After Removal Of Fibroadenoma

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Recovery after breast mass removal surgery?
    I am having an outpatient breast mass removal surgery for fibroadenoma. I am quite unsure about how soon can I recover and carry on the work after the surgery. The day after the surgery is very important for me since its my graduation day. If anyone had experience, please share with me.Can I recover the next day and enjoy it? What are the precautions I have to take? Please suggest. Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      I had the EXACT same surgery last year, so I know what you will be going through! You should be fine the next day as long as you really rest after your surgery. You'll be sore, but just take your pain killers as prescribed. Email me if you have any more questions: willow21089@Yahoo.com

  2. QUESTION:
    Fibroadenoma removal after breast augmentation. Will the removal of a Fibroadenoma affect my silicone implants?
    I had breast surgery done about 9 months ago. Now I am going to get surgery to get a Fibroadenoma removed. It has been biopsied and it has been confirmed that it is Fibroadenoma and I want to get it removed. I am afraid that the removal will cause my implant to rupture or move. Should I be concern? My implants were done under the muscle.

    • ANSWER:
      Not to worry I have had SEVERAL of those removed. Its not going to effect your implants at all since they were done under the muscle. They are going to make a small incision and most likely the lump will be pretty close to the surface as most Fibroadenoma's are. You might be in slight pain but everything will be ok.

  3. QUESTION:
    Lupron side effects with existing conditions?
    My new OB/GYN wants me to go on Lupron shots stating it may or may not help my case. She never mentioned any side effects aside from menopausal symptoms, and gave me a couple of weeks to think about my decision, so I talked to my pharmacist and did some research to learn more, and don't like what I'm reading.

    My family history includes stroke, diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, kidney failure. Mom had endo, surgical removal at 38, menopause at 40. I've been having menopausal symptoms for the past 7 years, increasing in severity for the last 3. I suffer from high blood pressure, high cholesterol, tachycardia (just today, 122 bpm for no reason), severe pelvic pain and DUB. I've had a recurring hemangioma of the palate which took 11 surgeries to fully remove, and a fibroadenoma on the left breast. My mom has angiomas on the liver.

    Last year, I was put on Seasonale for 3 months, Seasonique for 9. I ended up in more pain, with more bleeding, having a mild heart attack, and bad leg circulation problems (varicose veins, swelling, pain). This was my 7th BC pill in 11 years which just stopped working.

    MRI last October showed a thickening of the left USL, requiring further study. Suspected endo.
    I asked my new OB/GYN for a hysterectomy. She insisted on the shots, and completely dismissed my diagnostic laparoscopy request.

    If there is anyone out there with the appropriate knowledge, I need help.
    What are my chances of Lupron even improving anything, when the diagnostic hasn't been confirmed? And won't this drug harm the other health problems I already have?

    • ANSWER:

  4. QUESTION:
    One of my dogs breasts in larger than the others?
    For about the last year I have noticed one of my small unspayed female dogs breasts is larger than her others, it feels normal she has no health problems and it is not tender. People I've asked say oh that's just her muscle do you think it's anything to worry about? She is 5 years old

    • ANSWER:
      I would never leave a lump uninvestigated. You just never know.
      Take your dog to the vet asap.

      Mammary tumors are the most common tumors in female dogs who have not been spayed. Mammary tumors can be small, simple nodules or large, aggressive growths. With early detection and prompt treatment, even some of the more serious tumors can be successfully treated.

      Mammary tumors are more common in unspayed, middle-aged female dogs (those between 5 and 10 years of age), although they can, on rare occasions, be found in dogs as young as 2 years. These tumors are rare in dogs that were spayed under 2 years of age. Occasionally, mammary tumors will develop in male dogs and these are usually very aggressive and have a poor outcome.

      There are multiple types of mammary tumors in dogs. Approximately one-half of all mammary tumors in dogs are benign and half malignant. Mammary tumors should be properly diagnosed by a biopsy and histopathology to determine which treatment is to be used for that particular type of tumor.

      The common benign form of canine mammary tumors is actually a mixture of several different types of cells. This combination cancer in the dog is called a 'benign mixed mammary tumor' and contains glandular and connective tissue. Other benign tumors include complex adenomas, fibroadenomas, duct papillomas, and simple adenomas.

      Malignant mammary tumors can be: tubular adenocarcinomas, solid carcinomas, anaplastic carcinomas, osteosarcomas, fibrosarcomas, papillary adenocarcinomas, papillary cystic adenocarcinomas, and malignant mixed tumors.

      When tumors first appear they will feel like small pieces of pea gravel just under the skin. They are very hard and are difficult to move around under the skin. They can grow rapidly in a short period of time, doubling their size every month or so.

      Benign growths are often smooth, small and slow growing.
      Signs of malignant tumors include rapid growth, irregular shape, firm attachment to the skin or underlying tissue, bleeding, and ulceration.

      A biopsy or complete tumor removal and testing are almost always needed to determine if the tumor is benign or malignant, and to identify what type it is.
      Tumors, which are more aggressive and may spread to the surrounding lymph nodes or to the lungs. A chest x-ray and physical inspection of the lymph nodes will help in confirming this.

      Mammary cancer spreads to the rest of the body through the release of individual cancer cells from the various tumors into the lymphatics. Mammary glands in specific areas pertaining to the tumor drain and spread their tumor cells forward to axillary lymph nodes, new tumors form at these sites and then release more cells that go to other organs such as the lungs, liver, or kidneys.

      Upon finding any mass within the breast of a dog, surgical removal is recommended unless the patient is very old. If a surgery is done early in the course of this disease, the cancer can be totally eliminated in over 50% of the cases having a malignant form of cancer.
      With some tumor types, especially sarcomas, complete removal is very difficult and many of these cases will have tumor regrowth at the site of the previously removed tumor.
      Chemotherapy has not been a very successful nor a widely used treatment for mammary tumors in dogs.

  5. QUESTION:
    where can i find info about fibro adenoma?
    I have this disease since I was in high school and have had two surgeries to remove the fibroid adenomas but they continue to come back so I want to learn as much as I can as far as self education about the causes and if it can lead to breast cancer. Just wondered if any one else has experienced this and knows anything about it? Anything will be appreciated! Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      *I found this for you. The second paragraph talks about breast cancer. I hope this helps :)

      Fibroadenoma

      A fibroid adenoma is the most common cause for a lump in young women, often between the ages of 15-30. In contrast to a cyst a fibroadenoma is a solid lump comprising, as the name suggests, swirls of fibrous tissue with occasional compressed breast ducts. Fibroadenomas are entirely painless, and once again they probably arise due to hormonal changes in the breast. As a consequence, the lump may arise in an area of the breast were there is already more generalized hormonal breast pain and tenderness giving the false impression that the lump is causing the pain. Fibroadenomas tend to slowly grow to around 1-2cm in diameter and then stop growing. Most women will first become aware of a fibroadenoma when it is already around this size and it is therefore most common for fibroadenomas to seem to stay approximately the same size and not to grow noticeably. Since they are solid lumps fibroadenomas generally do not disappear, although during pregnancy they may undergo noticeable changes resulting in either their disappearance or their progressive enlargement.

      Fibroadenomas are entirely harmless and never turn into breast cancer. All fibroadenomas should however be carefully checked to prove their identity conclusively. Some fibroadenomas can feel very similar to small breast cancerous lumps, and although this is uncommon it is the reason why careful investigations, usually including an ultrasound and needle biopsy are very important. Once a lump has been shown to be definitely a fibroadenoma it is safe to leave. Alternatively a fibroadenoma can be removed by a small operation. A new treatment for fibroadenomas involves removal of the lump through a suction needle leaving only a pin point scar. Fibroadenomas that increase in size or that appear in any way abnormal on the ultrasound scan or needle test should be removed for safety sake.

  6. QUESTION:
    still feeling a lump in breast after biopsy removal of the lump?
    HI. I had a 4 cm Fibroadenomas lump in my breast. and the doctor said the best way to remove it is doing a biopsy.so I agreed to remove it. He said 99.9 % of it is removed. Several months have passed and I can still feel a hardening in the same spot, it doesn't really feel like a lump though. Does anyone have an idea what this could be? thanks a lot for your help

    • ANSWER:
      It is organised healed breast tissue.
      With due course of time it will resolve.
      I hope Bx. report was Fibroadenoma.

  7. QUESTION:
    How do i make my baby understand i can't breastfeed her anymore because i just had a cist removed .?
    I had the operation to remove the cist as it was infected with pus.

    • ANSWER:
      Can you nurse on the unaffected breast? Unless it is painful for you, you could still actually nurse on the breast you had surgery on.

      From La Leche League:

      "In some cases, an open biopsy, or surgical removal, of the lump or questionable area is appropriate (Margolese et al 1998; Robidoux et al 1998). Lactation might make the surgery a bit trickier because milk may leak if ducts are cut, but does not preclude breast surgery. Some surgeons are not comfortable performing surgery on a lactating breast. They might insist that a mother wean her child before surgery so there is no milk present in the ducts. This is not practical because it can take several weeks to months for all milk to disappear completely and if a breast lump is suspicious the mother will not want to wait. Both mother and surgeon will want to be prepared for the presence of milk, both during the surgery and post-operatively. While this can be messy and may slow healing, it does not pose any danger to recovery. Some surgeons will leave the incision open to allow drainage of milk during healing. Others may insert a drain or wick to collect the extra milk. Still others will close the incision and allow it to heal as they would any other incision (Love 2000).

      After surgery, THE MOTHER CAN NURSE HER BABY AS SOON AS SHE FEELS COMFORTABLE. If the incision is close to the baby’s mouth, she might want to pump that breast for a day or so. If she chooses to nurse on that side, she might feel more comfortable if she applies light pressure to the incision with her hand to support it as the baby nurses. She might see some blood or blood-tinged milk coming from her nipple. This is normal and will resolve as the breast heals. The blood will not hurt the baby but s/he might prefer not to nurse on that side. If this is the case, the mother can be encouraged to hand express or pump to maintain her milk supply and relieve discomfort (Love 2000).

      In the majority of cases (80 percent) the pathology report will confirm that the lump is benign, usually a cyst, fibroadenoma (benign, fibrous tumor), scar tissue, or abscess (Love 2000). If the lump is found to be cancerous, and chemotherapy is the decided course of treatment, the mother will have to wean her baby during the chemotherapy treatments (Hale 2000). If radiation is used, she might be able to continue nursing on the unaffected side. If the cancer is removed by lumpectomy, breastfeeding can continue uninterrupted. Mastectomy obviously precludes breastfeeding on the side where the breast was removed, but the mother can nurse her baby with her remaining breast."

  8. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know how long does fibroadenomas stay in the breast before they finally disappear?

    • ANSWER:
      As far as I know, they don't disappear. They are harmless lumps. They are also very common. Most women, especially those that are large breasted may not know they have them until diagnosed with a mammogram. I recently had 1 biopsied and removed. I believe the removal would be up to your and your surgeon.

  9. QUESTION:
    This is the third time I am being diagonised with fibroadenomas.?
    I had surgically removed them during the first time. But unfortunately, it recurred. My doctor prescribed me a vitamin tablet called zendol, and it vanished within three months. Now again, it has appeared. Can somebody mention the causes of such recurrence and if possible some treatment.
    I am 21 years old.
    I am unmarried too.

    • ANSWER:
      You have not mentioned your age or the number of children you have.

      Fibroadenomas are benign tumours arising from the uterine muscle....they basically grow in response to oestrogen...and as in your case, they can recur...

      If you have already completed your desired family size, its best you go in for surgical removal of uterus (hysterectomy)

      If not, you can either go in for medical (hormonal) treatment to reduce the size of your fibroids or alternatively go in for a conservative surgery to preserve your uterus (as you did in the first case)

      Your gynaecologist can advise you what is best in your case....

  10. QUESTION:
    Should a fibroadenoma be removed?
    I am in my late teens and have a fibroadenoma in my breast. It's 4 cm and I am not sure whether or not I should have surgery. I went to a doctor already and did a biopsy and he said that I should have it removed. I am definitely going to get a second opinion...but I am just wondering...

    Should I wait six months...to see if it changes?

    • ANSWER:
      If it's been biopsy'd and confirmed as a benign fibroadenoma, then there is no rush to take any action.

      There is no harm in monitoring for 6 months, many doctors would take that approach. So if you are not yet comfortable with removal, just wait awhile. In the meantime, you can seek a second opinion and have time to consider your options. There is really no urgency in this case.

  11. QUESTION:
    Can breast cancer really look like a sebaceous cyst?
    my friend found a lump on her breast and her doc told her it was a sebaceous cyst and not harmful. she had her breast removed a year ago from cancer and was cured. the doc said it's most likely nothing, but let's just remove it because it'll bother you. anyhow, bad news it's invasive cancer..how can that happen? do they really look alike? she said the lump didn't move and i thought cyst's move?!

    • ANSWER:
      Breast lumps are common, especially in women ages 30 to 50. A number of conditions can result in a lump or lumps in your breast. Most of these conditions are harmless or of minor concern.

      * Generalized breast lumpiness usually feels like lots of little bumps (nodularity) or as though some areas of the breast are thicker or denser than other areas. Your breasts also may feel tender. The lumps may occur in both breasts around the nipple and in the upper, outer part of the breasts, especially before your menstrual period. The lumps may come and go and change size in just a few days. Generalized lumpiness was once thought to be abnormal and was even called fibrocystic breast disease, but it is so common that it is now considered normal. Breast lumpiness usually goes away after menopause but may be found in women who are taking hormone replacement after menopause.
      * Blood clots in a vein ( thrombophlebitis) can feel like a lump. The phlebitis affects the large vein that normally crosses the chest to the underarm area (axilla). Symptoms include pain, redness, warmth, and lumpiness along the course of the vein. Blood clots in the breast or on the chest wall are rare.

      Following are other types of breast lumps and their symptoms.
      Cysts and abscess lumps

      * Cysts are fluid-filled sacs in the breast. They feel smooth or rubbery and move about under the fingers. They can be quite painful or tender, or they may be painless. Cysts are caused by the hormones that control the menstrual cycle. Cysts are rare in women older than 50 and are not related to breast cancer. If you have a cyst, your health professional may drain (aspirate) it to help relieve the pain and confirm the diagnosis.
      * Sebaceous cysts are caused by plugged ducts at the site of a hair follicle. Like a cyst, they move freely under the fingers. Hormone stimulation or injury may cause them to enlarge. A sebaceous cyst that does not cause symptoms does not require medical treatment. Removal usually involves making a small incision in the skin and removing the entire sac so that it does not return.
      * Abscesses are pockets of infection within the breast. They may be quite painful, and the skin over the breast may be red or feel hot or solid. You may feel feverish or ill. Abscesses are treated with antibiotics and surgery to drain the abscess. They are most common in women who are breast-feeding.

      Fatty lumps

      * Fat necrosis is a condition in which the normal fat cells of the breast go through a change and become round lumps. The lumps may or may not be painful and may be firm. The skin over the lump may be red or look bruised. Fat necrosis may occur after a bruise or other injury to the chest or breast and can occur from weeks to years after an injury. Fat necrosis usually goes away without treatment but can form permanent scar tissue that may show up as an abnormality on a mammogram.
      * Lipomas are noncancerous lumps of fatty tissue. They can be small or large. A woman may have just one or several lipomas at once.

      Growths

      * Adenomas are noncancerous abnormal growths of the glandular tissue in the breast. The most common growths, fibroadenomas, are somewhat more common in women in their 20s and in women of African descent. They usually feel round and firm and have smooth borders. They may move a little under the fingers, be tender, and change with the menstrual cycle. Adenomas are not related to breast cancer.
      * Intraductal papillomas are wart-like growths in the ducts of the breast. They usually feel like lumps just under the nipple and can cause a bloody discharge from the nipple. Women close to menopause may have only one growth. Several growths in both breasts are more common in younger women.
      * Breast cancerusually feels like a hard or firm lump (nodule). It usually is irregular in shape (it does not have smooth edges) and may feel like it is attached (fixed) to skin or tissue deep inside the breast so that it cannot be moved without moving breast tissue. Breast cancer is rarely painful and can occur anywhere in the breast or nipple.

      It can be difficult to tell what is causing a lump in your breast. Call your health professional if you feel a new lump in your breast or if you have generalized breast lumpiness and you notice a distinct lump in your breast that is not like the rest of your breast (dominant lump). A dominant lump in the breast is any lump that is new, larger, harder, or different in any other way from the rest of the breast tissue.

  12. QUESTION:
    17 and wanting my fibroadenoma removing?
    It worries me when I feel it, even though I know it's ok
    It is also right where the under-wire of my bra is, and it pushes against it causing discomfort and sometimes a stabbing pain
    How do I go about getting it removed? Do I go to my doctor and talk to him about it or do I call up the breast clinic?
    And what is the process of the removal?

    • ANSWER:
      If you have health insurance call them first and see if you need a referral to the breast clinic. If it doesn't cause you discomfort then you can leave it alone but if you are having pain from it being where it is, it ought to be removed. There's no reason for you to suffer discomfort and pain when it can be dealt with fairly easily.

      The procedure to remove it is usually an outpatient procedure unless you have some other health issue that would make it necessary for you to spend overnight in the hospital (your doctor can tell you the details of the procedure). In general, you'll be anesthetized and while you are asleep the doctor will make an incision, remove the fibroadenoma, and then either stitch the incision closed or close it with surgical adhesive and butterfly strips then cover it with a dressing.

      Good luck and I hope that your issue can be resolved soon and it doesn't reoccur.

  13. QUESTION:
    Fibroadenoma Removal Questions?
    I am 15 years old and just found out that i need to have a fibroadenoma removed from my right breast. I am pretty concerned because i have never had any type of surgery before so if anybody has any experience or advice i would appreciate it. I also need to know if it will leave a scar or some type of dent? It is on the top of my breasts and i like to wear cute shirts where a scar there would be visible.
    Thanks for any help you can give me.

    • ANSWER:

  14. QUESTION:
    Will I get fibroadenomas my whole life?
    When I was pregnant with my son I had two, they've grown. In 2006 i found one more. and just today i found another one. If m doctor decides to remove these won't i just keep getting them? and if they keep removing ...ill end up with scars all over my boobs.

    • ANSWER:
      It is possible but it can depend on what is causing them to occur.

      I would recommend checking with your doctor as well to see what they say as far as additional options besides surgical removal and let them know that you are concerned about the issue of scarring around your breasts.

  15. QUESTION:
    Is it bad my fibroadenoma grew?
    I am 18 I had my last ultrasound in the summer it was like 2/3cms but it has grown I don't know if it has grown quickly I don't think so I can still move it tho

    Should I be worried?

    • ANSWER:
      They often do grow. It isn't usually antything to worry about. A fibroadenoma, once it's identified, can continue to grow and may change the shape of your breast. Your doctor might recommend surgery to remove the fibroadenoma if one of your tests — the clinical breast exam, an imaging test or a biopsy — is abnormal. You may also consider surgical removal if leaving the fibroadenoma in place makes you anxious.

      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/fibroadenoma/DS01069

  16. QUESTION:
    Ever heard of cystosarcoma phylloides breast lump, variant of fibroadenoma?
    I had mammogram & ultrasound today that's what the doc thinks one of the lumps is....it's solid with a fluid interior...any info would be great, thanks!
    thanks, the doc told me it was not a cyst but a solid mass with fluid in the middle part and they did a core biopsy....will know more soon I guess

    • ANSWER:
      Cystosarcoma phylloides or Phylloides tumour is breast lump which is locally malignant (More often than not). There is however a benign variant.
      It is most important to understand that cystosarcoma phylloides does not spread to local or regional lymphnodes. It may spread by contiguity (i.e., by local extension) if neglected for long enough. But if diagnosed early and removed surgically the prognosis (chance of having normal life) is very good and bright.
      It is a leaf like tumour (Phylloides means leafy). It is a soft bulky and fleshy tumour. This condition affects young adults (ladies). Very rare in the elderly. It may ulcerate (meaning cause a break in the skin and extrude out). It is painless.
      The correct treatment is nothing short of SIMPLE MASTECTOMY (As against Radical Mastectomy for Infiltrating duct carcinomas) No nodal dissection is required in case of Cystosarcoma Phylloides (Arm pit lymph glands need not be touched because the spread to those nodes is an exception).
      But Simple Mastectomy is a must because if you do anything short of Simple Mastectomy it may recur. It is highly notorious for recurrence. Therefore Simple Mastectomy has to be done properly and meticulously. Simple Mastectomy means complete removal of Nipple, Areola and Breast tissue including the Pectoralis fascia (Meaning the fascial sheath underneath the breast tissue proper) in order to give good clearance and minimise chance of recurrence.
      As answered by someone aspirating the cyst is not the correct method of treatment. Aspiration is done only for benign cysts which are very commonly seen in any breast and these cysts are only due to the cyclical hormonal changes (Aberrations of Normal Development and Involution = ANDI for short). Aspiration is not done for a proven case of Cystosarcoma Phylloides.
      The contralateral breast (other breast) will not be affected in Cystosarcoma Phylloides. However one may keep it under observation after surgery to the affected breast.
      One need not worry about losing the form or shape of breast after simple mastectomy. As this is not a cancer in its true sense, we can reconstruct the bust using either LD flap or TRAM flap. We can also give the shape by the use of Silicon Implants that can be kept beneath the skin flaps and inflated from outside through a tube in stages. Or if you are not so much worried and interested in reconstruction of breast or losing the form and only interested in complete cure and leading a normal life, just go for Simple Mastectomy. There are plenty of moulds or forms made of soft plastic material that match the consistency of the breast tissue which can be worn within the cup of the Bra on the operated side.
      The reconstructed breast tissue will only maintain form or figure of the body; but will not be functional (meaning breast feeding is not possible) By maintaining form one will not lose her self confidence and socialization will not be a problem because others will not know that you have had a mastectomy. That's all.
      Areola can be reconstructed on this breast at the same time as the first operation or at a later date. Areola can be reconstructed by using the tattooing method (not so good) or by using part of areola of the other breast or by the use of skin of the labia minora (private part)

  17. QUESTION:
    i have a sharp pain in my left breast?
    im 20 years old and every few months i get a sharp pain in my left breast. it last for about 20 minutes then goes away does anyone know what it could be.

    • ANSWER:
      There are numerous causes for pains in the left breast:
      1) Mastitis & Clogged Ducts
      Mastitis is the inflammation of the breast tissue that may be caused due to an infection, or a clogged milk duct or may be brought on by some kind of an injury and usually happens to lactating women. This is usually seen in women who are breastfeeding and the various mastitis symptoms include redness, swelling and sharp pain in left breast when breathing. There may also be systemic symptoms like fever and chills, malaise and other symptoms that may even mimic the flu. The mastitis treatment will entail treating the underlying cause or infection in the body.

      2) Ulcer and GI Related Conditions
      There are many important structures that are present in the vicinity of the breast area. The area just under the left breast is what houses the stomach. Hence, if a person is suffering from pain under left breast, then this could be due to a stomach ulcer or even due to heartburn. A stomach ulcer will typically cause pain after eating, especially, after eating a heavy meal that contained spicy food. However, due to the proximity of the stomach to the left breast, it may be difficult for the woman to differentiate between pain in left breast/chest area and pain in the upper abdominal area. A few tests, like a CT scan or a barium swallow can help diagnose this condition correctly. Ulcer treatment will consist of taking antacids and in cases of severe conditions, it may end up being an emergency condition requiring surgical intervention.

      3) Fibrocystic Breast Disease and Breast Cancer
      There are many different conditions that can lead to the formation of a painful lump in the breast. Not all breast cancers are malignant. There are many benign conditions that could lead to the formation of a lump in the breast. These include fibroid breast tumors, fibroadenomas, intraductal papillomas, etc. In fact, sometimes, what may appear as a lump may in fact be a cyst in the breast. All of these conditions can lead to sharp pain in left breast area. A malignant breast cancer can especially be diagnosed by identifying the early symptoms of breast cancer, like breast tenderness, pain, dimpling of skin, swollen and tender nipples, etc. Breast cancer treatment will range from surgical removal of the lump to radiation and chemotherapy, depending on the type of breast cancer.

      Other Causes
      There are many other causes of pain in left breast area. Muscle pain, especially pectoral muscle pain may be wrongly interpreted as breast pain. However, at times, breast pain may even be physiological. This may occur due to hormonal changes in the body of a woman, like it may be one of the early pregnancy symptoms before missed period. Some women may experience breast pain and breast tenderness before period. If a person experiences left breast pain in the morning, then it may be due to sleeping in an improper position. In such cases, there is no need for any kind of treatment for breast pain, as the pain resolves on its own after a while.

  18. QUESTION:
    What is wrong with my breasts?
    They have been hurting really bad lately! And there is lumps like all over (small pebble size). I am sexually active and did not use protection last time, but it was the day after my period so i don't think I'm pregnant. They have never hurt this bad before. My last period was 19 days ago so IDK if its cus I'm getting close to my next period or what. Please help!?
    the lumps are inside my breasts not outside.

    • ANSWER:
      Hello haley,

      What Causes Calcium Deposits in Breast?

      Basically, calcium deposits occur when crystals of calcium phosphate and collagen, a type of insoluble proteins present in tissues clump up together. It can be found not just in breasts but also in other parts of the body like the hips, shoulders and hands. Calcifications is a part of the degeneration process that may be triggered by aging, injury or inflammation in the breasts. If there are foreign bodies like breast implants or stitches present in the breasts, deposition of calcium occur on them.

      Fibroadenomas are harmless noncancerous growth in the mammary gland which is believed to be formed due to decrease in the levels of hormones in menopausal phase. Calcium deposits may occur on these benign growths. Breast cysts are round or oval shaped fluid filled sacs which are benign in nature. These cysts develop when a woman is in her 30s or 40s and disappear after menopause. If the cysts continue to exist even after that, then calcium deposits may form on them. Mammary duct ectasia is a problem associated with milk duct where the nipple gets blocked with milk and can be responsible for breast calcifications. In these cases, it has been found that the duct got blocked with milk several years ago.

      Diagnosis and Treatment for Calcium Deposits in Breast

      Usually, the calcium deposits occupy a very small area. So, the tiny spots cannot be felt by you or even your doctor during the physical examination of the breast. It is detected on breast x-rays, also known as mammography as small white spots. The shape, size and pattern of these spots are carefully studied by the radiologist for diagnosing the problem. It is further confirmed with the help of biopsy which involves removal of a part of the affected tissue to analyze whether the condition is malignant or not. There are two different types of biopsy used for this purpose. One form of biopsy is needle core biopsy where a needle is used to collect the samples. The other one is known as surgical biopsy where a wire is inserted into the area to remove breast tissue. Both the tests are done under local anesthesia.

      Calcifications on fibroadenomas do not require any treatment and it disappears on its own. If the breast cysts become painful due to calcification, then draining out the fluid from it often provides relief to the patient. For mammary duct ectasia, surgical intervention is often required. Hardly, about 15-20 percent of the cases of calcium deposits in breast become malignant. Therefore, those of you who have this problem, should not get panicked unnecessarily. Rather, follow the instructions provided by your doctor. In malignant cases, close monitoring of the condition is advisable. In the first one year of detection, follow-up diagnostic mammogram is required after every six months. If no changes are found, then it would be monitored once a year.

      REASONS FOR BREAST PAIN:

      •Hormones: It is seen that cyclic breast pain is linked to hormones. The hormonal changes during periods, pregnancy and after pregnancy play a major role in breast pain.

      •Retention of Water: During periods, breasts absorb extra fluid instead of discharging it.

      •Physical factors: Non-cyclic breast pain is caused due to breast cysts, trauma, breast surgery and other factors related to the breast.

      •Imbalance of Fatty Acids: The fatty acid imbalance affects the breast tissue cell sensitivity to hormone circulation.

      •Size of Breast: It is seen that heavy chested women suffer from non-cyclic breast pain. This breast pain is accompanied by neck pain, shoulder pain and back pain.

      •Medications: Oral contraceptives and infertility treatments also cause breast pain. Estrogen and progesterone hormone replacement therapy lead to breast tenderness. Intake of certain antidepressants may also be possible breast pain causes.

      •Infection: A possible microbial infection may lead to breast pain.

      •Other Causes: Hormone replacement therapy, weight gain, unfitting bras and tumors may be other breast pain causes.

      Take care.

  19. QUESTION:
    Removal of fibroadenoma?
    Hi everyone.. So I had a 4 cm. Breast lump for about 4 years. I first got it checked out about a year ago. And its a fibroadenoma. The doctor recomanded to remove it with a needle. So we did that. But feels like it didn't go away completly. So after 6 months I went to my doctor again. He checked it again and said that it needs to be removed, because even though its fibroadenoma, my doctor mentioned that it might cause problems in the future. He said that its not cancer cancer right now but its in between. He said that its a type that will grow if we don't remove it and leaving it there is not an option. Do you think it should be rrmoved even if its fibroadenoma. Is it possible itbmay become canver in the future if I don't agree to remove it? Thank you all so much for answering

    • ANSWER:
      I'd say have it removed, and have no further problems with it. I've had it done twice. in the same breast. And you can't find the scars.

  20. QUESTION:
    Why do I need to go back?
    I am 37 years old. I found a lump in my breast 6 months ago. I had a sonogram and a mammogram which led to a biopsy. The biopsy showed that the lump was benign. I was instructed to come back in 6 months for another mammogram. What is the reason for this visit?

    • ANSWER:
      There are a couple of possible reasons. First, Although a needle core biopsy is extremely accurate, and most benign masses do not need to be removed, a mass which was called benign after a biopsy will occasionally grow rapidly, and removal may then be recommended. Typically, if you had a biopsy with ultrasound guidance, then a 6 month ultrasound would be recommended. Second, there may have been other abnormalities on your mammogram or ultrasound that need follow up. Abnormalities on mammogram/ultrasound are usually categorized as requiring biopsy or requiring follow up based on the appearance and level of concern. So while you had one biopsy, there may have been other areas that need follow up. It is very common for women to have several benign fibroadenomas, and only the largest will be biopsied, and the others will be followed. Finally, many facilities simply follow a standard practice of 6 month follow up for any benign biopsy to cover these and other possibilities.

  21. QUESTION:
    Fibroadenoma Lump in Breast?
    k, i've been to the doctors and i've been diagnosed with Fibroadenoma, a common lump that is benign (not dangerous). I also have an appointment for a mammogram soon. I was just wondering if it needs to be removed and if removing the lump can cause other problems.

    Thanx

    • ANSWER:
      Treatment options re surgery...
      * Less than 25 years - observe
      * 25 - 35 years - offer conservative treatment
      * More than 35 years - excision biopsy
      * Excise at any age if patient requests

      ...you will advised if removal is needed. The adenomas often disappear after the menopause - are thought to be linked with oestrogen.
      Removal is unlikely to cause any other problems.

  22. QUESTION:
    Can anyone help? Regarding a Fibroadenoma?
    I've been searching for days to find a site that explains exactly what is involved in surgery of a Fibroadenoma. I've found ones that say they cut it out but I want to know things like how long surgery takes, how they cut it out, what's involved etc. I'm going to my doctors tomorrow for the biopsy results and would like to know the procedure involved with removal so I can better portray my wishes. Please does anyone know any useful sites?

    • ANSWER:
      I don't know about websites but I can tell you from my wife's experience, it didn't take long to remove, a general anaesthetic and she was out the same day. Her scar is only a few cms long and not really visible.

  23. QUESTION:
    Fibroadenoma: What should I do?
    I have multiple fibroadenoma's in both of my breasts and am only 16 years old, should I be worried, I know that they arn't cancerous but since I'm younger, do you think they may get larger? Is the removal of them cause any scarring? If you have any experience, please tell me. Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      if you dont have no medical problems.. then get them removed from your breasts... they grow larger.. i was 14 and had one in my left breast and it grew bigger by time i was 15, and it grew up to about 1 pound or better, and so u should get that removed ASAP but u dont worry about getting a scar becuase they have creams and ointments that can clear up scars.

  24. QUESTION:
    breast lump removal? affect the look?
    i am having a fibroadenoma removed from my left breast and im scared that it will affect the look and feel of it, my breasts a kind of small to begin with(34 b) and im scared that it will affect the size of the one breast, does anyone have any expierience with this or know if they reshape it? the lump is over and inch and a half big!

    ps: they are biopsying it for cancer, even though i have no signs or symptoms, and no family history of it, should i be worried?
    sorry im 21 years old

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroadenomas, although benign, are usually removed from young women because they have a tendency to grow larger in response to hormones. They can give doctors major headaches -- is it the fibroadenoma getting bigger, or a new cancer?
      I wouldn't worry about getting a diagnosis of cancer. Tissue that is removed during breast surgery is usually checked by a pathologist to make sure they got the right area.
      As for the look of your breasts, I guess the best person to talk with is your surgeon. Lame answer, I know!
      You can always ask about breast augmentation (implants), as well. If too much tissue is removed, your insurance company might pay for that.

  25. QUESTION:
    Question about Fibroadenoma?
    i had an ultrasound a few months ago and the found a 6mm Fibroadenoma, i go back on the 17 for another ultrasund to see if it changed at all. Can anyone tell me out of experince what happened with them or someone they know that was in this situation

    • ANSWER:
      I am sorry I can't help you with personal information but a lot can be found on the net about your situation:
      Fibroadenoma
      Fibroadenoma is a smooth, rubbery or hard lump that moves easily within the breast tissue. It is most often found in teenagers and younger women and African American women. A Fibroadenoma is typically not cancerous. Fibroadenomas are solid, smooth, firm, benign lumps that are most commonly found in women in their late teens and early 20s. They are the most common benign lumps that occur in women and can occur in women of any age. Increasingly, they are being seen in postmenopausal women who are taking hormone replacement therapy. The painless lump feels rubbery and moves around freely and very often is found by the woman herself. They vary in size and can grow anywhere in the breast tissue.
      While most physicians can recognize this type of lump simply by feeling it, generally, the diagnosis is confirmed by mammography or ultrasound and fine-needle aspiration. Sometimes, in very young women, the fibroadenoma is not removed. However, since sometimes these tumors enlarge with pregnancy and breastfeeding, physicians may recommend surgically removing the fibroadenoma. A fibroadenoma is not cancer and does not lead to cancer, but sometimes an office exam, mammography and doctor cannot distinguish between a fibroadenoma or a cancer and therefore some type of breast biopsy is indicated
      http://womens-health.health-cares.net/fibroadenoma.php
      How Can You Be Sure It Is a Fibroadenoma?: Your doctor or radiologist may send you to have an ultrasound study done. This is because a fibroadenoma will be easier to distinguish from other tissue, because of the way it responds to sound waves. It will appear as a dark area, with a definite outline, homogeneous, round or oval, and may have smooth-edged bumps. If the ultrasound doesn’t give a definite result, the next study may be an MRI (magnetic resonance image). The most conclusive test is a fine needle biopsy or a core needle biopsy, to get a sample of the cells for a pathologist to examine.
      What Happens Next, If You Have Fibroadenomas?: Since fibroadenomas are benign, treatment will vary depending on your diagnosis. If it is small, painless, remains the same size, and a biopsy shows no problems, you would not need further treatment, but may have follow-up ultrasounds. However, if it is large (more than three cm), painful, growing, or a biopsy results in atypical (very active) cells, you can have it surgically removed. Doctors recommend removal of fibroadenomas, if you are over 40 years old.
      http://breastcancer.about.com/od/mammograms/p/fibroadenomas.htm

      There are support groups
      http://www.medhelp.org/HealthTopics/Fibroadenoma_-_breast.html
      http://www.georgetownuniversityhospital.org/body.cfm?id=555563&action=articleDetail&AEProductID=Adam2004_1&AEArticleID=007216

  26. QUESTION:
    Tumour Removal?
    I had a 6 inch fibroadenoma removed 18 months ago when I was 22 and still don't have full feeling around the scar. I was told it'd return within a year.
    I've been super vigilent with breast checks since then, but inside the scar tissue is still pretty hard and tender so I haven't been able to feel properly. I think there might be another lump there.
    I was wondering if any of you have experience with this, if you've had a recurring case, and if it's common for the same thing to come back?
    By the way, I have an appointment with my doctor later on today who'll do a full check. I would like to be prepared when I go in there though.
    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      I am not a woman but I have had surgery before several times. It is normal for there to be numbness at the scar site and sometimes in other places too. When they cut, it severs nerves. They do not regrow. I have had scars for 10 years that are still numb, the feeling increased some over time, but never will it fully return.
      Weird thing was that I had knee surgery, not only was there numbness at the scars, but I developed a totally numb area on the back of my calf. I feel pressure, but not the touch sensation. The doctor said the nerves that connected to that area must have been severed. The feelings have never come back, but over time I don't really notice it anymore.

  27. QUESTION:
    Pain after breast biopsy?
    I'm 22 years old an in June '06, I had two biopsies performed on my right breast for suspicious lumps that turned out to be fibroadenomas. It took at least a month for the biopsy sites to heal and now I experience deep twinges of pain at the biopsy sites. Is this normal? I figure that they probably need a good amount of time to heal completely, since they were ultrasound guided core biopsies, but sometimes the pain is very disconcerting, even though the twinges don't last a long time. Is it possible for the biopsies to aggrivate the lumps and cause them to become something serious? Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      No,it will not aggravate the lumps and cause something serious.
      I had a biopsy with removal of my breast lump at the age of 30 (I am 53 now).
      Though I know that if I am diagnosed with Fibercystic Disease as was the case, new lumps can appear any time for the rest of our lives.
      I had a girlfriend who had to have so many lump removals due to this disease that she eventually went ahead and had all of her breast tissue removed and replaced it with implants.(Her breasts had so many dimples due to the lump removals that the implants helped to smooth out her breast and took away future worry about more lumps,removal and the possibility of cancer.)
      The older we get the more we really need to watch them as they can turn cancerous.
      Avoiding cigarettes,caffine and chocolate is suppose to help lessen the possibility of having more problems with future lumps but I guess God has been on my side as I continue all 3 of them and have not had any problems(having gone thru menopause I suppose there is a possibility that I could start having problems,but so far so good.
      The pain you are feeling is the regeneration of nerves that were possibly severed during your procedure and that will clear up in time but until then it is somewhat bothersome.

  28. QUESTION:
    Large Fibroadenoma removal options?
    I have a large oval shape 2.5 in x 1.5 in fibroadenoma in the lower part of my left breast. I had a core biopsy and spoke to the surgeon. He said it should be removed and can be done very soon.

    My left breast is now a larger than the right due to the fibroadenoma. Will there be a change in the shape of my breast, besides that it will be smaller because of the lump removal? Should I expect a bad cosmetic result? Will my normal breast tissue just fill in where the lump was removed?

    Should I look into cryoablation (freezing it) http://www.sanarus.com/patinfo/treat.html ?

    • ANSWER:
      I also have a large fibroadenoma and it was recommended that I have it biopsied. But I was told that it wasn't cancerous by the ultrasound specialist. The radiologist was more cautious and said have the biopsy. I was given the option of a follow up ultra sound to make sure it's stable as an alternative to the biopsy. I checked with friends with similar diagnoses and one said it left a huge scar on her breast and it wasn't cancerous so she regretted it. Another had swelling right after her procedure which did leave a dent after the swelling subsided. I know it's very scary considering removing parts of your body; it terrifies me. But since they are urging you to have it soon it's better to be safe than sorry. Get a second or third medical opinion if you can.
      I wish you the best.
      I also have cysts so I've been researching this stuff. Here are a couple of articles I found helpful:

  29. QUESTION:
    fibroadenoma breast tumor removal recently, could this effect my period? Advice please!?
    I recently had a fibroadenoma tumor removed via surgery on Feb 17th, i know these are likely caused from a hormonal imbalance and thus can they cause my period to be irregular?( it usually is a few weeks late before I had the tumor) In Jan i had a normal period, but in the beginning of Feb it was very light and short, but i didn't think anything of it. Me and my boyfriend had protected sex possibly once during jan( but he didn't "go") but not at all in feb. so i feel there is no chance of pregnancy but im still stressed(anxiety problems aha)..but i've been feeling the last couple days on and off cramps, bloating, etc(this is around the time my period would come) Should I not worry because of my recent surgery and a fibroadenoma that could potentially affect my cycle? Advice please!

    • ANSWER:

  30. QUESTION:
    Fibroadenoma (benign breast lump)? Is removal necessary?
    I am only 16 years old, and my doctor told me I have a fibroadenoma (about 3.4cm) in my right breast and a small one in my left. I never noticed I had it until I got an x-ray for my stomach and we discovered it by accident. She says its extremely common, but for women my age?? Please give me your thoughts on whether it's mandatory to have it removed and I would like to hear other experiences to ease my mind a little. What should I expect at the surgery?
    Also, if I do the surgery and remove them, what if I get the lumps again?? Do I have to keep removing them? Can I prevent it? And can they be cancerous?

    I am very scared and have no idea what's going on, so PLEASE serious answers only and lots of detail. Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      I can only answer from personal experience. My doctor told me that removal was not neccessary and that we could monitor them and watch for any changes. I opted to go ahead with the surgery and have them removed because it was more stressful for me to worry about them changing, I wanted to be pro-active about it. The surgery was very simple, recovery time was very short & you can barely see my scar because they make the incision right along the line of your nipple.
      Hope that helps!! & good luck!

  31. QUESTION:
    Can fibroadenomas turn into breast cancer lumps?
    Hello. I'm just a tad bit curious about this. When i was around 16, I noticed 3 lumps on my breasts. I am now 19 and one has gone away. My dad's mother and sister both passed to breast cancer. Does this give me a higher risk of getting breast cancer? I asked my doctor if it was ok to get my fibroadenoma removed but she said since it's benign, i shouldnt worry. but i do! should i get it drained??what will happen if i dont??thanks!
    Sometimes the lump is painful. I would like it removed to lower my risk of getting breast cancer.

    • ANSWER:
      Breast cancer risk has a genetic component, so your family history of breast cancer certainly increases your risk. Some variants of genes (eg. BRCA 1,2) have been identified as risk factors for certain types of breast cancer and you may want to get screened. Of course, even if you are a carrier it does not mean you will definitely get cancer; there is only an elevated future risk. As far as fibroadenomas go, they are fairly common growths in young people (related to hormonal fluctuations) and are harmless. Fibroadenomas are usually firm with well-defined edges and very movable inside the breast. It should not hurt when you squeeze it. If this is the case, you probably have nothing to worry about. You cannot drain a fibroadenoma because it is tissue, not fluid. Removal is your choice, but why go through unnecessary surgery if you don't have to?

  32. QUESTION:
    Fibroadenoma (benign breast lump) removal surgery?
    I have had a benign breast tumor for the past five years. It is now 3.5 cm across. It periodically gives me pain, I can feel it at night when I sleep, and when I work out I can feel a tug, so I am considering surgery to have it removed.
    I have never had surgery or been hospitalized before, and I can find no good resources on the Internet about removal of benign breast tumors. Has anyone been through this? How long were you in the hospital? Is anesthesia scary or painful? What about post-op pain? is staying in the hospital as bad as people say it is? Do they make you wear the gown the entire time you are there, or can you change into your own pajamas after waking up from surgery? Do nurses really wake you up every hour to take your blood pressure? How long were you off work? Any advice would be welcome.

    • ANSWER:
      Wow, you have had some bad news about hospitals haven't you ?

      The fact is you may be able to have this done as a day procedure. That is no overnight in hospital. It is often the type of anaesthetic and whether you need IV fliuds etc that dictate whether you will need an overnight or not. So ask your doctor about that.

      If they do want you to stay, it is usually a restful enough experience. While immediately after surgery you do get your blood pressure taken every hour. They have machines these days that do it automatically, so they don't wake you up.

      This is not a big procedure so you shouldn't (depending on the work you do) be off for very long at all. Another good question for your doctor.

      In fact if you ask the doctor all the questions you've asked here you will get all the accurate information for your particular situation.

      I think you will find you are feeling more anxious than the whole thing creates just now.

      All the best.

  33. QUESTION:
    fibroadenoma or cancer? ?
    I'm 25 and last fall was diagnosed with a 2.3mm fibroadenoma thru an ultrasound test. Dr was not concerned and requested a 6month follow-up. Last week I went for my follow-up and the ultrasound found an increase in size to 3mm and an increase in color flow. She recomends I get a biopsy as soon as possible and supports removal of the tumor as well. Still diagnosed as a fibroadenoma with suspision.

    I plan to get a biopsy in November when insurance kicks in but until then I'm very scared. Is it possible for a fibroadenoma to turn out to be cancer once biopsied? I know if it was to be determined a fibroadenoma that it is near impossible for it to develope into cancer but I have read stories that Dr.'s have assumed a fibroadenoma and a biopsy has proven otherwise.

    Am I too young for cancer? And if this foes turn out to be just a fibroadenoma, am I at higher risk to develop cancer since I'm prone to get fibros?

    Anyone in or has been in my boat? And what should I expect?

    Scared

    I had my measurments off. It's 3 centimeters not millimeters. Sorry.

    • ANSWER:
      Macabella- The chances that your breast lump is cancer are less than 1 in a hundred.

      Fibroadenoma is a benign breast growth that most commonly presents in teenage girls and women under the age of thirty. The presence of a fibroadenoma mass in a breast often causes women anxiety and concern, partly because people equate any type of breast lump with cancer. Fibroadenoma carries a very slight risk for future breast cancer, but the majority of fibroadenoma are benign breast growths.

      Fibroadenomas are the most commonly diagnosed benign breast tumor in young women. A fibroadenoma tends to be sphere shaped, with a smoother surface than most malignant breast cancers. While malignant tumors tend to be immobile, fibroadenoma growths move easily within the breast.

      Ultimately, a biopsy sample is the only definitive diagnostic method for fibroadenoma. Biopsy samples may be gathered by incisional surgery, or though fine needle aspiration. During a fine needle aspiration a long thin needle is inserted into the fibroadenoma mass to retrieve cell samples. While biopsy is the only sure way to confirm fibroadenoma, young women in their teens to mid twenties may not require a biopsy if the lump meets all the requirements for a characteristic fibroadenoma mass.

      As benign growths, fibroadenomas are not always removed from the breast. Instead, the mass is left and carefully monitored for changes in shape and size. Whether fibroadenomas are removed depends on a number of physical and psychological factors. If tumor size or location causes pain or discomfort, then the fibroadenoma will be removed.

      Patient concerns and anxieties are also factors. If a woman is uneasy with the idea of a breast mass remaining untreated, the fibroadenoma may be removed to alleviate her anxiety.

      A fibroadenoma may be removed under local anesthetic, either through surgery or through the use of a fine needle. If a biopsy is required to rule out malignancy, the entire fibroadenoma may be removed during the procedure.

      Women with fibroadenoma have a slightly higher risk of breast cancer than other women, but not by a significant amount. Almost all fibroadenoma are benign.

  34. QUESTION:
    What is a fibroadenoma?

    • ANSWER:
      What Are Fibroadenomas?: Fibroadenomas are one of the findings that can be seen on your mammogram. They are benign (not cancerous) breast tumors that are made of glandular and fibrous breast tissue. Fibroadenomas can occur alone, in groups or as a complex. If you have multiple or complex fibroadenomas, this may raise your risk of breast cancer slightly.
      Can You Feel a Fibroadenoma?: While doing your regular breast self-exam, you may feel a breast fibroadenoma. These feel firm, round, smooth, rubbery, and are movable. They are so mobile that women sometimes refer to them as “breast mice” because they tend to run away from your fingers. A fibroadenoma may feel tender, especially right before your period, when it may swell due to hormonal changes.
      What Sizes Are Fibroadenomas?: Fibroadenomas range in size from one to five cm, (0.39 inches to nearly two inches). Giant fibroadenomas can be the size of a small lemon, about 15 cm (5.9 inches).
      What Do Fibroadenomas Look like on a Mammogram?: Fibroadenomas appear as round or oval smooth-edged masses. The outline of the mass will be clearly defined, not blurry. Sometimes they are accompanied by coarse calcifications. Fibroadenomas can look like cysts or a well-contained tumor.
      How Can You Be Sure It Is a Fibroadenoma?: Your doctor or radiologist may send you to have an ultrasound study done. This is because a fibroadenoma will be easier to distinguish from other tissue, because of the way it responds to sound waves. It will appear as a dark area, with a definite outline, homogeneous, round or oval, and may have smooth-edged bumps. If the ultrasound doesn’t give a definite result, the next study may be an MRI (magnetic resonance image). The most conclusive test is a fine needle biopsy or a core needle biopsy, to get a sample of the cells for a pathologist to examine.
      What Happens Next, If You Have Fibroadenomas?: Since fibroadenomas are benign, treatment will vary depending on your diagnosis. If it is small, painless, remains the same size, and a biopsy shows no problems, you would not need further treatment, but may have follow-up ultrasounds. However, if it is large (more than three cm), painful, growing, or a biopsy results in atypical (very active) cells, you can have it surgically removed. Doctors recommend removal of fibroadenomas, if you are over 40 years old.
      What Causes Fibroadenomas?: The exact cause of fibroadenomas is unknown. They seem to be influenced by estrogen, because they appear most often in premenopausal or pregnant women, or in women who are postmenopausal and taking HRT (hormone replacement therapy). Most fibroadenomas come and go during your menstrual cycle, when your hormone levels are changing.
      When Do Fibroadenomas Appear?: These are most common in women who are from 15 to 30 years old and in pregnant women. Fibroadenomas occur in 10 percent of all women, but in 20 percent of African-American women. They are much less common in postmenopausal women, unless the women is on estrogen therapy. About 10 percent of all fibroadenomas will disappear over time, and twenty percent of them will recur. If they don’t disappear, they usually stop growing when they reach two or three cm.

  35. QUESTION:
    Fibroadenoma Disappeared !?
    I had a large lump in the lower outer part of my breast ,about 5 yrs ago.I had an FNAC, which showed fibrocystic disease,but the doc said it was rather a large fibradenoma as it was extremely mobile.The doc suggested to wait and see,if it starts getting bigger or causes any pain,I would need an operation for removal of lump.
    OK ! I kept an eye on it by regularly doing a self examination.Couple of months back when i was getting an under arm waxing ...I noticed that the lump has disappeaed completely.Now I am wondering if that really was a fibroadenoma or something else.Do they have a tendency to disappear spontaneously? If yes why did it take 5 yrs ?
    has anyone had similar experience...please help !

    • ANSWER:
      When you go through menopause, and your hormones decrease, fibroadenomas can shrink. I am unsure of your age.

      Did the histological examination of the lump, after your biopsy, prove the lump to be a fibroadenoma? Did you ever have a mammogram or ultrasound of this lump, after your biopsy? Fibroadenomas image very well with ultrasound. Other breast conditions which can resolve themselves, and go away, are benign breast cysts. Cysts can totally disappear, even after being present for years.

      I would say you should bring up these concerns to your doctor, but that being said, I wouldn't stress over any lump in my breast which has gotten smaller, or disappeared completely. Breast cancers NEVER do this....they just keep getting larger.

      "Estrogen sensitivity is thought to play a role in fibroadenoma growth: some tumors may increase in size towards the end of the menstruation or during pregnancy. After menopause, many fibroadenomas spontaneously shrink due to lower estrogen levels. Hormone therapy for postmenopausal women may prevent fibroadenomas from shrinking."

      http://www.breasthealthfocus.com/articles/breast-disease/fibroadenoma.php

  36. QUESTION:
    i found out my dog has breast cancer. now she is howling,crying alot..is it a sign of her dieing now?
    i found out my dog has breast cancer. now she is howling and whinning alot. vet says she is not in pain. but why is she howling ? she is 19 years old in human life. but still worried she is in pain from the breast cancer. she has never whin or howl like this before.

    • ANSWER:
      Your vet is likely right that the howling and crying is not because of pain from breast cancer. Breast tumors in dogs are more common in unspayed, middle-aged female dogs (those between 5 and 10 years of age), although they can, on rare occasions, be found in dogs as young as 2 years. These tumors are rare in dogs that were spayed under 2 years of age. Occasionally, mammary tumors will develop in male dogs and these are usually very aggressive and have a poor prognosis.

      The risk of breast cancer is almost eliminated in dogs that are spayed before their first heat. Spaying greatly reduces the chances of a female dog developing this condition. In those females spayed prior to their first heat cycle, breast cancer is very, very rare. The risk of malignant mammary tumors in dogs spayed prior to their first heat is 0.05%. It is 8% for dog spayed after one heat, and 26% in dogs spayed after their second heat.It is believed that the elimination or reduction of certain hormonal factors causes the lowering of incidence of the disease in dogs that have been spayed. These factors would probably be estrogen, progesterone, a similar hormone or possibly a combination of two or more of these.

      There are multiple types of breast tumors in dogs. Approximately one-half of all breast tumors in dogs are benign, and half are malignant. All breast tumors should be identified through a biopsy and histopathology (microscopic examination of the tissue) to help in the treatment of that particular type of tumor.

      The most common benign form of canine breast tumors is actually a mixture of several different types of cells. For a single tumor to possess more than one kind of cancerous cell is actually rare in many species. This combination cancer in the dog is called a 'benign mixed mammary tumor' and contains glandular and connective tissue. Other benign tumors include complex adenomas, fibroadenomas, duct papillomas, and simple adenomas.

      Dop breast tumors present as a solid mass or as multiple swellings. When tumors do arise in the breast issue, they are usually easy to detect by gently palpating the mammary glands. When tumors first appear they will feel like small pieces of pea gravel just under the skin. They are very hard and are difficult to move around under the skin. They can grow rapidly in a short period of time, doubling their size every month or so.

      The dog normally has five mammary glands, each with its own nipple, on both the right and left side of its lower abdomen. Although breast cancer can and does occur in all of the glands, it usually occurs most frequently in the 4th and 5th. In half of the cases, more than one growth is observed. Benign growths are often smooth, small and slow growing. Signs of malignant tumors include rapid growth, irregular shape, firm attachment to the skin or underlying tissue, bleeding, and ulceration. Occasionally tumors that have been small for a long period of time may suddenly grow quickly and aggressively, but this is the exception not the rule.

      It is very difficult to determine the type of tumor based on physical inspection. A biopsy or tumor removal and analysis are almost always needed to determine if the tumor is benign or malignant, and to identify what type it is. Tumors, which are more aggressive may metastasize and spread to the surrounding lymph nodes or to the lungs. A chest x-ray and physical inspection of the lymph nodes will often help in confirming this.

      Mammary cancer spreads to the rest of the body through the release of individual cancer cells from the various tumors into the lymphatics. The lymphatic system includes special vessels and lymph nodes. There are regional lymph nodes on both the right and left sides of the body under the front and rear legs. They are called the 'axillary' and 'inguinal' lymph nodes, respectively. Mammary glands 1, 2, and 3 drain and spread their tumor cells forward to axillary lymph nodes, while cells from 3, 4, and 5 spread to the inguinal ones. New tumors form at these sites and then release more cells that go to other organs such as the lungs, liver, or kidneys.

      What is the treatment?

      Surgical Removal: Upon finding any mass within the breast of a dog, surgical removal is recommended unless the patient is very old. If a surgery is done early in the course of this disease, the cancer can be totally eliminated in over 50% of the cases having a malignant form of cancer. The area excised depends on the judgment and preference of the practitioner. Some will only remove the mass itself. Others, taking into consideration how the cancer spreads, will remove the mass and the rest of the mammary tissue and lymph nodes that drain with the gland. For example, if a growth were detected in the number 2 gland on the left side, we would therefore remove glands, 1, 2, and 3 and the axillary lymph node on that side. If it were found in the number 4 gland on the right side, then glands 3, 4, 5, and the inguinal lymph node on that side would be completely removed. With some tumor types, especially sarcomas, complete removal is very difficult and many of these cases will have tumor regrowth at the site of the previously removed tumor.

      Owners may confuse a surgical removal of a mammary gland in the dog with a radical mastectomy in humans, with all of the associated problems. In humans, this type of surgery would affect the underlying muscle tissue which complicates the recovery. In the dog, however, all of the breast tissue and the related lymphatics are outside of the muscle layer, so we only need to cut through the skin and the mammary tissue. This makes the surgery much easier and recovery much faster. A radical mastectomy in a dog means all the breasts, the skin covering them, and the four lymph nodes are all removed at the same time. Although this is truly major surgery, suture removal usually occurs in 10 to 14 days with normal activity resuming at that point.

      Many veterinarians will spay a dog having a mastectomy (unless she is very old). The value of this in decreasing the recurrence of tumors is still controversial.

  37. QUESTION:
    Going to get surgery for fibroadenoma... and scared...?
    So im 15 and i have fibroadenoma in my left breast and i have to have it surgically removed and im really scared because i have never had surgery before and i dont know what it will be like. Will it hurt like hell after?, Is the removal quick and simple about what is the estimate time for a procedure like this ? ( the size is 2.5 i think cms) Do i have to take vicadin after , i hate throwing up! O and im really scared that im going to wake up in the middle of the procedure !!!! so can anybody give me so advice or help me calm down!?

    • ANSWER:
      I'm a little scared too because I'm 14 and have fibroadenoma too and the doctors still don't know if they want to have it surgically removed or not. The most I can tell you is to pray to God that your procedure will go right or ask HIM to remove it before the doctors can. I have the same fears you do, but just hold yourself up and be positive about it.

  38. QUESTION:
    What to expect : mastectomy/reconstruction?
    I've booked surgery for early December to have my brest removed with an immediate recontruction . I've read tonnes of forums but I'm still pretty nervous about it.
    A bit about me:
    I'm 20(no family history; it is NOT impossible for this to happen at my age or for a fibroadenoma to become a carcinoma)
    I'm still in uni
    I'm dating my first serious boyfriend
    (I'm not doing this to troll or to get sympathy I just want to put this into context)

    Surgery is right after my last exam. I'm pretty scared and can't focus on anything. My mum wants me to get it done asap cause she's worried (but the Dr said it was ok for Dec). I know this just sounds superficial but I dont want to lose my breast. It wont look or feel right and its sucks cause I havn't even lived through my 20's yet to enjoy my body. I'm insecure about my body as it is and I don't know how to deal.
    i dont know whether or not to have an implant (recommended atm) or to have the 'flap' surgery done (having fat/muscle from the abdomenal trans to reconstruct the breast)

    To all you who know what I'm talking about, how was your recovery? Would you recommend the implant/flap method? Any stories would be great please
    A fibroadenoma has a 0.3% chance of developiing/becoming a carcinoma(cancer) That is what my breast specialist told me and since I am getting this mastectomy I trust she is correct in her diagnosis.
    http://www.jpgmonline.com/article.asp?issn=0022-3859;year=1995;volume=41;issue=1;spage=19;epage=20;aulast=Sarela

    Yes it is surprising that this has happened to me at my age. It does annoy the hell out of me that I have to have a mastectomy as a 'precaution' but hey you don't always get your way huh? I was told I couldnt not get radiation/lumpectomy due to my young age and they expect to have 'many years left' in my life and would not like to give a greater chance for a new cancer to form from exposure to radiation. Since I have no breast cancer history/my young age their is a greater chance for the cancer to return so they don't want to take any chances.
    It's interesting that you say I would make newspaper headlines. After this has blown over I'd like to h
    help* raise awareness for Breast Cancer in young women. Many women get random lumps and don't get the checked out -especially young women. I was told by so many doctors that breast cancer at my age was 'non existent' , so I would like to spread the word to help at least a few women out there who may face something similar

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroadenoma does not turn into cancer. The head of the breast cancer department at my hospital said so.

      Whole breast removal is so uncommon at your age that I would expect you to make newspaper headlines.

      I had a fibroadenoma removed years ago without any fuss.

      Exactly what tests and examinations did you have? Have you had biopsies?

      Hospitals would be very busy if the millions of women who had fibroadenomas had them removed. If your story is accurate, you willl go through life heavily mutilated for nothing.

  39. QUESTION:
    Breast lump-removal?
    When I was 17 my doctor found a grape sized lump in my left breast, sent me to a specialist, and got it biopsied. Turned out to be fibroadenoma. I did not have it removed. The past few weeks it has been bothering me, causing discomfort in sleep and making bras very uncomfortable. Over the year it has grow into the size of a small egg. My last pap smear, my doctor found a small lump in my right breast, she is sending me this month to get it checked out as well. I am considering getting all lumps removed- I can't live with the burden of a lump in my breast... it's hard to think it isn't cancerous- negativity has a way into my mind- I am almost 19-- and very nervous.

    I'd rather have a 3" scar though, than breast cancer-

    Does anyone know about the removal procedure.. I want to go in with some idea. Thank You!

    • ANSWER:
      Your doctor will decide if you need another mamo (it has been a year). Then when the results come back they will know if it needs to come out. If it does they will put you to sleep, make a small incision and remove it. You'll be back to work in a couple of days.

  40. QUESTION:
    Any one experianced or specialist here, can provide me info about "fibroadenoma".?

    I am having it remove, any pain any marks, anything to expect before or after surgeory? i m extremly nervous

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroadenoma of the breast is a benign (noncancerous) tumor.

      Causes, incidence, and risk factors

      Fibroadenoma is the most common benign tumor of the breast and the most common breast tumor in women less than 30 years of age. Fibroadenomas are usually found as solitary lumps, but about 10-15% of women have multiple lumps that may affect both breasts.

      Black women tend to develop fibroadenomas more frequently and at an earlier age than white women. The cause of fibroadenoma is not known.

      Symptoms

      Lumps may be moveable, painless, firm, or rubbery, with well-defined borders
      May grow in size, especially during pregnancy
      Often get smaller after menopause (if not taking hormones)
      Signs and tests

      The following may be performed to gain information about a breast lump:

      Physical examination
      Mammogram
      Breast Ultrasound
      Fine needle aspiration
      Biopsy (needle or open)
      Treatment

      A biopsy is needed to get a definitive diagnosis. Women in their teens or early 20s may not need a biopsy if the lump goes away on its own.
      If a biopsy indicates that the lump is a fibroadenoma, the lump may be left in place or removed, depending on the patient and the lump. If left in place, it may be watched over time with physical examinations, mammograms, and ultrasounds.
      The lump may be surgically removed at the time of an open biopsy (this is called an excisional biopsy). The decision depends on the features of the lump and the patient's preferences.
      Alternative treatments include removing the lump with a needle, and destroying the lump without removing it (such as by freezing, in a process called cryoablation).
      Expectations (prognosis)

      The outlook is excellent, although patients with fibroadenoma have a slightly higher risk of breast cancer later. Lumps that are not removed should be periodically monitored by physical examinations and imaging, following the recommendations of the doctor.

      Complications

      If the lump is left in place for observation, removal may be needed at a later time if the lump changes, grows, or persists.
      Cancer may be found in the lump (very rare) and require further treatment.
      Biopsy or removal may result in bleeding or scarring.
      Calling your health care provider

      Patients should contact their health care provider if they feel a new breast lump, if a known lump changes, or if they note changes in the breast that aren’t affected by the menstrual cycle. Women should perform regular breast self exam and undergo breast screening as recommended by their health care provider.

  41. QUESTION:
    Fibroadenoma Removal?
    I'm 20 years old and was told 6 months ago I have a fibroademona in my left breast. My doctor gave me the options to have it removed or to have another ultra sound 3-6 months from the first ultra sound. I chose to have another ultra sound (recommended by my doctor) and I'm going in for it next week. The lump has grown in size over the past couple of months and I'm worried I will have to have it removed. I realize the procedure is probably simple but before speaking with my doctor again- I'd like to know what the surgery consists of if anyone knows =) Thanks for any input you may have!!

    • ANSWER:
      I went with removal as well because I was pretty sure mine was getting bigger as well. But I wish I never had. My surgery was a day procedure and because the lump was 1.5cm long I was not put under. The doctor was so rough that still a month later my whole breast is bruised and rock hard. I am getting an ultrasound done to see why it is like this because he could have caused a blood clot they will have to surgically remove. I also had an infection right from the get go and I was in so much pain once the freezing wore off because of this that I could barely breath or it would cause more pain. All I could do was scream and cry for hours. They send me home with no pain killers by the way. I was so sick from the infection I couldn't get out of bed for three days, and moving was horrendously painful, even the slight pull of gravity on my breast from standing was enough to bring me to my knees. If I could do it all over again, I would see a natruopathic doctor for alternative treatments to reduce the lump. I found out a good treatment may be simple fish oil taken internally. I wish I knew that a month ago. To top it all off, the scar will be huge as he made a two inch incision, which is standard.

  42. QUESTION:
    I have PASH and need an expert who can help me.?
    I was diagnosed with 6 cm PASH,and was operated on at major, high profile medical center last October. They did not remove all of it and it is growing and painful. I need a doctor who can help me. I can go anywhere.

    • ANSWER:
      Background

      This is a rare but benign tumor of the breast. Its importance lies in the diagnostic skills of the pathologist, distinguishing it from a malignancy. PSH stands for pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia. It is a diangosis that only a pathologist can render by examining the breast tissue under the microscope.

      OUTLINE

      Disease Associations
      Pathogenesis
      Laboratory/Radiologic/Other Diagnostic Testing
      Gross Appearance and Clinical Variants
      Histopathological Features and Variants
      Special Stains/
      Immunohistochemistry/
      Electron Microscopy
      Differential Diagnosis
      Prognosis and Treatment
      Commonly Used Terms
      Internet Links

      DISEASE ASSOCIATIONS CHARACTERIZATION
      FIBROADENOMA

      Pseudoangiomatous hyperplasia of mammary stroma: a case of pure type after removal of fibroadenoma.

      Fukunaga M.

      Department of Pathology, The Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.
      APMIS 2001 Feb;109(2):113-6 Abstract quote
      A case of pure pseudoangiomatous hyperplasia of the mammary stroma after removal of a fibroadenoma is described. The lesion, which was found in the right breast of a 40-year-old woman, was a well-circumscribed non-encapsulated, rubbery, lobulated mass measuring 40x40x35 mm.

      Histologically, it consisted predominantly of a proliferation of spindle cells with interanastomosing vascular-like arrangements in the interlobular or interductal stroma. Neither cytological atypia nor mitotic figures were observed. The stroma contained abundant collagen with focal hyalinization. Focally, epithelial elements showed mild ductal hyperplasia. There was no fibroadenoma. Immunohistochemically, the spindle cells were positive for vimentin, CD34, alpha-smooth muscle actin, muscle actin, CD34, calponin, and progesterone receptors.

      Ultrastructurally, many spindle cells had thin elongated cytoplasmic processes, which enveloped pseudovascular spaces containing a few collagenous fibrils, indicating fibroblastic cells. This lesion should be distinguished from other mammary fibrous and vascular lesions with which it may be confused.

      GYNECOMASTIA
      Rapid growth of pseudoangiomatous hyperplasia of mammary stroma in axillary gynecomastia in an immunosuppressed patient.

      Seidman JD, Borkowski A, Aisner SC, Sun CC.

      Department of Pathology, University of Maryland Medical System, University of Maryland Hospital, Baltimore.
      Arch Pathol Lab Med 1993 Jul;117(7):736-8 Abstract quote
      Pseudoangiomatous hyperplasia of mammary stroma is a rare, benign mesenchymal proliferation that sometimes mimics angiosarcoma.

      To our knowledge, it has not been reported in men. We report the first case of this unusual entity in a man. This case was most unusual in that it occurred in a clinical setting of immunosuppression, in axillary gynecomastia, and was growing rapidly.

      Gynecomastia in type-1 neurofibromatosis with features of pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia with giant cells. Report of two cases.

      Damiani S, Eusebi V.

      Department of Oncology, Marcello Malpighi of the University of Bologna, Italy.
      Virchows Arch 2001 May;438(5):513-6 Abstract quote
      We describe the histological finding in two cases of gynecomastia in patients with von Recklinghausen's disease. The histological and immunohistochemical features of the two cases were reviewed and compared with those of five cases of gynecomastia in men without clinical evidence of neurofibromatosis.

      In both patients bearing von Recklinghausen's disease, the breast stroma showed features consistent with pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH). It was characterised by anastomosing empty spaces lined by spindle and multinucleated giant cells which were positive with CD34 and anti-vimentin antisera and negative with anti-FVIII and CD31 antisera. In two of five of the control cases without neurofibromatosis, the mammary stroma showed focal areas with features of PASH, but no multinucleated giant cells were present in any case. PASH with giant cells should be recognised as a feature of gynecomastia in von Recklinghausen's disease.

      The presence of multinucleated giant cells is very unusual and, although more cases have to be studied, these cells seem to be a feature of PASH occurring in patients with von Recklinghausen's disease.

      HIV
      Pseudoangiomatous hyperplasia of mammary stroma in an HIV patient.

      de Saint Aubain Somerhausen N, Larsimont D, Cluydts N, Heymans O, Verhest A.

      Department of Pathology, Institut Jules Bordet, Bruxelles, Belgium.
      Gen Diagn Pathol 1997 Dec;143(4):251-4 Abstract quote
      Pseudoangiomatous hyperplasia of the mammary stroma is a benign mesenchymal proliferative lesion. It is rarely observed as a tumor mass that has to be differentiated from angiosarcoma.

      We give a review of the literature and report a case unusual in that it occurred in a clinical setting of HIV infection, was rapidly growing, and has been the largest described so far.

      PATHOGENESIS CHARACTERIZATION
      MYOFIBROBLASTS

      Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH). A mammary stromal tumor with myofibroblastic differentiation.

      Powell CM, Cranor ML, Rosen PP.

      Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10021.
      Am J Surg Pathol 1995 Mar;19(3):270-7 Abstract quote
      Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH) is frequently a microscopic incidental finding in breast biopsies performed for benign or malignant disease. However, it may also produce a mass lesion.

      We reviewed PASH seen first as a tumor in 40 women aged 14 to 67 years (mean, 37 years). All but one lesion were clinically palpable. The exceptional tumor was found by mammography. The mass, typically unilateral, was usually diagnosed clinically as a fibroadenoma. Most specimens contained a well-circumscribed tumor with a firm white-gray cut surface. In six cases, there was no discrete gross lesion in the surgical specimen. Microscopically, there was a spectrum of pathological stromal changes ranging from classical PASH with anastomosing slit-shaped spaces outlined by flat, bland spindle cells to more proliferative lesions composed of bundles of plump spindle cells that obscured the underlying pseudoangiomatous architecture in the most florid lesions.

      The spindle cells were vimentin and CD34 positive and factor VIII negative. In more cellular fascicular lesions, the stromal cells acquired desmin and actin positivity.These immunohistochemical features were consistent with myofibroblastic histogenesis of PASH. Reactivity for progesterone receptor (PR) typically exceeded estrogen receptor (ER) in the nuclei of stromal and glandular cells. In most lesions, the nuclei of stromal spindle cells were ER negative. The majority of the patients were treated by excisional biopsy. One lesion, incompletely excised, spontaneously regressed. One patient had bilateral mastectomies. Follow-up was 0.6-11 years (mean, 4.5 years). Five patients had ipsilateral recurrences, and two had subsequent contralateral PASH. The morphological spectrum of cellular proliferation and staining qualities indicates that the myofibroblast plays a major role in the histogenesis of PASH.

      The pathogenesis of PASH remains uncertain, but aberrant reactivity of myofibroblasts to endogenous or exogenous hormones is likely to be an important factor. Simple excision is adequate treatment initially and for infrequent recurrences, Diffuse PASH occasionally presents a difficult management problem that may necessitate mastectomy.

      LABORATORY/
      RADIOLOGIC/
      OTHER TESTS
      CHARACTERIZATION
      RADIOLOGIC

      Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia: mammographic, sonographic, and clinical patterns.

      Cohen MA, Morris EA, Rosen PP, Dershaw DD, Liberman L, Abramson AF.

      Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021, USA.
      Radiology 1996 Jan;198(1):117-20 Abstract quote
      PURPOSE: To analyze the mammographic, ultrasonographic (US), and clinical patterns of pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH).

      MATERIALS AND METHODS: Preoperative mammographic and US images, clinical records, and histologic assessments were reviewed in seven cases of PASH as the sole component or dominant stromal component of a clinically or mammographically defined mass lesion. In five, a PASH tumor was diagnosed at image-guided 14-gauge core-needle biopsy; in two, it was diagnosed at surgical excisional biopsy.

      RESULTS: Four women were premenopausal, two were postmenopausal, and one 40-year-old patient had iatrogenic primary amenorrhea. Four of seven masses were palpable; three were discovered at mammography. Four masses enlarged over 6 months to 5 years. At mammography, all masses lacked calcifications; six were well defined, and one was spiculated. One was inapparent at US; the remaining six were well defined and hypoechoic.

      CONCLUSION: The diagnosis of this rare lesion with image-guided breast biopsy or surgical biopsy is consistent with a well-defined uncalcified mass at mammography and a solid hypoechoic mass at US, usually in a premenopausal woman.

      Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia: mammographic and sonographic appearances.

      Polger MR, Denison CM, Lester S, Meyer JE.

      Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
      AJR Am J Roentgenol 1996 Feb;166(2):349-52 Abstract quote
      OBJECTIVE: Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia is a benign, localized form of stromal overgrowth with a probable hormonal etiology. Our purpose is to describe the mammographic, sonographic, and clinical features of this entity.

      MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective review of breast imaging studies and demographic information for seven patients identified as having pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia was performed. The patients were chosen from a 1-year period during which 1661 breast biopsies were performed.

      RESULTS: The patients were 36-61 years old. Six were premenopausal, and the one postmenopausal woman was on hormone replacement therapy. Three patients wee evaluated palpable breast lumps, and four were asymptomatic. All seven women had noncalcified masses that measured 1.1-11 cm and that were visible by mammography. The border characteristics were as follows: three masses were well circumscribed, two were partly circumscribed, and two were indistinct, probably because they were obscured by overlying parenchyma. Sonography was performed for five patients; lesions were visible in four. All four of these lesions were solid and circumscribed. Five of the masses had increased in size since earlier studies, and one palpable mass was found by physical examination to have grown over time. Two patients had a local recurrence of pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia. Surgical excision was performed for three patients, large-core biopsy was performed for three patients, and both surgery and large-core biopsy were performed for one patient.

      ONCLUSION: Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia should be included in the differential diagnosis of a circumscribed or partially circumscribed mass, especially in the premenopausal population. These masses often grow over time and can recur locally. Pathologic diagnosis of the lesion may be difficult unless the pathologist is aware of the presence of a mass lesion and appreciates the stromal changes characteristic of such a lesion.

      Imaging appearances of pseudoangiomatous hyperplasia of mammary stroma.

      Kirkpatrick UJ, Burrows C, Loughran CF.

      Department of Surgery, Macclesfield District General Hospital, Cheshire SK10 3BL, UK.
      Clin Radiol 2000 Jul;55(7):576-8
      LABORATORY MARKERS

      GROSS APPEARANCE/
      CLINICAL VARIANTS CHARACTERIZATION
      GENERAL
      Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia of the breast.

      Castro CY, Whitman GJ, Sahin AA.

      Department of Pathology, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA.
      Am J Clin Oncol 2002 Apr;25(2):213-6 Abstract quote
      Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia is a benign proliferative lesion of the mammary stroma that rarely presents as a localized mass. We describe the clinical, radiologic, cytologic, and histologic features of a case of pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia that presented as a rapidly growing breast lesion in a 36-year-old woman.

      VARIANTS
      ANOGENITAL
      Pseudoangiomatous Stromal Hyperplasia in Lesions Involving Anogenital Mammary-Like Glands.

      Kazakov DV, Bisceglia M, Mukensnabl P, Michal M.

      From *Sikl's Department of Pathology, Charles University, Medical Faculty Hospital, Pilsen, Czech Republic; and daggerDepartment of Pathology, IRCCS-Ospedale "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza," San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy.

      Am J Surg Pathol. 2005 Sep;29(9):1243-1246. Abstract quote

      Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH), first reported in 1986, is nowadays a well-recognized change in the breast.

      We present three cases of lesions involving anogenital mammary-like glands demonstrating this feature. All patients were females (ages, 42, 43, and 53 years). Each presented with a solitary, 1.5- to 2-cm asymptomatic nodule. Locations included the perianal area, perineum, and labium majus.

      Histopathologically, one lesion was classified as low-grade phyllodes tumor, another as fibroadenoma, and in the remaining case PASH was found in the background of mild hyperplasia of anogenital mammary-like glands and substantial lipomatous metaplasia. In all lesions, PASH had an identical appearance to that in the breast, that is open, slit-like, often anastomosing channels devoid of erythrocytes and lined by discontinuous, often attenuated, inconspicuous cells without atypia or mitotic activity set in a hyalinized collagenous stroma. Quantitatively, PASH ranged in the above cases, forming a relatively small focus in the fibroadenoma and being quite extensive in the remaining two cases. In the phyllodes tumor, PASH areas exhibited focal hypercellularity and presence of myoid cells. In none of the cases were there cells with intranuclear inclusions or multinucleated cells. The lesions were surgically excised. Two patients with follow-up were disease-free at one and three years after the operation.

      As to our knowledge, PASH has not been previously described in the anogenital area, this feature seems to have been either overlooked or is genuinely rare in this location. It may occur in a preexisting lesion of anogenital mammary-like glands or may apparently by itself produce a clinically detectable lesion. The clinicopathologic features of PASH in the anogenital area seem to be identical to those in the breast.
      MALE BREAST

      Pseudoangiomatous hyperplasia of male breast.

      Badve S, Sloane JP.

      Department of Histopathology, Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton, Surrey, UK.
      Histopathology 1995 May;26(5):463-6 Abstract quote
      Ninety-three male breast specimens have been examined for the presence of pseudoangiomatous hyperplasia of the mammary stroma which has hitherto been described almost exclusively in females.

      Forty-four cases (47.4%) showed some degree of hyperplasia, varying from small microscopic foci to extensive change involving 90% of the mammary tissue. All but one were found in association with gynaecomastia, early and intermediate stage.

      The association between pseudoangiomatous hyperplasia and benign proliferative lesions mirrors that reported in the female breast, and our findings suggest that the change may represent a stage in the maturation of newly formed mammary stroma.

      MASS

      Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia: presentation as a mass in the female nipple.

      Iancu D, Nochomovitz LE.

      Department of Pathology, Winthrop-University Hospital, Mineola, New York 11501, USA.
      Breast J 2001 Jul-Aug;7(4):263-5 Abstract quote
      Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH) is a benign, localized fibroblastic and myofibroblastic overgrowth that occurs almost exclusively in premenopausal women as a painless, palpable intramammary mass.

      The lesion has a pale, fibrous, and homogeneous cut surface, is typically well circumscribed, and may have a diameter of 2.0-15 cm. Its ramifying slits lined by flattened myofibroblastic cells are apt to be mistaken for vascular spaces, leading to an erroneous diagnosis of angiosarcoma. The etiology of the condition is unknown, but a relationship to myofibroblastoma has been postulated. Hormonal factors, too, are thought to play a developmental role.

      The potential for PASH to create a palpable breast mass has been only quite recently advanced in the medical literature, and it has evidently not been reported in the nipple.

  43. QUESTION:
    I'm getting a pea size bump?
    On my breast it's turning lite pink. Any one know what it could be? I don't have health insurance Any one know?

    • ANSWER:
      Hello Brooke,

      Cysts

      These lumps may be situated near the surface or it can also be situated deep inside, closer to the chest wall.
      •It may often appear before the start of the menstrual period and disappear after it.
      •It may be caused due to a dilated milk duct.
      •This lump is often round, smooth and firm.
      •It may be small or large.
      •The surrounding area may be tender.

      If the cysts do not go away on their own, then a needle is used to drain the cyst. If the doctor is doubtful, the drained liquid may be sent for further examination. After draining, if the cyst does not reappear in six weeks, then no further treatment is required.

      Fibroadenomas

      These lumps in breast are normally seen near the surface and can be felt easily.
      •They are often caused in the teenage girls or in young women.
      •Breast lumps during pregnancy are often of this type.
      •These are hard, firm, smooth, round and move around rather easily.
      •They are often a rubbery mass, which do not cause pain.

      Often times this condition heals on it own. If it does not heal on its own, then surgical removal of the cyst may be required.

      Fibrocystic Changes Lumps

      are felt in both the breasts. They are caused due to hormonal fluctuations before or during the menstrual cycle. •Lumps are often present in both the breasts and are breast lumps that hurt.
      •The lumps may grow and become tender just before commencement of the menstrual cycle.
      •In some cases, discharge from nipples is also prominent.
      •The lumps may be hard and rubbery to touch.
      •Often only one big or small lump is seen.

      Over the counter pain killer medicines may be taken for treating the condition. In some cases, oral contraceptives may prove to be helpful.

      Calcifications

      They can be formed in any part of the breast. Although they are commonly seen closer to the surface.
      •They are lumps made of calcium, often caused due to aging.
      •Collection of calcium in a dilated milk duct.
      •They are more commonly seen in women above the age of 50.
      •There are multiple number of calcium deposits, which are seen.

      The line of treatment will depend on the condition of the patient. The treatment is different for larger and smaller chunks of deposit.

      Malignant Tumor

      These lumps may not be restricted to only one particular area in the breasts. It may be seen near the surface, as much as it can be seen closer to the chest wall. In a number of cases, it may also be seen around the armpit area.

      •Age is one of the factor, which does have a role to play in causing cancer.
      •The other most common cause is heredity. If a mother or grandmother has suffered from cancer, then the chances of the daughter or granddaughter suffering from it are more.
      •Exposure to radiation in life also increases the risk of breast cancer manifold.
      •They normally have irregular shape and pebbly surface.
      •These lumps are normally hard to touch.
      •During breast examination, these lumps do not normally move.
      •Shape of the breast may change and discharge from nipples may be seen.

      The treatment for breast cancer depends on spread of cancer. In some cases, surgery is performed for removing the lumps, while if the cancer has spread to the entire breast, then mastectomy may have to be performed. If any surrounding lymph node or tissues are also affected, they may also have to be removed. Other than surgery, there are the options of chemotherapy, hormone therapy, radiation, etc., which are also used to treat the condition.

      Take care! Mama Bear

  44. QUESTION:
    My friend says she has breast cancer, but she is only 15. ?
    is that possible for some to have breast cancer at that age?

    • ANSWER:
      Hello,

      It is possible, but extremely uncommon. She may have a tumor called Fibroadenoma, which is the most common in her age group. Fibroadenoma is not a cancer though. It is benign. Sometimes when you tell someone she has a tumor, she thinks they are all cancer.

      The management of a Fibroadenoma is simple. It requires removal, but that almost always solves the problem. No Chemo or anything else is needed in almost all cases.

      Best Regards,

      John Di Saia MD

  45. QUESTION:
    Breast Surgery to remove masses instead of biopsy?
    After an ultrasound the radiologist suggested that I get a biopsy to check 3 masses. My OBGYN called me and told me she received and reviewed my ultrasound report and thinks it best that I get surgery to remove the masses and biopsy them after removal. I am going in next Tues for her to check how mobile they are and how close together they are. The biopsy would not be for 5 weeks because that office is backed up. Does anyone have any experience with this type of situation. Also, how painful will the biopsy be, and will they put me out for it? The Dr. said that they are nost likely Fibroadenoma, but because of the size, the length of time I have had them, and because there are 3, she would recommend surgery. I am 26, and do not know 75% of my family history.

    • ANSWER:
      If they remove the masses they do not biopsy them afterward – everything goes to pathology. The radiologists report would tell her how close they are to each other. If she thinks you should have surgery she should refer you to a breast surgeon and I would wait for their opinion. It’s hard to advise you not knowing exactly what the report states. Sometimes they recommend you have these removed if they are palpable as they can make it difficult to diagnose cancer early later in life if you should ever get breast cancer.

  46. QUESTION:
    breast fybrosis benign? has anyone had this before??
    does it hurt to get a biopsy done? im a little worried

    • ANSWER:
      I have had a couple of them. Yes, it does hurt after the surgery. I had a lump in 1994 and I was just numbed and remained awake during the removal. It was a fibroadenoma. It hurt so much that the Tylenol with codeine they gave me didn't work. I wound up taking Extra Strength Tylenol too to make the pain tolerable.

      I had 3 more removed at the same time in 2000. I was put out for that one. It didn't hurt as bad but I had Darvocet instead of the Tylenol with Codeine. I only took 2 of them total. I think it really depends on where the biopsy is and how deep it is. My first one was deeper than the last 3. I have breast pain throughout the month anyway.

      All of mine were benign. They told me that since mine hurt, they weren't worried that they would be cancerous. They weren't. It is better to be safe than sorry. I will pray yours are benign and that you have little to no pain after it is over. Best wishes to you. May God Bless you during your new year.

  47. QUESTION:
    Very painful breast lump?
    I'm in my early teens. I know it's ( very most likely) not breast cancer. I have a "lump", of sorts that is kind of skinny and soft, and movable. It hurts a lot to touch it or the area around it. I'm very worried as this is only on my one breast, near the side of my chest up to my armpit. I am on my period, but the pain has not gotten any better since my period has gone on.

    What might this be? Should I go to the doctor? Could it be a cyst? Should I be worried?

    Thanks ahead

    • ANSWER:
      I'm going to preface my answer by saying that I am not a doctor, and you should still see your physician no matter what you read online. Only he/she can determine the cause of your pain.

      Generally speaking, breast tenderness is often related to your menstrual cycle, it has a lot to do with the hormone levels (estrogen and progesterone mainly) that are fluctuating. In addition, stress can play an important role, and make this soreness worse.

      The most commonly found 'lump' in women, are fibroadenomas, which are solid, and benign lumps that move freely, and are often found in women in their late teens and early 20's. Depending on the size of the lump, doctors may or may not recommend removal.

      I don't think that you have a cyst, as generally speaking, they aren't movable. There are also a number of other breast conditions listed on the web page I've posted below. Please don't forget that the internet is no substitute for your doctor. You should make an appointment as soon as possible.

      Feel better!

  48. QUESTION:
    My Rat appears to have a tumor...Is that what it sounds like it is?
    SINCE I BOUGHT MY RAT SHE HAS CLINCHED HER FIST.. A FEW WEEKS AFTER I BOUGHT HER A LUMP STARTED TO SHOW UP ON THE OUTSIDE OF HER ARM. A WEEK OR SO LATER IT GOT ALITTLE SCABBY AND NOW ITS GONE.. UNDER HER ARM SHE NOW HAS ANOTHER ONE THAT EVEN BIGGER. I JUST NOTICED THIS ONE TODAY. ITS NOT SCABBY JUST A HARD KNOT. SHE DOESN'T ACT LIKE IT HURTS HER WHEN YOU TOUCH IT BUT SHE DOESN'T USE THAT ARM AT ALL AND SHE STILL HAS HER FIST CLINCHED.. IS THIS A TUMOR OR A CYST SINCE THE FIST ONE SCABBED OVER AND WENT AWAY. TAKING HER TO THE VET IS NOT A OPTION SO DONT GO THERE. I CAN'T AFFORD TO TAKE A RAT TO THE VET EXPECIALLY TO FIND OUT ITS CANCER AND SHES GONNA DIE.

    • ANSWER:
      my rat had cancer an died heres some info

      Mammary Cancer in Rats and Mice
      Holly Nash, DVM, MS
      Veterinary Services Department, Drs. Foster & Smith, Inc.

      Mammary cancer is a common cause of tumors in rats and mice and can occur in both males and females. The prevalence of tumors varies with the strain of animal. In some mouse strains, 70% develop mammary tumors. In mice, mammary tumors are also associated with the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV), which predisposes a mouse to develop mammary cancer. One strain of this virus is termed the "Bittner agent."

      What are the signs of mammary cancer?

      Rats: Since mammary tissue in the rat extends from the neck region to the pelvic region, mammary cancer occurs anywhere in that area. Mammary tumors in mice can virtually be found anywhere on the body. The most common form of mammary cancer in rats is a benign fibroadenoma; malignant adenocarcinomas account for less than 10% of mammary tumors. Mammary tumors can become quite large, even up to 3-4 inches.

      Mice: In contrast, most mammary tumors in mice are malignant adenocarcinomas. These tumors commonly become ulcerated, and often metastasize to the lungs.

      How is mammary cancer diagnosed?

      Mammary cancer is generally diagnosed by the location of the tumor, and a biopsy is performed to determine the type of tumor, and if it is malignant.

      How is mammary cancer treated?

      Rats: Mammary tumors are treated by surgical removal. Fibroadenomas may form or recur in multiple areas of the mammary tissue, and repeated surgeries may be needed to remove them. Experimentally, the drug tamoxifen and other anticancer drugs have been used to treat mammary tumors in rats.

      Mice: Since most mammary tumors in mice are malignant, the recurrence rate is high and the prognosis is poor.

      Can mammary cancer be prevented?

      Rats: Spaying female rats can greatly reduce the risk of mammary cancer.

      Mice: An offspring of a mouse whose mother had a mammary adenocarcinoma may be at higher risk of developing mammary tumors since the virus can be passed from the mother to her offspring both in utero and through the milk.

      References and Further Reading

      Committee on Infectious Diseases of Mice and Rats, National Research Council. Infectious Diseases of Mice and Rats. National Academy Press. Washington DC. 1991.

      Donnelly, TM. Disease problems of small rodents. In Hillyer, EV; Quesenberry, KE (eds.): Ferrets, Rabbits and Rodents. W.B. Saunders Co. Philadelphia, PA; 1997.

      Harkness, JE; Wagner, JE. The Biology and Medicine of Rabbits and Rodents. Williams & Wilkins. Media, PA; 1995.

  49. QUESTION:
    lumpy boobs... help me!?
    im 14 and im a C and i can really only feel one big lump in each is it normal?

    • ANSWER:
      is the lump like any of them
      Adenomas are non-cancerous abnormal growths of the glandular tissue in the breast. The most common growths, fibroadenomas, are somewhat more common in women in their 20's and in women of African descent. They usually feel round and firm and have smooth borders. They may move a little under the fingers, be tender, and change with the menstrual cycle. Adenomas are not related to breast cancer.

      could be this
      Lipomas are non-cancerous lumps of fatty tissue. They can be small or large. A woman may have just one or several lipomas at once.

      Cysts are fluid-filled sacs in the breast. They feel smooth or rubbery and move about under the fingers. They can be quite painful or tender, or they may be painless. Cysts are caused by the hormones that control the menstrual cycle. Cysts are rare in women older than 50 and are not related to breast cancer. If you have a cyst, your health professional may drain (aspirate) it to help relieve the pain and confirm the diagnosis.

      Sebaceous cysts are caused by plugged ducts at the site of a hair follicle. Like a cyst, they move freely under the fingers. Hormone stimulation or injury may cause them to enlarge. A sebaceous cyst that does not cause symptoms does not require medical treatment. Removal usually involves making a small incision in the skin and removing the entire sac so that it does not return.

  50. QUESTION:
    ok lump on left brest, its been sore all day(im worried!)?
    so my left breast has been sore all day, anyway i thought it would help to take off my bra when i did i felt my brest and there is a big lump in the middle right where my nipple is. its almost liek a breast bud but big, and and it is harder them my right breast. im 16 and like size A. im worried doesnt this mean cancer??

    like if i poke my right breast i can, but if i poke my left one there is the hard lump!
    should i tell my mom, that will be embarrassing she will probably touch my breast :( (umm embarrassing)

    • ANSWER:
      Try not to worry. With a lump the first thought is something serious, but usually, especially at your age, that is not the case. Check your with your doctor to put your mind at ease.

      Breast Lumps

      Breast lumps are common. A number of conditions can result in a lump or lumps in your breast. Most of these conditions are harmless or of minor concern.

      * Generalized breast lumpiness usually feels like lots of little bumps (nodularity) or as though some areas of the breast are thicker or denser than other areas. Your breasts also may feel tender. The lumps may occur in both breasts around the nipple and in the upper, outer part of the breasts, especially before your menstrual period. The lumps may come and go and change size in just a few days. Generalized lumpiness was once thought to be abnormal and was even called fibrocystic breast disease, but it is so common that it is now considered normal. Breast lumpiness usually goes away after menopause but may be found in women who are taking hormone replacement after menopause.
      * Blood clots in a vein (thrombophlebitis) can feel like a lump. The phlebitis affects the large vein that normally crosses the chest to the underarm area (axilla). Symptoms include pain, redness, warmth, and lumpiness along the course of the vein. Blood clots in the breast or on the chest wall are rare.

      Following are other types of breast lumps and their symptoms.
      Cysts and abscess lumps

      * Cysts are fluid-filled sacs in the breast. They feel smooth or rubbery and move about under the fingers. They can be quite painful or tender, or they may be painless. Cysts are caused by the hormones that control the menstrual cycle. Cysts are rare in women older than 50 and are not related to breast cancer. If you have a cyst, your health professional may drain (aspirate) it to help relieve the pain and confirm the diagnosis.
      * Sebaceous cysts are caused by plugged ducts at the site of a hair follicle. Like a cyst, they move freely under the fingers. Hormone stimulation or injury may cause them to enlarge. A sebaceous cyst that does not cause symptoms does not require medical treatment. Removal usually involves making a small incision in the skin and removing the entire sac so that it does not return.
      * Abscesses are pockets of infection within the breast. They may be quite painful, and the skin over the breast may be red or feel hot or solid. You may feel feverish or ill. Abscesses are treated with antibiotics and surgery to drain the abscess. They are most common in women who are breast-feeding.

      Fatty lumps

      * Fat necrosis is a condition in which the normal fat cells of the breast go through a change and become round lumps. The lumps may or may not be painful and may be firm. The skin over the lump may be red or look bruised. Fat necrosis may occur after a bruise or other injury to the chest or breast and can occur from weeks to years after an injury. Fat necrosis usually goes away without treatment but can form permanent scar tissue that may show up as an abnormality on a mammogram.
      * Lipomas are non-cancerous lumps of fatty tissue. They can be small or large. A woman may have just one or several lipomas at once.

      Growths

      * Adenomas are non-cancerous abnormal growths of the glandular tissue in the breast. The most common growths, fibroadenomas, are somewhat more common in women in their 20s and in women of African descent. They usually feel round and firm and have smooth borders. They may move a little under the fingers, be tender, and change with the menstrual cycle. Adenomas are not related to breast cancer.
      * Intraductal papillomas are wart-like growths in the ducts of the breast. They usually feel like lumps just under the nipple and can cause a bloody discharge from the nipple. Women close to menopause may have only one growth. Several growths in both breasts are more common in younger women.
      * Breast cancer usually feels like a hard or firm lump (nodule). It usually is irregular in shape (it does not have smooth edges) and may feel like it is attached (fixed) to skin or tissue deep inside the breast so that it cannot be moved without moving breast tissue. Breast cancer is rarely painful and can occur anywhere in the breast or nipple.

      It can be difficult to tell what is causing a lump in your breast. Call your health professional if you feel a new lump in your breast or if you have generalized breast lumpiness and you notice a distinct lump in your breast that is not like the rest of your breast (dominant lump). A dominant lump in the breast is any lump that is new, larger, harder, or different in any other way from the rest of the breast tissue. .

after removal of fibroadenoma