatigue. A week before my period was supposed to come I had slight come and go period like cramping until a few days before my missed period on October 5. My period didn't come and I started having mild cramping two days after the 5th. Then on the 10th I started bleeding excessively. Since the 10th the blood is so heavy that I have to change my tampon every couple of hours or I'll pretty much be in a pool of blood. It's so disgusting.

    The scary thing is that every time I take the tampon out, one or two large, black blood clot things that have been getting bigger each time, comes out. They started out small like a dime and now have gotten to where they can be almost 3 inches long and 1 inch wide. The cramping isn't really there anymore and it was never unbearable. This might sound gross, but I've save a couple of the clot things in a plastic baggie to show the doctor in the morning. What is this? It's scaring me a lot!

    • ANSWER:
      I don't think it is a miscarriage. I think it is your period - but a very heavy one.

      Here is some info I cut and pasted to have a read:

      Let’s take a look at the most common causes of heavy menstrual bleeding:

      1.A hormonal imbalance during adolescence or menopause is the most common cause of heavy menstrual bleeding. During adolescence after girls have their first periods, and for several years before the onset of menopause when menstruation ceases, our hormones levels are fluctuating which often leads to excessive uterine bleeding during our periods. It’s often possible to treat menorrhagia caused by hormonal imbalances with birth control pills or other hormones.
      See also: Very Heavy Menstrual Bleeding

      2.Uterine fibroid tumors are another very common cause of excessive menstruation. It’s important to understand that fibroid tumors are usually benign (non-cancerous) tumors that often occur in the uterus of women during their thirties or forties. While the cause of uterine fibroid tumors is unclear, it is clear that they are estrogen-dependent. Several surgical treatments are available for treating fibroid tumors of the uterus including myomectomy, endometrial ablation, uterine artery embalization, and uterine balloon therapy, as well as hysterectomy. Non-surgical pharmacological treatments for fibroid tumors include GnRH agonists, oral contraceptives, androgens, RU486 (the abortion pill), and gestrinone. Some women find natural progesterone to be an effective treatment for uterine fibroid tumors. Often, when symptoms are not severe or troublesome, a “wait and see” approach is taken. Once menopause occurs, uterine fibroid tumors typically shrink and disappear without treatment.
      See also: Fibroid Tumors

      3.Cervical polyps are small, fragile growths that begin in either the mucosal surface of the cervix, or the endocervical canal and protrude through the opening of the cervix. The cause of cervical polyps is not clear; however, they are often the result of an infection and many times associated with an abnormal response to increased estrogen levels or congestion of the blood vessels located in the cervix. Women most commonly affected by cervical polyps are those over the age of twenty who have had children. A simple out patient office procedure that removes the growth, along with antibiotics, is the usual treatment for cervical polyps.
      See also: Cervical Polyps

      4.Endometrial polyps are typically non-cancerous, growths that protrude from the lining of the uterus. The cause of endometrial polyps is unclear, although they are often associated with an excess of estrogen following hormone treatment or some types of ovarian tumors. Treatments for endometrial polyps include hysteroscopy and D&C. A pathology lab will evaluate endometrial polyps for cancer following removal.
      See also: Endometrial Polyps

      I had a friend who had heavy clotting and she had endometriosis. she had a small procedure and then went on to become pregnant about 6 months later and has had no problems ever since.

      Good luck and try not to worry.

  33. QUESTION:
    3 weeks menstration is this normal?

    • ANSWER:
      No it's not normal. If it's happened only one time it could have been a miscarriage or very weird period due to the hormones that month. I had periods that lasted 10 days to two weeks and were very heavy that I couldn't be away from a bathroom more than 20 minutes at a time. It's best to see your gynecologist and if you don't have one get a good recommendation from another doctor. I can list possible causes of why this can happen but you need to find out what's going on.

      Miscarriage obviously if you had any chance of being pregnant it can take a couple weeks for the bleeding to stop.

      Adenomyosis-endometriosis in the uterine muscle that can sometimes cause heavy bleeding going through more than one supply within an hour and you may also pass clots. It can only be truly diagnosed after a hysterectomy(removal of the uterus) but an ultrasound may show an appearance of what can look like adenomyosis and on exam the doctor may feel a soft and/or boggy uterus. The uterus may also be enlarged on exam. It can also cause many small clots (I had some about the size of a dime to larger) that are very dark in color like black looking or bigger ones the size of a strawberry, fist, or you get the idea can be a symptom of adenomyosis. You may also have a lot of cramps not just during your period but also may feel bloated and have crampiness other times when you aren't having your period

      Fibroids-not cancerous tumor in the uterus that can be removed or shrunk. They can be diagnosed on ultrasound. If you want to preserve your fertility there's something called a myomectomy. If you don't want any kids they can shrink them with somethings and one I know of is where a dye is injected into the arteries of the uterus and they end up shrinking. Fibroids may be a cause of heavy bleeding or enlarged uterus and if they aren't causing any symptoms or preventing pregnancy usually they are left alone.

      Hormonal imbalances- anything that may not be right even if your ovaries are functioning. Sometimes women who get near menopause may have heavier periods but I'm not exactly sure why.

      With me I had a pre-op diagnosis of possible adenomyosis and fibroids. Every ultrasound I had showed what appeared to be a fibroid even in all my pregnancies. I also had trouble emptying my bladder and found that if I had any chance of needing bladder repair I should go in before my surgery so if necessary the urologist could go in and do the repair at the same time of the hysterectomy. It turned out he said that the enlarged uterus was causing the pressure on my bladder and probably caused the urethra to not be as open. He did a procedure (dilation) in the office that took care of the problem but I have since been back many times to get dilated again. It could have been from the narcotic pain meds I was on too.

      I'll see if I can find another link I responded to and get back to you with that link as there's tons of info I typed out for someone else. Check back to see if I edited my post.

      Edited: Here's some so far and I have one more to find that will hopefully give you more info.
      "HYPERMENORRHEA

      M—Malformations include bicornate uterus, congenital ovarian cysts, endometriosis, ectopic pregnancies, and retained placenta.
      I—Inflammation recalls cervicitis, endometritis, and pelvic inflammatory disease.
      N—Neoplasms include fibroids, carcinoma, and polyps of the cervix and endometrium. One should also not forget choriocarcinoma, hydatidiform moles, and hormone-producing tumors of the ovary.
      T—Trauma includes perforation of the uterus, excessive intercourse during the menses, and introduction of foreign bodies into the uterus.
      S—Systemic diseases include anemia and the coagulation disorders such as hemophilia, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, and scurvy. Also in this category are lupus erythematosus and endocrine disorders, especially hypothyroidism and dysfunctional uterine bleeding from disproportion in the output of estrogen and progesterone by the ovary.
      Approach to the DiagnosisThe diagnosis includes a thorough pelvic examination, CBC, coagulation studies, thyroid function tests, and perhaps other endocrine tests. Ultrasonography is ordered next. If all these are normal, a trial of estrogen or progesterone supplementation or a dilatation and curettage (D & C) may be indicated. Culdoscopy, peritoneoscopy, and a hysterosalpingogram may be necessary before performing an exploratory laparotomy and, if necessary, a hysterectomy. A gynecologist or endocrinologist will be helpful in solving the diagnostic dilemma in many cases."

      What does it mean if your period lasts for 2 weeks?
      http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index;_ylt=Avwu.vmuuhUphmRBdS9YMnQjzKIX;_ylv=3?qid=20091114131239AA4TE6K

      Is it healthy for a women to clot so much when she has her period?
      http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index;_ylt=AoAmo.R_57kcNWro3J9VLj8jzKIX;_ylv=3?qid=20090123182235AAZjh3n

      Why does my mom get her period for 2 weeks straight?
      http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index;_ylt=AgmPKuYQOLKZiSiOm_d9D64jzKIX;_ylv=3?qid=20090613110740AAu8szk

  34. QUESTION:
    Suddenly my period is back verry very heavy?
    Speratic irregular period suddenly?

    My periods are normally irregular. But suddenly they are more so. For the last month i have had weird spotting at random times. It happened 3 seperate times over the coarse of the month. So a week ago when i noticed a little blood i wasnt surprised, i figured it was more spoting. It was thicker and dark colored. But it lasted the whole day and continued for 4 more days. By day 2 it was bright pink. Yesterday the bleeding had stoped. I had been having cramps and normal period pain so i had thought it was my period. I woke up this morning to having a very very heavy flow. Far more so that usual. Acording to my calander today it should have started. Normally my periods are heavy, but ive soaked threw 2 tampons over the coarse of an hour.

    • ANSWER:
      A hormonal imbalance during adolescence or menopause is the most common cause of heavy menstrual bleeding. During adolescence after girls have their first periods, and for several years before the onset of menopause when menstruation ceases, our hormones levels are fluctuating which often leads to excessive uterine bleeding during our periods. It’s often possible to treat menorrhagia caused by hormonal imbalances with birth control pills or other hormones.

      Uterine fibroid tumors are another very common cause of excessive menstruation. It’s important to understand that fibroid tumors are usually benign (non-cancerous) tumors that often occur in the uterus of women during their thirties or forties. While the cause of uterine fibroid tumors is unclear, it is clear that they are estrogen-dependent. Several surgical treatments are available for treating fibroid tumors of the uterus including myomectomy, endometrial ablation, uterine artery embalization, and uterine balloon therapy, as well as hysterectomy. Non-surgical pharmacological treatments for fibroid tumors include GnRH agonists, oral contraceptives, androgens, RU486 (the abortion pill), and gestrinone. Some women find natural progesterone to be an effective treatment for uterine fibroid tumors. Often, when symptoms are not severe or troublesome, a “wait and see” approach is taken. Once menopause occurs, uterine fibroid tumors typically shrink and disappear without treatment.

      Cervical polyps are small, fragile growths that begin in either the mucosal surface of the cervix, or the endocervical canal and protrude through the opening of the cervix. The cause of cervical polyps is not clear; however, they are often the result of an infection and many times associated with an abnormal response to increased estrogen levels or congestion of the blood vessels located in the cervix. Women most commonly affected by cervical polyps are those over the age of twenty who have had children. A simple out patient office procedure that removes the growth, along with antibiotics, is the usual treatment for cervical polyps.

      Endometrial polyps are typically non-cancerous, growths that protrude from the lining of the uterus. The cause of endometrial polyps is unclear, although they are often associated with an excess of estrogen following hormone treatment or some types of ovarian tumors. Treatments for endometrial polyps include hysteroscopy and D&C. A pathology lab will evaluate endometrial polyps for cancer following removal.

      Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is an infection of one or more organs that affects the uterus, fallopian tubes, and cervix. PID is, most often, a sexually transmitted disease; however, it sometimes occurs following childbirth, abortion, or other gynecological procedures. The recommended treatment for pelvic inflammatory disease is antibiotic therapy.

      Cervical cancer is a type of cancer that occurs when cells in the cervix become abnormal, multiply out of control, and damage healthy parts of the body. The human papillomavirus, or HPV, is the cause of over ninety percent of all cervical cancers. Treatments for cervical cancer include surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy.

      Endometrial cancer occurs when abnormal cells in the uterus or the endometrium (the lining of the uterus) multiply out of control and damage to the uterus and other organs. While the cause of endometrial cancer is unknown, it is known that women diagnosed with this type of cancer tend are usually over fifty, often have endometrial hyperplasia, or many times use hormone replacement therapy (HRT). The first treatment for endometrial cancer is usually a hysterectomy, possibly followed by chemotherapy and/or radiation treatments.

  35. QUESTION:
    Really Heavy Flow ?
    Ok im only 14 and my period is really heavy. Like i have to change my pad every hour and their OVERNIGHT pads. My breast hurt really bad and i have awful cramps. Any at home remidies or tips ?
    Thax Alot already guys

    • ANSWER:
      I can surely suggest something to give you a little relief; but your symptoms definetely require immediate attention
      However here are some of the things you could think of:

      Specific treatment for menorrhagia [heavy bleeding]is based on a number of factors, including:

      Your overall health and medical history
      The extent of the condition
      The cause of the condition
      Your tolerance for specific medications, procedures or therapies
      Your doctor's expectations for how the condition will progress
      Effects of the condition on your lifestyle
      Your opinion or personal preference
      Drug therapy for menorrhagia may include:

      Iron supplements. If the condition is accompanied by anemia, your doctor may recommend that you take iron supplements regularly. If your iron levels are low but you're not yet anemic, you may be started on iron supplements rather than waiting until you become anemic.
      Prostaglandin inhibitors. These include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others) to help reduce cramping and blood flow.
      Oral contraceptives. Aside from providing effective birth control, oral contraceptives can help regulate ovulation and reduce episodes of excessive or prolonged menstrual bleeding.
      Progesterone. The hormone progesterone can help correct hormonal imbalance and reduce menorrhagia.
      If you have drug-induced menorrhagia from taking hormone medication, you and your doctor may be able to treat the condition by changing or stopping your medication.

      You may need surgical treatment for menorrhagia if drug therapy is unsuccessful. Treatment options include:

      Dilation and curettage (D and C). In this procedure, your doctor opens (dilates) your cervix and then scrapes or suctions tissue from the lining of your uterus to reduce menstrual bleeding. Although this procedure is common and often treats menorrhagia successfully, you may need the procedure repeated if menorrhagia recurs.
      Operative hysteroscopy. This procedure uses a tiny tube with a light (hysteroscope) to view your uterine cavity and can aid in the surgical removal of a polyp that may be causing increased menstrual bleeding.
      Endometrial ablation. Using ultrasonic energy, your doctor permanently destroys the entire lining of your uterus (endometrium). After endometrial ablation, most women have normal menstrual flow. However, some women have little or no menstrual flow after the procedure. Endometrial ablation negatively affects your ability to become pregnant.
      Endometrial resection. This surgical procedure uses an electrosurgical wire loop to remove the lining of the uterus. Both endometrial ablation and endometrial resection benefit women who have very heavy menstrual bleeding but don't have other underlying uterine problems such as large fibroids, polyps or cancer. Like endometrial ablation, this procedure negatively affects your ability to become pregnant.
      Hysterectomy. This surgical removal of the uterus and cervix is a permanent procedure that causes sterility and cessation of menstrual periods. You'll need general anesthesia and hospitalization. Additional removal of the ovaries (total hysterectomy) may cause premature menopause in younger women. Because hysterectomy is permanent, be sure you want this treatment before going ahead with surgery.
      Except for hysterectomy, these surgical procedures are usually done on an outpatient basis. Although you'll usually need a general anesthetic, it's likely that you can go home the same day.

      Hysterectomy: Benefits and alternatives

      Self-care

      Consider these tips for successful self-care of menorrhagia:

      Get your rest. Your doctor may recommend rest if bleeding is excessive and disruptive to your normal schedule or lifestyle.
      Keep a record. Record the number of pads and tampons you use so that your doctor can determine the amount of bleeding. Change tampons regularly, at least every four to six hours.
      Avoid aspirin. Because aspirin may promote bleeding, avoid it. Ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others) often is more effective than aspirin in relieving menstrual discomforts.

      Coping skills

      For some women, menorrhagia is manageable. Follow these tips:

      Work closely with your doctor. Stay informed of all aspects of your condition, including controllable causes and new treatment options. Have your blood count and iron level measured at least once a year.
      Consider iron supplements. With your doctor's approval, consider taking an iron supplement to prevent a lack of iron in your blood (iron deficiency anemia).
      Take good care of yourself. Eat a healthy diet, get enough rest and exercise, and keep your stress under check.
      Seek the support of family and friends. This can help lessen the effects of the condition and make dealing with difficult times more bearable.

  36. QUESTION:
    Whats a D&C operation?

    • ANSWER:
      A D&C is a procedure that must be done after a miscarriage, abortion and sometimes hysterectomy. It stands for Diltion and Curettage. This procedure is done to scrape and collect the tissue (endometrium) from inside the uterus.
      This is what E MedicineHealth has on it in their article specifically on the procedure:

      Together, this procedure involves expanding or enlarging the entrance of a woman’s uterus so that a thin, sharp instrument can scrape or suction away the lining of the uterus and take tissue samples.
      Today, the procedure is routine and considered safe. It is minor surgery performed in a hospital or ambulatory surgery center or clinic. D&C is usually a diagnostic procedure and seldom is therapeutic. It may stop bleeding for a little while (2-6 months), then the prior abnormal bleeding tends to return.
      A generation ago, many women were not given this option for so-called female problems. Instead, they were left with the option of hysterectomy (complete removal of the uterus/womb) or other major surgery.
      A D&C is seldom done as a lone procedure anymore. It is most frequently done as an adjunct procedure to a hysteroscopy and/or polypectomy. A D&C is often used for the following conditions:
      Irregular bleeding: You may experience irregular bleeding from time to time, including spotting between periods. If the spotting develops into continuous midcycle bleeding, your health care provider may perform a D&C to investigate the cause of bleeding.
      Too much bleeding: Bleeding with long, heavy periods, or bleeding after menopause, can signal a number of problems. These symptoms may not need immediate investigation. You may observe and record them. At some point, though, your doctor may look for a cause that is best detected with a hysteroscopy.
      Fibroids and polyps: These conditions are very common. In fact, they are thought to occur in about 20% of all women. Fibroid tumors are noncancerous growths appearing in and on the uterus. Some even grow out from the uterine wall on a stalk. Fibroids can cause chronic pain and heavy bleeding. Polyps, like fibroids, are noncancerous growths and are a common cause of irregular bleeding. Polyps and fibroids can have symptoms that resemble other more serious causes of bleeding. Your doctor may still want to perform a hysteroscopy.
      Endometrial cancer: Cancer is a scary word, especially when it is said about you. A D&C and hysteroscopy are often performed to make certain your symptoms are not caused by uterine cancer. It is, of course, important to detect cancer in its earliest, most curable stages.
      Therapeutic D&C: A D&C is often planned as treatment when the source of the problem is already known. One situation is an incomplete miscarriage or even full-term delivery when, for some reason, the uterus has not pushed out all the fetal or placental tissue inside of it. If tissue is left behind, excess bleeding can result, perhaps even life-threatening bleeding. This is an important reason why your doctor will want to remove any remaining tissue with a D&C.

  37. QUESTION:
    My mate has a polyp..................?
    on her womb and has to get it removed....nvr heard of it before any info would be really appreciated!.............thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Many women with uterine polyps are asymptomatic — having no signs or symptoms. However, other women with uterine polyps experience one or more of the following:

      Irregular menstrual bleeding, such as bleeding varying amounts at frequent but unpredictable intervals
      Bleeding between menstrual periods
      Excessively heavy menstrual periods
      Vaginal bleeding after menopause
      Uterine polyps can develop in pre- or postmenopausal women. Postmenopausal women may experience only light bleeding or spotting.

      When to seek medical advice
      If you experience any signs or symptoms of uterine polyps, such as irregular bleeding or bleeding between periods, seek prompt medical attention.
      Complications
      Uterine polyps may present an increased risk of miscarriage in women undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment for infertility. If you're undergoing IVF treatment and you have uterine polyps, your doctor may recommend polyp removal before embryo transfer.

      Treatment
      Possible treatments for uterine polyps include:

      Surgical removal (excision). If you undergo hysteroscopy, special instruments inserted through the hysteroscope — the device your doctor uses to see inside your uterus — make it possible to cut away and remove any polyps once they're identified. The removed polyp may be sent to a laboratory for microscopic examination.
      Hysterectomy. If closer examination reveals that your uterine polyps contain cancerous cells, surgery to remove your uterus (hysterectomy) becomes necessary.
      Uterine polyps, once removed, can recur. It's possible that you might need to undergo treatment more than once if you experience recurring uterine polyps.

  38. QUESTION:
    Cervical polyps?Anybody know anything about them?or had any exeriences with them?
    Like Found out you had one and also found out you were prego?

    I was just looking trying to find out why i still feel pregnant but have werid spotting and werid period like, and around ovulation time(while cheacking my cervix) werid brown spotting,and ALOT of CM from before period to after my period.

    Any experiences?are anyinformation you can share?

    I have a doc appt but,its not till the 25th so i just wanna get some info or experiences..Thanks!
    Thanks but i have read all about them,im looking for more of experience with them typ of answers!

    • ANSWER:
      Cervical polyps are smooth, red, fingerlike growths in the passage extending from the uterus to the vagina (cervical canal).

      What causes cervical polyps?
      The cause of cervical polyps is not entirely understood. They may result from infection. They can also result from long-term (chronic) inflammation, an abnormal response to an increase in estrogen levels, or congestion of blood vessels in the cervical canal.

      What are the symptoms?
      The most common symptom a woman will notice is abnormal vaginal bleeding that occurs:

      Between menstrual periods.
      After menopause.
      After sexual intercourse.
      After douching.
      Cervical polyps may be inflamed and rarely can become infected, causing vaginal discharge of yellow or white mucus. Polyps often occur without symptoms.

      How are they treated?
      The most common treatment is removal of the polyp during a pelvic examination. This can be done simply by gently twisting the polyp, tying it tightly at the base, or removing it with special forceps. A solution is applied to the base of the polyp to stop any bleeding.

      Polyps do not need to be removed unless they bleed, are very large, or have an unusual appearance.

      Should cervical polyps be tested?
      Almost all cervical polyps are noncancerous (benign), but all polyps should be evaluated.

      Who is affected by cervical polyps?
      Cervical polyps most often occur in women older than 20 who have had several pregnancies. Most cervical polyps are first discovered during a routine pelvic exam. Usually only a single polyp develops, though sometimes two or three are found during an examination.

  39. QUESTION:
    could my wife be pregnant?
    In march my wife took the med provera that bron her beriod on for seven days and it went off in april her period was due to come on the 5th but it didnt show up till the 16th and it came on with out taking a second cycle of provera it cam on by itself, her period for may did not come on and its june now what are the chances she is pregant and she have been have a lot of stomach cramps

    • ANSWER:
      I had menstrual problems all my life...always unpredictable. When I started bleeding irregularly with pressure on my uterus..orgasms, bowel movements, weight lifting, I consulted my doctor and her NP and asked for an ultrasound. They blew me off because I'd been on the pill for a long time; by that time I'd been off it for 6 months. I finally threatened to take my business elsewhere if they didn't do an ultrasound. They finally did and it indicated problems. A histeroscopy and D&C resulted in the discovery & removal of a 7 cm inter-uterin polyp...large enough to warrant concern for cancer but turned up normal.

      Before I had the surgery, I got so bloated & sick, I looked a few months pregnant and experienced pregnancy symptoms of indigestion & constipation yet I tested negative.

      If your wife does a home pregnancy test and turns up negative, she really should consult her doctor. I'd suggest waiting another week or two for another test except for the fact you mentioned she's having stomach cramps. Hmmm....now if it's PMS kind of cramping...yeah, she could be pregnant. I had the same experience a few weeks before testing positive.

      I am now 31 weeks along with our first baby, a little girl due Aug. 3.

      Best of luck to you and your wife. I hope she is OK.

      Take care.

  40. QUESTION:
    low iron...?
    ok so i'm 15 and i recently found out that i have low iron (i'm not sure on how low it is) but i was wondering what are some of the effects of having low iron??

    also what causes someone to have low iron?

    • ANSWER:
      What Causes Iron-Deficiency Anemia?

      Iron-deficiency anemia occurs when there is too little iron in the body. A person can have a low iron level for three reasons:
      Blood loss, either from disease or injury
      Not getting enough iron in the diet
      Not being able to absorb the iron in the diet

      Iron-deficiency anemia also can develop when the body needs higher levels of iron, such as during pregnancy.

      Loss of Iron Through Blood Loss

      In general, when blood is lost, iron is lost. If the body does not have enough iron reserves to make up for the iron loss, a person will develop iron-deficiency anemia.

      Blood is lost in a number of ways. In women, iron and red blood cells are lost when bleeding occurs from very long or heavy menstrual periods as well as from childbirth. Women also can lose iron and red blood cells from slowly bleeding fibroids in the uterus.

      Blood also is lost through internal bleeding. Most often this loss of blood occurs slowly and can be due to:
      A bleeding ulcer, colon polyp, or colon cancer
      Regular use of aspirin or other pain medicine such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (for example, ibuprofen and naproxen)
      Hookworm infection
      Urinary tract bleeding

      A more rapid loss or removal of blood that can cause iron-deficiency anemia occurs in situations such as:
      Severe injuries
      Surgery
      Frequent blood drawing

      Lack of Iron in the Diet

      Meat, poultry, fish, eggs, dairy products, or iron-fortified foods (that is, foods that have iron added) are the best sources of iron found in food. Eating patterns that exclude these foods or food supplements may lead to iron-deficiency anemia. For example, some vegetarians do not eat enough foods with iron. Other people get iron-deficiency anemia because of eating poorly due to alcoholism or aging. Following a diet that has an imbalance of food groups also can lead to this type of anemia. Examples of diets that can lead to iron-deficiency anemia include:
      Low-fat diets. Following a low-fat diet over a long period of time may limit sources of iron from animal foods.
      Diets high in sugars. These types of diets are often low in iron.
      High-fiber diets. These types of diets can slow the absorption of iron.

      Infants who are fed cow’s milk in the first year are at risk for iron-deficiency anemia because cow’s milk is low in iron. The same is true for infants who are breastfed after 4 months of age. These infants need iron supplements.

      An Increased Need for Iron

      People may need more iron at some periods in their lives. If they do not get more iron at these times, they may develop iron-deficiency anemia. Periods of rapid growth or growth spurts in children and teens are a good example of an increased need for iron. Pregnancy also is an example. The need for iron doubles during pregnancy due to an increased blood volume, the growth of the fetus, and the blood loss that occurs during childbirth.

      Inability To Absorb Enough Iron From Food

      Certain factors make it hard for the body to absorb enough iron from food. These factors include:
      Intestinal surgery or diseases of the intestine, such as Crohn’s disease or celiac disease
      Prescription medicines that reduce acid in the stomach
      Low levels of folate, vitamin B12, or vitamin C in the diet

      How Iron-Deficiency Anemia Develops

      First, iron is lost from the body by one of the ways listed above. Usually, this happens slowly over a period of time. Most often, the person is not taking in enough iron to meet the needs of the body.

      Next, the body starts to use iron that it has stored. When the stored iron is used up, new red blood cells have less hemoglobin than normal, and fewer red blood cells are produced. Finally, when the number of red cells is too low, iron-deficiency anemia develops.
      Living With Iron-Deficiency Anemia

      If you have iron-deficiency anemia, you need to see a doctor for treatment but you can recover, feel well, and live a normal life.

      Ongoing Health Care Needs

      You will need regular medical checkups to make sure your iron levels are going up. At your checkups you may have changes made to your medicines or supplements, or you may get further advice on a healthy diet.

      During treatment for anemia, you may feel fatigue (tiredness) and have other symptoms until your iron levels return to normal. This can take months. Tell your doctor if you get any new symptoms or if your symptoms get worse.

      Take iron supplements only with your doctor’s approval. Don’t decide to take them on your own. It is possible to get too high a level of iron in your body and cause a condition called iron overload.

  41. QUESTION:
    what is a D&C?
    i'm confused.

    • ANSWER:
      A D&C is a procedure that must be done after a miscarriage, abortion and sometimes hysterectomy. It stands for Diltion and Curettage. This procedure is done to scrape and collect the tissue (endometrium) from inside the uterus.
      This is what E MedicineHealth has on it in their article specifically on the procedure:

      Together, this procedure involves expanding or enlarging the entrance of a woman’s uterus so that a thin, sharp instrument can scrape or suction away the lining of the uterus and take tissue samples.
      Today, the procedure is routine and considered safe. It is minor surgery performed in a hospital or ambulatory surgery center or clinic. D&C is usually a diagnostic procedure and seldom is therapeutic. It may stop bleeding for a little while (2-6 months), then the prior abnormal bleeding tends to return.
      A generation ago, many women were not given this option for so-called female problems. Instead, they were left with the option of hysterectomy (complete removal of the uterus/womb) or other major surgery.
      A D&C is seldom done as a lone procedure anymore. It is most frequently done as an adjunct procedure to a hysteroscopy and/or polypectomy. A D&C is often used for the following conditions:
      Irregular bleeding: You may experience irregular bleeding from time to time, including spotting between periods. If the spotting develops into continuous midcycle bleeding, your health care provider may perform a D&C to investigate the cause of bleeding.
      Too much bleeding: Bleeding with long, heavy periods, or bleeding after menopause, can signal a number of problems. These symptoms may not need immediate investigation. You may observe and record them. At some point, though, your doctor may look for a cause that is best detected with a hysteroscopy.
      Fibroids and polyps: These conditions are very common. In fact, they are thought to occur in about 20% of all women. Fibroid tumors are noncancerous growths appearing in and on the uterus. Some even grow out from the uterine wall on a stalk. Fibroids can cause chronic pain and heavy bleeding. Polyps, like fibroids, are noncancerous growths and are a common cause of irregular bleeding. Polyps and fibroids can have symptoms that resemble other more serious causes of bleeding. Your doctor may still want to perform a hysteroscopy.
      Endometrial cancer: Cancer is a scary word, especially when it is said about you. A D&C and hysteroscopy are often performed to make certain your symptoms are not caused by uterine cancer. It is, of course, important to detect cancer in its earliest, most curable stages.
      Therapeutic D&C: A D&C is often planned as treatment when the source of the problem is already known. One situation is an incomplete miscarriage or even full-term delivery when, for some reason, the uterus has not pushed out all the fetal or placental tissue inside of it. If tissue is left behind, excess bleeding can result, perhaps even life-threatening bleeding. This is an important reason why your doctor will want to remove any remaining tissue with a D&C.

      Hope this helps to give you better knowledge of the procedure and why they are done and specific reasons why?
      Gina

  42. QUESTION:
    Im constantly on my period can I do about it?
    Ive already been to the doctors

    It has been a full month and I am still on my period. It's a very lite blood flow, every other day it is just spotting. It's getting really irritating, it has prevent me from having intercouse with my husband. This has happened once before but it was ten times worse. I went to the doctors and they did some test but they didn't really give me an answer and birth control should help. The visit ended up costing me a few hundred dollar and the birth control did not help, I still went the whole month with a ultra heavy flow.

    I just want to know if anybody else has this problem and what do you do to control it?

    • ANSWER:
      Normal menstrual bleeding occurs every 21 to 35 days, lasts two to six days and does not occur in the middle of the menstrual cycle. Bleeding that occurs for prolonged periods of time or on and off all month is called menorrhagia. Abnormal menstrual bleeding is considered dysfunctional uterine bleeding, or DUB. Dysfunctional uterine bleeding occurs more frequently when women first start having menstrual cycles and at the end of the menstrual reproductive cycle.

      Anovulation
      Ovulation is the release of an egg each month. Anovulation is lack of ovulation and is most often the cause of DUB, according to Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, or LSUHSC. In a normal menstrual cycle, estrogen rises until an egg releases from a follicle. The leftover shell of the follicle produces progesterone, which maintains the uterine lining for a potential embryo. If no pregnancy occurs, progesterone levels drop, and the menstrual lining is shed. Continuously high estrogen levels stimulate endometrial lining growth until parts begin to break down and bleed. Since different areas are being stimulated and breaking down continuously, constant bleeding occurs.

      Endometrial cancer must be ruled out in every case of DUB, LSUHSC reports. Around 75 percent of cases of endometrial cancer don't occur until after menopause. Obesity, diabetes, a history of polycystic ovary disease, never having had children, and later-than-normal onset of menopause all increase the chances of endometrial cancer. A family or personal history of ovarian cancer or breast cancer, particularly if the woman took tamoxifen, also increases the risk of endometrial cancer.

      Fibroids
      Fibroids, which are common benign growths either inside or outside the uterine walls, often cause heavy bleeding along with bleeding or spotting between periods. Fibroids can be seen on pelvic ultrasound exams. Fibroids occur more frequently in black women and those with a family history of fibroids. Obesity may also increase the risk of fibroids, MayoClinic.com reports. Fibroids may be surgically removed if they're causing excessive bleeding. Pelvic pain, constipation, difficulty urinating and back or leg pain may also occur in women with fibroids.

      Polyps
      Polyps, which are fleshy growths inside the uterus, may cause frequent spotting and constant bleeding. Rarely, polyps may grow to the size of an orange. Frederick R. Jelovsek, MD, of Women's Health Resource reports that polyps may be diagnosed through hysteroscopy -- looking into the uterus with a lighted scope -- or with a sonohysterogram, a procedure involving dye being injected into the uterus and then tracked via X-ray. Surgical removal or medical treatment with drugs that decrease estrogen levels and shrink polyps help control excessive bleeding. Polyps occur more frequently up to menopause, and then they shrink. Between 10 and 24 percent of women undergoing endometrial biopsy or hysterectomy are found to have polyps, according to MDGuidelines.

      Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/257540-what-are-the-causes-of-constant-menstrual-bleeding/#ixzz1tG7nMgfw

  43. QUESTION:
    LADY PROBLEMS....HELP???too many periods.?
    ok so ive never had a normal period a day in my life. it comes and goes when it pleases. sometimes not rearing its ugly head for months at a time. but this month for some reason. ive had 3! they started around the 30th of last month. lasted a week the first time. then about 1 week and a half later another one. just shy of a week. now here i am another week has gone by and BAM! it hits me again this morning. they do hurt but then again i cant tell the if it suposed to hurt this bad. ive had two kids all natural and would much rather to be going thru labor pains than what ive been feeling the last few weeks...PLEASE HELP ME!?!?!?!
    and when i say it comes and as it pleases i mean. ill have one then itll disappear for months. IVE NEVER HAD TWO PERIODS IN ONE MONTH. other than lochia then reg. cycle after birth...
    well. i didnt think any thing of it with the 2nd one but this just started this morning so im makeing my appt. thx..

    • ANSWER:
      Normal menstrual bleeding occurs every 21 to 35 days, lasts two to six days and does not occur in the middle of the menstrual cycle. Bleeding that occurs for prolonged periods of time or on and off all month is called menorrhagia. Abnormal menstrual bleeding is considered dysfunctional uterine bleeding, or DUB. Dysfunctional uterine bleeding occurs more frequently when women first start having menstrual cycles and at the end of the menstrual reproductive cycle.

      Anovulation
      Ovulation is the release of an egg each month. Anovulation is lack of ovulation and is most often the cause of DUB, according to Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, or LSUHSC. In a normal menstrual cycle, estrogen rises until an egg releases from a follicle. The leftover shell of the follicle produces progesterone, which maintains the uterine lining for a potential embryo. If no pregnancy occurs, progesterone levels drop, and the menstrual lining is shed. Continuously high estrogen levels stimulate endometrial lining growth until parts begin to break down and bleed. Since different areas are being stimulated and breaking down continuously, constant bleeding occurs.

      Endometrial cancer must be ruled out in every case of DUB, LSUHSC reports. Around 75 percent of cases of endometrial cancer don't occur until after menopause. Obesity, diabetes, a history of polycystic ovary disease, never having had children, and later-than-normal onset of menopause all increase the chances of endometrial cancer. A family or personal history of ovarian cancer or breast cancer, particularly if the woman took tamoxifen, also increases the risk of endometrial cancer.

      Fibroids
      Fibroids, which are common benign growths either inside or outside the uterine walls, often cause heavy bleeding along with bleeding or spotting between periods. Fibroids can be seen on pelvic ultrasound exams. Fibroids occur more frequently in black women and those with a family history of fibroids. Obesity may also increase the risk of fibroids, MayoClinic.com reports. Fibroids may be surgically removed if they're causing excessive bleeding. Pelvic pain, constipation, difficulty urinating and back or leg pain may also occur in women with fibroids.

      Polyps
      Polyps, which are fleshy growths inside the uterus, may cause frequent spotting and constant bleeding. Rarely, polyps may grow to the size of an orange. Frederick R. Jelovsek, MD, of Women's Health Resource reports that polyps may be diagnosed through hysteroscopy -- looking into the uterus with a lighted scope -- or with a sonohysterogram, a procedure involving dye being injected into the uterus and then tracked via X-ray. Surgical removal or medical treatment with drugs that decrease estrogen levels and shrink polyps help control excessive bleeding. Polyps occur more frequently up to menopause, and then they shrink. Between 10 and 24 percent of women undergoing endometrial biopsy or hysterectomy are found to have polyps, according to MDGuidelines.

      Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/257540-what-are-the-causes-of-constant-menstrual-bleeding/#ixzz1uwIo0iIQ

  44. QUESTION:
    Extremely heavy periods? Help????????
    I'm 20 and I've have my period for about 7 years now, but last May I had a ridiculously heavy period. I was was wearing a super plus tampon, along with a long pad and still leaked through that in less than two hours. That lasted for about a week. Well I think it's starting again. I haven't had an actual period, or anything like that other than spotting since last May.
    Ever since I can remember, my periods have been far from normal. They've either been just spotting, or non-existent. But they started getting really odd when I was prescribed to adderall when I was 17(I'm no longer prescribed to it), and ever since then my periods have been even more out of whack. Also I've never been to the gyno.. So I have a few questions.
    1. WTF causes this?
    2. What's the best way to deal with this besides the doctor? I don't have insurance so that's pretty much out of the question.
    3. What are the best tampons and pads to use for this situation? I usually use kotex U click super plus tampons, along with an always ultra thin long pad, but it manages to leak through.
    Any other helpful tips is appreciated. Also no links to websites, I'm on a mobile device that doesn't let me click them.

    • ANSWER:
      The correct medical definition of heavy periods is the passage of more than 80ml of blood each period. It is seldom realistic or practical, however, to actually measure the blood loss and so doctors rely on the woman's description of her period.

      Periods are considered heavy when:

      * a woman bleeds for more than 8 to 10 days, especially if this is repeated month after month.
      * a woman bleeds so much that it is difficult for her to attend her job. She may be forced to plan her holidays and leisure time according to the timings of her period.
      * the bleeding is continuously so heavy that the woman becomes anaemic.
      * the presence of other than small clots for more than one or two days suggests heavy periods.
      * 'flooding' describes the sudden, unexpected onset of periods, like turning on a tap, and indicates heavy periods.

      Why do some women have heavy and long menstrual flows?

      The causes of prolonged and heavy bleeding are given below.

      * In younger women heavy periods are most often due to a temporary hormone imbalance, which eventually corrects itself.
      * In the years close to the menopause, (45 years of age onwards) heavy periods are usually a sign of hormone imbalance. However, the possibility of heavy periods being caused by an underlying disease increases with age.

      The following conditions are associated with heavy periods:

      * fibroids.
      * endometriosis.
      * pelvic inflammatory disease.
      * polyps of the lining of the womb.
      * the commonest cause is a condition called dysfunctional uterine bleeding (DUB). This refers to heavy bleeding with no apparent explanation.

      Is it necessary to consult a doctor?

      If a woman is experiencing heavy or irregular periods that are interfering with her quality of life, then she should consult a GP or gynaecologist.
      What will the doctor do?

      A pelvic examination is usually necessary. If the woman is over 40 years of age, then a pelvic ultrasound scan or a biopsy of the lining of the womb is appropriate. This is to ensure that there is no abnormality with the cells of the lining of the womb.

      An examination called a hysteroscopy is often suggested. This involves placing a fine telescope through the neck of the womb so that the lining of the womb can be seen. Most hysteroscopies are performed without the need for general anaesthesia.

      How are heavy periods treated?

      If there are no signs of an underlying abnormality, treatment is not absolutely necessary but most women prefer to have something to help them cope more easily each month.

      * If the problems are severe, bleeding may be regulated by tablet treatment. These may be hormonal or non-hormonal.
      * Hormonal treatments include the contraceptive pill and danazol (eg Danol).
      * Progestogens are effective in making a woman's periods more regular but do not reduce the monthly flow.
      * Non-hormonal treatments include tranexamic acid (eg Cyklokapron), which reduces the blood loss by up to half.
      * Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) reduce monthly loss by about a third.
      * Alternative approaches include the use of a hormone containing contraceptive coil (Mirena), which is suitable for most women.
      * Surgical alternatives include destroying the lining of the womb with a laser or applying heat treatment to the lining of the womb with hot water in a balloon. Hysterectomy - the removal of the uterus - is commonly performed for heavy periods. These two surgical procedures are only appropriate for women who do not wish to have any more children.
      * If a diagnosis of an underlying condition is made, then the treatment will be tailored towards that condition.
      * If the woman is anaemic, iron or folic acid supplements may be needed.

      Hope this helps!(:

bleeding after removal of polyps in uterus