Colon Polyps Turn To Cancer

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    How long would a 5mm adenomatous colon polyp take to turn into malignant cancer?
    I had one removed, and now I need to go back for yearly screenings. I'm just wondering had I not gone, how many more years it would have taken to turn into colon cancer.

    • ANSWER:
      We think the time frame from earliest genetic changes to frank cancer is something like 7-10 yrs in colorectal cancer.

  2. QUESTION:
    Do all colon polyps turn into cancer,and if you have had some removed are they likley to return.?
    I had 3 small polyps removed about 5 years ago that were not cancerous I was wondering what the chances of them coming back and turning into cancer .I just dont want to go through the test again. My doc said colon cancer is rare so im not as worried but would like other oppions.

    • ANSWER:
      You have gotten good answers from the others, but I will add my two cents. Polyps are either hyperplastic or adenomatous. Hyperplastic polyps have little to no risk of turning into cancer, while adenomatous polyps do. It is difficult to know how frequently polyps become cancer, because when we discover them we remove them. But the general thought is about 5% of adenomatous polyps will become a cancer over a lifetime, and it takes about 7 years for an adenomatous polyp to transform to a cancer. Current guidelines recommend for a person with no risk factors (ie never had a polyp, no family history of colon cancer OR polyps, no change in bowel patterns, and no blood in the stool) get a colonoscopy every 10 years. This does mean a new polyp could form and become cancer during that ten years, but it is unlikely.

      If your polyps were small and removed completely, the chances of any of those polyps coming back or becoming a cancer is nil. However, if any of those were adenomatous, it tells you that your colon makes adenomatous polyps, and as such you are at increased risk for colon cancer (small, but still a risk factor). That means you need to get colonoscopies every 5 years, regardless of whether new polyps are found. If any polyps found at a colonoscopy are concerning or if there are multiple ones, then the next colonoscopy may need to be sooner than 5 years.

      Please don't be hesitant about getting the colonoscopy- it is so important. The worst part is of course the bowel prep. But the colonoscopy itself should not be uncomfortable. If it was uncomfortable when you had it previously, request an endoscopist that uses propofol sedation, or "monitored anesthesia care". You should not feel anything.

  3. QUESTION:
    How can she get medical help if she can't afford it?
    My cousin might have Polyps and she doesn't have any money to get to a doctor. She's scared it might turn into Colon Cancer if left untreated. She tried to apply for Medicaid but they rejected her. She lives in Marietta, Ga. Does anyone know any doctors that have a flexible payment plan?

    • ANSWER:
      Cobb Hospital will let her set up a payment plan. How does she know she has polyps if she has not gone to a doctor? An office visit will not cost any more than what she would have been paying in premiums if she had insurance anyway.

  4. QUESTION:
    What cancers are considered hereditary?
    I have had cervical cancer and several people in my family have died of different types of cancer,lung canser mostly, also skin cancer and pancreatic cancer. I want to know if my chances of developing another type of cancer are greater due to this.

    • ANSWER:
      having a positive family history increases your chances,but this does not mean that you'll have cancer for sure.
      the only hereditary case is familial polyposis,which is a massive number of polyps in the intestines,that will turn into a colon cancer in 100% of the cases.and the bad thing about it that it is familial.
      once you find it in a member of a family,you have to screen the rest.

  5. QUESTION:
    How can you tell if you have colon cancer? What causes it?
    Random question...I do not think I have it or anything, but I hear about it everywhere. So how do you know if you have it? What causes it? Are there any symptoms?

    • ANSWER:
      You can't tell if you have colon cancer. You have to have a colonoscopy which is when they insert a camera into you bowel through your bum. To have one, you have to be either over a certain age and hence are checked regularly, or because you may have symptoms or other bowel issues.

      I had some of the symptoms, which is what made me go to the doctor. However, the problem with colon cancer is that it doesn't show any symptoms until it is quite advanced.

      Symptoms are:
      - rectal bleeding
      - painful stomach cramps
      - constipation
      - diarrhoea
      - a feeling of having not emptied your bowels fully
      - fatigue

      There are many explanations for the causes of colon cancer but they include:
      - your age - your risk increases the older you are
      - your diet - a diet high in red meats and processed meat increases your risk
      - polyps - they are growths in the bowel which can turn cancerous
      - obesity
      - genetics - whilst it is a small percent, it does still happen (I was 20 when diagnosed)
      - bowel problems - e.g. IBS, chrons, ulcerative colitis

      But fortunately, colon cancer can be treated if caught early enough.

  6. QUESTION:
    What is the youngest age to get Colon Cancer? or it doesn't matter?
    my dad and grandpa have had colon cancer and i have already had colitis but now my doctors are worried that i could have it, but im only 15 going on 16 can i still get it?

    • ANSWER:
      How can colon cancer be prevented?

      Unfortunately, colon cancers can be well advanced before they are detected. The most effective prevention of colon cancer is early detection and removal of precancerous colon polyps before they turn cancerous. Even in cases where cancer has already developed, early detection still significantly improves the chances of a cure by surgically removing the cancer before the disease spreads to other organs. Multiple world health organizations have suggested general screening guidelines.

      Digital rectal examination and stool occult blood testing

      It is recommended that all individuals over the age of 40 have yearly digital examinations of the rectum and their stool tested for hidden or "occult" blood. During digital examination of the rectum, the doctor inserts a gloved finger into the rectum to feel for abnormal growths. Stool samples can be obtained to test for occult blood (see below). The prostate gland can be examined at the same time.

      An important screening test for colorectal cancers and polyps is the stool occult blood test. Tumors of the colon and rectum tend to bleed slowly into the stool. The small amount of blood mixed into the stool is usually not visible to the naked eye. The commonly used stool occult blood tests rely on chemical color conversions to detect microscopic amounts of blood. These tests are both convenient and inexpensive. A small amount of stool sample is smeared on a special card for occult blood testing. Usually, three consecutive stool cards are collected. A person who tests positive for stool occult blood has a 30% to 45% chance of having a colon polyp and a 3% to 5% chance of having a colon cancer. Colon cancers found under these circumstances tend to be early and have a better long-term prognosis.

      It is important to remember that having stool tested positive for occult blood does not necessarily mean the person has colon cancer. Many other conditions can cause occult blood in the stool. However, patients with a positive stool occult blood should undergo further evaluations involving barium enema x-rays, colonoscopies, and other tests to exclude colon cancer, and to explain the source of the bleeding. It is also important to realize that stool which has tested negative for occult blood does not mean the absence of colorectal cancer or polyps. Even under ideal testing conditions, at least 20% of colon cancers can be missed by stool occult blood screening. Many patients with colon polyps are tested negative for stool occult blood. In patients suspected of having colon tumors, and in those with high risk factors for developing colorectal polyps and cancer, flexible sigmoidoscopies or screening colonoscopies are performed even if the stool occult blood tests are negative.

      Flexible sigmoidoscopy and colonoscopy

      Beginning at age 50, a flexible sigmoidoscopy screening tests is recommended every three to five years. Flexible sigmoidoscopy is an exam of the rectum and the lower colon using a viewing tube (a short version of colonoscopy). Recent studies have shown that the use of screening flexible sigmoidoscopy can reduce mortality from colon cancer. This is a result of the detection of polyps or early cancers in people with no symptoms. If a polyp or cancer is found, a complete colonoscopy is recommended. The majority of colon polyps can be completely removed by colonoscopy without open surgery. Recently doctors are recommending screening colonoscopies instead of screening flexible sigmoidoscopies for healthy individuals starting at ages 50-55. Please read the Colon Cancer Screening article.

      Patients with a high risk of developing colorectal cancer may undergo colonoscopies starting at earlier ages than 50. For example, patients with family history of colon cancer are recommended to start screening colonoscopies at an age 10 years before the earliest colon caner diagnosed in a first-degree relative, or five years earlier than the earliest precancerous colon polyp discovered in a first-degree relative. Patients with hereditary colon cancer syndromes such as FAP, AFAP, HNPCC, and MYH are recommended to begin colonoscopies early. The recommendations differ depending on the genetic defect, for example in FAP; colonoscopies may begin during teenage years to look for the development of colon polyps. Patients with a prior history of polyps or colon cancer may also undergo colonoscopies to exclude recurrence. Patients with a long history (greater than 10 years) of chronic ulcerative colitis have an increased risk of colon cancer, and should have regular colonoscopies to look for precancerous changes in the colon lining.

      Genetic counseling and testing

      Blood tests are now available to test for FAP, AFAP, MYH, and HNPCC hereditary colon cancer syndromes. Families with multiple members having colon cancers, members with multiple colon polyps, members having cancers at young ages, and having other cancers such as cancers of the ureters, ute

  7. QUESTION:
    What could cause blood after a bowel movement when it is not hard?
    I often have blood after a bowel movement. Most of the time it is hard but other times it is not. Just recently I noticed clumping in the blood but it was just one time and the stool was soft at that moment. I'm just anxious to know if this is hemmroids or something more serious.
    This happens oftena nd usually starts with a hard boewel movement that triggers the bleeding then i wil bleed the next few times i have a baowel movement and then it will stop for awhile.

    • ANSWER:
      Off the top of my head - hemorrhoids, colon cancer, polyp

      Please see article below as it can be anything and then see a doctor

      Finding blood in your stool can be an alarming experience. Regardless of how much you know about health care, everybody knows that bloody stool is simply not right. The appearance of bloody stool causes a whole range of possibilities to race through your mind, none of them good. What are the causes of bloody stool? What are the most likely possibilities and what should you do about it?

      In very general terms, bloody stool means that there's some sort of injury or disorder located somewhere in your digestive tract. Unfortunately, that doesn't narrow things down very much, because your digestive tract can refer to almost any location between your mouth and your anus. One of the ways that you and your doctor can start to zero in on the likely location of the problem is by the color of the blood.

      As a rule, the closer the source of bleeding is to the anus, the brighter red the blood will be. This is because the bacteria in your digestive system works to break down the blood as it passes through. So the longer blood stays in your digestive tract, the darker it will become. The color of the bloody stool can range from bright red through maroon and black, all the way to occult (or hidden).

      There is a great deal of emphasis on the color because this is how your doctor will begin to diagnose the causes of bloody stool. If the bloody stool is bright red, then there's a good chance the blood was essentially added on the way out by hemorrhoids or anal fissures. Obviously, although these causes of bloody stool can be uncomfortable, they are relatively minor and easily treated. You might want to try a natural colon cleanse. Regular cleansing can practically eliminate constipation that lead to hemorrhoids or anal fissures. Even a one-time colon cleanse can help.

      The causes of bloody stool that is more maroon in color lie farther up the digestive tract. If you have intestinal polyps, these may sometimes bleed and cause maroon-colored stool. The most serious possibility is that some of these polyps have begun to develop into colon cancer. That's why you should never delay contacting your doctor if you're concerned about the causes of bloody stool. Early action could conceivably save your life. Bloody stool that is maroon in color could also be caused by inflammatory bowel disease or diverticulosis. However, most doctors agree that diverticulosis causes significant bleeding and is therefore relatively easy to diagnose.

      Some people have black and tarry stools with an especially foul odor. If the blood in your stool has turned black, that means it has spent a longer time passing through your digestive tract. The causes of bloody stool that is black and tarry (or sticky) may lie not in your colon, but rather in your stomach or small intestines. The blood has been turned black by the action of bacteria in your system. Doctors refer to black bloody stool as "melena."

      There is a possibility that the appearance of your stool was changed by something in your diet. Some foods, supplements and medicines have a tendency to turn your stool black. Licorice, iron pills, Pepto-Bismol and blueberries can result in black-colored stools. Beets and tomatoes, on the other hand, have a tendency to turn your stools reddish on some occasions. However, this doesn't occur all the time and not everyone experiences this symptom. Most of the time when you see red, you should assume it's blood and act accordingly.

      Although not all of the causes of bloody stool are serious, there's only one safe course of action if you spot bloody stool in your toilet. See a doctor. There's a good chance that the causes of bloody stool are relatively minor and easily treated. However, you should allow a health professional to make that determination. Self-diagnosis is not recommended, especially when there could be more serious causes of bloody stool. Colon cancer causes the second highest number of cancer deaths in the United States, but up to 90 percent of cases could be prevented with early detection and treatment.

      Calling your doctor and discussing the color of your stool is not something that you would normally look forward to doing. However, don't let embarrassment keep you from doing the right thing. Don't take chances with your health.

      Jim McDonald is a passionate writer and webmaster of http://www.colon-cleaners.com, an informative website about colon cleansing and how a colon cleanse can help you solve lots of digestive problems.

      Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jim_A._McDonald

  8. QUESTION:
    I had a syst removed in september that was precancerous? I now have precancerous polyps? Is it curable really?
    The tumor removed in September was on my left ovary which was removed as well. As a follow I had a ct scan which showed fluid in my abdomen and my oncologist suggested I have a colonoscopy. During this there were two polyps found which proved to have precancerous cells. It seems that removing the mass in September wasn't effective enough. Or was it? And is removing the polyps enough?

    • ANSWER:
      During a colonoscopy they should remove any abnormal findings. They have the equipment to do so. You don't say if they took those out. It's ALWAYS best to remove precancerous cells as they can likely turn cancerous. Best to take them out before that happens. Ask the dr's office if they are removed when they found those if you are not sure.

      An ovarian cyst is NOT the same as and not related to colon polyps. They are 2 seperate items. It does seem from the sound of this though that you have cancer risks. BE SURE TO eat high fiber to keep your colon in best prevention for that now (25 grams of fiber is recommended daily). Look on the package of foods to see what has this. I had pasta today that has 6 grams of fiber in it (that is a big amount for a serving actually). It's called ronzoni smart taste. There are also whole wheat breads that have up to 5 grams of fiber per slice. Try cereals also as they have fiber sometimes. Check the back of the box to see if there is some in what you pick.

      IF you don't eat that much fiber now, slowly increase the amount so to not get it " stuck" in the colon.That causes digestive upsets if you eat it all at one time from the start.

      I would take vitamins a, c, and e also. These are antioxidants and help prevent / protect from any cell changes. Those vitamins should be taken as beta carotene in the vitamin A. The limit is 25,000 units. Vitamin C should be at 500 mg. The vitamin E is trickier as that has mixed reports on it. BEST to use that one at not more than 200 mg. DAILY use of all three of these at once are great for your health in protecting cells.

      Also eat many fresh fruits and vegetables. They are very good to avoid cancers. Blueberries and pomegranates have the highest form of anti cancer properties in them.

      As long as they took the precancerous cells out that is the way they know to cure or remove the threat of cancer best. Also, for breast health protection 400 i.u. of vitamin d is great. The bottle of this I have shows it helps one's immunity.

  9. QUESTION:
    Had a colonoscopy yesterday and have to have it repeated, anyone with same ?
    I had a colonoscopy done yesterday that could not be completed because of pain, spasm in the colon and polyps. I will have it repeated under general anesthesia. As far as the test could progress my doc found three polyps, one small, one 2.5cm and one larger than that. He biopsied them all. He wants me to have a CT scan done of pelvis and abdomen to see if there is anything around my intestines and told me that polyps over 1 cm have a 50/50 chance of being cancer. I am scared, worried and a bit frantic. I am generally a positive person and try not to worry until the facts are known but this has me totally with my knickers in a twist. Anyone ever had anything similar, what was your experience, any words of wisdom appreciated.
    Good News !!! CT scan is normal, and CEA 3.5 YEAH !!! Thanks for all the encouragement and words of wisdom

    • ANSWER:
      have many polyps in my colon, not cancerous, have had 2 colonoscopy's back to back what turned up was something else not cancer, the CT Scan is to exclude any other area's or check for any other problems and sometime one follows the other, Dr's tend to be a little over worried and if no CT the doctor does not have a complete picture of what is happening
      whatever this is, stay calm, because you will need to ask heaps of questions on your behalf re any treatment no matter for what, try writing a list to take with you to the doctors, focus on something that you like to do. good luck with everything.

  10. QUESTION:
    what is the difference between a polyp and a tumor?
    i was informed a relative of mine has a cancerous polyp.... is this better or worse then having a cancerous tumor? i had never heard the term poylp before

    • ANSWER:
      Polyps are growths which develop in the colon and other parts of the body as well. They vary in size and appearance. They may look like a wart when small and when they grow they may appear like a cherry on a stem or fig. They are important because they can with time turn into cancer. Sometimes they can bleed causing anemia.

      A tumor is an abnormal growth of body tissue. Tumors can be cancerous (malignant) or non-cancerous (benign). In general, tumors appear to occur when there is a problem with the dividing of cells in the body. Typically, the division of cells in the body is strictly controlled. New cells are created to replace older ones or to perform new functions. Cells that are damaged or no longer needed die to make room for healthy replacements.

  11. QUESTION:
    What might have happen if there is bright red blood in stool almost everyday?
    I just seemed to have bright red blood in my stool almost everyday. And sometimes, because of the above, when I urinate, the blood did come out too. There is blood also in my tissue roll when I wiped my back. Can anyone help me out with this; like what I really should do?

    • ANSWER:
      Blood in the stool can be bright red, maroon in color, black and tarry, or occult (not visible to the naked eye). Causes of blood in stool range from harmless, annoying conditions of the gastrointestinal tract such as hemorrhoids to serious conditions such as cancer. Blood in the stool should be evaluated by a healthcare professional.

      Rectal bleeding (known medically as hematochezia) refers to passage of bright red blood from the anus, often mixed with stool and/or blood clots. Most rectal bleeding comes from the colon, rectum, or anus. The color of the blood during rectal bleeding often depends on the location of the bleeding in the gastrointestinal tract. Generally, the closer the bleeding site is to the anus, the blood will be a brighter red. Thus, bleeding from the anus, rectum, and the sigmoid colon tend to be bright red, whereas bleeding from the transverse colon and the right colon (transverse and right colon are several feet away from the anus) tend to be dark red or maroon colored.

      In some patients bleeding can be black and “tarry” (sticky) and foul smelling. The black, smelly and tarry stool is called melena. Melena occurs when the blood is in the colon long enough for the bacteria in the colon to break it down into chemicals (hematin) that are black. Therefore, melena usually signifies bleeding is from the upper gastrointestinal tract (for example: bleeding from ulcers in the stomach or the duodenum or from the small intestine) because the blood usually is in the gastrointestinal tract for a longer period of time before it exits the body. Sometimes melena may occur with bleeding from the right colon. On the other hand, blood from the sigmoid colon and the rectum usually does not stay in the colon long enough for the bacteria to turn it black. Rarely, massive bleeding from the right colon, from the small intestine, or from ulcers of the stomach or duodenal can cause rapid transit of the blood through the gastrointestinal tract and result in bright red rectal bleeding. In these situations, the blood is moving through the colon so rapidly that there is not enough time for the bacteria to turn the blood black.

      Sometimes, bleeding from the gastrointestinal tract can be too slow to cause either rectal bleeding or melena. In these patients bleeding is occult (not visible to the naked eyes). The blood is found only by testing the stool for blood (fecal occult blood testing) in the laboratory. Occult bleeding has many of the same causes as rectal bleeding and may result in the same symptoms as rectal bleeding. It is often associated with anemia that is due to loss of iron along with the blood (iron deficiency anemia). For more information, please see the colon cancer screening and fecal occult blood test .Causes of Rectal Bleeding

      Anal Fissure
      Colon Cancer
      Colon Polyps
      Crohn's Disease
      Diverticulitis (Diverticulosis)
      Hemorrhoids
      Peptic Ulcer
      Stomach Cancer
      Other Causes of Rectal Bleeding

      Esophageal Varices

  12. QUESTION:
    What are the symptoms of duodenal ulcer or any ulcer in the digestive system?
    What are the symptoms of duodenal ulcer or any ulcer in the digestive system?
    plz help fast...

    • ANSWER:
      There are many signs and symptoms from either or both of these. From bloody or black colored stool to constipation that isn't relieved after 2-3 days. The duodenal is a part of the colon and the symptoms are usually different from a stomach ulcer. The stomach ulcer can still have you bringing up blood or having it go through the entire colon, then there can be allot of gas that isn't relieved, to not wanting to eat at all. You can also vomit blood from an ulcer. Since the colon is about 25 feet of a turning open tunnel it wraps around and then up then around until it finally turns down toward the rectum and anus. If you suspect any problems with any part of the digestive system which includes the esophagus, stomach, liver,pancreas and gallbladder and then the appendix until finally the colon and down try going to a GI doctor for a complete exam of this system. As you get older it's a great idea to have your digestive system checked for any problems including polyps and or cancer. Good luck and God Bless

  13. QUESTION:
    how long do you have colon polyps before turning to cancer?
    can only eat small meals,wt. loss, fatigue, colon polyp

    • ANSWER:
      Not all polyps become cancerous.
      When they do it usually takes more than 5 years.

  14. QUESTION:
    How long does it take to die from untreated colon cancer?

    • ANSWER:
      It depends on the stage of the colon cancer.
      At stage 0 it takes 5 to 7 years for polyps to turn into cancer.
      At stage I and II, generally another 5 years, but is treatable
      At stage III cancer has affected other organs around the colon and life expectancy might slip down to 1 year or maximum 2, depending on the health state of the patient,
      At stage IV, cancer has spread to liver, kidneys, lungs and has become inoperable. Doctors would usually give 3 to max 6 months before death.
      On the other hand by taking 1 drug only life expectation is rised from 6 months,to 10 to 12 months, with 2 drugs, it goes to 14 to 16 months and with 3 drugs,, over 20 months.
      Another way of expressing is:
      rate of survival within 5 years
      at stage I, 93%
      at stage II 72 to 85%
      at stage III 44 to 83%
      at stage IV, 8% only
      with 2 drugs, it becomes

  15. QUESTION:
    how necessary is a colonoscopy if you have no conditions?
    Just wondering if this is just a nice money making procedure or are they actually finding things in perfectly normal healthy people.

    • ANSWER:
      people with colon cancer usually don't have symptoms in the beginning and that is the time when you want to get to the problem before it turns into cancer. Polyps can exist with no symptoms and that is what the test is for, to see if they do exist before they bloom into cancer.

      I also think it is a good idea to get tested if there is a history of colon cancer in the family

  16. QUESTION:
    Why does my cocker spaniel poo blood?
    My 6 year old cocker spaniel is pooing blood. We had dewormed her but she is still pooing blood, please let me know why?

    • ANSWER:
      From my knowledge on this I'd say this is a sign of any of the following:

      Infectious agents, such as bacteria, protozoa, viruses, and intestinal parasites
      Dietary intolerance/allergy/indiscretion
      Cancer (neoplasia) of the lower bowel
      Polyps (benign masses) in the colon or rec

      One of my dogs begin having blood in the stool, it turned out to be cancer. So you should most definitely take it to a vet asap.

  17. QUESTION:
    Why did I just poop out a good amount of blood?
    It painted the toilet paper in pure red. I'm 18, male, drink frequently, have done drugs in the past, just recently stopped chronic marijuana smoking.

    I ate seafood and drank margaritas last night and fastfood today.

    • ANSWER:
      You probably don't want to yell "I have blood in my poop!" when you're standing in a crowd. However, if you turn around one day and see bloody stools in the toilet, it's certainly something you might be screaming inside your head. Seeing blood is bad enough, seeing your own blood is worse. When you start seeing blood in your poop, that's gone too far. If you've just exclaimed to yourself, "I have blood in my poop!", what could be the problem? What should you do?

      There are actually quite a few reasons why you might have blood in your poop. Some of them could be serious. Most of them are not. The first thing you need to ask yourself is, "How do I know it's blood?" You may not have realized this before, but there are actually several foods that can make your poop look bloody. Tomatoes and beets can turn your stools red. That makes sense now that you think about it, doesn't it? Other possibilities include blueberries, licorice, iron supplements, Pepto-Bismol--all of these can turn your stools black, which looks a lot like blood in your poop. So the first thing you need to eliminate as a cause is your diet. Have you eaten any of these foods or taken any of these substances in the last 18 hours?

      If food is not the cause of your strange-looking stools, then you probably should accept the likelihood that you actually do have blood in your poop. By itself, this certainly isn't the end of the world. But here's the thing--you need to call up your doctor and tell him, "I have blood in my poop!" Or, you might want to wait until you're back in one of those private exam room. It's your decision. But don't delay making an appointment to see your doctor. Most causes of blood in your poop are minor. But it's important for you to know for sure.

      The very first thing that your doctor will want to know is what color your stools were. The obvious answer is "red," but not all bloody poop is red. The actual color depends on where the problem is. The farther up your digestive tract the bleeding is occurring, the darker the blood will be. You see, as blood passes through your intestines, bacteria works to digest it like food. The chemical changes that bacteria cause darkens the color of the blood. The longer it stays inside your body, the darker it gets.

      So what does this all mean? Well, bright red blood in your stool most likely was added just before exiting your body. The most common causes of bright red blood in your poop are hemorrhoids and anal fissures. Hemorrhoids can begin to bleed when you strain during a bowel movement or even when you wipe a little too roughly. Anal fissures are also quite sensitive to straining and may cause you to have bloody poop. If this is the cause of your problem, the doctor will probably encourage you to drink more fluids and deal with any possible causes of constipation. Another remedy that will provide great results is a colon cleanse. Natural colon cleaners help to remove old waste matter that may be contributing to your constipation.

      Darker blood in your stools means that the cause is more likely in your stomach or small intestine. One of the most common causes of blood from your stomach is a bleeding ulcer. Although this sounds dangerous, it's often a result of taking medication. Even over-the-counter medications like aspirin or ibuprofen can lead to ulcers that cause no pain but that bleed into your digestive tract. If your doctor believes that this is a likely cause, he may recommend a change in medications.

      Why is it so important to tell your doctor about blood in your poop? The problem could be caused by bleeding from intestinal polyps. Polyps are not that dangerous by themselves, but there is a possibility that polyps could develop into colon cancer. This type of cancer is much more likely in people over age 50. If that describes you, then you should not hesitate to get screened for colon cancer. Although colon cancer is one of the major cancer killers, it's also very easy to prevent. By discovering and removing polyps before they turn cancerous, colon cancer can be completely prevented. Whenever you notice anything that might indicate digestive tract bleeding, call your doctor immediately and tell him, "I have blood in my poop!"

  18. QUESTION:
    My wife says she poops blood sometimes. Should she see a doctor?
    She said this has been going on for years. She said it is not a big deal and everyone does it. I think she should seek professional help.

    • ANSWER:
      Most definitely. Blood in excrement can sometimes be serious, but first it is important to recognise that is has nothing to do with her diet. Does she eat a lot of the following foods; tomatoes and beetroot; blueberries, licorice, iron supplements, Pepto-Bismol? all of these can turn your poop black or red, which looks a lot like blood in your poop. Has she eaten any of this in the last 18 hours or so?

      Darker blood is normally a result of a problem with the stomach or the ileum (small intestine). For the blood to be coming due to the stomach might suggest that there is a bleeding ulcer. These can be due to medication such as asprin or Ibuprofen which can lead to painless bleeding ulcers.

      If it is not due to her diet then she needs to have a look at what shade the excrement is. If it is bright red it can be associated with haemorrhoids and anal fissures. Haemorrhoids can begin to bleed when you strain during a bowel movement or even when you wipe a little too roughly. Anal Fissures are also sensitive to straining.

      Finally the bleeding can be caused by bleeding intestinal polyps, which can lead to colon cancer. This is more common in people over 50.

  19. QUESTION:
    Doctors out there, do you recommend that I get a Colonoscopy?
    I am 58. I never had a colonoscopy done. I did have a sigmoidoscopy done about 3-4 years ago. I believe my mother's brother died of colon cancer. The sigmoid I had was negative. Doctors out there...do you recommend this procedure ? thx.

    • ANSWER:
      Absolutely.

      If you have tiny polyps (the size of a pin head), they can be seen and removed easily. If you don't, then you have 10 years until you need another one. (Your uncle is not a close enough relative to increase your risk of cancer, which would require the every 5 years check)

      The sigmoidoscopy only looks at the last 1/3 of the colon, and polyps (that may turn into cancer) can pop up anywhere.

      Go get it done.

  20. QUESTION:
    I have been abnormally hungry lately, my stomach has been hurting and when a went #2 it came out bloody?
    What could that be?

    • ANSWER:
      There are actually quite a few reasons why you might have blood in your poop. Some of them could be serious. Most of them are not. The first thing you need to ask yourself is, "How do I know it's blood?" You may not have realized this before, but there are actually several foods that can make your poop look bloody. Tomatoes and beets can turn your stools red. That makes sense now that you think about it, doesn't it? Other possibilities include blueberries, licorice, iron supplements, Pepto-Bismol--all of these can turn your stools black, which looks a lot like blood in your poop. So the first thing you need to eliminate as a cause is your diet. Have you eaten any of these foods or taken any of these substances in the last 18 hours?

      If food is not the cause of your strange-looking stools, then you probably should accept the likelihood that you actually do have blood in your poop. By itself, this certainly isn't the end of the world. But here's the thing--you need to call up your doctor and tell him, "I have blood in my poop!" Or, you might want to wait until you're back in one of those private exam room. It's your decision. But don't delay making an appointment to see your doctor. Most causes of blood in your poop are minor. But it's important for you to know for sure.

      The very first thing that your doctor will want to know is what color your stools were. The obvious answer is "red," but not all bloody poop is red. The actual color depends on where the problem is. The farther up your digestive tract the bleeding is occurring, the darker the blood will be. You see, as blood passes through your intestines, bacteria works to digest it like food. The chemical changes that bacteria cause darkens the color of the blood. The longer it stays inside your body, the darker it gets.

      So what does this all mean? Well, bright red blood in your stool most likely was added just before exiting your body. The most common causes of bright red blood in your poop are hemorrhoids and anal fissures. Hemorrhoids can begin to bleed when you strain during a bowel movement or even when you wipe a little too roughly. Anal fissures are also quite sensitive to straining and may cause you to have bloody poop. If this is the cause of your problem, the doctor will probably encourage you to drink more fluids and deal with any possible causes of constipation. Another remedy that will provide great results is a colon cleanse. Natural colon cleaners help to remove old waste matter that may be contributing to your constipation.

      Darker blood in your stools means that the cause is more likely in your stomach or small intestine. One of the most common causes of blood from your stomach is a bleeding ulcer. Although this sounds dangerous, it's often a result of taking medication. Even over-the-counter medications like aspirin or ibuprofen can lead to ulcers that cause no pain but that bleed into your digestive tract. If your doctor believes that this is a likely cause, he may recommend a change in medications.

      Why is it so important to tell your doctor about blood in your poop? The problem could be caused by bleeding from intestinal polyps. Polyps are not that dangerous by themselves, but there is a possibility that polyps could develop into colon cancer. This type of cancer is much more likely in people over age 50. If that describes you, then you should not hesitate to get screened for colon cancer. Although colon cancer is one of the major cancer killers, it's also very easy to prevent. By discovering and removing polyps before they turn cancerous, colon cancer can be completely prevented. Whenever you notice anything that might indicate digestive tract bleeding, call your doctor immediately and tell him, "I have blood in my poop!"

      I know that is alot to read but every bit of it is important. I hope I helped you.

  21. QUESTION:
    What is a colonoscopy? Why do so many people dread them?
    They say you're supposed to start getting them after you turn 50. I know it checks for colon cancer. But what IS it?

    • ANSWER:
      I've had 4 colonoscopies in the past 3 years - I found some blood in my stool and my GI doc needed to take a look. Basically a fiber optic tube is inserted in your rectum and pokes its way around your intestines looking for whatever shouldn't be there, such as cancers or polyps. If polyps are found, they are snipped out. Polyps can be a forerunner of cancers so they are removed. Usually the first colonoscopy is at 50 then if your bowels look good, every 3 years after that. However, if polyps are found, then every year until the bowel is clear of them. (Yeah! No polyps this time, 1 month ago.)
      The first answerer talked about the stuff you need to drink before the colonoscopy. It really is vile swill and you have to drink about 2 quarts of it. Plus another laxative. Plus the very popular enemas before the colonoscopy can commence. Your bowel needs to be clean so your doc can get a good look.
      Have it done, it doesn't hurt and is just annoying. Best of luck!

  22. QUESTION:
    Polyp the size of a tennis ball in my husbands bowel?
    My husband just turned 32, been suffering from moderate to severe abdominal cramping for several years. Doctors have shrugged it off as IBS, until about 6-7 months ago he couldn't have a bowel movement for 5 weeks, and when he did it contained some blood. He was referred to a Specialist's who booked him for a colonoscopy. This was yesterday, he went in and while it was to only take about 20 minutes, they bring him out and all I hear is them talking about admitting him, getting blood work, having 2 units of blood on standby and so on. I was not able to see him at this time. I then went over, he was awake and they said they were keeping him as a precautionary due to the doctor finding polyps and had to remove a fairly large one. I asked the nurse how large and she had no idea seeing as she was the recovery nurse. She went and got the doctor and when we asked he said it was the size of a tennis ball. The nurse's jaw dropped, and said she had never seen that before. The doctor left and my husband said that the Doctor and nurses were taking photo's of the polyp! They sent it away for testing, what are the odds that it will come back benign? Internet say's the worst, but hoping to find some people who have had this and it was not cancer. Results in 2 weeks, he is out of hospital today but is passing some blood now when he has a bowel movement which means we may have to head back. Any input would be appreciated! Thank you in advance!
    Are you saying it being that large would imply it is cancer? They just said it was a polyp the size of a tennis ball and was sent away for analysis!

    • ANSWER:
      Any bleeding following a colonoscopy has to be reported to the doctor that did the colonoscopy right away or evaluated in an ED. Also, any fever, abdominal pain or dizziness (low blood pressure). When they remove polyps they use electrocautery and there is some risk of perforation developing... that would be a medical emergency. It might not be apparent at the time of the polypectomy (removal of the polyp) or gradually happens a day or two after. When there is a perforation the bacteria in the bowel leaks into the abdominal cavity and the person will get peritonitis (like what happens when an appendix ruptures). This can be very serious if not managed correctly and timely. Sometimes... with polypectomies and bleeding... you can end up with a bacteremia... (when the bacteria gets into the blood stream... the person gets septic... (fever, low blood pressure) and this can be lethal if they are not put on the proper IV antibiotic(s). This would be septic shock in the worst case senario.

      These complications are not very common... but, they can happen and have to be recognized and dealt with immediately.

      Most colon polyps are not much larger than marble size when they are removed by colonoscopy. If they are tumor rather than polyp sized they often want to address it with an abdominal surgery. When they remove a concerning polyp... they sometimes will tatoo near the removal site... so they know exactly where it was taken from and can do follow up scopes or if they decide they should remove that part of the colon (due to a malignancy that has advanced) and be sure to evaluate that precise area (by the Pathologist...microscopic cell studies)

  23. QUESTION:
    Are occult blood tests for Colon Cancer really effective?
    Since the NHS began mass screening by means of this test
    is it an efficient way to detect and treat colorectal cancers before they've got a grip, or does it mostly detect established cancers?
    would it be better to have a biannual colonoscopy as I understand happens in France?

    • ANSWER:
      A colonoscopy will find the polyps and get them removed before they have a chance to turn into a tumor mass. To me that seems a heck of a lot more effective than until waiting for a full blown tumor that starts bleeding. I had colon cancer, the occult blood test probably helped save my life for once I knew there was blood in my stool then my goal became to find WHAT was the cause. What was bleeding. To make a long story short, I eventually had a colonoscopy and a large tumor, the size of a baseball or small apple according to my physicians, was found (I was only 45 years old and not in line for any routine colonoscopy but sickness symptoms kept me searching for what was the matter with me). I asked about the bleeding and was told that the tumor ulcerated and the blood came from that.

      So, I believe it mostly detects established cancers. A person would not need a biannual colonoscopy, that is way too often. If you have one and you are "clean" then I believe you can go at least 3 to 5 years without having to do it again (only because it takes a while for a polyp to form). Having had colon cancer, I had one one year after I had surgery, now I am going 2 years and will have another one next summer. After that, if all looks good I suspect I will be able to go longer between them. I hope this info helps you.

  24. QUESTION:
    How to treat hemorrhoids - Who knows the best way ?really bothers me every day?

    • ANSWER:
      Hemorrhoids are a quite common problem. Most women and men will get them as they get older. Trauma to the anus and any sort of straining could make hemorrhoids worse.

      Hemorrhoids are abnormally swollen veins within the rectum and anus. When these veins are irritated, they trigger surrounding membranes to swell, burn, itch, turn out to be painful, and even bleed.We know with what people call anal fissure treatment. Anal Fissure is usually associated to hemorrhoids. Anal fissures are embarrassing as a result of individuals with this kind of illness will really feel very uncomfortable due to the itchy feeling, burning sensation and ache within the rectum area.For more info Click http://www.analfissuretreatments.com/how-to-treat-hemorrhoids/

      Hemorrhoids bleed when the blood vessels rupture, similar to from straining throughout a bowel movement. As a result of bleeding is usually a signal of colon most cancers or colon polyps, you must seek the advice of together with your physician every time you’ve bleeding from the rectum, blood in your stools, or blood in the bathroom after a bowel movement.

  25. QUESTION:
    Lately every time I have a bowel movement large amounts of blood come out. Any idea of what might be causing?
    I'm not having pain or anything so its not like its hemmeroids. And I don't bleed when I am not going to the bathroom, but it is quite a bit of blood when I do.
    Could it still be hemmorids if it isn't at all painful?
    What are internal hemmeroids?

    • ANSWER:
      I advise you to go to a doctor immediately. Rectal bleeding is a sign that something is wrong. It is usually something minor that can be easily diagnosed, but not always. It is, therefore, important that the specific cause of rectal bleeding be identified so appropriate treatment can be started and the problem corrected. Even though rectal bleeding may not be serious, an individual should never assume this to be the case. Most importantly, rectal bleeding may be a sign of rectal cancer.

      Here are some of the causes of rectal bleeding:

      Hemorrhoids - These are dilated blood vessels or veins in the anal or rectal area. They can occur on the outside where they are felt as small bumps when wiping. Or they may be on the inside where they are usually painless. They develop quite commonly with chronic constipation and especially with pregnancy. Hemorrhoids are usually treated with stool bulking agents that soften the stool and reduce straining.

      Fistula - A fistula is an abnormal, burrowing channel that usually runs from the rectum to the skin around the anus. It often will drain a whitish discharge, but it can also bleed. While it is usually just a local problem, a fistula is often associated with chronic inflammation in other parts of the intestinal tract. This disorder is called Crohn's disease. Fistulas are treated with antibiotics and hot baths or certain medications used for Crohn's disease. If they persist, surgery is usually required.

      Fissure - The passage of a hard stool or severe diarrhea may tear the lining tissue of the anus. This problem is similar to having cracked lips in cold weather. Nerve endings and blood vessels are exposed so that pain and bleeding occur with bowel movements. Frequent warm baths and bulking agents, used to keep stools soft, usually correct this problem. Sometimes surgery is needed.

      Diverticulosis - Diverticula are pockets or sacs that project from the bowel wall. They balloon out over the years due to recurrent, high pressure spasm of the colon. Occasionally they can bleed. They usually produce a lot of blood, and it comes all at one time. It normally does not persist in small amounts with bowel movements over days or weeks. Serious, persistent diverticular bleeding usually requires hospitalization and, at times, surgery.

      Proctitis and Colitis - Either the rectum, colon, or both, can become inflamed and ulcerated. There are a number of disorders which cause the inside surface of the bowel to become ulcerated and bleed. There may be rectal urgency, cramps or diarrhea associated with the bleeding. When the inflammation is restricted to the rectum, the condition is called proctitis. When the colon is involved, it is called colitis. It is important to identify the specific cause of the inflammation so that appropriate treatment can be started.

      Polyps and Cancer - Of course, the greatest concern about rectal bleeding is cancer. Polyps are benign growths in the colon. When polyps reach a large size, they can bleed. And certain types of polyps turn into cancer. Colon cancer is usually curable when discovered early. It most often occurs in people over the age of 50, but it is not unheard of in younger individuals, even in their 30's or younger. Because colon cancer is such a common cancer, it is always considered as a possible diagnosis.

      Protrusion of the Rectum - Some older individuals will have weakened rectal support tissues. Part of the rectum then can project from the anus and bleed. This condition is called rectal prolapse. It can be felt as an abnormal bulging from the rectum when wiping. Surgery is the only effective treatment.

      Rectal bleeding always means that there is a problem. It is usually not a serious problem, but it should always be assumed to be serious until proven otherwise. The diagnosis is easy to make and effective treatment is almost always available.

  26. QUESTION:
    Had polyp removed during colonoscopy. How long until I find out if its cancer?
    Had the procedure on Wed. and my Dr. removed a polyp. She sent it to be biopsied... How long does that take and when will I know if it is cancerous? I have an appt. to see my Dr. Monday, but if it turns out to be cancer, would I know sooner than Monday? I wasn't real worried until today... But now I am getting more and more worried, especially since I've had some very severe epi-gastric attacks lately, and we're trying to figure out why I'm sick all the time. Anyone have experience with this??

    • ANSWER:
      Relax, it the polyp was malignant appearing, the gastroenterologist would have already told you so. They always do biopsies and always check everything out while they are in there. It does not mean you have cancer.
      Also, less than 1% of colon polyps removed are pre cancer.
      I work in a hospital and we do hundreds of colonoscopy's a year. I imagine 85% of them show a polyp or more, and of course, less than 1% show any pre cancerous lesions.
      Dont worry. Your fine.

  27. QUESTION:
    Is a 5mm pre-cancerous polyp cause for alarm?
    I had one removed from my rectum when a colonoscopy was done. When I had a sigmoidoscopy 3 years earlier, nothing was found. The doctor wants me to go back yearly now and told me that I'm considered a "high risk" patient.
    Had I not had this removed (it was causing bleeding problems, which is why I had this done,) how long would it have taken to turn into cancer?

    • ANSWER:
      Without looking at your pathology report it is not possible to give you any kind of a time frame. I am assuming by “pre-cancerous” it was an in-situ carcinoma, which is cancer it is just not yet invasive. The pathologist would know how close the cells were to becoming invasive and that will give a general time line. In general colon cancers do not grow real fast.

      Your polyp is not necessarily cause for alarm, but it is a reason to make some changes in your diet. Try to stay away from processed foods and eat a lot of fiber this will help keep your colon healthy.

      Also, DO NOT rely on a sigmoidoscopy as a colon screening test insist upon a colonoscopy. Even though it worked out okay in your situation, it only worked out because of the location of your polyp.

      A sigmoidoscopy only views up to the sigmoid colon (just above the rectum). This is only about a third of your colon. A colonoscopy views the entire colon. Most people who die of colon cancer had cancer that started in or near the cecum or the beginning part of the colon. This is because by the time the patient has symptoms the cancer is usually in the advanced stages.

  28. QUESTION:
    What is the deadliest cancer for men? What are steps to prevent it?

    • ANSWER:
      Lung cancer is the biggest killer but obviously if you aren't a smoker then your risk is reduced (it's such a big killer because of tobacco use). So I guess if you do smoke it's probably lung cancer and if you don't smoke then it's going to be colon or rectal cancer i.e. bowel cancer. It's probably worth mentioning prostate cancer as well because it's certainly up there in terms of mortality rates.

      In terms of how best to prevent these diseases... In the case of lung cancer the obvious one is not to smoke, period. For bowel cancer screening is recommended to find the polyps before they become cancerous, according to the Mayo Clinic. You can also screen for prostate cancer, so I would highly recommend that. I know it used to involve a finger up the bum but I[m not sure if it still does (even if it does would you rather die a horrible and painful death or experience thirty seconds of discomfort in a doctors office?).

      Besides these specific things the only other things you can really do include trying to eat a healthy diet, low in fat and sugar, high in vegetables, fruits, lean meats, grains, fibre etc. I'm sure you know the deal.

      Regular exercise, one hour every day is ideal but if you can't manage that then a bare minimum would be three times a week for roughly 30 minutes at a time.

      Limit alcohol intake. If you are really concerned then I wouldn't drink at all but in all honesty alcohol in moderation is fine.

      Practice sun safety and recognize when skin changes occur. I'm sure you know what this means - long sleeve shirts, wide brim hats, sun screen and definitely no sun baking! If you are worried about a mole or sun spot then go to your doctor and have it tested. YES YOU CAN DIE FROM SKIN CANCERS! AND they can in turn spread cancer to other parts of your body, not nice (and tragic considering dangerous spots can be removed quickly and painlessly in your doctors office).

      Practice safe sex. You may wonder what sex has to do with cancer. Unsafe sex can result in the infection of the human papillomairus (HPV), a known cause for cervical cancer and a risk factor for many other types of cancer. HPV is a common sexually transmitted infection that is spread through sexual, skin-to-skin contact.

      Lastly, avoiding stress is very important as high levels of stress have been proven to worsen or indeed cause many physical ailments. In other words good emotional health - see a psychologist if you're chronically depressed, anxious or angry as this can have very real negative effects on your health.

      Well that's a fair bit of info, I hope some of it helps!

      K

  29. QUESTION:
    Could I have colon polyps at age 15?
    I am 15 years old and I am getting a Colonoscopy in March. Is it even possible for me to have polyps? Aren't I to young? Colon cancer runs in the family. My dad's mom had colon cancer. So did my great grandpa. And also one of my dads aunts and one of his uncles. My dad and one of his brother also had polyps when they were checked. My dad was around 36 at the time.

    • ANSWER:
      You are less likely to have them due to age but you could and you will be very happy you caught them if you do have polyps. Good luck and I hope things turn out ok.

  30. QUESTION:
    How often is a human supposed to poop? Not to be gross...?
    should humans poop? I am 22,M and I go number two like maybe once every two weeks. I have been this way all my life, even as a kid.

    I will go on weeks vacations and not poop the whole time on vacation. Its not like I hold it, I just don't have to go.... is this bad? Abnormal?

    • ANSWER:
      Two - three sizeable, formed, smooth and easy to pass bowel movements daily is ideal. There's a good deal of variation among individuals, and "normal" is impossible to define. That said, intestinal cells turn over (are replaced) every 3 days. Proper sloughing of the intestinal epithelium is important to promote healthy tissue.

      Infrequent bowel movements increase the likelihood of inflammation and irritation of the intestinal mucosa. This will impact absorption, increase physiologic stress and increase systemic inflammation, etc. It will also increase risk of somewhat more serious issues like diverticulosis and colon polyps (as well as increased risk of colon cancers.)

      It's possible that you're not drinking enough water, and that's making things worse. Ideally, you'll be drinking about 1.5 - 2L/day. However, in my experience, chronic constipation tends to be related to some sort of dietary sensitivity. It's not a true allergy, it's typically a delayed hypersensitivity reaction. (Different sort of immune response.) Finding out what your body's reacting to is the key to correcting the issue. In North America, the top 5 foods that cause sensitivity reactions are:
      - wheat (typically it's the protein called "gluten" in the wheat. Other glutinous grains are included in this category.)
      - dairy (again, typically it's a protein. Casein.)
      - soy
      - corn
      - sugar & processed foods

      If increasing your water intake doesn't help, consider cutting all of the above out of your diet (aggressively) for a few weeks. Once your bowels are moving more regularly, you can reintroduce each in turn and watch for symptoms like diarrhea/constipation, gas, fatigue, headaches, etc.

      And if you try the above and still have no change to your bowel habits, you may want to seek some personalized guidance from a qualified ND in your area.

      Good luck! Happy pooing :)

  31. QUESTION:
    Doctor says i have polyp what is that?
    I had an ultrasound which report says I have a polyp. I have to see the docs next week. What is it and is it serious? How is it treated? Removed? Its causing me problems for the last 3 years which just today it was discovered as a polyp. Its really uncomfortable and everyday 24/7 I feel sick or nausea and want to vomit. ??????
    Thank u

    • ANSWER:
      get it removed may turn into cancer in colons

  32. QUESTION:
    Crohns and risk to cancer. Had renal cell cancer and nervous about colon cancer. Higher risk now?
    Had my left kidney taken out over the Summer due to renal cell cancer. In a follow up with my gastroenterologist yesterday, he indicated that since I am at my 15 year mark with the diagnosis of Crohns, he wanted to do a scope and that sooner was better than later. As I have already been diagnoses and had renal cell cancer removed, is my risk for Colon cancer higher?

    • ANSWER:
      No, not at all. One of my children suffer from Chrohns. Although he has good kidneys and never had cancer, his Dr keeps scoping him about once a year just to keep an eye him. He's never had any signs of cancer. No polyps in the intestinal tract, No stomach polyps etc. I don't think your diagnosis is an indication of possible cancer. We are all predisposed to cancer of kind or an other but as you know, not everyone gets cancer. It takes one mutated cell to decide to it's damage. Lets hope that you never have one of those cells. Good luck. I hope all turns out well. Speak to your Dr about your fears OK> Blessins

  33. QUESTION:
    I have colonoscopy questions because I need to get one?
    I have to get a colonoscopy. What will they do? I will not be sedated. So will it hurt? What will I feel? I am having a male doctor do it(he is the best one to do it in town) What does it feel like when it is put in? What does it feel like when it is taken out? I also have to get a breast exam and a pap(not all in the same day. If you can give me any info on the pap and breast exam that would be great too. PLEASE ANSWER

    • ANSWER:
      Colonoscopies are simple procedures and painless even though you might be told there may be some "discomfort". I've had two of them and I'm due for my 3rd.

      The most uncomfortable part of getting a colonoscopy is not the procedure itself. It is the preparation. In the preceding 24 hours you will be required while at home to take a liquid mixture. This is usually a powder mixed with either water or apple juice. You need to take about 2 quarts of this stuff over a period of time. It will bring on incredible diarrhea to clean out your colon entirely. The doctor doesn't want to mess around with stuff in your colon. Stay close to the toilet cause you are going to need it- BIG TIME. The bowel movements are explosive! You'll only be able to drink apple juice or water and eat jello before the procedure.

      Re: the procedure itself

      You will be sedated but it is NOT a general anesthetic. In other words you will be conscious and completely aware but it is intended to reduce and minimize any discomfort you might experience. I say "might" because I felt none at all. Some people actually fall asleep during the procedure. The sedative is administered intravenously and the needle does initially cause discomfort.

      When they're ready your bed will be wheeled into the room where the equipment is and the specialist will have you turn over on your side. A small very narrow tube with a camera at the end of it will be gently inserted into your bum. You have the option of actually watching the whole thing on a closed circuit color monitor so you can watch the entire procedure which takes about 20 minutes. You will see exactly what the doctor sees. The doctor will move the tube along up your colon looking for small growths called polyps. These are believed to be the beginnings of possible cancer sites. It doesn't mean you have cancer if they are detected. Many are benign or pre-cancerous.

      Where you might feel a little discomfort is at the transverse colon region where the colon makes a right hand turn and goes horizontally. The doctor has to get the tube around a "corner" if you will and this can cause mild discomfort. I felt no discomfort at all. Attached to the camera apparatus is another instrument used for snaring and cauterizing [burning or searing away] any polyps.

      Part of the polyps that have been discovered will be sent to the lab for analysis to see if they were cancerous, pre-cancerous or benign. Colon cancer is one of the most preventable cancers known when colonoscopies are performed.

      When the procedure is completed the doctor simply slides the narrow tube etc out. Again, there is no discomfort. You'll be given a snack and you'll remain a couple of hours before being picked up. You will be instructed not to drive yourself home because of the sedation effects.

      Since I'm a male I cannot give you first hand experience about pap smears or breast exams. You may want to ask that question on the woman's health forum.

  34. QUESTION:
    How do you get colon cancer?

    • ANSWER:
      Colon Cancer: The Facts

      What is colon cancer?
      How common is colon cancer?
      Who is at risk of getting colon cancer?
      How do you prevent colon cancer?
      Who should get regular screening tests for colon cancer?
      What are the symptoms of colon cancer?
      Where can I find more information about colon cancer?

      What is colon cancer?
      Colon cancer occurs when the cells in the colon grow out of control and form a small group of abnormal cells. These cells grow into a lump called a polyp. A polyp is a small, non-cancerous tumor that sometimes turns into cancer.

      The colon is the upper 5 to 6 feet of the large intestine. The large intestine is the long, muscular tube that food passes through during digestion.

      How common is colon cancer?
      Cancer of the colon and rectum is the third most common cancer among men and women in the US. And it's more common among older men and women.

      Who is at risk of getting colon cancer?
      Anyone can get colon cancer, but it usually strikes people over age 50. And the risk quickly goes up with age. People with a family history of colon cancer have a higher chance of getting the disease.

      How do you prevent colon cancer?

      Get regular screening tests beginning at age 50
      Eat less red meat
      Take a multivitamin with folate every day
      Be physically active for at least 30 minutes every day
      Maintain a healthy weight
      Limit the amount of alcohol you drink
      Eat more vegetables
      Take an aspirin every day (check with your doctor first)
      Click here for a list of things that affect colon cancer risk.

      Who should get regular screening tests for colon cancer?

      All women and men over age 50 should be screened for colon cancer regularly. The need for screening before age 50 depends on a person's family history of the disease.

      Getting regular screening tests is the single best way to lower colon cancer risk. Screening tests can prevent colon cancer by finding polyps and then removing them. Polyps are small, non-cancerous tumors in the colon or rectum, which sometimes turn into cancer.

      Click here for more information on colon cancer screening.

      What are the symptoms of colon cancer?
      Colon cancer may have no symptoms in the early stages. As the cancer grows, symptoms may include:

      A change in bowel habits
      A change in the way bowel movements look
      Diarrhea or constipation
      Blood in bowel movements
      Frequent gas pains
      These symptoms can also be caused by something less serious, like an ulcer, swelling of the colon, or hemorrhoids. If you have these symptoms for the first time, talk to a doctor.

  35. QUESTION:
    I wanted to know whether colon cancer is a genetic disease?
    My grandpa has colon cancer . Is there any chance that it might affect us too...

    • ANSWER:
      Polyps are growths which develop in the colon and other parts of the body as well. They vary in size and appearance. They may look like a wart when small and when they grow they may appear like a cherry on a stem or fig. They are important because they can with time turn into cancer. Sometimes they can bleed causing anemia. A polyp is defined as a growth that projects, often on a stalk, from the lining of the intestine or rectum. Polyps of the colon and rectum are almost always benign and usually produce no symptoms. They may, however, cause painless rectal bleeding or bleeding not apparent to the naked eye. There may be single or multiple polyps. The incidence of polyps increases with age.

      Both polyps as well as colon cancer occur much more frequently in industrialized, western societies. Diets low in fruits, vegetables, protein from vegetable sources and roughage are associated with a higher incidence of polyps. Persons smoking more than 20 cigarettes a day are 250% more likely to have polyps as opposed to nonsmokers who otherwise have the same risks. Persons who drink have an 87% increased likelihood of having polyps compared to nondrinkers and those who both smoke and drink are 400% more likely to develop polyps compared to their peers who neither smoke nor drink. There is increasing evidence that diets high in calcium can reduce the risk of colorectal cancer. An even more potent agent in preventing colon cancer is the eating of vegetables. Apparently it isn't the fiber but it is likely that phytochemicals in vegetables act to prevent cancer. People who exercise daily are less likely to develop colon cancer. Polyps tend to cluster in families so that having a first degree relative ( sibling, parent or child ) with colon polyps raises ones chances of having polyps. The familial cancer syndromes such as Lynch Syndromes I and II ( rare ) carry a high risk of the development of colon and other cancers. Family adenomatous polyposis or FAP, is a rare condition characterized by thousands of adenomatous polyps throughout the large bowel. People with 1st degree relatives with inflammatory bowel disease are at increased risk and those who have a first degree relative with colon cancer have a fourfold increase in risk over the general population and should be screened earlier with colonoscopy and more often than the proposed outline for screening suggested by the American Cancer Society. There is an association of cancer risk with meat, fat or protein consumption which appear to break down in the gut into cancer causing compounds called carcinogens. A personal history of ovarian, endometrial, or breast cancer also appear to be risk factors.

  36. QUESTION:
    My colonoscopy found 2 polyps. Since they were removed, why a biopsy and what happens if they are cancerous?

    • ANSWER:
      Well, when they remove polyps, they usually use a loop and excise the entire thing. A lot of polyps are not cancerous, but they can be precancerous, so they remove all of it when they do a colonoscopy. If yours turn out to be cancerous, what follows next will depend on what stage of it's in. In most cases they will determine that it's not been invasive. They made do another colonoscopy to take additional samples to make certain it was excised in total. After that, if they find that the area is clear, you will just have colonoscopy's done on a more regular basis. Since you only had two, it's more than likely not going to be your scenario. Your doctor will tell you what sort of followup you should have. It's usually to have a colonoscopy each year, possibly every 2 or 3 years. Fortunately polyps take quite a while to become cancerous, and the treatment for cancer of the colon is pretty sucessful, moreso when caught early. Good luck, and think positive. Most polyps are not cancerous.

  37. QUESTION:
    Can Chrons Disese Turn Into Cancer?
    I have chrons and i had a dream last night that my dad said i have bad news it's not chrons it's cancer so now im worried can it?

    • ANSWER:
      hi wisam, I am a crohn's pt. I've been one since the age of 12....going on 28 yrs. now. I understand your concern of CD
      turning into Crohn's. There is a risk in pts. who have IBD if they have polyps in their large intestines and don't take care of themselves.

      Some crohnies will have no problems b/c they are on maintenance medications such as Entocort, Humira, Remicade, or immunosuppressants to keep things under control.

      Be sure to ask the GI for something for pain mgt. such as Darvocet, Demerol, Tylenol 3, etc. to get you through those rotten spells. For stomach spasms ask for Hyocosamine or Bentyl.

      The Crohn's & Colitis Foundation has a website that you can go to find the latest information on treatments, diet, surgery, how to handle pain/flare ups, etc. They also have a live chat and website that is run by healthcare workers during the week as well as a forum that is open 24/7 where pts. and their family members can post questions.

      This disease is a pain in the butt. My heart goes out to you. I hope that your MD can put you on something to keep things in check and something for the pain. Feel free to email me if you have questions. I've been where you are.

      The CCFA site has info on colon cancer and IBD as well. You can also talk to your GI and primary MD to get accurate information as well.

  38. QUESTION:
    Are all colon polyps precancerous?
    All or nearly all colon cancer develops from polyps, but do doctors consider all polyps to be precancerous?

    • ANSWER:
      I guess in a way you could say the doctor doing the colonoscopy would consider them al to be precancerous. This is why they remove every one they find and they would never just do a biopsy unless they had no other choice.

      However, a pathologist would not look at it the same way. Precancerous is not a medical term; doctors only use it when speaking to patients. It is a vague way of saying abnormal looking cells, which is how cells look before they turn into cancer. There are degrees of abnormal and not all polyps have abnormal cells, these things are determined by the pathologist and they give their findings to the doctor who did the colonoscopy.

      Your doctor will take the findings, your history, what they saw during the colonoscopy, etc., etc., into consideration when they give you a diagnosis.

  39. QUESTION:
    Can you share you Colonoscopy stories?
    I'm looking for you colonoscopy stories. Preferably people who had symptoms, had a colonoscopy, and turned out not to have cancer.

    I'm only 23 (no family history of colon cancer) and I have a colonoscopy this week. I've had a change in bowel habits, stomach cramps, as well as some rectal bleeding. I know it could be a number of things, but I'm still worried.

    I would love to hear you stories!

    Yeah, details. What prompted you to get one? what were you symptoms? What were the results?

    • ANSWER:
      I had my first in my forties. It was a result f my doctor's concern that I had constipation and a family history of colorectal issues. I used a prep other than one of the PEG laxatives. Spent the day before pooping my guts out. For the actual procedure I was got my doctor to agree NOT to sedate me. I was fully awake through the entire thing. There was some cramping like pains as they filled me with air and a few times when the colonoscope had to make the turns. Most discomfort is while the scope is going to the cecum. On the way out is when she removed a polyp which turned out to be benign. I have had several since then and never been sedated. Every time they have found some and removed some benign polyps. There is no pain when the polyps are removed. However, after it's over you will be told it is acceptable to pass gas as you need to get the air they injected out of the colon or you will be having gas pains.

  40. QUESTION:
    My 72 year old father had 16 precancerous polyps removed about 3 months ago. Now they are back. What's up?
    After these 3 months a new exam has shown 19 new ones. Still waiting on the biopsy. He is obviously a little scared. What can we start doing now to slow or prevent these from coming back again. What can we expect in the near or distant future. Or what are our options going to look like. Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Hello,

      I am sorry about your Dad, but I would be inclined to view this from a much more positive perspective. Clearly 16 chances for him to get a bowel colon cancer, have been frustrated and got rid of. This wouldn't have been possible a generation ago.

      The new polyps, since then, are completely fresh ones, - they are not recurrences of the previous 16. If these are removed, then they, too, will give him no further trouble.

      It sounds as if your Dad might have a condition called Polyposis Coli, a disease of recurring polyps in the colon.

      There is some evidence that a daily dose of junior aspirin may be helpful, I suggest you ask the doctor about this.

      So long as the polyps are all individually removed before they can turn nasty, the medical outlook for your Dad is excellent, in my opinion. It could be seen as a small price to pay, to have 3- monthly Colonoscopies. Given that we don't yet know how to prevent the polyps.

      It would be possible for your Dad to have his colon totally removed, and then wear an ileostomy bag day-and-night to collect the poo, but prolly that is a bit drastic.

      I hope this is of some help.

      Best wishes,

      Belliger
      retired uk gp

  41. QUESTION:
    how long does it take a colon polyp to become cancerous?

    • ANSWER:
      It usually takes many years before it develops into cancer. It depends on your overall health and what type of cancer it is. Most polyps never turn into cancer. Most people develop colon cancer in their 50s or older. If you have a strong family history of colon cancer then you may need a colonoscopy when you turn 40 instead of 50.

  42. QUESTION:
    Should all men over 50 have a colon-oscopy just to be safe?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, everyone, regardless of gender, should get a screening colonoscopy beginning at age 50. Colonoscopies can actually prevent colon cancer by finding pre-cancerous polyps and removing them before they turn into cancer.

  43. QUESTION:
    Colon cancer in your 20's anyone?
    I am 26 and want to get a colonoscopy to check if I have any polyps (which can then turn into colon cancer). My father got colon cancer, and my 37 year old brother had a colonoscopy and they found polyps.

    Does anyone have an experience of a person in their 20's getting colon cancer?

    • ANSWER:
      my dad is a gastereterologist (which basically means he gives colonoscopies and checks for colon cancer.)
      he mainly screens older people in their 60s or 50s, and the recommended age that you're supposed to get a colonoscopy is around 40, i think. so i highly doubt you have colon cancer. my dad says he's never diagnosed a young patient with colon cancer, the youngest patient he's ever diagnoased with cancer is a 28 boy with liver cancer.
      i don't know about the polyp thing, though. if you have a family history it would be good to go check, but i don't think you need to have it checked now.

  44. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know about colon cancer?
    Does it affect people in their late 20s?
    What are the early symptpoms?

    • ANSWER:
      Someone else mentioned the signs and symptoms of colon cancer. Check their answer. Though it is rare, colon cancer can strike someone at any age. It is the second leading cause of cancer death after lung cancer. My brother died needlessly of it at the age of 50. It turns out he had had a polyp found during a routine colonoscopy in his early 40's but never went back for another screening. Since it is familial, I have gone for 3 colonoscopies in the past 9 years. It is nothing compared to the waste of a human life. It is a relatively painless procedure, takes 20 minutes and if all is O.K. you need not go back for about 4-5 years. It is not embarassing at all. You are given a mild sedative to relax and before you know it, it's done. I reassure people all the time. I am a member of the Canadian Colorectal Cancer Association which has been recently very instrumental in educating the Canadian population about it. Much is being done to inform and warn people about breast cancer. Colon cancer is a silent killer. Prescreening is the only method of detecting it. It should be a regular part of a check-up especially by the age of 50 and sooner if there is a family history. Don't guess, get a medical opinion should you experience symptoms. It is almost always treatable in its early stages.

  45. QUESTION:
    Bleeding, everytime i go to toilet for a no:2?
    For the past 2 month every day i open my bowls i bleed a lot, its not sore, but the amount of fresh blood i loose is becoming more. has any body else had or have this problem.

    • ANSWER:
      luckily you've only had this for 2 months and you have come to get help early. i actually had your symptoms for awhile and finally went to a gastrentologist and she thought i had a polyp in my colon. unfortunately though, it turned out to be ulcerative colitis. both are not life threatening. although, polyps and colitis can develop into cancer if not removed or treated. i'd say go to your doctor and have them refer you to a specialist. only your doctor can tell you what's really going on. for now though, try eating a high fiber diet and drinking lots of water. who knows? maybe the bleeding will stop over time. metamucil seems to work great as well.
      your condition could be anything from a gash in your rectum to early signs of colitis or in more serious cases crohn's. don't worry about it for now because you're not showing the dire symptoms of a tumor or anything like that. just rememeber a healthy life style and a doctor's visit is what you need right now. best of luck. :)

  46. QUESTION:
    Question about colon polyps?
    Do those eventually turn to cancer if not removed? Also, how slow-growing are these polyps (in other words, can they turn cancerous within five years)?

    (36-year-old female, family history of colon cancer on both sides of the family (maternal great-grandmother, paternal great-uncle)...also, dad has diverticulitis and irritable bowel syndrome I had my first colonoscopy three years ago, doctor found two polyps and lanced them off ... will need another colonscopy in two years.)

    • ANSWER:
      if you had polyps you should have it done every 5 years the DR told me it takes 9 years for polyps to turn to cancer if they are going to if you didn't have polyps then its every 10 years but with family history it should be every 5 years

  47. QUESTION:
    When polyps turn into bowel cancer?
    Hi, my dad just had a colonoscopy and they found 2 polyps. One they were able to remove but one was big (almost the size of a tennis ball i think) and wasnt able to be removed at the same time. They have taken a piece out of that large polyp to see if it has cancer cells.

    Are all large polyps cancerous? Whats the chances it is cancerous?

    thanks for your help

    • ANSWER:
      Although polyps can become cancerous, most are benign. I don't think size has any bearing. Polyps form because as you get older the lining of your colon becomes weaker and may bulge slightly, forming a pocket or polyp. Although they will perform a biopsy to be sure, the biggest problem is that they can get infected.

  48. QUESTION:
    can a biopsy be false positive?
    If some one has a polyp in their colon and the do a biopsy and it turned out positive for cancer their is still the chance that it may be false positive right?

    • ANSWER:
      The only way it would be a false positive is if your biopsy got mixed up with another patient and thankfully, this is very rare. You will not be asked to repeat the test. Since it could not be removed on colonoscopy, the next step is surgery.

  49. QUESTION:
    hemorrhoid/ colon polyps?
    i have hemorrhoids. i've heard that it sometimes can cause colon polyps or is related to it. my hemorrhoid is not bleeding. i have it for three years and it never bleed. my feces is thin. can i have colon polyps?
    how long does a colon polyps turn cancerous?

    • ANSWER:
      I would have it checked it out by a dr. Thin ribbon like shape stool could be a sign of a blockage or colon cancer. I don't want to scare you but I am 46 and found out I had colon cancer and had no symptoms at all. They removed 12 inches of my large intestines. It was in stage 1, so I didn't need any chemo or radiation. Polyps can turn cancerous over a period of time. Colon cancer is very slow growing and by time it shows signs it is usually pretty advanced. I only found out because I was on blood thinners for a blood clot and saw some blood in my stool. After I found out all the signs, like thin stools, constitapation or diareaha, I see I did have the thin stool. Please have it check out.

  50. QUESTION:
    Bleeding from anus need help worried?
    Female. Light spots of bright red blood (it seems to be surrounded by a little bit of clear mucus), IT IS NOT mixed in with poop, its not black. It has been after intercourse (not anal) and after a small excretion. A tiny bit constipated. Rare sharp momentary pain in anus (but has been every now and then for a few years-- really rare) Im 18 also,

    • ANSWER:
      You need to see a gastrointestinal dr. as you could have small hemmorhoids even at your age. Any bleeding from the anus is immediately saying you need to get checked ASAP by a G.I. dr. Try eating more fiber to make you less constipated too and that may help. In the future you may need to have the hemmorhoids if that's what it is ligated or tied with small rubber bands so they will fall off. Another thing you could have is an anal fissure or cut inside. It can cause a lot of pain after going and you can gettreatment easily by a dr. sometimes with suppositories. A family dr. may be able to help but you should see a G.I. dr. and he/she may most likey due a rectal exam which is something I wasn't even prepared for at that age cause I was never told about it and the dr. didn't even have a nurse in the room. Since there is more than two things that can cause bleeding see a dr. for an examination and treatment. But either way you need to eat more fiber as that can help prevent bleeding. I'm not sure what the mucus is unless it is part of loose stool mixed with the hard ones which can cause bright red bleeding. They could also be polyps inside your colon which are benign tumors that can turn into cancer if not removed. They can be diagnosed with a colonoscopy outpatiend center or hospital or flexible sigmoidoscopy in the office. This is why you need to be seen. Good luck.

colon polyps turn to cancer

Causes Polyps Duodenum

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Colonoscopy was done and there was hemorrhoid's found in the last portion of small intestine. Causes?
    So my mother had a colonoscopy done and she forgot to ask her doctor about the cause of there being hemorrhoid's in the last portion of the small intestine. The last portion is found to be the ileum, because it goes from duodenum, jejunum, to the ileum. Does anyone know the cause of there being hemorrhoid's there? All help appreciated! Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Okie Dokie! Let's set the record straight. A colonoscopy looks at the colon (large intestine) not the small intestine. The colonoscopy makes the journey through the colon via the anus, up the descending colon, across the transverse colon, around the bend and down the ascending colon and if successful finally reaches the cecum. At this point the doctor begins looking for abnormalities and polyps while retracting the colonoscope. After the scope is almost completely retracted, the doctor turns the scope to look at the rectum and that's when they will see the hemorrhoids.

  2. QUESTION:
    Does a benign tumour exhibit similar symptoms to a malignant one?
    If a benign tumour arises in the small intestine (duodenum) would it cause abdominal pain and weight loss just as a malignant tumour would?

    • ANSWER:
      A benign tumor can exhibit some symptoms but only the basic ones. Like shape, size, and even on an x-ray will look like a tumor but the only way a Dr can tell if a tumor is cancer is by doing a biopsy. Only a biopsy can tell if it's a tumor It would be helpful if we knew how old you are.. As far as tumors in the small intestines, most of them will begin as polyps. They can be removed during either sygmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, It the polyps are higher up in the intestines, then an endoscopy or gastroscopy can remove the polyps
      Any foreign matter that does not belong in the body will cause pain. It's a warning sign by your body telling you something is wrong. Pain is always a warning sign. Unless of course for the obvious reason, like surgery, broken bones. Those pains are warning signs yes, but they mean "take it easy'.
      As far as weight loss, you could be looking at a number of reason. The fact that you are having abdonminal pain, can make you just refuse food. Who wants to eat when they are in pain.
      If you suspect anything like tumors or polyps, the only way you're going to know for sure is by testing. Call your MD and tell him/her what's going on and say you would like to be seen. At this point, you should. Good luck Blessings

  3. QUESTION:
    What is the difference between a laporoscope and an endoscope?

    • ANSWER:
      Endoscopy, examination of the body's interior through an instrument inserted into a natural opening or an incision, usually as an outpatient procedure. Endoscopes include the upper gastrointestinal endoscope (for the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum), the colonoscope (for the colon), and the bronchoscope (for the bronchial tubes). With fibre optics, much more maneuverable instruments can reach formerly inaccessible sites, while causing much less discomfort. Attachments can take tissue samples, excise polyps and small tumours, and remove foreign objects.

      Laparoscopy is a type of surgical procedure in which a small incision is made, usually in the navel, through which a viewing tube (laparoscope) is inserted. The viewing tube has a small camera on the eyepiece. This allows the doctor to examine the abdominal and pelvic organs on a video monitor connected to the tube. Other small incisions can be made to insert instruments to perform procedures. Laparoscopy can be done to diagnose conditions or to perform certain types of operations. It is less invasive than regular open abdominal surgery (laparotomy).

      Purpose

      Since the late 1980s, laparoscopy has been a popular diagnostic and treatment tool. The technique dates back to 1901, when it was reportedly first used in a gynecologic procedure performed in Russia. In fact, gynecologists were the first to use laparoscopy to diagnose and treat conditions relating to the female reproductive organs: uterus, fallopian tubes, and ovaries.

  4. QUESTION:
    What might have happen if there is bright red blood in stool almost everyday?
    I just seemed to have bright red blood in my stool almost everyday. And sometimes, because of the above, when I urinate, the blood did come out too. There is blood also in my tissue roll when I wiped my back. Can anyone help me out with this; like what I really should do?

    • ANSWER:
      Blood in the stool can be bright red, maroon in color, black and tarry, or occult (not visible to the naked eye). Causes of blood in stool range from harmless, annoying conditions of the gastrointestinal tract such as hemorrhoids to serious conditions such as cancer. Blood in the stool should be evaluated by a healthcare professional.

      Rectal bleeding (known medically as hematochezia) refers to passage of bright red blood from the anus, often mixed with stool and/or blood clots. Most rectal bleeding comes from the colon, rectum, or anus. The color of the blood during rectal bleeding often depends on the location of the bleeding in the gastrointestinal tract. Generally, the closer the bleeding site is to the anus, the blood will be a brighter red. Thus, bleeding from the anus, rectum, and the sigmoid colon tend to be bright red, whereas bleeding from the transverse colon and the right colon (transverse and right colon are several feet away from the anus) tend to be dark red or maroon colored.

      In some patients bleeding can be black and “tarry” (sticky) and foul smelling. The black, smelly and tarry stool is called melena. Melena occurs when the blood is in the colon long enough for the bacteria in the colon to break it down into chemicals (hematin) that are black. Therefore, melena usually signifies bleeding is from the upper gastrointestinal tract (for example: bleeding from ulcers in the stomach or the duodenum or from the small intestine) because the blood usually is in the gastrointestinal tract for a longer period of time before it exits the body. Sometimes melena may occur with bleeding from the right colon. On the other hand, blood from the sigmoid colon and the rectum usually does not stay in the colon long enough for the bacteria to turn it black. Rarely, massive bleeding from the right colon, from the small intestine, or from ulcers of the stomach or duodenal can cause rapid transit of the blood through the gastrointestinal tract and result in bright red rectal bleeding. In these situations, the blood is moving through the colon so rapidly that there is not enough time for the bacteria to turn the blood black.

      Sometimes, bleeding from the gastrointestinal tract can be too slow to cause either rectal bleeding or melena. In these patients bleeding is occult (not visible to the naked eyes). The blood is found only by testing the stool for blood (fecal occult blood testing) in the laboratory. Occult bleeding has many of the same causes as rectal bleeding and may result in the same symptoms as rectal bleeding. It is often associated with anemia that is due to loss of iron along with the blood (iron deficiency anemia). For more information, please see the colon cancer screening and fecal occult blood test .Causes of Rectal Bleeding

      Anal Fissure
      Colon Cancer
      Colon Polyps
      Crohn's Disease
      Diverticulitis (Diverticulosis)
      Hemorrhoids
      Peptic Ulcer
      Stomach Cancer
      Other Causes of Rectal Bleeding

      Esophageal Varices

  5. QUESTION:
    What would be the reason someone would have blood in there stools?
    I was wondering as a mate of mine said he had this a few weeks ago but I never found out why!

    • ANSWER:
      There are a few reasons...

      1. Haemorrhoids (piles)
      2. Anal Fissure ( its like a cut/crack in the anus
      3. Parasites.. worms, ova, cysts etc
      4. sometimes polyps in the colon
      5. What many of them are concerned.. Cancer Colon.., though there would be other associated symptoms.
      6. Ulcers in the stomach & duodenum (stools are usually black or tarry)

      There are some other causes too.
      I hope this helps, Natasha

  6. QUESTION:
    What is the purpose of Barium swallow?
    Does it really need 10 vials of blood to detect thyroid or esophagus cancer?

    Is there only 2 hospitals in New Mexico that perform endoscopy?

    • ANSWER:
      A barium meal, also known as a barium swallow or an upper gastrointestinal series is a procedure in which radiographs (x-rays) of the esophagus, stomach and duodenum are taken after barium sulfate is ingested by a patient. Barium meals are useful in the diagnosis of structural and motility abnormalities of the foregut.

      There are two varieties of barium meal, these being single and double contrast meals. A single contrast meal uses only barium, a radiopaque (or positive) contrast medium, to image the upper gastrointestinal tract while a double contrast meal uses barium as well as a radiolucent (or negative) contrast medium such as room air, nitrogen, or carbon dioxide. The double contrast meal has the advantage of demonstrating mucosal details and is much more useful as a diagnostic test allowing the detection of small mucosal lesions such as diverticula or polyps.

      Esophageal cancers grow from the wall of the esophagus into the opening of the esophagus, creating a tumor or bump inside the esophagus. A barium swallow test can show irregularities in the normally smooth surface of the esophageal wall. Barium in liquid form is used to coat the esophagus wall before the x-ray is taken, allowing the x-ray to show the esophagus clearly.

      A barium swallow test is often the first diagnostic test in people with trouble swallowing. It can be used to identify both early and advanced cancers, although early cancers (before symptoms occur) are often found by accident while having the test for another reason. In the barium x-ray, early cancers can look like small round bumps. They also can appear as a flat, raised area called a plaque. These masses will cause the barium to coat the affected area of the esophagus unevenly. Advanced cancers look like large irregular areas and cause a narrowing of the width of the esophagus. A barium swallow test cannot be used to determine how far a cancer may have spread outside of the esophagus.

      A barium swallow test can also be used to diagnose one of the more serious complications of esophageal cancer called a tracheoesophageal fistula. This occurs when the tumor destroys the tissue between the esophagus and the trachea (windpipe) and creates a hole connecting the swallowing and breathing tubes. This leads to frequent coughing and gagging, and can be repaired with surgery or an endoscopy procedure.

      There are six tests that are performed on the blood when assessing a patient for thyroid cancer. They are:

      a. T3
      b. T3 resin uptake
      c. T4
      d. thyroid scan
      e. TSH
      f. TSI

      A search of endoscopy facilities in Albuquerque, New Mexico turned up at least six hospitals.

  7. QUESTION:
    What is a gall bladder and is it a necessary organ?

    • ANSWER:
      The gallbladder (or cholecyst, sometimes gall bladder) is a pear-shaped organ that stores about 50 ml of bile (or "gall") until the body needs it for digestion.

      The gallbladder stores about 50 ml of bile (1.7 US fluid ounces / 1.8 Imperial fluid ounces), which is released when food containing fat enters the digestive tract, stimulating the secretion of cholecystokinin (CCK). The bile, produced in the liver, emulsifies fats and neutralizes acids in partly digested food.

      After being stored in the gallbladder, the bile becomes more concentrated than when it left the liver, increasing its potency and intensifying its effect on fats. Most digestion occurs in the duodenum.

      The gallbladder is about 7-10 cm long in humans and appears darkgreen because of its contents (bile), rather than its tissue. It is connected to the liver and the duodenum by the biliary tract.
      The binary tube leads from the gallbladder and joins with the left tube to form the common bile duct.
      The common bile duct then joins with the pancreatic duct, and enters through the hepatopancreatic ampulla at the major duodenal papilla.

      Cholestasis is the blockage in the supply of bile into the digestive tract. It can be "intrahepatic" (the obstruction is in the liver) or "extrahepatic" (outside the liver). It can lead to jaundice, and is identified by the presence of elevated bilirubin level that is mainly conjugated.
      Biliary colic is when a gallstone blocks either the common bile duct or the duct leading into it from the gallbladder.
      Up to 25% of all people have gallstones (cholelithiasis), composed of lecithin and bile acids. These can cause abdominal pain, usually in relation with the meal, as the gallbladder contracts and gallstones pass through the bile duct.
      Acute or chronic inflammation of the gallbladder (cholecystitis) causes abdominal pain. 90% of cases of acute cholecystitis are caused by the presence of gallstones. The actual inflammation is due to secondary infection with bacteria of an obstructed gallbladder, with the obstruction caused by the gallstone.
      When gallstones obstruct the common bile duct (choledocholithiasis), the patient develops jaundice and liver cell damage. It is a medical emergency, requiring endoscopic or surgical treatment such as a cholecystectomy.
      A rare clinical entity is ileus (bowel) obstruction by a large gallstone, or gallstone ileus. This condition develops in patients with longstanding gallstone disease, in which the gallbladder forms a fistula with the digestive tract. Large stones pass into the bowel, and generally block the gut at the level of Treitz' ligament or the ileocecal valve, two narrow points in the digestive tract. The treatment is surgical.
      Cancer of the gallbladder is a rare but highly fatal disease. It has been associated with gallstone disease, estrogens, cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption and obesity. Despite aggressive modern surgical approaches, advanced imaging techniques, and endoscopy, nearly 90% of patients die from advanced stages of the disease and experience pain, jaundice, weight loss, and ascites.
      Polyps (growths) are sometimes detected during diagnostic tests for gallbladder disease. Small gallbladder polyps (up to 10 mm) pose little or no risk, but large ones (greater than 15 mm) pose some risk for cancer, so the gallbladder should be removed. Patients with polyps 10 mm to 15 mm have a lower risk but they should still discuss removal of their gallbladder with their physician. Of special note is a condition called primary sclerosing cholangitis, which causes inflammation and scarring in the bile duct. It is associated with a lifetime risk of 7% to 12% for gallbladder cancer. The cause is unknown, although primary sclerosing cholangitis tends to strike younger men who have ulcerative colitis. Polyps are often detected in this condition and have a very high likelihood of malignancy.

  8. QUESTION:
    What wud cause a person to have blood in their poop?

    • ANSWER:
      Possible causes of blood in stool include:

      Diverticular disease. Diverticula are small pouches that project from the colon wall. Usually diverticula don't cause problems, but sometimes they can bleed or become infected.

      Anal fissure . A small cut or tear in the tissue lining the anus similar to the cracks that occur in chapped lips or a paper cut. Fissures are often caused by passing a large, hard stool and can be painful.

      Colitis . Inflammation of the colon. Among the more common causes are infections or inflammatory bowel disease.

      Angiodysplasia. A condition in which fragile, abnormal blood vessels lead to bleeding.

      Peptic ulcers . An open sore in the lining of the stomach or duodenum, the upper end of the small intestine. Many peptic ulcers are caused by infection with a bacterium called Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). Long-term use or high doses of anti-inflammatory drugs such as aspirin, ibuprofen, and naproxen can also cause ulcers.

      Polyps or cancer. Polyps are benign growths that can grow, bleed, and become cancerous. Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in the U.S. It often causes bleeding that is not noticeable with the naked eye.

      Esophageal problems. Varicose veins of the esophagus or tears in the esophagus can lead to severe blood loss.

  9. QUESTION:
    How does dehydration effect body functions?

    • ANSWER:
      Water and Heartburn

      Heartburn is a signal of water shortage in the upper part of the gastrointestinal tract. It is a major thirst signal of the human body. The use of antacids or tablet medications in the treatment of this pain does not correct dehydration, and the body continues to suffer as a result of its water shortage.

      Not recognizing heartburn as a sign of dehydration and treating it with antacids and pill medications can, in time, produce inflammation of the stomach and duodenum, hiatal hernia, ulceration, and eventually cancers in the gastrointestinal tract, including the liver and pancreas.

      Water and Arthritis

      Rheumatoid joint pain - arthritis - is a signal of water shortage in the painful joint. It can affect the young as well as the old. The use of pain-killers does not cure the problem, but exposes the person to further damage from pain medications. Intake of water and small amounts of salt is the answer.

      Water and Back Pain

      Low back pain and ankylosing arthritis of the spine are signs of water shortage in the spinal column and discs - the water cushions that support the weight of the body. These conditions should be treated with increased water intake - not a commercial treatment, but a very effective one.

      Not recognizing arthritis and low back pain as signs of dehydration in the joint cavities and treating them with pain-killers, manipulation, acupuncture and eventually surgery can, in time, produce osteoarthritis when the cartilage cells in the joints have eventually all died. It can produce deformity of the spine. It can produce crippling deformities of the limbs. Pain medications have their own life-threatening complications.

      Water and Angina

      Heart pain - angina - is a sign of water shortage in the heart/lung axis. It should be treated with increased water intake until the patient is free of pain and independent of medications. Medical supervision is prudent.

      Water and Migraines

      Migraine headache is a sign of water need by the brain and the eyes. It can totally clear up if dehydration is prevented from establishing in the body. The type of dehydration that causes migraine might eventually cause inflammation of the back of the eye and possibly loss of eye sight.

      Water and Colitis

      Colitis pain is a signal of water shortage in the large gut. It is associated with constipation because the large intestine constricts to squeeze the last drop of water from the excrements - thus the lack of water lubrication.

      Not recognizing colitis pain as a sign of dehydration can cause persistent constipation. Later in life, it can cause fecal impacting: it can cause diverticulitis, hemorrhoids and polyps, and appreciably increases the possibility of developing cancer of the colon and rectum.

      Water, Salt and Asthma

      Asthma, which also affects 14 million children and kills several thousand of them every year, is a complication of dehydration in the body. It is caused by the drought management programs of the body. In asthma free passage of air is obstructed so that water does not leave the body in the form of vapor - the winter steam. Increased water intake can prevent asthma attacks. Asthmatics need also to take more salt to break the mucus plugs in the lungs that obstruct the free flow of air in and out of the air sacs.

      Not recognizing asthma as the indicator of dehydration in the body of a growing child not only can sentence many thousands of children to die every year, but can permit irreversible genetic damage to establish in the remaining 14 million asthmatic children.

      Water and High Blood Pressure

      Hypertension is a state of adaptation of the body to a generalized drought, when there is not enough water to fill all the blood vessels that diffuse water into vital cells. As part of the mechanism of reverse osmosis, when water from the blood serum is filtered and injected into important cells through minute holes in their membranes, extra pressure is needed for the "injection process." Just as we inject I.V. "water" in hospitals, so the body injects water into tens of trillions of cells all at the same time. Water and some salt intake can bring blood pressure back to normal!

      Not recognizing hypertension as one of the major indicators of dehydration in the human body, and treating it with diuretics that further dehydrate the body can, in time, cause blockage by cholesterol of the heart arteries and the arteries that go to the brain. It can cause heart attacks and small or massive strokes that paralyze. It can eventually cause kidney disease. It can cause brain damage and neurological disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease.

      Water and Early Adult-onset Diabetes

      Adult-onset diabetes is another adaptive state to severe dehydration of the human body. To have adequate water in circulation and for the brain's priority water needs, the release of insulin is inhibited to prevent insulin from pushing water into all body cells. In diabetes, only

  10. QUESTION:
    What three structures are viewed during an EGD?

    • ANSWER:
      Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy
      An upper gastrointestinal (UGI) endoscopy is a procedure that allows your doctor to look at the interior lining of your esophagus, your stomach, and the first part of your small intestine (duodenum) through a thin, flexible viewing instrument called an endoscope. The tip of the endoscope is inserted through your mouth and then gently moved down your throat into the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum (upper gastrointestinal tract).

      Since the entire upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract can be examined during this test, the procedure is sometimes called esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD).

      Using the endoscope, your doctor can look for ulcers, inflammation, tumors, infection, or bleeding. Tissue samples can be collected (biopsy), polyps can be removed, and bleeding can be treated through the endoscope. Endoscopy can reveal problems that do not show up on X-ray tests, and it can sometimes eliminate the need for exploratory surgery.

      Why It Is Done
      An upper gastrointestinal endoscopy may be done to:

      Find problems in the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract. These problems can include:
      Inflammation of the esophagus (esophagitis).
      Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).
      A narrowing (stricture) of the esophagus.
      Barrett's esophagus, a condition that increases the risk for developing esophageal cancer.
      Hiatal hernia.
      Ulcers.
      Cancer.
      Find the cause of vomiting blood (hematemesis).
      Find the cause of symptoms, such as upper abdominal pain or bloating, difficulty in swallowing (dysphagia), vomiting, or unexplained weight loss.
      Find the cause of an infection.
      Document the healing of stomach ulcers.
      Look at the inside of the stomach and upper small intestine (duodenum) after surgery.
      Look for a blockage in the opening between the stomach and duodenum (gastric outlet obstruction).
      Endoscopy may also be done to:

      Check for an esophageal injury in an emergency (for example, if the person has swallowed poison).
      Collect tissue samples (biopsy) for examination in the laboratory.
      Remove growths from inside the esophagus, stomach, or small intestine (gastrointestinal polyps).
      Treat upper gastrointestinal bleeding, including bleeding caused by engorged veins in the esophagus (esophageal varices).
      Remove foreign objects that have been swallowed.
      Look for bleeding that may be causing a decrease in the amount of oxygen-carrying substance (hemoglobin) found in red blood cells (anemia).

  11. QUESTION:
    Why aren't you supposed to take iron pills when you are getting a capsule endoscopy?

    Thanks for the answers. I don't know how to go about this yet.(replying) Would iron cause blue pigments to show up in the small intestine?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi I found this info for you.

      Tell your doctor in advance about any medications you take including iron, aspirin, bismuth subsalicylate products and other “over-the-counter” medications. You might need to adjust your usual dose prior to the examination.

      Discuss any allergies to medications as well as medical conditions, such as swallowing disorders and heart or lung disease.

      Tell your doctor of the presence of a pacemaker, previous abdominal surgery, or previous history of obstructions in the bowel, inflammatory bowel disease, or adhesions.

      What Can I Expect During Capsule Endoscopy?
      Your doctor will prepare you for the examination by applying a sensor device to your abdomen with adhesive sleeves (similar to tape). The capsule endoscope is swallowed and passes naturally through your digestive tract while transmitting video images to a data recorder worn on your belt for approximately eight hours. At the end of the procedure you will return to the office and the data recorder is removed so that images of your small bowel can be put on a computer screen for physician review.

      Remember that iron tends to constipate the gut, therefore affecing the procedure.

      Understanding Capsule Endoscopy
      What is Capsule Endoscopy?
      Capsule Endoscopy lets your doctor examine the lining of the middle part of your gastrointestinal tract, which includes the three portions of the small intestine (duodenum, jejunum, ileum). Your doctor will use a pill sized video capsule called an endoscope, which has its own lens and light source and will view the images on a video monitor. You might hear your doctor or other medical staff refer to capsule endoscopy as small bowel endoscopy, capsule enteroscopy, or wireless endoscopy.

      Why is Capsule Endoscopy Done?
      Capsule endoscopy helps your doctor evaluate the small intestine. This part of the bowel cannot be reached by traditional upper endoscopy or by colonoscopy. The most common reason for doing capsule endoscopy is to search for a cause of bleeding from the small intestine. It may also be useful for detecting polyps, inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn’s disease), ulcers, and tumors of the small intestine.

      As is the case with most new diagnostic procedures, not all insurance companies are currently reimbursing for this procedure. You may need to check with your own insurance company to ensure that this is a covered benefit.

      How Should I Prepare for the Procedure?
      An empty stomach allows for the best and safest examination, so you should have nothing to eat or drink, including water, for approximately twelve hours before the examination. Your doctor will tell you when to start fasting.

      Tell your doctor in advance about any medications you take including iron, aspirin, bismuth subsalicylate products and other “over-the-counter” medications. You might need to adjust your usual dose prior to the examination.

      Discuss any allergies to medications as well as medical conditions, such as swallowing disorders and heart or lung disease.

      Tell your doctor of the presence of a pacemaker, previous abdominal surgery, or previous history of obstructions in the bowel, inflammatory bowel disease, or adhesions.

      What Can I Expect During Capsule Endoscopy?
      Your doctor will prepare you for the examination by applying a sensor device to your abdomen with adhesive sleeves (similar to tape). The capsule endoscope is swallowed and passes naturally through your digestive tract while transmitting video images to a data recorder worn on your belt for approximately eight hours. At the end of the procedure you will return to the office and the data recorder is removed so that images of your small bowel can be put on a computer screen for physician review.

      What Happens After Capsule Endoscopy?
      You will be able to drink clear liquids after two hours and eat a light meal after four hours following the capsule ingestion, unless your doctor instructs you otherwise. You will have to avoid vigorous physical activity such as running or jumping during the study. Your doctor generally can tell you the test results within the week following the procedure; however, the results of some tests might take longer./font>

      What are the Possible Complications of Capsule Endoscopy?
      Although complications can occur, they are rare when doctors who are specially trained and experienced in this procedure, such as members of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, perform the test. Potential risks include complications from obstruction. This usually relates to a stricture (narrowing) of the intestine from inflammation, prior surgery, or tumor. It’s important to recognize early signs of possible complications. If you have evidence of obstruction, such as unusual bloating, pain, and/or vomiting, call your doctor immediately. Also, if you develop a fever after the test, have trouble swallowing or experience increasing chest pain, tell your doctor immediately. Be careful not to prematurely disconnect the system as this may result in loss of image acquisition.

  12. QUESTION:
    what are some medical disqualifiers?
    Where can you find what medical conditions disqualifies you for the army?

    • ANSWER:
      Abdominal organs and gastrointestinal system

      The causes for rejection for appointment, enlistment, and induction are an authenticated history of:

      a. Esophagus. Ulceration, varices, fistula, achalasia, or other dismotility disorders; chronic or recurrent esophagitis if confirmed by appropriate x-ray
      b. Stomach and duodenum.

      (1) Gastritis. Chronic hypertrophic, or severe.

      (2) Active ulcer of the stomach or duodenum confirmed by x-ray or endoscopy.

      (3) Congenital abnormalities of the stomach or duodenum causing symptoms or requiring surgical treatment, except a history of surgical correction of hypertrophic pyloric stenosis of infancy.

      c. Small and large intestine.

      (1) Inflammatory bowel disease. Regional enteritis, ulcerative colitis, ulcerative proctitis.

      (2) Duodenal diverticula with symptoms or sequelae (hemorrhage, perforation, etc.).

      (3) Intestinal malabsorption syndromes, including postsurgical and idiopathic.

      (4) Congenital. Condition, to include Meckel's diverticulum or functional abnormalities, persisting or symptomatic within the past 2 years.

      d. Gastrointestinal bleeding. History of, unless the cause has been corrected, and is not otherwise disqualifying.

      e. Hepato-pancreatic-biliary tract.

      (1) Viral hepatitis, or unspecified hepatitis, within the preceding 6 months or persistence of symptoms after 6 months, or objective evidence of impairment of liver function, chronic hepatitis, and hepatitis B carriers. (Individuals who are known to have tested positive for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection require confirmatory testing. If positive, individuals should be clinically evaluated for objective evidence of liver function impairment. If evaluation reveals no signs or symptoms of disease, the applicant meets the standards.)

      (2) Cirrhosis, hepatic cysts and abscess, and sequelae of chronic liver disease.

      (3) Cholecystitis, acute or chronic, with or without cholelithiasis, and other disorders of the gallbladder including post-cholecystectomy syndrome, and biliary system.

      Note. Cholecystectomy is not disqualifying 60 days postsurgery (or 30 days post-laproscopic surgery), providing there are no disqualifying residuals from treatment.

      (4) Pancreatitis. Acute and chronic.

      f. Anorectal.

      (1) Anal fissure if persistent, or anal fistula.

      (2) Anal or rectal polyp, prolapse, stricture, or incontinence.

      (3) Hemorrhoids, internal or external, when large, symptomatic, or history of bleeding.

      g. Spleen.

      (1) Splenomegaly, if persistent.

      (2) Splenectomy, except when accomplished for trauma, or conditions unrelated to the spleen, or for hereditary spherocytosis.

      h. Abdominal wall.

      (1) Hernia, including inguinal, and other abdominal, except for small, asymptomatic umbilical or asymptomatic hiatal.

      (2) History of abdominal surgery within the preceding 60 days, except that individuals post-laparoscopic cholecystectomy may be qualified after 30 days.

      i. Other.

      (1) Gastrointestinal bypass or stomach stapling for control of obesity.

      (2) Persons with artificial openings.

      Blood and blood-forming tissue diseases

      The causes for rejection for appointment, enlistment, and induction are an authenticated history of:

      a. Anemia. Any hereditary acquired, aplastic, or unspecified anemia that has not permanently corrected with therapy.

      b. Hemorrhagic disorders. Any congenital or acquired tendency to bleed due to a platelet or coagulation disorder.

      c. Leukopenia. Chronic or recurrent, based upon available norms for ethnic background.

      d. Immunodeficiency.

      Dental

      The causes for rejection are for appointment, enlistment, and induction are:

      a. Diseases of the jaw or associated tissues which are not easily remediable, and will incapacitate the individual or otherwise prevent the satisfactory performance of duty. This includes temporomandibular disorders and/or myofascial pain dysfunction that is not easily corrected or has the potential for significant future problems with pain and function.

      b. Severe malocclusion that interferes with normal mastication or requires early and protracted treatment; or relationship between mandible and maxilla that prevents satisfactory future prosthodontic replacement.

      c. Insufficient natural healthy teeth or lack of a serviceable prosthesis, preventing adequate mastication and incision of a normal diet. This includes complex (multiple fixture) dental implant systems that have associated complications that severely limit assignments and adversely affect performance of world-wide duty. Dental implants systems must be successfully osseointegrated and completed.

      d. Orthodontic appliances for continued treatment (attached or removable). Retainer appliances are permissible, provided all active orthodontic treatment has been satisfactorily completed.

      Ears

      The causes for rejection for appointment, enlistment, and induction are:

      a.

  13. QUESTION:
    Blood in stool and on tissue?
    I am a 17 year old male. Recently, I have been noticing decent amounts of blood in the toilet and on the toilet paper after going to the bathroom. Sometimes, the only thing on the paper is blood. Nothing hurts, but it's really starting to worry me since it has been happening for the past 3 - 4 weeks. Should I be concerned?
    recently it has been dark red.

    • ANSWER:
      Causes of Blood in Stool
      Blood in the stool means there is bleeding somewhere in your digestive tract. Sometimes the amount of blood is so small that it can only be detected by a fecal occult test (a test to check for hidden blood in the stool). At other times it may visible on toilet tissue or in the toilet after a bowel movement as bright red blood. Bleeding that occurs higher up in the digestive tract may make stool appear black and tarry.

      Possible causes of blood in stool include:

      Diverticular disease. Diverticula are small pouches that project from the colon wall. Usually diverticula don't cause problems, but sometimes they can bleed or become infected.

      Anal fissure . A small cut or tear in the tissue lining the anus similar to the cracks that occur in chapped lips or a paper cut. Fissures are often caused by passing a large, hard stool and can be painful.

      Colitis . Inflammation of the colon. Among the more common causes are infections or inflammatory bowel disease.

      Angiodysplasia. A condition in which fragile, abnormal blood vessels lead to bleeding.

      Peptic ulcers . An open sore in the lining of the stomach or duodenum, the upper end of the small intestine. Many peptic ulcers are caused by infection with a bacterium called Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). Long-term use or high doses of anti-inflammatory drugs such as aspirin, ibuprofen, and naproxen can also cause ulcers.

      Polyps or cancer. Polyps are benign growths that can grow, bleed, and become cancerous. Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in the U.S. It often causes bleeding that is not noticeable with the naked eye.

      Esophageal problems. Varicose veins of the esophagus or tears in the esophagus can lead to severe blood loss.

      Blood in Stool Diagnosis
      It is important to have a doctor evaluate any bleeding in the stool. Any details you can give about the bleeding will help your doctor locate the site of bleeding. For example, a black, tarry stool is likely an ulcer or other problem in the upper part of the digestive tract. Bright red blood or maroon-colored stools usually indicate a problem in the lower part of the digestive tract such as hemorrhoids or diverticulitis.

  14. QUESTION:
    When I have a bowel movement, I get a lot of blood, is that bad?

    • ANSWER:
      Blood in the stool means there is bleeding somewhere in your digestive tract. Sometimes the amount of blood is so small that it can only be detected by a fecal occult test (a test to check for hidden blood in the stool). At other times it may visible on toilet tissue or in the toilet after a bowel movement as bright red blood. Bleeding that occurs higher up in the digestive tract may make stool appear black and tarry.

      Possible causes of blood in stool include:

      Diverticular disease. Diverticula are small pouches that project from the colon wall. Usually diverticula don't cause problems, but sometimes they can bleed or become infected.

      Anal fissure. A small cut or tear in the tissue lining the anus similar to the cracks that occur in chapped lips or a paper cut. Fissures are often caused by passing a large, hard stool and can be painful.
      Colitis. Inflammation of the colon. Among the more common causes are infections or inflammatory bowel disease.
      Angiodysplasia. A condition in which fragile, abnormal blood vessels lead to bleeding.
      Peptic ulcers. An open sore in the lining of the stomach or duodenum, the upper end of the small intestine. Many peptic ulcers are caused by infection with a bacterium called Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). Long-term use or high doses of anti-inflammatory drugs such as aspirin, ibuprofen, and naproxen can also cause ulcers.
      Polyps or cancer. Polyps are benign growths that can grow, bleed, and become cancerous. Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in the U.S. It often causes bleeding that is not noticeable with the naked eye.
      Esophageal problems. Varicose veins of the esophagus or tears in the esophagus can lead to severe blood loss.

  15. QUESTION:
    Should I request an upper GI?
    I had a CT scan to determine the cause of very bloated abdomen. No problems found. Would an upper GI find something that does not show up in a CT scan??

    • ANSWER:
      It's possible, but a CT scan is much more sensitive than an upper GI, and would show any structural abnormalities such as ulcers, eroded mucosal lining, masses, polyps and such. The one thing an upper GI might show better is movement in the GI tract, which is called peristalsis, and shows how food is moved through the stomach, intestines and colon.

      What might show more than a CT scan is upper endoscopy, in which the gastroenterologist inserts a scope down into your stomach, duodenum and jejunum and actually eyeballs the mucosa and any abnormalities (all done in twilight sleep). The only disadvantage to this is the scope can only go so far, and the last segments of the small intestine are not visualized.

  16. QUESTION:
    Frequent bloody stool, but no pain? What is wrong?
    I'm a 15 year old female and for the past couple month I've been going on and off between either having really bad diarrhea to being really constipated. Now for the past week there seems to be blood in my stool and on the tissue paper when I wipe, at first I thought it was my period spotting but I realized it only happens after I poop. But I have no pains, help?

    • ANSWER:
      Blood in the stool can be bright red, maroon in color, black and tarry, or occult (not visible to the naked eye). Causes of blood in stool range from harmless, annoying conditions of the gastrointestinal tract such as hemorrhoids to serious conditions such as cancer. Blood in the stool should be evaluated by a healthcare professional.

      Rectal bleeding (known medically as hematochezia) refers to passage of bright red blood from the anus, often mixed with stool and/or blood clots. Most rectal bleeding comes from the colon, rectum, or anus. The color of the blood during rectal bleeding often depends on the location of the bleeding in the gastrointestinal tract. Generally, the closer the bleeding site is to the anus, the blood will be a brighter red. Thus, bleeding from the anus, rectum, and the sigmoid colon tend to be bright red, whereas bleeding from the transverse colon and the right colon (transverse and right colon are several feet away from the anus) tend to be dark red or maroon colored.

      In some patients bleeding can be black and "tarry" (sticky) and foul smelling. The black, smelly and tarry stool is called melena. Melena occurs when the blood is in the colon long enough for the bacteria in the colon to break it down into chemicals (hematin) that are black. Therefore, melena usually signifies bleeding is from the upper gastrointestinal tract (for example: bleeding from ulcers in the stomach or the duodenum or from the small intestine) because the blood usually is in the gastrointestinal tract for a longer period of time before it exits the body. Sometimes melena may occur with bleeding from the right colon. On the other hand, blood from the sigmoid colon and the rectum usually does not stay in the colon long enough for the bacteria to turn it black. Rarely, massive bleeding from the right colon, from the small intestine, or from ulcers of the stomach or duodenal can cause rapid transit of the blood through the gastrointestinal tract and result in bright red rectal bleeding. In these situations, the blood is moving through the colon so rapidly that there is not enough time for the bacteria to turn the blood black.

      Sometimes, bleeding from the gastrointestinal tract can be too slow to cause either rectal bleeding or melena. In these patients bleeding is occult (not visible to the naked eyes). The blood is found only by testing the stool for blood (fecal occult blood testing) in the laboratory. Occult bleeding has many of the same causes as rectal bleeding and may result in the same symptoms as rectal bleeding. It is often associated with anemia that is due to loss of iron along with the blood (iron deficiency anemia). For more information, please see the colon cancer screening and fecal occult blood test articles

      Causes of Rectal Bleeding
      Anal Fissure
      Colon Cancer
      Colon Polyps
      Crohn's Disease
      Diverticulitis (Diverticulosis)
      Hemorrhoids
      Peptic Ulcer
      Stomach Cancer

  17. QUESTION:
    who is affected when it comes to peutz-jeghers syndrome?

    • ANSWER:
      Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is characterized by the association of gastrointestinal polyposis and mucocutaneous pigmentation. Peutz-Jeghers-type hamartomatous polyps are most common in the small intestine (in order of prevalence: in the jejenum, ileum, and duodenum) but can also occur in the stomach and large bowel. Gastrointestinal polyps can result in chronic bleeding and anemia and cause recurrent obstruction and intussusception requiring repeated laparotomies and bowel resections. Anyone can be affected by this.

  18. QUESTION:
    I have lot of pain in my abdomen & Ultrasound report says Distended Gall Bladder. Please Help ....?
    my ultrasound report says "gall bladder is distended show smooth walls, lumen is echo free, common bile duct is not dilated"
    is it something serious ?

    • ANSWER:
      you really need to speak with a doctor, not yahoo answers, but nevertheless here's some info from a site on gall bladders;

      Gallstone disease is the most common affliction of the biliary system, affecting 15-20% of the US population, with nearly 1 million new cases reported annually.
      Problem

      Mucocele or hydrops of the gallbladder describes an overdistended gallbladder filled with mucoid or clear and watery content. This usually noninflammatory distension results from an outlet obstruction of the gallbladder and is commonly caused by an impacted stone in the neck of the gallbladder or in the cystic duct.
      Frequency

      About 3% of all pathologic gallbladders in adults are mucoceles. The true prevalence may be higher because of the varying criteria used by different authors to define the condition.

      Reports indicate that an association could exist between mucoceles and solitary stones of the gallbladder.
      Etiology

      Causes include the following:

      * Impacted stone in the gallbladder neck or cystic duct
      * Spontaneously resolved acute cholecystitis
      * Tumors - Polyps or malignancy of the gallbladder
      * Extrinsic compression of the neck or cystic duct by lymph nodes or inflammatory fibrosis or adjacent malignancies in the liver, duodenum, or colon
      * Prolonged total parenteral nutrition or ceftriaxone therapy
      * Congenital narrowing of the cystic duct
      * Parasites such as Ascaris (occasionally)
      * In infants and children, acute, acalculous, noninflammatory hydrops of the gallbladder may be associated with the following:
      o Kawasaki syndrome (mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome)
      o Streptococcal pharyngitis
      o Mesenteric adenitis
      o Typhoid
      o Leptospirosis
      o Hepatitis
      o Familial Mediterranean fever
      o Nephrotic syndrome
      o Fibrocystic disease

      Other problems to be considered include the following:

      * Hepatomegaly, choledochal cyst
      * Courvoisier gallbladder due to simultaneous obstruction of the gallbladder and common bile duct
      * Pseudocyst of the pancreas
      * Renal mass
      * Right suprarenal gland mass
      * Mesenteric cysts
      * Parasitic cysts - Hydatid cyst
      * Ascending colon mass

      Pathophysiology
      Long-standing obstruction to the outflow from the gallbladder results in overdistension of the gallbladder; occasionally, the gallbladder assumes massive proportions and the volume may be as much as 1.5 liters. The bile or bile pigment is slowly resorbed, and continuing secretion from the mucosa of the gallbladder results in clear and watery or mucoid content (white bile). The wall may be of normal thickness, or, in long-standing cases, the mucosa atrophies and the wall becomes thin, sometimes even transparent. Wall thickening can occur with recurrent attacks of cholecystitis. The contents are usually sterile, and any bacterial contamination ends in empyema of the gallbladder. Gross overdistension may result in gangrene and/or perforation of the gallbladder, with ensuing pericholecystic collection or peritonitis. The severity of the inflammatory episode dictates the clinical presentation.

      Microscopic examination reveals a flattened mucosa lined by low columnar or cuboidal cells; the increased intraluminal pressure results in plentiful Rokitansky-Aschoff sinuses. Inflammatory cells may be present either in small numbers or in abundance.
      Presentation

      Symptomatology includes right upper quadrant (RUQ) pain or epigastric pain and discomfort, nausea, and vomiting. Continuance of pain or persistence of tenderness longer than 6 hours indicates possible acute cholecystitis. Fever and chills suggest infected bile, with a possible empyema of the gallbladder. Jaundice is unusual except in coexisting obstruction of the common bile duct either by stones or by extrinsic compression (Mirizzi syndrome). A palpable, somewhat tender mass is usual; the gallbladder at times may even be felt down in the pelvis.

      Diagnostic criteria

      The diagnosis of a mucocele should be considered in the following:

      * Minimal acute inflammatory signs are present.
      * A large, palpable, minimally tender gallbladder is found on clinical examination.
      * Laboratory test results are normal or just within the upper limit of reference range values.
      * Plain radiograph of the abdomen shows a soft tissue density globular shadow in the subhepatic region.
      * Ultrasonography of the RUQ shows evidence of minimal wall thickening, an impacted stone in the neck, or infundibulum of an enlarged gallbladder and clear content.
      * Intraoperatively, the aspirate from the gallbladder is clear and watery or mucoid (white bile).
      * The gallbladder on opening shows a white wall; clear, watery, or mucoid content; a stone or stones impacted in the neck or cystic duct; a narrowed cystic duct; or a tumor and/or polyp causing obstruction of the neck of the gallbladder.

      Indication

  19. QUESTION:
    How is upper g.i. tract bleeding related to type 2 diabetes mellitus and diabetes ketoacidosis?

    • ANSWER:
      What can cause bleeding in the esophagus?

      * Gastroesophageal reflux disease (or GERD, backward flow of stomach acid into the esophagus) can cause esophagitis (inflammation of the esophagus), leading to esophageal bleeding.
      * Liver cirrhosis can cause esophageal varices (enlarged veins) at the lower end of the esophagus. Varices can rupture, causing massive bleeding.
      * Mallory-Weiss syndrome (tears in the lining of the esophagus) can cause esophageal bleeding. Potential causes of Mallory-Weiss syndrome include:
      o Prolonged Vomiting (the most common cause)
      o Coughing
      o Hiatal Hernia
      o Childbirth

      What can cause bleeding in the stomach?

      Inflammation of the stomach ("gastritis") and/or stomach ulcers can cause bleeding.

      Potential causes of stomach inflammation/ulcers include:

      * Alcohol
      * Aspirin (or aspirin-containing medications)
      * Other Medications

      Other potential causes of stomach bleeding include:

      * Benign (noncancerous) stomach tumors
      * Stomach cancer

      What can cause bleeding in the small intestine?

      Ulcers in the duodenum (the first part of the small intestine) are the most common cause of bleeding in the upper digestive tract.

      What can cause bleeding in the colon or the rectum?

      Bleeding may arise from:

      * Hemorrhoids
      * Intestinal Polyps (benign growths on on the intestinal lining)
      * Colorectal Cancer
      * Inflammation as a result of:
      o Intestinal Infection
      o Ulcerative Colitis
      o Crohn's Disease
      * Diverticulosis
      * Age-related abnormalities in the blood vessels of the large intestine

  20. QUESTION:
    Large sessile polyp too large to be removed?
    My father has had anemia and constipation. He was sent for a colonoscopy this revealed a large sessile polyp which almost certainly has been the cause of the anemia. They could not remove it there and then but they did several biopsies. We have been told that because of its size dad has to go back in and get t removed. My questions are 1) what will they do second time that they couldn't do first time and also is it likely to be cancer. He is 76 and is constantly fatigued. We are still waiting for a follow up appointment . It as been over a week now. His iron level has fallen to 9.5. He said his stools have been black but he is on iron tablets.

    • ANSWER:
      Gloria - What you describe as a large sessile polyp in your father's colon may be also known as a "villous adenoma." If its size is about one inch or larger, then it is likely too large to remove by a colonoscopy. Open abdominal surgery surgery may be necessary since it is often impossible to be sure otherwise whether it is a benign or malignant lesion.
      Villous adenomas are associated more often with larger adenomas and more severe degrees of dysplasia (suspicious for malignant change within).. These adenomas occur more frequently in the rectum and rectosigmoid, although they may occur anywhere in the colon. They generally are sessile structures that appear as velvety or cauliflowerlike projections. Although rare, villous adenomas of the duodenum and the small bowel, particularly at the ampulla, can occur. Villous adenomas are of concern primarily because of the risk of malignant transformation (approximately 15-25% overall but higher once >2 cm).

  21. QUESTION:
    Help advice needed, any ideas what this stomach pain is?
    Has anyone ever suffered with the following, any ideas, suggestions & advice would be appreciated.

    My partner who is 25 years has been suffering with stomach pain for about 6 months and has had loose stools for about 8 months now.
    He has moderate stomach pain which lasts 5 minutes about 10/15 times a day, and also intense stomach pain about 3/4 times a day (where he is doubled over in pain). He has about 3/4 loose stools a day.
    Doctor has complete numerous test and he has tested negative to stomach bugs etc, however 2 level’s of his blood are very high, indicating something not right....however they don’t know what is causing it.

    9 months ago he was suffering with pain when swallowing, the report from consultant in gastroenterology stated “The pain is not associated with dysphagia just odynophagia” – whatever this means, I was not at the appointment to ask. Consultant stated he thought my partner was suffering from Gastro Oesophageal Reflux Disease. He had an OGD (Camera down throat). From findings from camera his reports states he has/had: 3cm Hiatus hernia with tiny ulcer @ 37cm, his D1, D2 were normal. Tested for CLO test – Negative, suggesting no evidence of Helicobacter Pylori infection in the stomach. Suggested therapy – 3 months of PPI for ulcer healing.
    His swallowing improved and was discharged after 3 months.

    However in he has now started with loose stools, stomach pain – There is no blood or mucus in stools. He tends to experience intense pain especially after eating or lying down when going to bed. Is this pain associated with the above?

    They have tested for Coeliac - Negative
    They have proscribed – Hyoscine butylbromide 10mg – 8 times a day, however this is not offering much comfort.
    He has been referred to Colorectal Clinic to have rectal camera, however this is a few weeks away and it’s taking its toll on my partner, and he is exhausted with the constant stomach pain.
    He is managing to still work, so it is bearable, however when he gets the pain he has to stop working and breath through it as it only lasts few minutes, but it can be every half hour he has a pain.

    Please, has anyone suffered with these symptoms and can offer us any advice. I’m thinking about going private for his treatment, no disrespect to NHS however they don’t seem to know the answer and pass him on to another person with week’s in-between appointments
    Many thanks for your reply...
    He can't see any blood in his stool?
    I'm not sure what colonoscopy is.....He is booked into Hospital to have a camera inserted up his back passage, however this is not due till jan and he is exhausted with the pain.

    I have asked the GP if this pain is related to the Ulcer and Hernia he had a few months agao but they have said no.

    They have tested his Blood and stools for lots but unsure whether for anemia?

    • ANSWER:
      Do you say there is no blood in the stool because you can't see it? Or because it tested negative for blood? You can't necessarily see blood in the stool (if you can you might have bigger problems). Has your partner had a colonoscopy to check for diverticulitis/diverticulosis? I would stick with gastroenterologists on this one. Keep finding new one's until you find someone that will get it figured out. This is definitely a problem for physician level diagnostics. You just need to find the right doc. I haven't earned my MD quite yet but it sounds like an ulcer or gastritis to me. In the case of gastritis he/she would need a esophagogastroduodenoscopy to check. Has he/she been tested for anemia?

      UPDATE
      The camera you refer to is the colonoscopy. The colon is another word for large intestine. It is the part of the digestive tract that comes after the stomach and small intestines in the path toward the rectum and anus. The colonoscopy is used to view the inside of the colon to check for certain things like the presence of diverticula, polyps ect. It is inserted up through the anus. The esophagogastroduodenoscopy goes the other way through the mouth and down into the stomach, duodenum ect.

  22. QUESTION:
    Why does my stomach hurt?
    Every morning when I wake up I have stomach cramps and nausea. It lasts for about 1 hr or 2. I don't eat even a quarter of what I used to. I weigh 362 lbs down from 448 in just March of this year. I have lost my appetite and I have been losing weight like crazy. Drs all say that the weight loss is explainable and it is because I don't eat like I used to. I have had a upper endoscopy, 3 chest xrays, a barium swallow, and a ct scan of my chest abdomen and pelvis. All of my tests have come pack completely clear except for the endoscopy show h pylori which I took antibiotics for. I have a appointment with my gastroenteroligist on Tuesday and I think he is going to want to do a Colonoscopy. I am tired of feeling like crap. My blood work has also always come back fine. Untill just this March although morbidly obese I felt great and now I feel like crap every day I just want my quality of life back I want to be able to stop worrying that I am dieing. I am 26 and I know mostly anything serious is incredibly unlikely at my age but I just want to be able to stop worrying. Serious answers only please. Someone please give me some type of good news.
    How unlikely is Colon cancer my ct scan in March was completely clear of anything including my colon it showed no polyps and no masses and I have heard it taked years for polyps to turn to cancer once you have them. What else could this be? I know I am a bit of a hypochondriac but please someone help talk me off of this ledge.

    • ANSWER:
      H pylori is thought to cause ulcers via inflammation. When the Duodenum is sore or has an actual ulcer the stomach will hold food back longer (it is supposed to give the Duodenum a break and a chace to heal over.) Unfortunately when food is held back it starts to ferment and the wrong bacteria grow even more.
      Antibiotics kill off the H pylori, Sucralfate (Antepsin) helps heal the sore areas, proton pump inhibitors like Omeprazole stop the damage from there being too much acid. Then you can repopulate the good bacteria by eating bio yoghurt.
      Cancer in the colon will be much rarer in someone of your age. The colonoscopy may find ulcerative colitis. Being scoped from both ends covers all the bases and permits a surer diagnosis to be made.

      Waking up with stomach pain etc can be as a result of the stomach anticipating food about an hour beforehand. Eat a slice of bread late in the evening (if not gluten intolerant) and this should be less of an issue.

      When you see your doctor hand over a list of all questions you need answering, then you won't have to worry about slotting them into the convesation and will be ale to listen better. Good luck.

  23. QUESTION:
    A detailed question about poo?
    I am 15 years old. I have had constipation for my whole life, since I was in diapers. In the past year, I was put on miralax and it helped. However, if I don't use it for a day, my poo is hard/painful/bloody. I went to the hospitol about a year ago because I had diarrhea for about 7 hours and it was bloody. It got to the point where I was spewing straight up blood. They said I had hemmerhoids and sent me home. After taking suppositories for 5 weeks, I gave up when nothing happened. When I fart, it smells like I am dying inside. No joke, I clear the room. I am always weak and tired, and my skin/hair is dry, dark rings under my eyes, etc. I look like someone who is starving themselves, except I am at a healthy weight. It is almost as if the organ that sucks out the nutrients in my food isn't working. What organ is that and how do they test it? I had a colonoscopy and an endoscopy a few weeks ago and they said that I have a beautiful colon, no signs of any polyps or cuts or anything. I take fiber suppliments and everything and my poop is still hard without the Miralax. He said I have a little bit of acid reflux and that was it. So what the heck?

    • ANSWER:
      Im sorry but I have a very hard time believing that your situation is due to acid reflux. Those symptoms are normally in the chest, esophagus, and throat. Since your colon was checked and you do not have polyps, you should have your entire gastrointestinal system checked (intestines, duodenum, stomach, etc) and possibly check for bacteria. I don't know the details of what you have, but here are some suggestions of what might be going on:
      - Hemorrhoids are a reason for the blood in your stools
      - Sometimes blood appears in the stool simply because the hardness rubs the surrounding tissue and scrapes occur
      - Flatulence is normally a side effect of the Miralax
      - Hard stools can occur because of low hydration; drinking a lot of water might soften them (unless your doctor has other directions for you)
      - Bacteria in the GI system could be a part of this
      - Not enough fiber in your diet; that will help with constipation as well (although you said you already take supplements)
      - You might be taking a medication(s) that causes constipation (but if it occurred since you were little, that might not be the case)
      - Body is not digesting properly

      I would suggest going back to the doctor and getting to the bottom of this (I just cant believe that it is acid reflux). There has to be a reason for why your have chronic constipation. However, since you have had it so long, there might be the chance of being on a permanent medication.

      Hope you get well!

  24. QUESTION:
    How does a doctor check for ulcers?
    Back in october I went to the Dr's office and had a blood test, and the test came back and said I was healthy and everything was in proper order.

    This whole past week, I have been having some stomach cramps/pain. I haven't had anything like this normally before, just these random pains in my stomach. I'm not on my period, so it's not that. My stool has been dark, and last night I noticed some bright red blood on it... which I figured could be linked to hemmroids, but those wouldn't cause stomach pain, would they? They pain goes away after I eat though, but I've neverrr had this issue.

    If it's an ulcer, would they have detected it with a blood test when I was tested in mid-october? I'm 20 years old, I don't smoke, I only have a casual drink about once a month, and I eat pretty healthy.

    • ANSWER:
      I suggest you see your doctor as soon as possible and if its really bad, go to the ER. Blood tests are sometimes used to detect H. pylori, a cause of stomach ulcers, but you know there are so many different causes of GI bleeding. If its a fast or heavy bleed in the upper GI, there will be red stool.

      For the large intestine: A sigmoidoscopy is a diagnostic procedure that allows the physician to examine the lower one-third of the large intestine. Sigmoidoscopy is helpful in identifying the causes of diarrhea, abdominal pain, constipation, abnormal growths, and bleeding. It may also be used to obtain biopsies and to perform procedures such as removal of polyps or hemorrhoids. Sigmoidoscopy is also used to screen for colorectal cancer, the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the US.

      Maroon-colored stools or bright red blood usually suggests that the blood is coming from the lower part of the GI tract (large bowel, rectum, or anus). Hemorrhoids and diverticulosis (an abnormal pouch in the colon) are the most common causes of lower GI bleeding. Abnormal collections of blood vessels called arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) and tumors in the intestine may also cause lower GI bleeding. However, sometimes massive or rapid bleeding in the stomach causes bright red stools.

      For stomach ulcers: Upper endoscopy is a procedure that enables the examiner (usually a gastroenterologist) to examine the esophagus (swallowing tube), stomach, and duodenum (first portion of small bowel) using a thin, flexible tube through which the lining of the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum can be viewed using a TV monitor.

  25. QUESTION:
    what is eosinophilic enteritis?

    • ANSWER:
      Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis, or EG, is a condition in which one or more layers of the stomach and/or small intestine are infiltrated with a type of white blood cell called eosinophils, often with no known/identified allergic cause. Some cases are due to parasitic/bacterial infection, which can be successfully eradicated with a course of antibiotics. Some people with a related condition called Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EE, eosinophilic infiltration confined to the esophagus) or another related condition called Eosinophilic Colitis (EC, eosinophilic infiltration confined to the large bowel) also have EG, but not all. Because the infiltration with eosinophils in EE/EG/EC is often very patchy, there is sometimes a difficulty in being correctly diagnosed (especially in infants & children) even when multiple biopsies are obtained (via an endoscopic procedure).

      Symptoms of EG may include early satiety (feeling full before finishing a meal), swelling, reflux, diarrhea, abdominal cramping or pain, nausea and vomiting, blockages. Some patients also have been diagnosed with a protein-losing enteropathy (loss of protein from the body that often results in low blood levels of albumen and total protein) due to increased mucosal permeability which results in hypoalbuminemia and hypogammaglobulinemia. Also, it is not uncommon for people with EG to have a thickening of the lower end of the stomach and/or duodenum, pseudopolyps, and/or blockages (or partial blockages) as a result of the chronic inflammation and tissue damage. Symptoms of EE may include choking, chest pain, nausea, reflux not relieved by standard anti-reflux therapy, strictures, polyps in the esophagus, and/or swallowing problems. Symptoms of EC may be similar to Ulcerative Colitis, and may include diarrhea, cramping, bloody stools, constipation, obstruction/strictures, and/or polypi. These symptoms most likely vary depending on location of eosinophilic infiltration within the digestive system, as well as which layer or layers of the digestive system wall is/are infiltrated with eosinophils. Asthma and/or food sensitivities/allergies will oftentimes accompany the disease.

      It is believed that whole food proteins are the most common precipitators of an EG "attack." Most with this condition are forced to eat a restricted diet and/or drink elemental formulas containing no whole food proteins, such as Neocate, Elecare, etc. (see formula list). Some people with EE/EG/EC are even fed elemental formulas via gastrostomy tube, or are limited to TPN (blood-vessel feeding) due to the severity and complications of the disease. The condition itself is not fatal, but complications can be quite serious. EG is known to occur sometimes during the second stage in a 3-stage eosinophilic disease called Churg-Strauss Syndrome. Other eosinophilic conditions include Idiopathic Hypereosinophilia, Eosinophilic Myalgia (from a contaminant in L-Tryptophan supplements), and Eosinophilic Pneumonia.

      Because there is no known cure for EE, EG or EC, medications are used for maintenance of symptoms and prevention of full-blown attacks (or "flare-ups"). The only known medication to successfully stop the eosinophilic inflammation in EE, EC and EG is prednisone. Fluticasone Propionate (Flonase, Flovent) has been helpful in most cases of EE, if the medicine is swallowed so that it comes directly in contact with the esophageal tissues that are infiltrated with the eosinophils. Elemental formulas are also very effective for EE. Cromolyn Sodium (Gastrocrom) has been used with some success for EG, but does not work in all cases. Azathioprine and other immunomodulators have also been used with some success, but often the side-effects lead to discontinuance of the medication. An experimental steroid called Budesonide may be helpful but no clinical trials have been done with EG, EC or EE to my knowledge. Some people have found they can reduce the severity of an "attack" if they take long-acting, nondrowsy antihistamines (like Claritin, Allegra or Zyrtec) but no clinical trials to my knowledge have been done on EG/EE/EC with such medications. Finally, a new class of asthma medications called leukotriene inhibitors, is showing some mixed results in clinical trials for asthma patients, and has been used experimentally in cases of EG/EE, but again with mixed results.

  26. QUESTION:
    What causes black poop?
    Seriously like all black. Weird. I had tons of blood in my stool once about a month ago. Every bowel movement is a little worse I swear it.

    I have sworn off gluten and casein and still see no improvement. I am nauseous s all day long. I have severe abdominal inflammation after eating gluten. I have diverticulosis. I take probiotics. I do not take iron pills. I drink lots of water. My stomach hurts so bad every time I eat. Digestion altogether just hurts. I tend to eat very lightly and just drink teas.

    I have seen doctors and they are very mean because I am on Medicaid. I've been seeing doctors for this for years. They will not do anything. They just say, "go home if it doesn't go away, come back." I come back and they say "well we aren't sure we'll do a blood test... ...your blood test looks fine so it must just be nothing. Don't worry." Then I go in a few months later because its still bad and they say "there's nothing we can do, it will go away, just go home"

    So if you can give me a list of things it could be, I will do more research and see what I can't do for myself at home.

    • ANSWER:
      Does it also smell absolutely terrible? Like, worse than your bowel movements used to. So you basically have two things going on at the same time. The black stool (doesn't cause lots of blood to turn the toilet bowl red) is most likely due to a peptic ulcer in your stomach or duodenum, or celiac disease that's is not fully controlled. I can't monitor your dieting, so I can't tell if it's the latter case or not. In either case, you'd need to see a GI doc to get an endoscopy to see if there's an ulcer, where the ulcer is, how badly it's bleeding, and possibly electrocautery ablation of the ulcer if necessary. Afterwards, you'd probably need to be started on Prilosec or Protonix. If you also are urease positive, you'd need to be started on Clarithromycin and Doxycycline to treat the H. pylori infection.

      Now, onto the second issue, the episode of massive amounts of blood in your stool. That would be due to the diverticulosis. Unfortunately, that's something that's going to require a second procedure to determine. If it's not actively bleeding, they'd need to do a colonoscopy to see where it is, and whether there are any polyps in the colon. This is most likely what's going to need to be done for you, since your last episode of bleeding was a month ago.

  27. QUESTION:
    Blood in stool?
    Ive been getting blood in stool for about 5 month now. Im 20 year old. It some its dark or bright red and I only see it on the last one I take. and when i whip.

    • ANSWER:
      Causes of Rectal Bleeding
      Anal Fissure
      Colon Cancer
      Colon Polyps
      Crohn's Disease
      Diverticulitis (Diverticulosis)
      Hemorrhoids
      Peptic Ulcer
      Stomach Cancer

      Blood in the stool can be bright red, maroon in color, black and tarry, or occult (not visible to the naked eye). Causes of blood in stool range from harmless, annoying conditions of the gastrointestinal tract such as hemorrhoids to serious conditions such as cancer. Blood in the stool should be evaluated by a healthcare professional.

      Rectal bleeding (known medically as hematochezia) refers to passage of bright red blood from the anus, often mixed with stool and/or blood clots. Most rectal bleeding comes from the colon, rectum, or anus. The color of the blood during rectal bleeding often depends on the location of the bleeding in the gastrointestinal tract. Generally, the closer the bleeding site is to the anus, the blood will be a brighter red. Thus, bleeding from the anus, rectum, and the sigmoid colon tend to be bright red, whereas bleeding from the transverse colon and the right colon (transverse and right colon are several feet away from the anus) tend to be dark red or maroon colored.

      In some patients bleeding can be black and “tarry” (sticky) and foul smelling. The black, smelly and tarry stool is called melena. Melena occurs when the blood is in the colon long enough for the bacteria in the colon to break it down into chemicals (hematin) that are black. Therefore, melena usually signifies bleeding is from the upper gastrointestinal tract (for example: bleeding from ulcers in the stomach or the duodenum or from the small intestine) because the blood usually is in the gastrointestinal tract for a longer period of time before it exits the body. Sometimes melena may occur with bleeding from the right colon. On the other hand, blood from the sigmoid colon and the rectum usually does not stay in the colon long enough for the bacteria to turn it black. Rarely, massive bleeding from the right colon, from the small intestine, or from ulcers of the stomach or duodenal can cause rapid transit of the blood through the gastrointestinal tract and result in bright red rectal bleeding. In these situations, the blood is moving through the colon so rapidly that there is not enough time for the bacteria to turn the blood black.

      Sometimes, bleeding from the gastrointestinal tract can be too slow to cause either rectal bleeding or melena. In these patients bleeding is occult (not visible to the naked eyes). The blood is found only by testing the stool for blood (fecal occult blood testing) in the laboratory. Occult bleeding has many of the same causes as rectal bleeding and may result in the same symptoms as rectal bleeding. It is often associated with anemia that is due to loss of iron along with the blood (iron deficiency anemia). For more information, please see the colon cancer screening and fecal occult blood test articles.

  28. QUESTION:
    Cervical cancer or Ovarian Cancer ?
    i have pain on the left side of my stomach and lately when i make a bowl movement this sticky discharge is on my poo (sorry for lots of detail] and some times a little bit of blood then like 10 minutes ago i used the bathroom too pee and i wiped my self and there was some blood in my discharge and i got off my period last friday so its not that. & if this helps im 16

    • ANSWER:
      blood in your stool is a symptom of many many things some not so bad and some bad. Go to a doctor we are not able to do any more than guess.

      Rectal Bleeding SymptomsSymptoms & Signs Index

      Terms related to Rectal Bleeding:
      Blood In Stool
      Hematochezia
      Stool, Bloody
      Blood in the stool can be bright red,�maroon in color, black and tarry, or occult (not visible to the naked eye).�Causes of blood in stool range from harmless, annoying conditions of the gastrointestinal tract such as hemorrhoids to serious conditions such as cancer. Blood in the stool should be evaluated by a healthcare professional.

      Rectal bleeding (known medically as hematochezia) refers to passage of bright red blood from the anus, often mixed with stool and/or blood clots. Most rectal bleeding comes from the colon, rectum, or anus. The color of the blood during rectal bleeding often depends on the location of the bleeding in the gastrointestinal tract. Generally, the closer the bleeding site is to the anus, the blood will be a brighter red. Thus, bleeding from the anus, rectum, and the sigmoid colon tend to be bright red, whereas bleeding from the transverse colon and the right colon (transverse and right colon are�several feet away from the anus)�tend to be dark red or maroon colored.

      In some patients bleeding can be black and "tarry" (sticky) and foul smelling. The black, smelly and tarry stool is called melena. Melena occurs when the blood is in the colon long enough for the bacteria in the colon to break it down into chemicals (hematin) that are black. Therefore, melena usually signifies bleeding is from the upper gastrointestinal tract (for example: bleeding from ulcers in the stomach or the duodenum or from the small intestine) because the blood usually is in the gastrointestinal tract for a longer period of time before it exits the body. Sometimes melena may occur with bleeding from the right colon. On the other hand, blood from the sigmoid colon and the rectum usually does not stay in the colon long enough for the bacteria to turn it black. Rarely, massive bleeding from the right colon, from the small intestine, or from ulcers of the stomach or duodenal can cause rapid transit of the blood through the gastrointestinal tract and result in bright red rectal bleeding. In these situations, the blood is moving through the colon so rapidly that there is not enough time for the bacteria to turn the blood black.

      Sometimes, bleeding from the gastrointestinal tract�can be too slow to cause either rectal bleeding or melena. In these patients bleeding is occult (not visible to the naked eyes). The blood is found only by testing the stool for blood (fecal occult blood testing) in the laboratory. Occult bleeding has many of the same causes as rectal bleeding and may result in the same symptoms as rectal bleeding. It is often associated with anemia that is due to loss of iron along with the blood (iron deficiency anemia). For more information, please see the colon cancer screening and fecal occult blood test articles.

      REFERENCE:

      Fauci, Anthony S., et al. Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine. 17th ed. United States: McGraw-Hill Professional, 2008.

      Main Articles on Rectal Bleeding
      Rectal Bleeding
      Causes of Rectal Bleeding
      Anal Fissure
      Colon Cancer
      Colon Polyps
      Crohn's Disease
      Diverticulitis (Diverticulosis)
      Hemorrhoids
      Peptic Ulcer
      Stomach Cancer
      Yellow Fever
      Other Causes of Rectal Bleeding

  29. QUESTION:
    what is oesophagoscopy?

    • ANSWER:
      A diagnostic procedure which involves direct visualisation of the oesophagus (that part of the alimentary canal between the pharynx and the stomach) using a fibreoptic scope (endoscope).

      http://www.mondofacto.com/facts/dictionary?oesophagoscopy

      Other names

      Upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy (or panedoscopy) or esophagoscopy (if esophagus alone is examined).
      Purpose
      To examine the inner lining of the esophagus, the stomach, and the duodenum when there are such unexplained symptoms as difficulty swallowing, diarrhea or heartburn that is not promptly relieved by drugs, persistent nausea or vomiting, vomiting blood or bloody stools, loss of appetite and weight loss, or chest pain in the absence of heart disease.
      To confirm or rule out suspected cancer of the esophagus or stomach.
      To perform a biopsy of the gastric antrum in order to identify H. pylori as a cause of peptic ulcer or gastritis.
      To perform a biopsy of the small bowel in cases of suspected malabsorption syndrome.
      As treatment, to control bleeding, remove polyps, dilate narrowed passages, or remove a foreign body.

      more......

      http://www.answers.com/topic/esophagogastroduodenoscopy

  30. QUESTION:
    My Mom was put in the hospital last night for eternally bleed in the stomach. What can cause it?
    I'm extremely worried about my Mom. She had the flu days ago been sick, but it's all because she's been bleeding internally. It's so bad that she passed out when she was taking a shower, lost half of her blood. If she wasn't admitted into the hospital she would of died. Thing is, I just turned 18, and I'm graduating high school in 5 months. I don't talk to my Dad at all because he's a dirt bag. Lost my grandpa to colon cancer two years ago, along with my great grandma because she was old 5 months apart. If something happens to her I wouldn't be able to feel better. I had cancer when I was young, and she stayed at my side for 2 weeks when I was in the hospital. Could it be cancerous? Or could it just be a ulcer that broke? fuck, it's Christmas Sunday.

    • ANSWER:
      Gastrointestinal Bleeding Causes

      The many causes ofgastrointestinalbleeding are classified into upper or lower, depending on their location in the GI tract.
      Upper GI bleeding
      Peptic ulcer disease: Peptic ulcers are localized erosions of the wall of the digestive tract. Ulcers usually occur in the stomach or duodenum. Breakdown of the walls results in damage to blood vessels, causing bleeding. When the mucous membranes break down, they are unable to counteract the harsh effects of stomach acid. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), aspirin, alcohol, and cigarette smoking promote gastric ulcer formation. Helicobacter pylori are a type of bacteria that also promote formation of ulcers.
      Gastritis: General inflammation of the stomach wall, which can result in bleeding. Gastritis also results from an inability of the gastric lining to protect itself from the acid it produces. NSAIDs, steroids, alcohol, burns, and trauma can cause gastritis.
      Esophageal varices: Swellings in veins of your esophagus or stomach usually result from liver disease. Varices most commonly result from alcoholic liver cirrhosis. When varices bleed, the bleeding can be massive and catastrophic and occur without warning.
      Mallory-Weiss tear: A tear in the esophageal or stomach wall, often as a result of vomiting or retching. Tears also can occur after seizures, forceful coughing or laughing, lifting, straining, or childbirth. Physicians often find tears in people who have recently binged on alcohol.
      Lower GI bleeding
      Diverticulosis: One of the most common causes of lower GI bleeding. Small out-pockets, or diverticula, form on part of the wall of your colon (large intestine), usually in a weakened area of the bowel wall. You may develop several pockets, which are more common in people who have constipation and strain at stool.
      Angiodysplasia: Along with diverticulosis, this is one of the most common causes of lower GI bleeding. Angiodysplasia is a malformation in the blood vessels in the wall of the GI tract. The sores are most common in the large intestine and often bleed. The elderly and people with chronic kidney failure develop the disease most often.
      Polyps: Intestinal polyps are noncancerous tumors of the GI tract, occurring mostly in people older than 40 years. A small proportion of these polyps may transform into cancer. Colonic polyps may bleed rapidly, or they may bleed slowly and go undetected.
      Hemorrhoids and fissures: Hemorrhoids are swellings of veins in and around your rectum. Repeated stretching from straining at stool causes them to bleed. Bleeding from hemorrhoids is usually mild, intermittent, and bright red. Massive bleeding is rare. Anal fissures, or tears in the anal wall, also may trigger small amounts of bright red bleeding from the anus. Forceful straining during passage of hard stool usually causes such tears, which can be very painful.

  31. QUESTION:
    PLEASE HELP PLEASE PLEASE HELP!!!!!!!?
    Do i have bowl cancer r colen cancer 5days in a. Row when i wipe my butt they got blood on the paper but today theres none an i poo about 4 r 5 times a day an they got like jelly stuff that floats in the toilt after i poo.....im a 13 year old male my names cris ....dont no whats rong

    • ANSWER:
      Origin of rectal bleeding (where the blood comes from)

      Most rectal bleeding comes from the colon, rectum, or anus. The colon is the part of the gastrointestinal tract through which food passes after it has been digested in the small intestine. The colon is primarily responsible for removing water from the undigested food and storing it until it is eliminated from the body as stool. The rectum is the last 15 cm of the colon. The anus (anal canal) is the opening through which stool passes when it is being eliminated from the body. Together, the colon, rectum, and anus form a long (several feet in length), muscular tube that also is known as the large intestine, large bowel, or the lower gastrointestinal tract. (The esophagus, stomach, duodenum, and small intestine are referred to as the upper gastrointestinal tract.)

      The colon can be divided further into three regions; the right colon, the transverse colon, and the left colon. The right colon, also known as the ascending colon, is the part of the colon into which undigested food from the small intestine is first deposited. It is furthest from the rectum and anus. The transverse colon forms a bridge between the right and the left colon. The left colon is made up of the descending colon and the sigmoid colon. The sigmoid colon connects the descending colon to the rectum.

      The color of blood during rectal bleeding often depends on the location of the bleeding in the gastrointestinal tract. Generally, the closer the bleeding site is to the anus, the brighter red the blood will be. Thus, bleeding from the anus, rectum, and the sigmoid colon tends to be bright red, whereas bleeding from the transverse colon and the right colon tends to be dark red or maroon-colored.

      In some patients bleeding from the right colon can be black, "tarry" (sticky) and foul smelling. The black, smelly and tarry stool is called melena. Melena occurs when the bleeding is in the stomach where the blood is exposed to acid or is in the small intestine or colon for a long enough period of time for the intestinal bacteria to break it down into chemicals (hematin) that are black. Therefore, melena usually signifies that the bleeding is from the upper gastrointestinal tract (for example, bleeding from ulcers in the stomach or the duodenum or from the small intestine) because the blood is exposed to stomach acid or is in the intestines for a longer period of time before it exits the body. Although it is possible for melena to occur with bleeding from the right colon, blood from the sigmoid colon and the rectum usually does not stay in the colon long enough for the bacteria to turn it black.

      Rarely, massive bleeding from the right colon, from the small intestine, or from ulcers of the stomach or duodenum can cause rapid transit of the blood through the gastrointestinal tract and result in bright red rectal bleeding. In these situations, the blood is moving through the colon so rapidly that there is not enough time for the bacteria to turn the blood black. Sometimes, bleeding from the gastrointestinal tract (upper or lower) will be so minimal that it will not cause either rectal bleeding or melena. In such situations, blood can be found only by the use of special tests done on samples of stool. (See occult gastrointestinal bleeding)

      Occult gastrointestinal bleeding

      Rectal bleeding needs to be distinguished from another type of gastrointestinal bleeding, occult gastrointestinal bleeding. Occult gastrointestinal bleeding refers to a slow loss of blood into the upper or lower gastrointestinal tract that does not change the color of the stool or result in the presence of visible bright red blood. The blood is detected only by testing the stool for blood (fecal occult blood testing) in the laboratory. Occult bleeding has many of the same causes as rectal bleeding and may result in the same symptoms as rectal bleeding. For example, slow bleeding from ulcers, colon polyps, or cancers can cause small amounts of blood to mix and be lost within the stool. It is often associated with anemia that is due to loss of iron along with the blood (iron deficiency anemia)
      Source(s):
      medicinenet.com

  32. QUESTION:
    Fever, vomiting, and stuff..?
    Yesterday night my temperature started rising. It is currently about 37.3 Celsius. I did not sleep very well either, but I did get enough.

    In the morning, around 9 A.M., I drank a relative large cup of black tea with 3 spoons of sugar.

    Then, around 10 A.M., I drank the same thing. These are the only food/liquids that I consumed.

    Around 10:30 A.M., I vomited several times into the toilet, some of it going through my nose. It was, of course, the tea.

    I noticed there were some black things floating in the toilet water and vomit. I am thinking there is a possibility that I have gastrointestinal bleeding.

    I'm not sure what to do now! Please help!

    • ANSWER:
      Bleeding in the digestive tract is a symptom of a problem rather than a disease itself. Most causes of bleeding are related to conditions that can be cured or controlled, such as hemorrhoids.

      The cause of bleeding may not be serious, but locating the source of bleeding is critical. The digestive or gastrointestinal (GI) tract includes the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, colon, rectum, and anus. Bleeding can come from one or more of these areas, that is, from a small area such as an ulcer on the lining of the stomach or from a more diffuse problem such as inflammation of the colon.

      Bleeding can sometimes occur without you even knowing about it. This type of bleeding is called occult or hidden. Fortunately, simple tests can detect occult blood in the stool.

      Bleeding from the esophagus can be caused by:

      Esophagitis and gastroesophageal reflux. Stomach acid that refluxes (returns) back into the esophagus from the stomach can cause an irritation and inflammation of the esophagus (esophagitis) that may lead to bleeding.
      Varices. Abnormally enlarged veins located at the lower end of the esophagus, called varices, may rupture and bleed massively. Cirrhosis of the liver is the most common cause of esophageal varices.
      Mallory-Weiss tear. This is a tear in the lining of the esophagus that usually is caused by prolonged vomiting but may also result from other causes of increased abdominal pressure, such as coughing, hiccupping, or childbirth.
      Bleeding from the stomach can be caused by:

      Gastritis. Alcohol, medications including NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as aspirin, Motrin, Aleve, or ibuprofen, and many others can cause stomach ulcers or inflammation (gastritis).
      Stomach ulcers and intestinal ulcers. Ulcers in the stomach may enlarge and erode through a blood vessel, causing bleeding. Aside from medication, the most common cause of a stomach ulcer is an infection with a bacterium called Helicobacter pylori. Also, patients suffering from burns, shock, head injuries, or cancer, as well as those who have undergone extensive surgery, may develop stress-related stomach ulcers. Intestinal ulcers are believed to be caused by excess stomach acid and infection with Helicobacter pylori.
      Cancer of the stomach.
      Bleeding from the lower digestive tract (colon, rectum, and anus) can be caused by:

      Hemorrhoids. These are probably the most common cause of visible blood in the lower digestive tract, especially blood that appears bright red. Hemorrhoids are enlarged veins in the anal area that can rupture and produce bright red blood, which can show up in the toilet or on toilet paper.
      Anal fissures. Tears in the lining of the anus can also cause bleeding.
      Colon polyps . These are growths that can occur in the colon. They can be the precursor of cancer and may cause bleeding.
      Colorectal cancer.
      Intestinal infections. Inflammation and bloody diarrhea can result from intestinal infections.
      Ulcerative colitis . Inflammation and extensive surface bleeding from tiny ulcerations can be the reason for blood showing up in the stool.
      Crohn's disease . This chronic condition also causes inflammation and can result in rectal bleeding.
      Diverticular disease . Caused by diverticula -- outpouchings of the colon wall.
      Blood vessel abnormalities. As one gets older, abnormalities may develop in the blood vessels The signs of bleeding in the digestive tract depend on the site and severity of bleeding.

      If blood is coming from the rectum or the lower colon, bright red blood will coat or mix with your stool. The stool may be mixed with darker blood if the bleeding is higher up in the colon or at the far end of the small intestine.

      When there is bleeding in the esophagus, stomach or duodenum, the stool is usually black or tarry. Vomit may be bright red or have a "coffee-grounds" appearance when bleeding is from the esophagus, stomach, or duodenum.

      If bleeding is occult, or hidden, you might not notice any changes in stool color.

      If sudden massive bleeding occurs, a person may feel weak, dizzy, faint, short of breath, or have cramp-like abdominal pain or diarrhea. Shock may occur, with a rapid pulse and drop in blood pressure. You may become very pale.

      If bleeding is slow and occurs over a long period of time, a gradual onset of fatigue, lethargy, shortness of breath, and pallor (or paleness of the skin) from anemia will result. Anemia is a condition in which the blood's iron-rich substance, hemoglobin, is diminished.

      Note that iron and some foods, such as beets, can give the stool a red or black appearance, falsely indicating blood in the stool.
      Any of the following symptoms could indicate bleeding in the digestive tract:

      Bright red blood coating the stool
      Dark blood mixed with the stool
      Black or tarry stool
      Bright red blood in vomit
      "Coffee-grounds" appearance of vomit
      Other signs may indicate the presence of bleeding in the digestive tract and require fur

  33. QUESTION:
    when i'm stressed i get a bad burning pain in my esophagus/near my stomach?
    i'm 18, female and have had this pain/burning sensation ever since 5 years ago. the pain went away after awhile, and has only come back this year.. i find that i am only experiencing this pain when i am under a great amount of stress. i was put on nexium 40mg which wasn't working, then the doctor told me to up my meds of 40 mg to 2 tables a day which hasn't been working.. so it obviously isn't acid reflux. i've been going to the doctor where i have been undergoing many tests. recently i had to swallow this white chalky substance and they took an xray of my stomach and esophagus, but from what they could see i was not having acid reflux ?? i don't know what this pain is, and i'm having it daily. it doesn't ever go away, and is very discomfortable.

    • ANSWER:
      Well it appears they did a Barium Swallow and negative for GERD, so I would assume the next step might be an Endoscopy to actually look inside the esophagus, stomach and the first part of the small intestines.

      Medication may be given through your IV to make you sleepy and relaxed. Also, to make this examination more comfortable, your healthcare provider may spray a numbing medication into the back of your throat or you may gargle with it. This may taste slightly bitter and will make your mouth and throat numb for approximately 30 minutes. Then you will be positioned on your left side.

      A small plastic mouthpiece, or guard, will be put into your mouth to protect your teeth when the tube is slowly placed into your esophagus, or food-pipe, and to keep you from accidentally biting the tube.

      In order to help relax the muscles in the back of your throat and help open the passageway, you will need to take slow, deep breaths. You will then be instructed to put your chin to your chest and open your mouth. As the doctor begins to push the tube in, you will be asked to swallow. Swallowing makes the tube go down more easily.

      During this procedure your doctor will use an endoscope. The endoscope is a long, soft, bendable tube. This instrument acts as a camera and allows your doctor to view the inside of your digestive system on a video screen. It can also take pictures and videotape the procedure.

      Once the endoscope is inside, your doctor will examine your esophagus, stomach, and the first part of the small intestine. To better see this area, these structures may be filled with a small quantity of air through the endoscope. While this air may cause you to feel full it should not be painful.

      Depending on what is found during the endoscopy, your doctor may perform several procedures through the endoscope. A photograph, biopsy, or cytology may be taken. A biopsy involves taking a small sample of tissue. And cytology is a brushing of cells.

      Other procedures that may be performed include stretching narrowed areas of the esophagus, stomach, or duodenum, removing polyps and swallowed objects, or treating bleeding vessels and ulcers.

      If your doctor finds a narrowed area, it may be possible to dilate, or widen, this narrowed section, or stricture, with a dilator. Your doctor has two options for doing this. The first is balloon dilation. During this procedure your doctor inserts a special balloon-tipped catheter through the endoscope and guides it to the narrowed area. Once the balloon catheter is correctly placed it is often inflated and deflated several times to increase the size of the narrowed area. The balloon catheter is then removed.

      The second option is to use plastic tube dilators. In this method a guide-wire is passed through the endoscope into the narrowed area. Then progressively larger dilators are passed over the guide-wire to dilate the narrowed area. Both of these methods have the same effect.

      When the examination is finished, the doctor will slowly pull the endoscope out through your mouth. The upper endoscopy procedure usually takes about 20 to 30 minutes.

      Arrange another appointment with Gastroenterology and question other sources, this would be a good next step.
      In the mean time diet modification...no alcohol, caffeine, pepper, citrus, fatty/greasy foods. 6 small meals instead of 3 large, don't lay down after eating, no smoking and if you know stress aggravates it, find a healthy way to relieve that stress.

  34. QUESTION:
    Familial adenomatous polyposis - Is it transmissible?
    Let me start off by saying that I am not calling my girlfriend a liar if it seems that way, I'm just a naturally curious person.

    My girlfriend has Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and almost a year ago she told me that because of this, if I were to somehow get some of her blood in my mouth (for example if I kissed cut), I would contract the disease through her DNA.
    So here I am tonight, sitting at my computer, when I remembered my girlfriend mentioning it. With nothing to do, I decided to look it up and see if there are any other ways it can be transferred from person to person but I can't find any. I can't even find any mentions of it being transmissible through blood, so I'm pretty confused.

    • ANSWER:
      What is familial adenomatous polyposis?

      Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is an inherited disorder characterized by cancer of the large intestine (colon) and rectum. People with the classic type of familial adenomatous polyposis may begin to develop multiple noncancerous (benign) growths (polyps) in the colon as early as their teenage years. Unless the colon is removed, these polyps will become malignant (cancerous). The average age at which an individual develops colon cancer in classic familial adenomatous polyposis is 39 years. Some people have a variant of the disorder, called attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis, in which polyp growth is delayed. The average age of colorectal cancer onset for attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis is 55 years.

      In people with classic familial adenomatous polyposis, the number of polyps increases with age, and hundreds to thousands of polyps can develop in the colon. Also of particular significance are noncancerous growths called desmoid tumors. These fibrous tumors usually occur in the tissue covering the intestines and may be provoked by surgery to remove the colon. Desmoid tumors tend to recur after they are surgically removed. In both classic familial adenomatous polyposis and its attenuated variant, benign and malignant tumors are sometimes found in other places in the body, including the duodenum (a section of the small intestine), stomach, bones, skin, and other tissues. People who have colon polyps as well as growths outside the colon are sometimes described as having Gardner syndrome.

      A milder type of familial adenomatous polyposis, called autosomal recessive familial adenomatous polyposis, has also been identified. People with the autosomal recessive type of this disorder have fewer polyps than those with the classic type. Fewer than 100 polyps typically develop, rather than hundreds or thousands. The autosomal recessive type of this disorder is caused by mutations in a different gene than the classic and attenuated types of familial adenomatous polyposis.

      **I looked everywhere possible on the internet and found nothing that even hinted that this is transmissible. Maybe your girlfriend was misinformed on how it can be transmitted and was just worried about your safety. Let her know that you were just curious about her medical condition and that you did some research so you could be more informed of her situation and that you can't find anything stating that it can be transmitted. Tell her that she may want to speak with her doctor to find out for sure if it can be transmitted or if it is purely genetic.

      Good luck!

  35. QUESTION:
    Very scared about having a Colonoscopy and Endoscopy?
    In about 3 weeks I am having both procedures and im only 21.... colon cancer runs in my family and all my life ive been having a lot of problems so now they want to do these procedures. I'm a very nervous person anyways and just the thought of this is killing me. Im honestly NOT worried about the prep part. What I am worried about is the actually procedures. Some people are saying you do remember it.... some say you dont... some say you are awake,,, some say you arent,,,!?!? I want to be COMPLETELY out of it so I wont feel or remember a thing.. but I heard this one med "versed?" is really bad?!?! please someone ease my nerves..

    serious answers only..... and thank you for helping.. God Bless.

    • ANSWER:
      You need not worry over these very much. To evaluate your health position these tests are to be completed. No doubt they will make you somewhat scary and they also give some uncomfortableness during the procedure and you will be given necessary sedation during the procedure, If not you may tell your doctor to give a mild local anesthesia.

      Colooscopy - Colonoscopy is a medical procedure where a long, flexible, tubular instrument called the colonoscope is used to view the entire inner lining of the colon (large intestine) and the rectum. The patient is generally given a sedative and a pain-killer through the IV line. So there will not be any pain during the proceedure.

      Endoscopy - Examination of the body's interior through an instrument inserted into a natural opening or an incision, usually as an outpatient procedure. Endoscopes include the upper gastrointestinal endoscope (for the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum), the colonoscope (for the colon), and the bronchoscope (for the bronchial tubes). With fibre optics, much more maneuverable instruments can reach formerly inaccessible sites, while causing much less discomfort. Attachments can take tissue samples, excise polyps and small tumours, and remove foreign objects.

      Again here also sedation will be given before performing the procedure

      Please therefor do not worry and worry for the result to come alright. Best of luck.

  36. QUESTION:
    Why would my gastronologist to a biopsy when he scoped me?
    I have had ulcers since I was 17 and now I am 30! I now have been vomitting blood for 6 years now and I finally get the scope down after 10 years since my last one.

    I also have an enlarged liver and we do not know why!

    So I went for my scope yesterday and when I woke up the doctor came over to me and said "Well we have good news and bad news" I said "ok" and then he said " I didnt find any active ulcers but I had to do a biopsy"????? I was out of it so I didnt ask why he chose to do a biopsy and why is that bad news?

    Does anyone know why he may have done this?

    Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      A regular endoscopy goes from the mouth, through the esophagus,
      to the stomach, and over to the first part of the intestines
      (known as a duodenum). Some people can develop polyps in
      the stomach and have to have them removed for testing. They
      can also take some tissue for a biopsy. Abnormal cells can
      occur near the end of the esophagus from acid reflux disease
      (barretts esophagus) and also in the stomach.
      http://www.gihealth.com/html/education/pamphlets.html

      An advanced endoscopy known as an ERCP, goes further into
      the first part of the intestines and over to where the bile ducts
      come down to meet the intestines. They can shoot dye up into
      the bile ducts/pancreatic ducts to see if there is a stone
      that has moved into the bile ducts from the gallbladder,
      if there is a growth there, or if the ducts are malformed.

      You do not mention, for certain, whether you had the biopsy
      done in the stomach or the liver. A liver biopsy is the best
      test done to determine a serious liver problem.
      When the liver cells become damaged, the immune system
      of the body responds to this damage and causes inflammation
      to develop inside the liver. This is what causes the liver to
      enlarge in size.
      There are many different things that can cause this problem:
      alcohol consumption, medication toxification, chemical
      exposure, mushroom poisoning, viral or parasite infections,
      hereditary conditions, metabolic disorders,
      tumors/growth/cancer/cysts, cardiac/vascular problems,
      fatty liver disease, biliary obstruction/malformation/infections,
      and more.

      You should discuss this further with your doctor. Don't be
      afraid to make a list and ask any questions you have...
      that is what the doctor is being paid for. It takes time
      for the results of the biopsy and tests results...I definitely
      would have an appointment to see him asap and I would
      call his office to see if they got the results of those tests.

      Best of wishes to you. Hope this is of some help.

causes polyps duodenum

Cause Of Fibroids In Uterus

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Is there a way to prevent or reduce the growth of fibroids?
    I understand that fibroids are common and once developed, it really doesn't go away. But is there a way to prevent getting any more of them or having them grow larger? Is there a certain diet or lifestyle that can be contributed to them?

    I thought I read somewhere that although it is not a certain cause, fibroids seem to occur often in women who experience weight gain.

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroids develop from abnormal cell growth in the uterus (womb). The exact cause of these benign tumors is not known. However, both genetic and environmental conditions have been identified as contributing risk factors for fibroids. A number of factors may increase a woman’s likelihood of developing uterine fibroids. These include:

      Age. Although they can occur at any age after puberty, fibroids most frequently appear in women aged 30 to 40 years old. In addition, early age at menarche, especially before age 10, is considered a risk factor for the condition later in life.

      Genetics and heredity. Research indicates that many fibroids contain alterations in genes that code for uterine muscle cells. Women who have a mother or sister with fibroids appear to be at increased risk of developing them.

      Ethnicity. Fibroids tend to appear more frequently among black women than Caucasians. Also, black women tend to develop fibroids at younger ages, and also typically experience numerous and/or larger fibroids.

      Hormonal changes. Research indicates that the hormones estrogen and progesterone appear to influence the growth of uterine fibroids. When a woman with uterine fibroids experiences hormonal changes during pregnancy, the fibroids typically enlarge. However, after childbirth the fibroids tend to shrink back to the original size. In addition, when women stop menstruating (menopause), uterine fibroids usually shrink or disappear altogether. Other studies indicate that hormones that help the body maintain tissues, such as the insulin-like growth factor, may also affect fibroid growth.

      High-fat diet and alcohol consumption. Significant consumption of red meats (e.g., beef, ham) and alcoholic beverages, especially beer, is associated with an increased risk of developing fibroids in the uterus.

      Obesity. Having a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or greater appears to increase a woman’s risk of developing these benign tumors of the uterus.

      There's really a lot of great information on fibroids - their prevention, treatment, signs and symptoms at the women's site below. Take a look - I'm sure you'll find it helpful!

      http://obgyn.health.ivillage.com/uterineovarianhealth/uterinefibroids.cfm

  2. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of uterine fibroid without surgery?
    I want to kow if there is any natural method of getting rid of a fibroid. I have a very huge fundal fibroid outside my uterus, though it is not creating any discomfort, I am only 28 and this may cause complications in my pregnancy.

    Can anyone suggest any natural methods for treating this

    • ANSWER:
      It is perfectly possible to learn how to get rid of uterine fibroids naturally but first and foremost you must understand that this is not a quick fix approach and will require a committed and systematic approach from yourself.

      Your fibroids did not grow overnight and although common, not every woman will have fibroids. There are various causes of uterine fibroids and most of these are caused by lifestyle and dietary issues. Certain conditions need to exist for uterine fibroids to grow-there is never any single cause of this condition, but it happens due to the subtle interaction of various factors which cause an environment which triggers off growth.

      By neutralising the conditions which caused fibroid growth in the first place, this will cause the fibroids to shrink naturally and once the conditions cease to exist, fibroids cannot grow any more. There is certainly a strong connection between the Western lifestyle fibroid growth. This does not just apply to our Western diet, but also factors such as stress, lack of exercise and poor sleep patterns all come into play.

      To get rid of uterine fibroids naturally, you will need to use a tried and tested plan. Implementing ad-hoc treatments may help give symptomatic relief, but will not provide a proper solution.

      The components of a successful plan will include:-

      * A robust detox to help eliminate toxins

      * Systems to rebalance hormone levels

      * The correct diet for fibroid sufferers

      * How to control stress levels

      * The role of herbs

      * The link between yeast and fibroids

      Combining these elements makes for an extremely powerful method to rid you of your uterine fibroids.

  3. QUESTION:
    Can having fibroids on your uterus stop u from getting pregnant?
    My doctor says i have fibroids on my uterus i don't know if this is stopping me from getting pregnant or something else. Im so unhappy and sad cause i just wanna have a baby and im 27 without any. what should i do? what is wrong with me?

    • ANSWER:
      It can interfere with implantation if they are numerous or large, but it doesn't mean you won't get pregnant at all - women do all the time.

  4. QUESTION:
    Can Uteran Fibroids cause a miscarriage or infertility?
    I have 3 small fibroids in my uterus and I was told that they would not affect getting pregnant by my doctor. I recently had a miscarriage and then D&C and was wondering if the fibroids had anything to do with this?

    • ANSWER:
      They can. It depends on the size, number, and location of the fibroids.

      You might want to have an ultrasound done by a fertility specialist, who could give you a better idea of whether or not yours are likely to cause problems for you.

      I am so sorry for your loss--I've been there too.

  5. QUESTION:
    What causes fibroids in the uterus and what the recommended treatment?

    • ANSWER:
      The exact cause of uterine fibroids is not known. Fibroids begin when cells overgrow in the muscular wall of the uterus. Once a fibroid develops, the hormones estrogen and progesterone appear to influence its growth. A woman's body produces the highest levels of these hormones during her childbearing years. After menopause, when hormone levels decline, fibroids usually shrink or disappear.
      Estrogen is thought to play a major role in fibroid growth because fibroids tend to grow larger when a woman's body produces more estrogen (during pregnancy), and usually shrink when a woman's body produces less estrogen (after menopause). Progesterone also seems to stimulate fibroid growth, even when estrogen is not present. Some women do not receive treatment because they do not have symptoms. Other treatments include: pain medication, medical therapy, and surgery to remove just the fibroid, to cut off the blood supply to the fibroid, or to remove the entire uterus.
      Doctors are exploring less-invasive surgeries and hormone therapy as other options.

  6. QUESTION:
    Is it possible to get pregnant with a fibroid?
    I have a 7cm fibroid in my uterus insurance doesn't cover its removal don't know if anyone has still gotten pregnant with one.

    • ANSWER:
      Yes it is possible, it can just be more difficult and can also cause miscarriages.

  7. QUESTION:
    How does the uterus keep the body healthy?
    Also, Which diseases/disorders affect the uterus?
    And, How would a woman's life be without her uterus? She would die, right? But she would also not be able to have babies and what else?

    • ANSWER:
      The uterus really doesn't play a role in keeping the body healthy and many women have to have their uteruses taken out for health reasons and no, they don't die. A woman's life without a uterus would simply be a life without a period and without biological children. If her ovaries are still there, she should not have any really bad consequences. Not have ovaries decreases estrogen production and causes numerous issues, but not having a uterus is not too bad.

      As for what diseases affect the uterus? There are many diseases that affect the uterus....everything from uterine cancer to endometriosis to uterine fibroids.

  8. QUESTION:
    What is a fibroid? I went to the er cause i was having a lot of pain & they told me i had one in my uterus?
    The paper they gave me said i have a (masslike lesion) along my endomertium and a fibroid inmy uterus. Im going to the doctors right now to see whats going on but does anyone know some who has this too? im so confused.

    • ANSWER:
      Unfortunately, I do too. A uterine fibroid is a non-cancerous tumor that grows in a woman's uterus. Typically it affects women who are 25-35. They can be small or large (so if you have a little pooch in your lower ab, this may be the cause). The fibroids can be on the inside wall of your uterus, or inside the wall there are four types in total all dependant upon the placement of the fibroid. It is EXTREMELY important that you do not let ANY DOCTOR tell you that a hysterectomy (removing your uterus entirely) is the only cure for your fibroids. That is absolutely not true, and often older doctors say this because decades ago, that was true. Today there are several procedures out there that can rid you of fibroids (UFE). In my case, I want to preserve my uterus because I want to have children. Often, the fibroids grow back when you remove them, so because I am not ready to have kids now, I am not removing the fibroids. It is possible, if the fibroids are small, to still get pregnant with the fibroid. So again, my doctor has me on a wait and see.

      There is a great Yahoo group that has three doctors who post regularly on the board. You can ask questions, or just read through the various posts and see... you'll learn a lot. I have pasted a few very informative links. If you have anymore questions after you skim through, you can email me through the links on my profile. Most of all, try not to worry too much, this is unfortunately very common in women, predominately women who are not of Caucasian descent.

  9. QUESTION:
    I have a large fibroid in my uterus and do not want to get a hysterectomy, anyone had one removed?
    I have been having VERY heavy cycles for the past year and I am interested in finding out if anyone else who has a fibroid has chosen to have it removed through laproscopic surgery. I am also going to have an ablation done at the same time. Any feedback is appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      I have uterine fibroids as well. Almost a year ago I had a laproscopic surgery to remove some endometriosis I had and althought it ended up painful for me (because my stitches wwent in and got an infection in my incision) it was not too bad besides that. The doctor did not remove my fibroids because he wanted to know for sure which one was causing my specific sort of pain. (Which it is much better by the way) And he said that if he were to remove the fibroids, he would do a laparotomy (A little bit bigger surgery than the laproscopic so it would require a little more down time.) Well, I don't know if this was of any help, but I know I was happy of my decision to go through with my surgery.

  10. QUESTION:
    How much does it cost to remove a fibroid tumor inside your uterus?
    I have a fibroid tumor, about 4 inches, inside my uterus. I want it out, like now. It hurts so much. I am a full time college student with no job, so I need to find out the cost. Will the gynie know? I am going to make an appt with her to talk about it, but I would like to have surgery once this semester is over.

    btw, I want to keep my uterus.

    • ANSWER:
      I just had the Davinci, and my bill was ,700.00. Fibroids generally do not cause pain. Most women don't even realize they have them until they become substantial in size. They start causing pain when they twist or the blood supply is compromised.
      You need to get a job so you can get some insurance,

  11. QUESTION:
    Will my fibroids need removed before another pregnancy?
    I know this is something I will discuss with my doctor, but thought some might have experience. My C-Section surgeon found some fibroids on my uterus while delivering the baby. Is this something that will need taken care of before I get pregnant again? I know they can get larger with pregnancy because of the blood supply, but just curious. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      I would ask advice from your doctor. It really depends on the size of the fibroids. I had fibroids that was so bigger it cause me to have miscarriage twice. Yours probably not worst like mine. Most people have small fibroids that does not cause any problems. good luck.

  12. QUESTION:
    Is a 4 inch fibroid tumor in the uterus too big to have a baby with?
    I have a fibroid tumor that the doc says is about 4 inches, she said it was about the size of a lemon. She also said that it pushes into my uterus.

    I was wondering if this would cause serious complications to a fetus when pregnant. She doesn't think so, but I am curious as to what other women who have experienced this will say?

    • ANSWER:
      I'm almost 9 months pregnant and I have several fibroids of different sizes within my uterus and I've have had no bleeding or problems at all. I never had any problems before this other than mild cramping between cycles.

  13. QUESTION:
    What is a fibroid? I went to the er cause i was having a lot of pain & they told me i had one in my uterus?
    The paper they gave me said i have a (masslike lesion) along my endomertium and a fibroid inmy uterus. Im going to the doctors right now to see whats going on but does anyone know some who has this too? im so confused.

    • ANSWER:
      What are fibroids?

      Fibroids are muscular tumors that grow in the wall of the uterus (womb). Another medical term for fibroids is "leiomyoma" (leye-oh-meye-OH-muh) or just "myoma". Fibroids are almost always benign (not cancerous). Fibroids can grow as a single tumor, or there can be many of them in the uterus. They can be as small as an apple seed or as big as a grapefruit. In unusual cases they can become very large.

      Why should women know about fibroids?

      About 20 percent to 80 percent of women develop fibroids by the time they reach age 50. Fibroids are most common in women in their 40s and early 50s. Not all women with fibroids have symptoms. Women who do have symptoms often find fibroids hard to live with. Some have pain and heavy menstrual bleeding. Fibroids also can put pressure on the bladder, causing frequent urination, or the rectum, causing rectal pressure. Should the fibroids get very large, they can cause the abdomen (stomach area) to enlarge, making a woman look pregnant.

      Can fibroids turn into cancer?

      Fibroids are almost always benign (not cancerous). Rarely (less than one in 1,000) a cancerous fibroid will occur. This is called leiomyosarcoma (leye-oh-meye-oh-sar-KOH-muh). Doctors think that these cancers do not arise from an already-existing fibroid. Having fibroids does not increase the risk of developing a cancerous fibroid. Having fibroids also does not increase a woman's chances of getting other forms of cancer in the uterus.

  14. QUESTION:
    What causes uterus like swelling besides pregnancy?
    With having the iud Paragard since march, the last time I had sex was 5 months ago, I could still be.pregnant, but have to get an ultrasound to clarify. But im wondering, I don't want to get myself worried over being pregnant if it could be something else. What else causes what feels like a swollen uterus? I literally feel like I have a small balloon in my lower abdomen. Please don't bash, only looking for other possibilities. Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroids can do it. Some of them can be extremely large. It is also possible to grow a tumor in the uterus after birth (don't mean to scare you - it is very, very rare). You can also have fluid in there for various reasons. Go get your ultrasound and they will be able to see whatever is going on in there.

  15. QUESTION:
    What are the symthoms of fibroids and how do you get rid of them?
    I think I have fibroids because I am 45 yrs old and I have alot of pain I am going to the doctor but what will they do to help me get rid of them?

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroids are knots of overgrown muscle tissue of the uterus. They can cause pain and irregular or heavy menstrual bleeding. If the problem is bad enough, the treatment is surgery-hysterectomy

  16. QUESTION:
    Natural ways of shrinking uterine fibroids and ovarian cysts?
    Today I was diagnosed with three uterine fibroids (3 cm each) and a small ovarian cyst. I don't want to get surgery as it could be dangerous for other organs. Are there any natural ways of shrinking them?

    Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroids are benign uterine growths. Many women have no symptoms while others experience bleeding, increased urination, bladder displacement, urine retention, constipation, infertility, miscarriage, pain during intercourse and anemia. Ovarian cysts are enlarged follicles that fail to rupture and release an egg. Women may experience general pain, disrupted periods, pain in the back and abdomen and painful intercourse. Both of these conditions are caused by imbalances in estrogen production. There are many natural treatments to deal with both of these conditions. Talk to your doctor about any natural supplements you are using.

      Herbal Treatments for Fibroids

      Herbal treatments that address bleeding often work quite quickly, but supplements that control hormone levels take about three months of use before bringing about noticeable results.

      Black cohosh controls bleeding and relieves pain; take 500 milligrams daily. Cinnamon oil has a long history of use in traditional American medicine to control bleeding fibroids. Use 10-to-15 drops every 15 minutes until the bleeding stops. Dan shen, which should only be used under professional supervision, treats congealed blood, dark red clots during menstruation, and relieves pelvic congestion. Reishi tincture alleviates pelvic inflammation. Take one tablespoon in ¼ cup of water three times daily.

      There are three traditional Chinese formulas that are commonly used to treat uterine fibroids. Take as directed on the product label.

      Augmented Rambling powder lowers estrogen levels and is most useful for women who are also suffering from painful or difficult urination. Cinnamon Twig and Poria Pill lowers estrogen levels without interfering with the menstrual cycle or causing weight gain. Four Substance Decoction treats fibroids and is especially useful for women who eat a poor diet.
      Herbal Treatments for Ovarian Cysts

      Dioscorea tincture, also known as wild yam, alleviates cramping caused by ovarian cysts. Take as directed on the label. Dong quai relieves pain resulting from this condition. Take 1,000 milligrams daily during the two-week period after menstruation and then discontinue for two weeks.

      There are several Chinese formulas used to treat ovarian cysts. Use as directed on the product label.

      Dong Quai and Peony Powder reduces estrogen levels and the formation of inflammatory substances in the tissues that line the uterus. Two Cured Decoction reduces estrogen levels. Augmented Rambling Powder and Cinnamon Twig and Poria pill, which are listed above, can also be used for ovarian cysts

      Estrogen is produced from body fat. Excess weight increases the amount of estrogen in the body, so make an effort to maintain a normal weight. Do your best to exercise regularly and reduce stress levels. Avoid the following herbs that stimulate estrogen production: Coleus, Cordyceps, fennel seed, licorice, and moutan.
      What Are Uterine Fibroid Cysts?
      Uterine fibroid cysts are noncancerous tumors that grow in or around the uterus. Uterine fibroids are a common medical complaint, occurring in up to 80 percent of ...
      Uterine Cysts
      Uterine cysts are tumors that can vary in size from less than 1 inch to as large as a melon. Also referred to as uterine fibroids, or simply fibroids, these growths ...
      Dong Quai Benefits

      Dong quai (Angelica sinensis) is a plant found at high altitudes in the mountain regions of China, Korea and Japan. It has been used for thousands of years to treat a ...
      How to Cure Ovarian Cysts & Uterine Fibroids

      Ovarian cysts and uterine fibroids are two problems that commonly affect women. In many cases, they go away on their own, without requiring treatment. However, they ...
      Uterine Fibroid Laser Treatment

      Uterine fibroids are quite common, and usually go away on their own. Even when this does not occur, these fibroids are usually benign. However, when they result in ...
      How to Treat Uterine Fibroids With Natural Medicine

      Uterine fibroids are hard growths that occur in the muscle tissue of the uterus, particularly in women between the ages of 35 and 45. Often fibroids cause little or ...
      Herbs to Take for Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

      Polycystic ovary syndrome is a disorder of the ovaries that causes multiple follicles to develop and form into clumps. Rather than disintegrate during menstruation ...
      Ovarian Fibroid Procedures

      According to the University of Pennsylvania, fibroids are a common abnormal growth within the uterus and are the No. 1 reason U.S. women have a hysterectomy. Fibroids ...
      Homeopathic Treatment Help for Shrinking a Uterus Fibroid

      In some cases, homeopathic medicine can be extremely helpful in shrinking uterine fibroids. A fibroid is a muscle tumor that can produce heavy menstrual bleeding ...

  17. QUESTION:
    What is a fibroid? I went to the er cause i was having a lot of pain & they told me i had one in my uterus?
    The paper they gave me said i have a (masslike lesion) along my endomertium and a fibroid inmy uterus. Im going to the doctors right now to see whats going on but does anyone know some who has this too? im so confused.

    • ANSWER:
      My mom has about 4 fibroids in her stomach they don't hurt her they just make her stomach look like she is pregnant, the doctor told her that as long as they are not too big and they are not bothering her she is fine and sometimes the go down by themselves. You shouldn't worry too much unless they are stopping you from doing your everyday activities I have a cyst and they still haven't taken it out so you should be fine I had a healthy baby with the cyst in my uterus so you should be fine.

  18. QUESTION:
    Does anybody know what it means to have an enlarged uterus?
    I went to gyn for pap and breast exam. she is running 3 different test on some stuff leaking out of my nipples. now i have to go to the hospital for an ultrasound because my uterus is enlarged. it cant be pregnancy because my tubes are tied. I am so scared. Please someone give me some good advice or share an experience you have had.

    • ANSWER:
      Why do Fibroids Cause an Enlarged Uterus?

      The uterus is designed to expand to accommodate a growing baby. When fibroids develop, the uterus enlarges in response to fibroid growth. Some women notice a distended abdomen similar to pre-menstrual bloat; others experience expansion as big as a full term pregnancy.
      Adenomysis

      Occasionally, an enlarged uterus may be the result of Adenomyosis, a disease which mimics fibroids. Adenomyosis can only be diagnosed with biopsy and imaging studies.
      Can the Uterus Shrink Back?

      When fibroids are removed by surgery (Myomectomy) or are shrunk by Uterine Fibroid Embolization, the uterus will return to normal size. Unfortunately, Myomectomy can damage the uterine lining, impairing fertility. There is also a 30% chance of fibroid re-growth. Embolization has neither of these problems. As a non-surgical procedure, it also won't leave scars on the stomach or bikini area.

  19. QUESTION:
    What can cause blocked fullopian tubes or cervix?
    My husband and I have been trying to get pregnant for over a year and now I have been on Clomid for almost two months now and my OB/GYN said if we don't get pregnant by December then I'll have to get my cervix and tubes checked for blockage. What causes this and how common is it?

    • ANSWER:
      The fallopian tubes can sometimes become blocked or even damaged due to certain conditions that a woman may suffer from. In rare cases, the blockage to the fallopian tubes may have been present since birth as a birth defect, but have went undetected until the woman reached adulthood and tried to conceive.

      Common conditions that are known to block fallopian tubes are:

      • Endometriosis
      • Pelvic Inflammatory Disease
      • Fibroid tumors that are present in the uterus
      • Ectopic pregnancy

      Endometriosis and Fibroid tumors are both conditions which are becoming present in more women every year. In fact, an astounding 13.6 million women in the United States alone suffer from mild to severe endometriosis.

      Pelvic inflammatory disease is another common condition which women suffer from. Pelvic inflammatory disease or PID, is an umbrella term for a number of different problems that create an inflammatory infection in the female reproductive system. PID is almost always the direct result of a sexually transmitted disease, such as gonorrhea or chlamydia, and is responsible for about 100,000 cases of female infertility per year.

      All of these conditions can cause blockage to the fallopian tubes by having adhesions, scar tissue, tumors or polyps form inside the path of the tube. As the fallopian tubes themselves are very thin to begin with, it does not take much for them to become blocked, preventing the ova from traveling through.

      As far as your cervix being blocked, this is rare and with a pelvic exam your doctor should be able to see some signs of something on or around your cervix that may be causing this.

  20. QUESTION:
    Can an ultrasound detect cancerous fibroids?
    My first test showed fibroids in my uterus. My second ultrasould can in a the finding we some what the same, but now it is stating cancerous notings. My gyn told me not possible cause they can tell that in an ultrasoul. He then gave me another gyn for him the take a look at the test. Kind of funny y send my to another doctor when it is not possible. Should I be worried?

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroids are usually not cancerous, but growths of tissue that many women have. They are hereditary and can be painful at times. I was diagnosed with them when pregnant by ultrasound and I was told that they are very, vey rarely cancerous. If they were cancerous they would need to take a sample of the tissue to biopsy it for cancer.

  21. QUESTION:
    What may cause someone to be on their period for over 2 weeks?
    My friend has had relatively regular periods. She had a d&c last year due to a developed sac but no baby. Not sure if thats related. Shes had cramping and bleeding since Dec 23. What may cause this? I told her to get checked but am asking in the meantime.

    • ANSWER:
      First, I have to say she needs to go to the doctor. That being said, it could be a number of things. I'm not looking to scare anyone, but if she had a D & C, she may need another one because several things could've happened. Because of that procedure you can develop scar tissue which can cause problems healing after your period. Another thing could be uterine fibroids, or if she is on any medication which can cause prolonged bleeding. For example if she is taking depo-provera, or another birth control she might experience "breakthrough bleeding". If she just started taking a birth control, she might also start unusual bleeding. Another thing to consider would be poly-cystic ovary syndrome. Which is when cysts routinely develop on the ovaries, but do not go away. This can cause severe cramping, and hirsutism (unwanted facial hair growth), mood swings, and other problems. This will usually develop in overweight females, but does occur in average women as well. It will cause abnormal bleeding as well as abnormal periods. The last thing that I'm thinking it could be in endometriosis. Which is where the lining of the uterus can start growth elsewhere in the body and cause unusual bleeding. Whatever is going on definitely needs to be checked out. I wish her luck, and think positively!

  22. QUESTION:
    I am scheduled for a hysterectomy soon to have fibroids removed and uterus. Did?
    anyone experience hair loss because of this surgery? I heard it can cause you to lose some of you hair? Is this true, it took my hair forever to grow, it's at a nice healthy long length now, I don't want to start all over with getting my hair to grow again.

    • ANSWER:
      I have had many surgeries and never loss any of my hair. The only thing I noticed was really dry skin. A good moisturizing lotion fixed the problem in no time. Rest when needed after surgery while your healing. I don't mean lye around constantly, keep moving and its great for your circulation and prevents you from feeling stiff. Don't worry about the hair falling out. Cocoa

  23. QUESTION:
    Can a serious fall injury cause you to miss your period?
    On July 11th, I fell on my tailbone while rollerskating, and smushed the tip of the bone. I wasn't able to walk for a few weeks. The last time I got my period was on June 22nd and It's already August 20. Could the injury cause me to miss my period?

    • ANSWER:
      Certain accidents mental shock etc may change the system to disorder for prolonged period of time..The main reasons irregular periods are
      1 .Blockage of blood circulation to the lower abdomen area due to lack of physical exercise.
      2. Functioning of the thyroid glands is not fair.
      3. Fibroid in the uterus and/ or cyst in the ovaries
      4. Poor health condition and / or lack of exercise
      5. Psychological reasons such as anxiety neurosis stress tension etc.
      Periods during adolescent stage will be generally irregular. It is normal. It may become regular by the age of 18 or 19.
      All bleeding from the vagina are not menstrual bleeding or period. Heavy bleeding or irregular bleeding in between periods should be brought to the attention of a doctor and get treatment soon.
      The span of monthly period may differ ie total days of gap for next period may differ. Sometimes it may go up to 36 or 40 days.

  24. QUESTION:
    Can i be on a diet bill and a birth control pill at the same time?
    Im 17 years old and im on the birth control because they recently found 2 fibroid tumors in my uterus and it's supposed to diminish the tumors. Anyways, i heard you gain weight while your on the pill, and i really really really DO NOT want to gain weight, so i was wondering if i can be on the diet pill at the same time?

    Im about 5'4-5'5 and i weigh 119 pounds. I dont smoke or drink.

    • ANSWER:
      If you're that concerned about gaining weight, you can try certain diet pills. But research first. Go to www.webmd.com and enter the birth control you're using in the search engine, along with some of the diet pills you're looking to try. Search each one individually and see if there's any ingredients in them that would counteract eachother, or cause any implications. If so - then just eat healthy & exercise. You're 17, so you'll be able to maintain your shape pretty well with just that.

  25. QUESTION:
    Can a fibroid on your uterus cause nausea?
    I have a small fibroid on my uterus, and I don't usually have problems with nausea but this round... I've officially missed my period for 2 weeks now, and the nausea hit about a couple of days after missing my period, and it's only increasing in intensity and to be quite frank it feels like morning sickness. I've taken multiple tests and they have all come back negative, but my question is... can a fibroid cause nausea for this long and in intensity? Thanks!

    • ANSWER:

  26. QUESTION:
    How can a fibroid affect the pregnancy?
    After my first ultrasound at 5 weeks pregnancy they found a little amniotic sac in my uterus and also two fibroid ( one aprox. 4x4x4 and the other aprox. 2x2x2). How are they going to interfere with my preganancy? Am I safe?

    • ANSWER:
      Complications during pregnancy due to fibroids is rare. Please talk to your doctor regarding your concerns. You can get information on the net, but your doctor can address your specific situation. Remember that many women have fibroids, and the far majority do not experience any complications in pregnancy. My best wishes to you.....

      "Can a fibroid tumor harm the baby?
      Probably not. Even if you do experience symptoms, they most likely won't affect the baby. However, your risk of miscarriage and premature delivery does increase slightly if you have fibroids. They occasionally cause the baby to be in an abnormal position for delivery. They can also stall labor, or, if they're located in or near the cervical opening, they may block the baby's passage. All of these (rather rare) problems can increase the likelihood of cesarean delivery."

      http://health.discovery.com/centers/pregnancy/americanbaby/fibroids.html

      "Most women with fibroids have no more trouble becoming pregnant than women who do not have fibroids, and their risk of a bad pregnancy outcome is no higher."

      http://www.ehealthmd.com/library/fibroids/FBR_pregnancy.html

  27. QUESTION:
    Can Uterus fibroid be cared with Homeophathy medicine ?
    Fibroid is inside the Uterus.

    • ANSWER:
      Homeopathy is effective for treating a number of ailments including fibroids. In case of fibroids normally the cause can be varied. Hence any type of uterine fibroids treatment should adopt a holistic approach. It should concentrate on a number of aspects like
      a) diet changes
      b) liver detox
      c) physical exercise
      d) practices to reduce stress like meditation, yoga accupuncture
      Hence in addition to medicines you will have in incorporate a few other measure to help shrink your fibroids naturally and prevent the growth of new ones
      http://ezinearticles.com/?Fibroid-Treatment---Side-Effects-of-Medical-Procedures-and-Alternative-Options-Available&id=4550401

  28. QUESTION:
    if am not comfotrable with mammogram can i ask my doctor to schedule a ultrasound?
    i had some sharp pain after my menses and seen a doctor,he check my breast and said it was a fibroid on my left breast.he schedule me for a mammogram.am soo scared of mammo because they say it is risk and can cause breast cancer.i wonder why he schedule for mammo while there other options like ultrasound which has no risk.please any suggestion will help,am 30 years old with one fibroid in my uterus.

    • ANSWER:
      Who is “they”?
      You ask the doctor what you want and you can refuse any test you want, but you will be limiting the doctor of being able to see what the problem is if you limit the kind of exam you are given. Your doctor may or may not agree to treat you under those conditions.
      What are you planning on doing when you turn 40?

  29. QUESTION:
    Has anyone ever had to undergo a hysteroscopic myomectomy?
    I'm having the surgery done June 2 to remove a large fibroid inside my uterus. It was found when I discovered I was pregnant and caused a miscarriage. I have already had an abdominal myomectomy to remove fibroids from the outside of my uterus (2 years ago), but am looking for anyone who has personal experience with the hysteroscopic surgery--info on recovery time, how painful etc. Please only personal actual experiences need reply.

    • ANSWER:
      I had an hysterscopic myomectomy two months ago to remove a submucosal fibroid. I was under general anstheisa and once I was "knocked out", the RE dialated me and then removed the first part of the fibroid (the second part is going to be removed this week). The total surgery time was 2 hours and when I woke in the recovery room I had pretty intense cramping/bleeding so I used the pain scale (pain from 1 to 10) to tell the nurse that I was about a 7 and she then added morphine to my drip which took care of the pain. I was in recovery for about 2 hours and once you can go to the bathroom on your own, drink fluids and eat they will release you. I spent the entire weekend in bed resting and was back to work the next week so the recovery was fairly fast. hope this helps. I go in this week to have the 2nd part removed so hopefully this will be it. good luck!

  30. QUESTION:
    Can a small fibroid cause excessive bleeding during your cycle?
    I had a hysteroscopy in Sept and since then I started bleeding heavy at first then went 2 months with only spotting. They removed some polyps but the fibroid was under the lining of my uterus so they left it. It is very small but not my cycles come regularly but I pass huge clots. I can go all day without any blood but around 8pm I pass a huge clot and mess up my clothes. What should I do?

    • ANSWER:
      i don't think so.

  31. QUESTION:
    What is the recovery time after having a hysterectomy and is it like a c- section?
    I am having a hysterectomy in 12 days and I am so nervous. I had a C-Section 3 years ago and I know how painful that was, is it any thing like that? I know it will be abdominal. I am just trying to figure out how I am going to do this, it is bad enough I am going to have to climb 3 flights of stairs after the surgery to get to my apartment and have to take care of my 8 and 3 year old kids. I also had to move to this town with no family to help me (cause of hurricane katrina). I am just hoping I can do this by myself. My main worry is after the surgery I have 2 weeks until my son starts school and I am wondering if I will be ok to drive him to school ? Please let me know any experiences anyone have had .

    • ANSWER:
      Good luck with your upcoming surgery.

      Honestly, it depends on what you have done, how you have it done and why. I know you said abdominal, but why is that your doc's only option/choice for you? For example, an LAVH [laparoscopic assisted vaginal hyst] is less invasive and offers quicker recovery. An abdominal hyst is far more invasive and has longer recovery. Vaginal hyst is less invasive and has faster recovery overall than the others above, but can affect sexual function. Vaginal hysterectomy is preferable to abdominal hysterectomy where possible, however. Where vaginal hysterectomy is not possible, laparoscopic hysterectomy is preferable to abdominal hysterectomy, although it brings a higher chance of bladder or ureter injury [Methods of Hysterectomy: Systematic Review & Meta-analysis of Randomised Controlled Trials; BMJ. 2005 Jun 25;330(7506):1478].

      Also, how well you recuperate depends on how well you tolerate the procedure; i.e., any reaction to anesthesia, complications, etc. A hyst. is not that similar to a c-section in all honesty.

      You also need to discuss with your doc exactly what will be done, i.e., removal of uterus only, hysterectomy with oophorectomy [removal of one or both ovaries], hysterectomy with salpingoopherectomy [removal of one or both fallopian tubes], radical hysterectomy, which removes the uterus, cervix, the top portion of the vagina and most of the tissue that surrounds the cervix in the pelvic cavity. Pelvic lymph nodes may also be removed; supracervical hysterectomy, also referred to as a subtotal hysterectomy, which removes the uterus while leaving the cervix intact.

      It is a major operation, any way you cut it (no pun intended). It will take at least 2 weeks or longer to be completely healed, again, depending on what was done, how complicated your surgery was, etc. Abdominal surgery recovery is expected to be easily longer than 2 weeks till you feel "normal."

      As an aside, if heavy bleeding or similar concern is the "only" reason for your hysterectomy, you may want to look into alternatives, such as endometrial ablation or similar procedure. If you have having it because of Endometriosis or fibroids, please know that there are alternatives and that hyst is not a cure for Endo.

      I do NOT recommend climbing 3 flights of stairs afterwards. I honestly think you need to have a friend or neighbor help with the 3 yr. old following surgery for a few days. You will only be doing yourself harm and jeopardizing your recovery if you do too much, too soon. You will also be on narcotic pain meds and it's hard to be a great parent when you're feeling dopey from the pills. You really need some help - if you do too much, you can experience complications or adhesion development, etc. This is not a surgery I recommend recuperating alone with 2 children from.

      Again, good luck to you, I hope all turns out ok.

  32. QUESTION:
    How rare is it for a woman in labor to get a uterine rupture if she is not induced and has never had a c-sec?
    Someone we know got a ruptured uterus and lost the baby and nearly died. She was not induced and had never had a c-sec. How rare is this?

    • ANSWER:
      What causes uterine rupture?

      Ninety percent of uterine ruptures happen at the site of a scar from a previous c-section. And ruptures are most likely to occur during labor because a scar is more likely to give way under the stress of contractions.

      If you've had one c-section with the typical low-transverse uterine incision and are considered a good candidate for VBAC, most studies estimate the risk of rupture during labor to be less than one percent. On the other hand, if you've had a "classical" c-section, in which the incision extends vertically to the upper, more muscular part of the uterus, you have a much higher risk of rupture and should be scheduled for c-section before the onset of labor. The same is true for women who have had other kinds of uterine surgery, such as an operation to remove fibroids or to correct a misshapen uterus, or repair of a previous rupture.

      It's possible for an unscarred uterus to rupture, but that happens in fewer than 1 in 15,000 pregnancies, almost always during labor. Risk factors include having had five or more children, a placenta that's implanted too deeply into the uterine wall, an overdistended uterus (from too much amniotic fluid or carrying twins or more), contractions that are too frequent and forceful (whether spontaneous or from medication such as oxytocin or prostaglandins, or as the result of a placental abruption), and a prolonged labor with a baby that's too big for the mother's pelvis.

      Trauma to the uterus, from such things as a car accident or a procedure such as an external cephalic version or a difficult forceps delivery, may also cause a uterine rupture, as can a difficult manual removal of the placenta.

      Hope this helps!

  33. QUESTION:
    What are other causes for vaginal bleeding after intercourse other than STDs or tearing of the vaginal walls?
    As a 30 year old female, I can honestly say I probably don't engage in sexual activities as much as the normal person my age, so I have had a hard time determining if the bleeding I am having is related to intercourse. This has gone on for years, so I doubt it is STD related because I have been tested through the years. More recently I have have noticed that the bleeding definately appears the day after intercourse and it fools me into thinking I am getting my period.

    It is not the bleeding you get when you have tissue tearing. It definately is more like spotting and lasts a day or so. I even feel like I have cramps.

    For years I had pain during intercourse but the doctor never really saw cause for alarm and because I was never really that sexually experienced, (probably cuz it hurt.) I was never sure what was normal or not.

    No I notice I don't have as much pain, but the bleeding thing is more an issue.

    I believe I have hormone imbalances. Could this be related?

    • ANSWER:
      I am going through the same thing. I am married though and have sex often. I just started the bleeding and pain during sex. I have been to the Dr. (whom I TRUST!!! ) 2 times this week. We did a sonogram to see if I have a fibroid or a polyp on my cervix or uterus. There was nothing on the sonogram. I am going to end up needing to have a uterine biopsy if this continues.

      You need to have a pap smear, sono of the ovaries and uterus to check for fibroids and polyps. After that you might want to be tested for endometriosis.

      It could be any of the things I listed above or just a hormone imbalance. BUT.... Those are also symptoms of cervical or uterine cancer. Best to get it all checked out!!

      Good luck and Im so sorry that sex has been painful for you for so long!! That is a bummer!!

      GOD BLESS and GOOD LUCK!!

  34. QUESTION:
    What time of the menstrual cycle would someone have to be stressed to miss a period?
    I'm 3 days late for my period, there is no chance I'm pregnant, and I've had my period for many years (So, it's not that I'm going through puberty when it'd be normal to be irregular) It's usually right on time. I was under a lot of stress last month shortly before and during my period, could that cause me to miss a period this month? Of course, it's only been 3 days, and I'm feeling some cramps so it could be on it's way.

    • ANSWER:
      Irregular Periods/ Vaginal disorders
      The main reasons irregular periods are
      1 .Blockage of blood circulation to the lower abdomen area due to lack of physical exercise.
      2. Functioning of the thyroid glands is not fair.
      3. Fibroid in the uterus and/ or cyst in the ovaries
      4. Poor health condition and / or lack of exercise
      5. Psychological reasons such as anxiety neurosis stress tension etc.

      Periods during adolescent stage will be generally irregular. It is normal. It may become regular by the age of 18 or 19.
      . Monthly period may differ the span of time ie total days of gap for next period may differ. Sometimes it may go up to 36 or 40 days.
      But when the gap in between two periods is less than 25 days everyone should consult a gynaecologist and get advice and treatment.

  35. QUESTION:
    How to tell if my girlfriend is pregnant?
    Me and my girlfriend had sex once and I know it sounds stupid but I never cam or was even close to. But I seen her today and I felt some type of lump in her stomach, Is it too late to buy a pregnancy test to see if she is cause she still had her period and she has not gotten any bigger not even in breast size.

    • ANSWER:
      Go to a clinic and have a doctor examine your girlfriend to make sure that lump is nothing serious like a fibroid uterus. You can have a period when your pregnant. I would be very sensitive to her in this situation. You can do another pregnancy test and the results should be accurate. Why are you afraid. If you think you didn't do it maybe someone else did. That is when DNA comes in. When did you have sex with her from the next time you saw her. A lump is not a bump. I think you are also paranoid and young. They make these things..not sure if you heard of them...they are called ..i think..condoms. Try 2 at a time or just abstain. You don't sound ready for responsibility.

  36. QUESTION:
    can u suggest a good method of removing fibroid without doing any surgery?
    my mother has got the fibroid in her uterus and she doesn't want to do any surgery. please suggest a good and effective medicine which doesn't have any side-effects and is homeopathy medicine for fibroid effective?

    • ANSWER:
      A majority of fibroids require no treatment. However treatment becomes necessary if there is excessive bleeding during menstruation, the tumour keeps growing or if there are other symptoms. In women older than 35years or with completed family are treated by a hysterectomy (removal of the uterus) rather than myomectomy (removal of the fibroids), to minimize the chances of recurrence. Myomectomy is generally done in cases where the patient wishes to preserve her fertility. Medicines like danazol, GnRH analogues and progesterone derivatives, to shrink the fibroid, may be given for 2-3 months before surgery.

      In the present times, laparoscopic removal of the uterus with fibroids or removal of the fibroid only are also performed reqularily with excellent results. The advantage over the routine open procedures is a quicker recovery, shorter hospital stay and less complications. The only disadvantage may be a longer anasthesia duration.

      Bed rest and medicines like aspirin or paracetamol may help in cramps and body aches. A hot water bottle or a heating pad may also help to relieve the pain. Excessive menstrual blood loss may cause anaemia. In this case, prescribed medication (such as tranexamic acid) should be taken during the three first days of the period. The anaemia can be corrected by taking iron supplements.

  37. QUESTION:
    What can cause mulitple periods in one month?
    Im 19 years old and ive had my period since i was 12 and this has never happened before... This month ive had THREE period all with like three to four days between them. Ive tried researching it but nothing so far has helped me. Can someone please tell me what may cause multiple periods monthly? or a link to a medical page that can help me out?

    • ANSWER:
      Hello, I found an article on the internet in regards to irregular periods and their reasons for being late, early, heavy, abnormally long and heavy bleeding. I hope this helps you to answer a few of your questions. Take care.

      Hormonal Imbalance One of the prime reasons for periods to go irregular is hormonal imbalance. In a female's body, in order to produce a period, the body creates hormones such as estrogen and progesterone. Various parts of the body need to send signals to each other in order to trigger menstruation. However, due to hormonal imbalance, many a time, these signals are missed or skipped, thus, resulting in irregular periods.

      Sudden Weight Gain or Loss Have you gained or lost a lot of weight lately? If yes, you've got an answer. When your body works at a constant pace, the hormones learn to process in similar manner. However, the moment you start doing rigorous workout, or eat a lot, your body takes a while to adjust to it. Hence, hormones become imbalanced, and lead to irregularity in periods. However, this is not a tense situation as it happens with every woman who has lost or gained weight quickly.

      Stress Workload? Job issues? Relationship turmoil? Mental dissatisfaction? Reduce your stress, female, for it's affecting the regularity of your periods. Yes, stress contributes to the most common reasons for a late period. With increasing stress, you are affecting the hormonal balance of your body, and hence, not only do your periods become irregular, but they also result in excessive weight gain, and anxiety.

      Polycystic Ovarian Disease So, you aren't pregnant, but you're still worried. Well, if your pregnancy test result came out to be negative, get a check up done, for chances, even though very less, are that you are suffering from Polycystic Ovarian Disease which is caused due to irregular ovulation as a result of hormonal imbalance. With proper treatment, your gynecologist will help you get your periods back to regular. However,

      Medications
      The Mayo Clinic advises that certain medications and result in excess bleeding including anti-coagulants that prevent blood clots and anti-inflammatory medicines. Not only can these medications result in heavy bleeding but they can also prolong your bleeding. If you are improperly taking hormone medication, this can also result in menorrhagia

      Anovulation, Fibroids
      When a woman fails to ovulate, this is called Anovulation. You can have a menstrual period but not ovulate. When this happens, the hormones may become unbalanced, resulting in excess bleeding.

      Cervical polyps are small, fragile growths that begin in either the mucosal surface of the cervix, or the endocervical canal and protrude through the opening of the cervix.

      Endometrial polyps are typically non-cancerous, growths that protrude from the lining of the uterus.

      Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is an infection of one or more organs that affects the uterus, fallopian tubes, and cervix. PID is, most often, a sexually transmitted disease; however, it sometimes occurs following childbirth, abortion, or other gynecological procedures.

      Cervical cancer is a type of cancer that occurs when cells in the cervix become abnormal, multiply out of control, and damage healthy parts of the body. The human papillomavirus, or HPV, is the cause of over ninety percent of all cervical cancers.

      Endometrial cancer occurs when abnormal cells in the uterus or the endometrium (the lining of the uterus) multiply out of control and damage to the uterus and other organs. While the cause of endometrial cancer is unknown, it is known that women diagnosed with this type of cancer tend are usually over fifty.

      IUDs or intrauterine devices used for contraception are a potential cause of heavy menstrual bleeding or menorrhagia. Women who experience prolonged or heavy periods while using the IUD should have the device removed and choose an alternate method of birth control.

      Bleeding disorders occur when it is hard for a person to stop bleeding. While there are several types of bleeding disorders, the most common type in women is von Willebrand Disease or VWD.

      Source(s):
      http://www.buzzle.com/articles/reasons-f…
      http://womenshealth.about.com/od/abnorma…

  38. QUESTION:
    Could menstual cramps that are way worse than normal be a sign of an std?
    I had a condom slip off once during sex, and duing my next period I had worse cramps than normal. Is this a possible sign of an std? If so, which ones?

    You don't need to tell me to get tested, I am planning on it. But I was just wondering if you know this to be a symptom or if there could be another cause.

    • ANSWER:
      Painful period cramps that are worse than normal may indicate a problem in a reproductive organ. This includes conditions such as endometriosis (when tissue from the uterus is displaced to somewhere else like the pelvic wall or ovaries), uterine fibroids (thick bands of muscular and fibrous tissue in the uterus), ovarian cysts, ovarian cancer (rare), or pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) which is an infection of the reproductive organs, usually from a sexually transmitted disease.

      The key is to know when you must seek medical care right away. In many cases you can simply wait to see whether it goes away in a few days or call your doctor at a later time if the symptoms persist. I would recommend however that if it doesn't go away within a couple of days you have to go see a doctor or a nurse at a clinic for further evaluation.

      I experienced the same painful menstrual like cramps before, during and after my period and 3 weeks ago through a laparoscopy found out that I have endometriosis.

      Good luck :)

  39. QUESTION:
    What are some of symptoms of uterine fibroids?
    I had a late miscarriage in January. I lost the baby because some sort of tissue has wrapped around the umbilical cord and cut it off. Since the miscarriage I have had light periods, been constantly looking and feeling bloated, and I am very sensitive to touch around where my uterus is. I know I sound crazy but I have been ignoring how I feel for a long time and I just want to know if I have any cause for concern. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      heavy or painful periods, abominal discomfort, bloating, painful defecation, backache, and frequent urination.

  40. QUESTION:
    Is it normal for a 20 years old girl to have very painful periods?
    This just started happening with my last 3 periods that I've had. My legs go numb, and the pain is at times unbearable. I cry cause it hurts so bad. I get dizzy but not nauseous. I take Aleve but it doesnt help and I dont like going to the doctor however I probably should. Has anyone else had periods like this?

    • ANSWER:
      Although some pain during menstruation is normal, excessive pain is not. Dysmenorrhoea refers to menstrual pain severe enough to limit normal activities or require medication. It may coexist with excessively heavy blood loss (menorrhagia).

      Endometriosis could be another cause.

      You should consult with your well woman doctor, and have a pelvic exam. Make sure nothing physically is wrong, and if not, then some medicines will help.

      I have a Fibroid tumor in my uterus and swelled doing that time and caused extreme pain. There are treatments for this too.

      Good luck – consult your doctor – very important!!!

      Check out this website of some good information that may help you.

  41. QUESTION:
    Are meopausal symptons common after a hysterectomy, where you still have your ovaries?
    Also, is there still monthly pain, if you retain your ovaries?
    Are there hormonal changes, if you retain your ovaries?
    Lastly, is depression associated with a hysterectomy, in the instance you retain your ovaries, shown to be caused by the physical changes or only psychological perceptions of a loss of femininity?

    • ANSWER:
      Some women don't have any symptoms of menopause. Some were in peri-menopause for years, and didn't realize it, so they may not notice the symptoms.

      I had a total abdominal hysterectomy too last year, but I kept my ovaries. I haven't had any feelings of menopause since then. Although, I have had hot flashes, shortness of memory, etc. for the last few years anyway. I may still be in the peri-menopause state since I still have my ovaries. But I tell ya, I don't miss the periods every month!!!

      I still have the normal issues with having ovaries, but no more cramping!!! There are no hormonal changes when you still have your ovaries. If you keep your ovaries there are no psychological issues. In fact, since I got rid of those fibroids, I feel sooo much better. My fibroids were so big and many, my uterus was the size of a six month pregnancy.

      I HIGHLY recommend you check out www.hystersisters.com. They helped me EXTREMELY with my questions and advice on hysterectomies. It's a support group and it's FREE.

      I wish I'd found the site before I had mine. A lot of my questions and concerns would have been answered with just looking at the responses on this website. But I stumbled on the site a few days after my hysterectomy and learned of various things I should do before the surgery, things I'm entitled to at the hospital (which the hospital doesn't tell you), questions to ask the doctor, etc. It's an awesome site for women.

      I hope it helps you, it has helped me and my family and friends

  42. QUESTION:
    What is the cause of mestruating after sex.?
    What is the cause of mestruating after sex when before you did it you were not and it goes on for days. does this mean there is something wrong internally or simply because it was close to the date. I am on contraceptives(3months). beginning of the month i was mestruating but its stopped when i went for my family planning injection.

    • ANSWER:
      The main reasons irregular periods are
      1 .Blockage of blood circulation to the lower abdomen area due to lack of physical exercise.
      2. Functioning of the thyroid glands is not fair.
      3. Fibroid in the uterus and/ or cyst in the ovaries
      4. Poor health condition and / or lack of exercise
      5. Psychological reasons such as anxiety neurosis stress tension etc.

      Periods during adolescent stage will be generally irregular. It is normal. It may become regular by the age of 18 or 19.
      Consult a doctor in person soon.
      All bleeding from the vagina are not menstrual bleeding or period. Monthly period may differ the span of time ie total days of gap for next period may differ. Sometimes it may go up to 36 or 40 days.
      When the gap in between two periods is less than 25 days everyone should consult a gynaecologist and get advice and treatment.

  43. QUESTION:
    What exactly is happening when you have period cramps?
    I just want to know what is the uterus doing when you get cramps? Cause' I have been getting REALLY bad cramps today.

    • ANSWER:
      The cramps you experience are strong contractions of the uterus that are triggered by chemicals that cause inflammation which also sends pain signals to the brain - this is how the uterus sheds its protective lining, marking the start of a new reproductive cycle. The menstrual blood is partly blood and partly tissue from inside the uterus, or womb.

      Though some women have pain that may be caused by other problems (fibroids, endomorphism, etc.), but it is really normal to experience some discomfort.

      Sometimes you may experience pain before their is any blood, that too is part of the process of contractions and chemical/hormones being released to prepare for menses.

      Also some women have some minor discomfort when they ovulate, too.

  44. QUESTION:
    How do you know if you need a hysterectomy?
    I have irregular and sometimes painful periods that cause me to become very irritable and I often clot so bad that tampons can't be worn and pads are impossible.

    • ANSWER:
      I think your GYN is the best person to answer this. There could be many many reasons which causes these symptoms. I think hysterectomy is done usually if you have ovarian cysts so large that they afeect your other systems or if you have endometriosis or fibroids. To find out if you have any of these, the doctor might first have you go through abdominal and vaginal ultrasound which is a simple procedure. And if they find anything on it, then they might want to do a diagnostic laparascopy to ensure further the nature,size and exact location of the problem and make a decision about doing a hysterectomy.
      It is not a simple thing and they will not make a decision right away. The function of the ovaries and uterus is not just to reproduce and menstruate. There are many hormones that are involved and so many side effects also.

  45. QUESTION:
    what is the cause and effect of fibroid on a woman?
    I went for infertility diagnosis. The only problem discovered is fibroid. What could be the cause and effect of this. What is the solution as surgical operation on it tend to be a temporary effort. It regrows over time.

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroids are caused by estrogen dominance.
      Infertility can be a progesterone defiency symptom. Seems to fit together, doesn't it.

      Get some NATURAL progesterone cream to supplement with. It will help you become pregnant and help the embryo to stay attached to your uterine lining!

      ------------------------------
      The uterus is one of the first organs to manifest symptoms when a woman's hormones are out of balance. Two of the most common uterine symptoms of premenopause syndrome are an enlarged uterus and uterine fibroids.

      Women with PMS often experience painful periods which are most often caused when the endometrial linging of the uterus extends into the muscular wall of the uterus.

      When shedding of the endometrium occurs (menstruation) the blood is released into the muscular lining, causing severe pain. Conventional medicine treats this pain with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID's) such as ibuprofen, but ignores the underlying metabolic hormonal imbalance that caused it.

      Estrogen dominance causes the uterus to grow, and without the monthly balancing effect of progesterone it doesn't have the proper signals to stop growing. In some women this results in an enlarged uterus that presses on other organs, such as the bladder, and often on the digestive system, and generally causes discomfort and heavy menstrual bleeding. In other women estrogen dominance results in fibroids, which are tough, fibrous, noncancerous lumps that grow in the uterus. Some fibroids can grow to the size of a grapefruit or cantaloupe, causing constant bleeding and such heavy menstrual periods that the blood loss is akin to hemorrhaging.

  46. QUESTION:
    what kinda doctor do i need to see for uterine fibroids?
    i wouldve thought the OB/GYN but the fibroid is outside my uterus. any advice?
    are there any non surgical procedures out there?

    • ANSWER:
      There is such a thing called a myeomectomy if you want to save the uterus and have kids. I think they can do it either by laporoscopy or an abdominal incision. My fibroids however weren't to big to prevent my babies from developing. I did get diagnosed later on with adenomyosis and had a total hysterectomy keeping both ovaries. There are non-surgical ways to help get rid of fibroids and one I think of is called UAE or uterine artery embolization but the only way to be able to have kids after a fibroid is removed is by a myomectomy since the other procedures don't usually recommend that you want to become pregnant afterwards.

      You should still see an OBGYN for fibroids on the outside of the uterus cause the uterus is a part of the reproductive system.

  47. QUESTION:
    What is the best way to get rid of a fibroid tumor??
    I was diagnosed with a fibroid tumor over two years ago. The thing has gotten bigger over time and is now starting to look like the early stages of a pregnancy,. I cannot wear any of my cute little dresses anymore because the stomach bulge from the tumor is embarassing.
    I haven't been to the obgyn in two years because I do not have very good health insurance and it is very expensive. The last time I did go she just told me that as long as I am not having any complications from it, than there is nothing I should do about it. I am starting to become embarassed with the way that I look and I want to get rid of it. I have done some online research about it but it talks about having surgery or getting pills to shrink it. Surgery is too expensive and I can't afford it and the pills seem like a gimmick.
    Is there anything that I can do to rid mysel of this ugly tumor?? Help
    I am only 30 and I do not want to have to dress like an old lady.

    • ANSWER:
      Que paso Stacy,

      Im drorganico, natural health practitioner for 12 years and have dealt with several dozens cases like yours and every single one of them, when they client followed every step of the protocol that is, has been cleared up with 6 to 8 weeks of detoxing and making the right adjustments in their lifestyles.

      As you said, your 30 and lots of carefree living in front of you so please get a hold of your emotions and forget the old lady analogies, lets get you back to the secure and sexy image that you know you have of yourself. This can be dealt with faster than you can imagine. However I do need to mention that lack of action on your part will make not being able to wear cute little things a very minor issue compared to other complications that will certainly come about.

      Forget surgery and forget additional costly "toxic legal poison" known as pharmaceuticals prescribed by docs that realy dont know that there are legit, effective and economic solutions that work in harmony with your body, not against it, Ill give you some basic info and if you cant find a decent natural practitioner in your city, and you want some detailed help, contact me through yahoo, my email is listed.

      Stacey, my business slogan is EDUCATE SO AS NOT TO MEDICATE, so bear with me while I give you some basic information so your informed and at least make informed decisions not just heresay, trendy and gossip decisions.

      The fibroid tumor is a hard, benign (noncancerous) tumor that generally occurs in the uterine wall. It usually has no toxic effects on the body and causes problems only if it grows large enough to physically encroach on vital structures. If such tumors are present in the uterus as a woman approaches menopause, they may produce abnormal menstrual bleeding.

      At times this bleeding can be controlled only by removing the uterus. In many cases, much less extreme and natural measures are more than satisfactory. The cause of fibroid tumors remains medicaly unproven though there are many solid theories. Researchers in my natural health field believe its due to certain trace mineral deficiencies via an imbalance of the body PH, more on that in bit.

      The balance of ovarian hormones must play some part in their formation because as a woman goes through menopause, the fibroids present frequently retrogress and atrophy along with the normal shrinking of the uterus.

      Many tumors are in the early stages respond well to the use of certain detox protocols and trace mineral supplementation, this in combination of consuming less acid forming foods and more alkaline forming foods and the all important stress management aspect which also plays a factor in why these tumors formed in the fist place since its a know scientifica fact that un managed stress releases a large amount of unnecessary acid in your system.

      To accomplish this, I recommedn certain detox herbs, supplements with natural detox agents; essential vitamins that reinforce the immune system, vegetable protein and supplementation.

      This combined with spiritual reconnection therapy is effective in virtualy all cases within a time frame of 7 days to get rid of pain, 8 to 12 weeks for the enitre detox process to take hold and at about 12 weeks after the process begins get an ultrasound to confirm what you will already know and feel, the tumor has been flushed out naturaly with no drugs or toxins.

      Now Stacy, about one of the main root causes of your tumor, PH out of balance. Let me explain.

      The body is dominated by 2 chemicals, alkaline and acid, when the acid takes over for a considerable length of time the entire cell structure and tissues are deprived of sufficient oxygen, this is called an "anaerobic enviroment" this was discovered by 2 time Nobel Prize winner in science and medicine, Dr. Otto Werberg, a German physician that won those prestigious awards in 1931 and then again 1938, he also documented that once you get the PH to get more alkaline than acid, the oxygen comes back and no way that any tumor, germ, bacteria, paraiste, fungus or any illness can stay in the body since it doesnt have its required food, acid.

      So as you continue to remain in a Candida state, over acid, fungus starts to form in the inner organs, in your case the uterus and fellopian tubes, to try and combat this over acid state the body now produces mucus, the same icky yellowy stuff we have when we deal with head colds, the reason is that the acid we consume via canned and processed foods or foods that convert into acid in your body, toxic medicines, untreated stress and other factors, these acids have the ability to damage the membranes of your nerves and tissues, therefore the body as a defense mechanism engulfs the acid/toxins with the mucus and in a body with the proper PH balance, it ejects it, detoxes from the body and no problem.

      However in a body out of PH balance, which I suspect is your case, resulting in candida and anaerobic enviroment, the mucus now begins to accumulate in the inner wall of the intestines, tissues, joints, lungs, cells and inner organs so now the body has to produce EXTRA FAT CELLS to engulf the mucus to protect the organs from damage.

      Stacy I dont know if weight gain is an issue in your case, but in most over acid states it is. So in one sense the extra fat cells are actualy saving your life, however the negative result is the weight that wont come off cause your are constantly over acid. That is why it makes sense to eat foods high in alkaline and that way your body wont need to make mucus or fat cells to protect you.

      The solution?....... forget about calories, forget about fat grams, forget about cholesterol count, concentrate on detoxing your body with natural foods I will recommend, get rid of excess acid, get and maintaing the proper PH balance and the tumors will go away, your other symptoms will disipate, your mood will change to positive, weight will come off naturaly and with out these fad diets or toxic pills.

      Glad to help, Live healthy,
      droorganico

  48. QUESTION:
    Will the natural cortisol supplement impact hormone balance?
    I am 54 and have uterus fibroid issue for a few years. I always have heavy period. Due to low energy and the test result, my ND asks me to start taking Adren-All to enhance the cortisol level to boost energy. I just start taking it for 2-3 weeks. I had terrible heavy period this month and it won't stop. I wonder if the supplement could cause my flow even worse than before. Any Advice or suggestion.

    • ANSWER:
      If you take extra cortisol it will suppress your own production of it.

  49. QUESTION:
    Can fibroids keep you from having children?
    I want someone who has actually gone through this to answer. If you have had fibroids and had a successful pregnancy and healthy baby or if your are having trouble getting pregnant. I've just discovered that I have 3 fibroids in my uterine walls and one outside the uterus. I don't want to miss out on having my own babies and I'm scared that this may ruin my chances of ever experiencing that. So your answers are very much appreciated .

    • ANSWER:
      Only the dr can confirm for sure if your fibroids is the cause you are unable to conceive. I have fibroids but I got pregnant and am about 3 months now. My sister had fibroids too which the dr removed soon after she delivered her first child. Good luck...

  50. QUESTION:
    I am 28 years old and have been having severe hot flashes. Any suggestions as to what may be causing this?
    I haven't had a period in 10 months old. I have PCOS, Endimetriosis and Fibroids on my uterus. I've seen my doctor numerous times and he has no idea what is going on with me. He put me on Provera to get me flowing and then to start the birth control pill to regulate me. I never started my period with these medications. I know I'm not pregnant. I had my tubes tied 3 years ago after my 3rd child. And we've done pregnacy tests. Any ideas what is going on or what my next step should be? Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Could be early menopause. Or it could be a hormone imbalance in your body. The meds you're taking, along with the medical issues you have, probably have your hormones all out of whack. See your dr. and talk to him/her about what is going on with you. Hot flashes are a Bich!

cause of fibroids in uterus

Endometriosis Bladder Pain

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What are the biggest signs of endometriosis?
    A nurse I know says that by my symptoms that's what it seems like. I have sharp pelvic pain during sex, urination and bowel movements and my periods are very irregular. But I don't have much money to go see a OB/GYN, is this a serious disease? It's getting worse, should I try to find a way to see a doctor?

    • ANSWER:
      Endometriosis is a gynaecological condition in which deposits of endometrial cells (lining of the uterus) develop in places outside of the uterus. It is a common condition, affecting up to 20-25% of women of reproductive age. Endometriosis is most commonly found on or in the ovaries and on the peritoneum (internal lining of the abdomen), particularly on the uterosacral ligaments and behind the uterus. It can also occur on the bladder or intestines, particularly the rectum. Endometriosis can cause inflammation and scarring which may lead to adhesions between organs and result in pain or infertility.

      Endometriosis can cause a wide range of symptoms including pain and infertility. Some women with endometriosis experience no symptoms at all. The most common symptom of endometriosis is lower abdominal/pelvic pain. This may be experienced with periods or at other times of the menstrual cycle. Pain may also be experienced during intercourse, when passing urine or when opening the bowels. Infertility, heavy or irregular periods and bleeding from the bowel may also be associated with endometriosis.

      Unfortunately many women suffer the symptoms of endometriosis for many years before it is diagnosed. Endometriosis can only be diagnosed by viewing it on the pelvic organs and peritoneum where it appears as red, black or white spots with or without scarring or as "chocolate" cysts within the ovaries. Most commonly endometriosis is diagnosed by laparoscopy (keyhole surgery). Sometimes it is found incidentally when a woman has surgery for another reason e.g. at appendicectomy.

      Endometriosis can be treated with medications or with surgery (or a combination). The medications used are mainly hormones that act by suppressing the menstrual cycle and inhibiting the growth of the deposits of endometriosis. These hormones include the combined oral contraceptive pill, progesterones, GNRH analogues and danazol. They have all been shown to provide affective pain relief during therapy but there is a high rate of recurrence of symptoms when the medication is ceased. Medical treatment will not improve fertility.

      Surgery for endometriosis is usually done via the laparoscope (keyhole surgery). The options for minor cases of endometriosis include laser or diathermy (burning) to destroy the lesions or complete excision of the lesions. When the endometriosis is more extensive, complete excision of the lesions is usually recommended as the lesions are too large or deep to be treated by burning alone. When all the endometriosis lesions are completely excised this has shown to result in a 70-90% success rate for complete or partial relief from pelvic pain symptoms.

      I would recommend that you do try to see an OB/Gyn to see what they think could be causing your pain. Like mentioned above, the only way to find out for sure though is to have the laparoscopy done to definitely diagnose whether or not you do have endo.

      Good luck :)

  2. QUESTION:
    What is the difference between adnometriosis and endometriosis?
    I just had a laparoscopic done yesterday. I thought the symtoms I had were endometriosis, but turns out it's some adnometriosis. Whats's the difference? Thanks for your input :)

    • ANSWER:
      Endometriosis occurs when the tissue that normally lines the uterus (the endometrium) is found in sites outside the uterus. The misplaced tissue implants itself onto the surface of the tissue or organ where it has been deposited and begins to grow and function.

      Symptoms can include:
      - Period pain
      - Abdominal, back and/or pelvic pain
      - Heavy or irregular bleeding
      - Bowel or bladder symptoms
      - Infertility
      - Premenstrual symptoms
      - Tiredness
      - Mood changes
      - Bloating

      Adenomyosis is a condition in which tissue that normally lines the uterus (endometrium) also grows within the muscular walls of the uterus. This is most likely to happen late in your childbearing years and after you've had children.

      Adenomyosis isn't the same as endometriosis, although women with adenomyosis often also have endometriosis. The cause of adenomyosis remains unknown, but the disease typically disappears after menopause. For women who experience severe discomfort from adenomyosis, there are treatments that can help, but hysterectomy is the only cure.

      Although adenomyosis can be quite painful, the condition is generally harmless.

      In some women, adenomyosis is "silent" causing no signs or symptoms or only mildly uncomfortable. But other women with adenomyosis may experience:

      - Heavy or prolonged menstrual bleeding
      - Severe cramping or sharp, knife-like pelvic pain during menstruation (dysmenorrhea)
      - Menstrual cramps that last throughout your period and worsen as you get older
      - Pain during intercourse
      - Bleeding between periods
      - Passing blood clots during your period
      - Your uterus may increase to double or triple its normal size.

      Although you might not know if your uterus is enlarged, you may notice that your lower abdomen seems bigger or feels tender.

      I would recommend that you discuss your treatment options with your gynaecologist.

      Good luck :)

  3. QUESTION:
    What does it mean when you have lower abdominal pain?
    So recently, every time I wake up in the morning, I get a painful lower abdominal pain. It's sometimes real quick. But mostly whenever I go to use the restroom it hurts so bad! Like if i'm starting my period even though I just got off it about 2 weeks ago. It's major cramps when I use the restroom, or whenever I sit down. Should I be worried? What could it might be? Is there a cure? Should I go to the doctor? HELP!
    Oh, and i'm 16 years of age.

    • ANSWER:
      What causes lower abdominal or pelvic pain?

      All women feel discomfort or pain in the lower abdomen below the navel from time to time, for instance, before or during menstruation.
      NetDoctor/Geir Haukursson
      Taking note of certain symptoms will help you and your doctor accurately diagnose the problem, although this can be difficult.

      In many cases it can be difficult to identify the cause of the pain, but noting certain features will help you and your doctor come to a likely diagnosis.

      The most common causes are a urinary disorder such as a bladder or kidney problem, a bowel problem or a condition involving the reproductive system – the uterus, Fallopian tubes and ovaries.
      Type of pain arising from the urinary system

      Pain from the urinary system can indicate such conditions as cystitis (inflammation of the bladder), inflammation of the collecting system of one or both kidneys (pyelonephritis), kidney stones or uncommonly tumours.

      Typical symptoms of infections are a burning sensation when passing urine and a need to empty the bladder more frequently. In addition, pain travelling from the back and around to the front might suggest a kidney infection or kidney stone.

      The pain associated with kidney stones may be particularly severe. The presence of blood in the urine raises the possibilities of infection, kidney or bladder stones or even a bladder or kidney tumour. Both benign and malignant tumours can first make themselves noticed in this way. The presence of blood in the urine always requires further investigation and should be reported to your doctor.

      The duration of the pain will further help you and your doctor to make the correct diagnosis.
      Type of pain arising from conditions of the intestines

      The bowel can give rise to a wide variety of symptoms including pain.

      Constipation and diarrhoea can be painful in themselves, and the change in bowel habit usually identifies the pain as coming from the bowel. Pain from the bowel is often described as colicky in nature. This means that the pain or discomfort comes in waves with little or no discomfort in between the pain.

      Bloating or swelling of the lower abdomen may be present in many intestinal (bowel) conditions including irritable bowel syndrome.

      The passing of fresh blood or altered blood (black motions) from the back passage should be reported to your doctor as investigation is usually necessary.
      Type of pain arising from conditions of the reproductive organs

      Pain might originate from the uterus (womb), Fallopian tubes or ovaries. It is usually felt in the middle of the lower abdomen, above the line of pubic hair as far up as the navel. Occasionally, the pain is more to one side, which is more typical of a pain coming from an ovary.

      There might be discomfort or even pain during intercourse (called dyspareunia) felt deep within the pelvis.

      Pain originating from the uterus is usually worse at the time of a woman's period (dysmenorrhoea).

      Examples of conditions of the reproductive organs giving rise to pain include endometriosis, pelvic inflammatory disease, ovarian cysts, fibroids and problems related to the early stages of pregnancy such as miscarriage and ectopic pregnancy.

      In any case of sudden, severe, unexplained abdominal pain your doctor should be contacted.
      What will the doctor do?

      Acute and sudden pains are always worrying but chronic pain can also have serious implications and a doctor should be consulted.

      The doctor will ask about periods, passing of urine and bowel movements. They might also ask if there have been episodes of nausea, vomiting, or fever. If appropriate, they may ask questions concerning the person's emotional life - family, friends, work - and their sex life.

      The doctor will want to examine you. This will involve feeling your abdomen and, in addition, an internal examination (vaginal,rectal or sometimes both) may be necessary.

      Further investigations or treatment will be based upon the description of the pain and the findings of the doctor's examination.

      Typically, a urine sample will be requested and tested for any signs of infection.

      If a kidney problem is suspected than an ultrasound scan of the kidneys and bladder will be arranged.

      If a problem with the womb or ovaries is suspected, swabs from the vagina looking for any infection might be performed and an ultrasound scan of the womb and ovaries is commonly performed.

      If a bowel problem is suspected, a sample of the motion is often investigated for signs of infection and you may be recommended to have a telescopic examination of the bowel called an endoscopy.

  4. QUESTION:
    How does extreme period pain caused by endometriosis differ from that caused by IBS?
    In case of extremely painful periods, is there any way to know whether it is caused by endometriosis or IBS? Do the symptoms differ?

    • ANSWER:
      I dont suffer from ibs but i do suffer from terrible endometriosis the symtoms are quite similar but ibs pain tends to be higher up in the stomach than endo pain, also ibs can cause mucus is poo, bladder problems, and indigestion, all that is pretty uncommon in endometriosis. Endometriosis pain is unbareable, the pain is quite low down and its the most severe period pain, it can even cause diarrhea and sickness. The pain spreads right down your thighs, through your back and sometimes higher up in the stomach, the pain is so bad for the first 3 days im bed bound and there is nothing i can do to stop it, paracetamol and ibruprofen does nothing to help nor does a hot water bottle ir warm bath, all that together can help a tiny bit, but not enough. If you think u may have endo then you should definately see a doctor because it can limit you in so many ways and even cause infertility. Hope this helped

  5. QUESTION:
    Could Endometriosis be causing the constant pain in my lower left abdomen and lower back since January?
    Kidney stones, Gall stones, UTI, Ovarian Cysts have all been ruled out by diagnostic testing.
    Last February, I was diagnosed with Endometriosis and had surgery to remove cysts from each ovary. I had a 9cm cyst on my left ovary and a 5 cm cyst on my right ovary.

    • ANSWER:
      Normally tissue of endometrium is present in the inner lining of uterus. In endometriosis this tissue appear in other parts of the body like ovaries, gut, U bladder, peritoneum etc. Pain comes mostly before and during menstruation.
      One thing more that this condition comes after puberty and regresses in menopause.

  6. QUESTION:
    What is it that will cause severe pain in your entire pelvic region?
    that is bad enough to wake you out of a deep sleep, but goes away after about a half hour? This was a very deep pain, and I couldn't tell whether it was a soft tissue, nerve, or bone thing.

    • ANSWER:
      Sometimes the intestines or bladder irritation can cause this, sex can too for some women. It should go away and stay gone. If it comes back it can be an infection, or endometriosis. If it is endometriosis the only real way to get rid of it is to do a surgery that removes it at the roots. Laser does not work.
      If you still feel weird in a few days get STD tests done by a GYN who also does papsmear and an exam.

  7. QUESTION:
    How can I get rid of vaginal pain during intercourse?
    I never had any pain during intercourse until several months ago. I had a bladder infection. It was treated and it cleared up but sex has not been the same since then. The pain that I am experiencing is on penetration. It feels like it's on the front wall of the vagina. After he's been thrusting for a while, the pain turns more into a burning sensation. Can anyone tell me how I can get this pain to stop? Also, I know that I do not have any STD's. Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Lady Please try this measures I hope it should help Applying lubricating gels to the outer sexual organs, including the vulva and labia, and in the vagina may be helpful to women and ease pain during intercourse. Sex toys, such as vibrators or dildos, may also be useful. A woman should talk with her health care provider before attempting to use a vaginal dilator. Treatment of pain during intercourse depends on the cause.

      * Entrance pain may be treated when the cause is identified.

      o Atrophy (thinning of the vaginal walls): Entrance pain caused by atrophy is common among postmenopausal women who do not take hormone replacement medication. Blood flow and lubricating capacity respond directly to hormone replacement. The most rapid relief of atrophy comes from applying topical estrogen vaginal cream directly to the vagina and its opening. This cream is available by prescription only.

      o Urethritis and urethral syndrome: With this condition, a woman may urinate frequently with urgency, pain, and difficulty, but a urinalysis can find no identifiable bacteria. These symptoms may be caused by chronic inflammation of the urethra (the tube through which urine exits the body) from muscle spasms, anxiety, low estrogen levels, or a combination of these causes. Using a special instrument, the doctor may dilate the urethra. The doctor may prescribe low-dose antibiotics. At times, antidepressants and antispasmodics may also be prescribed.

      o Inadequate lubrication: Treatment of inadequate lubrication depends on the cause. Options include water-soluble lubricants (for use with condoms ; other types of lubricants may damage condoms) or other substances such as vegetable oils. If arousal does not take place, more extensive foreplay might be needed during sexual relations.

      o Vaginismus: Painful spasms of muscles at the opening of the vagina may be an involuntary but appropriate response to painful stimuli. These spasms may be due to several factors, including painful insertion, previous painful experiences, previous abuse, or an unresolved conflict regarding sexuality. For a woman with vaginismus, her doctor may recommend behavioral therapy, including vaginal relaxation exercises.

      o Vaginal strictures (abnormal narrowing): Doctors commonly see vaginal strictures after pelvic surgery, radiation, or menopause . Estrogen, or special surgical techniques may be used to treat these strictures.

      o Interstitial cystitis: This chronic inflammation of the bladder has no known cause; however, pain with intercourse is a common symptom. A health care provider may perform a cystoscopy (a procedure to look inside the bladder), or a urologist may distend (stretch) the bladder to examine the bladder wall. These procedures often work to clear the condition. Other treatments include amitriptyline, nifedipine, Elmiron, or other prescription therapies. Other options include bladder washings with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) or other agents or transcutaneous electric stimulation (TENS) and acupuncture. Surgery is a last resort.

      o Endometriosis: Endometriosis occurs when the lining of the uterus is found outside the uterus. Pain during intercourse caused by endometriosis is not uncommon. Relief of this pain often indicates success in treating endometriosis.

      o Vulvovaginitis (inflammation of the vulva and vagina): Whether recurrent or chronic, this problem is common despite the rise in the number of over-the-counter treatments.

      + If not responsive to self-treatment with lubricating gels or initial treatment by a doctor, a woman may need a more thorough evaluation to identify the cause.

      + A doctor may ask the woman if she uses antibiotic or antifungal medication or if she douches. If so, these practices should be stopped to help determine whether a specific disease-causing organism is present.

      + Treatment is based on the presence of bacteria or other organisms. Often, no single organism is identified. The doctor may talk to the woman about proper hygiene.

      + If recurring symptoms are shared with a sexual partner, both individuals should be tested for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs).

      + A doctor considers the possibility of intermittent urethral infection with chlamydia, an STD, as well as a more obvious urinary tract infection, and then treats with the appropriate antibiotics.
      * Treatment for deep thrust pain includes 2 strategies.

      o Pelvic adhesions (tissue that has become stuck together, sometimes developing after surgery): Pain with intercourse caused by pelvic adhesions can be relieved by removing the adhesions.

      o Uterine retroversion: The health care provider may find physical causes of the pain, including ovarian cysts, pelvic inflammatory disease , endometriosis (mucous tissue out of place), or retroversion of the uterus (uterus is tilted backward instead of forward).

      A doctor should be able to find the cause and to select proper treatment for pain experienced during intercourse. Sometimes, the doctor refers the woman to a specialist.

  8. QUESTION:
    What does a bladder infection feel like?
    My lower abdomen area is sore and feels bloated. I thought maybe it was just my female organ area as I have endometriosis. But now when I pee it hurts toward the end. I feel like my insides are swallon and going to pop. What do you think I have? How do I know if it could be a kidney or bladder infection? How can I know the difference?
    Ealier today, I felt really nauceous and crampy but thought it was because I had too much popcorn last night at the movies.

    • ANSWER:
      Bladder infections sometimes cause pain in urination. Also, sometimes you feel like you have to go a LOT and only a little comes out. Also going frequently. Don't mess with it, get it checked out.
      Best wishes

  9. QUESTION:
    What does a bladder infection feel like?
    My lower abdomen area is sore and feels bloated. I thought maybe it was just my female organ area as I have endometriosis. But now when I pee it hurts toward the end. I feel like my insides are swallon and going to pop. What do you think I have? How do I know if it could be a kidney or bladder infection? How can I know the difference?
    Ealier today, I felt really nauceous and crampy but thought it was because I had too much popcorn last night at the movies.

    • ANSWER:
      Usually there is no way to tell the difference between the two infections. Occasionally a kidney infection might involve some pain in the lower back where the kidneys are located. Both infections however cause irritating burning pain in the lower abdomen, it also hurts like hell when you pee. If I were you I would see a doctor. either way you will need a proper diagnoses and you will need to treat whatever it is. A doctor will more than likely get you to pee in a cup, and if it is an infection he will simply prescribe you some antibiotics.

  10. QUESTION:
    What does a bladder infection feel like?
    My lower abdomen area is sore and feels bloated. I thought maybe it was just my female organ area as I have endometriosis. But now when I pee it hurts toward the end. I feel like my insides are swallon and going to pop. What do you think I have? How do I know if it could be a kidney or bladder infection? How can I know the difference?
    Ealier today, I felt really nauceous and crampy but thought it was because I had too much popcorn last night at the movies.

    • ANSWER:
      sounds like you have a uti. if you have urge or it hurts when you go then you most likely have one. there are basic urge and pain pills at the pharmacy or walmart they turn ur urine orange but its not harmful unless ur allergic to something in them. take those untill u can get to a doctor [they are about 6 dollers] the docter will probably give you leviquin [i belive thats the name] and it is quite strong but it will knock the infection right out of you and u will be clear in just a few days. if not u certianly have a problem. i hope u feel better.

  11. QUESTION:
    why would a15 year old girl have an adhesion on her bowel and bladder?
    my daughter had an adhesion removed that was connecting her bowel and bladder. she has never had surgery before, nor was she born with it . what would you think caused it ? i have my suspicions, but i want to see if anyone else would know .

    • ANSWER:
      The adhesion could be caused by a condition like endometriosis or something similar, but since you didn't mention that she has endo, I'll assume the doctor did not diagnose her with it. I also recently found out that I had adhesions. I'm 23 years old and have had heavy bleeding between periods and severe pelvic pain for well over a year. I just had a laparoscopy last week, where my doc found and removed adhesions. My doc said that the adhesions were probably caused by my constant heavy bleeding (he still doesn't know the cause of the heavy bleeding though). If your daughter has had unusually heavy period she could have adhesions, although they probably wouldn't be found on her bowel and bladder. Did her doc have any ideas of what caused the adhesions? If not, you might want to see some kind of specialist and ask them what they think. I hope this helped! Good luck!!

  12. QUESTION:
    Is it normal to have yellow discharge with endometriosis?
    My menstrual cycle has been over, but I have small pains in my pelvic area, bladder such and such. I also have greenish yelowish discharge. Is this normal? I am not active nor have ever been.

    • ANSWER:
      The vagina is self-cleaning. It's normal to have a white/clear discharge throughout your cycle. Your normal discharge will turn yellow or dry yellow when exposed to air. If it's coming out yellow, then you probably have a bacterial infection that has nothing to do with endometriosis and you need to see a doctor to be treated.

  13. QUESTION:
    Can endometriosis be diagnosed through a pelvic ultrasound?
    I am 17 years old and have had a significant increase in menstrual pain over the last 2 years to the point where I can barely get out of bed. My cycles are highly irregular, sometimes twice in a month, other times only once every 3-6 months. I had a pelvic ultrasound not too long ago and the doctor said that it was normal. I've been reading up on possible causes of severe menstrual pain and have come up with endo as one of the possibilities. Also, the pain is not restricted to my menstrual periods, but strewn out over the month and varying in sensations and severity.

    • ANSWER:
      I am an ultrasound technician, specializing in OB/GYN.

      Ultrasound CANNOT diagnose endometriosis. Typically, it is suspected due to clinical symptoms but can only be confirmed or ruled out with a laparoscopy.

      You should see a gynecologist about your pain if you haven't already. A general doctor is not the best choice in this situation. Oftentimes, a gyne will prescribe oral contraception pills to regulate menstruation and decrease pelvic pain associated with endometriosis.

      Good luck.

      I had to add this, because there has been misinformation given as answers to your question. Endometriosis is NOT thickening of the uterine wall. Endometriosis is when the endometrium, which is the lining of the uterine cavity (where a pregnancy implants) grows anyplace in addition to its normal locatio. For instance, in the fallopian tubes or beyond.... i.e. the pelvis. It can be very painful, since it reacts hormonally just like the normal endometrium, and bleeds just like the endometrium which is shed during menstruation. Additionally, the endometriosis causes pelvic structures (the uterus, ovaries, fallopian tubes, bowel, bladder, etc) to stick to each other, much like glue or adhesions.

      Other possiblities for your pain could be:
      Bladder infection or urinary tract infection
      Pelvic inflamatory disease
      Irritable bowel syndrome
      Spinal or Muscular problems
      etc

      None of these possibilities, including endometriosis, usually get better without medical intervention of some kind.

      However, some women suffer chronic (ongoing) pelvic pain for which the diagnosis is never confirmed.

  14. QUESTION:
    Do you know what is endometriosis and the best way to find a good treatment?
    I have endometriosis is really hard to manage pain before, during and after period.
    It is really uncomfortable!

    • ANSWER:
      Endometriosis is NOT an infection, and it cannot be treated with antiobiotics, as someone mistakenly wrote above. That person is confusing the disease with endometritis. The two are totally different and have nothing to do with each other.

      From Associated Content -

      Endometriosis is a painful disease afflicting over 7 million women and teens in the United States alone (twice the number of Alzheimer's patients and 7 times those with Parkinson's Disease), with an estimated 70 million more worldwide.[1] The disease is a leading cause of female infertility, chronic pelvic pain and gynecologic surgery, and accounts for more than 120,000 of the 500,000 hysterectomies performed annually.[2] It is more prevalent than breast cancer,[3] yet continues to be treated by many as an insignificant, obscure ailment. Recent studies have even shown an elevated risk of certain cancers in women with the disease.[4]

      With Endometriosis, tissue like the lining of the uterus (the endometrium) is found in other areas of the body. These implants continue to respond to hormonal commands each month and break down and bleed. However, unlike the lining of the uterus which is discarded with menstruation, the tissue has no way of exiting the body. The result is internal bleeding, degeneration of blood and tissue shed from the implants, inflammation and irritation of the surrounding areas, formation of scar tissue and often, severe pain. Endometriosis is commonly found on the ovaries, tubes, bowels, bladder and surrounding pelvic organs, but has even been discovered in such remote places as the lungs, brain and under the skin.

      Endometriosis can only be diagnosed through invasive surgery, and the average delay in diagnosis is a staggering 9 years. A patient may seek the counsel of 5 or more physicians before her pain is adequately addressed. Once diagnosed, it is not unusual for a patient to undergo several pelvic surgeries and embark on many different hormonal and medical therapies in an attempt to treat her symptoms. Unfortunately, there is no absolute cure for Endometriosis.

      Endometriosis is a benign disease; however, recent studies indicate that women who have the disease may have a slightly increased risk of developing cancer of the breast or ovaries and a greater risk of cancers of the blood and lymph systems, including non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma. Researchers caution that the cause of the relationship is unclear. The association may be due to drugs or surgery used to treat the condition rather than Endometriosis itself, and only women with the most severe form of the disease have the excess risk[5]. Endometriosis has also been linked to exposure to the environmental contaminant, Dioxin. This may be to blame for the cancer risk, rather than the Endometriosis.

      Findings of one survey conducted on over 4,000 Endometriosis patients in the United States and Canada[6] indicated possible links to other serious medical conditions, including a 9.8% incidence of melanoma, compared with 0.01% in the general population, a 26.9% incidence of breast cancer, compared with 0.1% in the general population; and an 8.5% incidence of ovarian cancer, compared with 0.04% in the general population. Women with Endometriosis who participated in the survey also had a greater incidence of autoimmune conditions and Meniere's disease.

      While researchers remain unsure as to the definitive cause of the disease, there are several theories, including:

      Dr. John Sampson's theory of retrograde menstruation, formulated in 1921: Dr. Sampson contended that during menstruation, a certain amount of menstrual fluid is regurgitated, or forced backward, from the uterus through the fallopian tubes and showered upon the pelvic organs and pelvic lining. There has been little evidence to support Dr. Sampson's theory, however, as studies have shown that most women experience retrograde menstruation and have evidence of a "tipped" uterus, yet not all women will develop the disease. His theory also fails to explain the presence of Endometriosis in such remote areas as the lungs, skin, lymph nodes, breasts and other areas.

      Transplantation theory: Endometriosis is spread through the lymphatic and circulatory systems. This would explain Endometriosis in most sites.

      Iatrogenic Transplantation-or "doctor caused:" the accidental transference of the Endometriosis tissue from one site to another during surgery. This is highly uncommon today due to advanced surgical management, and does not explain the presence of the disease to begin with.

      Coelomic Metaplasia: Drs. Ivanoff and Meyer's theory that "certain cells, when stimulated, can transform themselves into a different kind of cell". This would explain the presence of the disease in absence of menstruation, and further, the presence of the disease on the bladders of men who have undergone prostate removal and were treated with estrogens.

      Heredity: popular theory that women with relatives who have the disease may be genetically predisposed to developing it themselves. This theory was suggested as early as 1943, and research is currently underway by Oxegene researchers at the University of Oxford[7] to study it further. Results released on a 2002 study showed that Endometriosis may have even deeper genetic roots than previously thought: Icelandic researchers found that "having a sister or mother who had Endometriosis increases your risk by fivefold. In addition, even having a second, third or fourth cousin with this disorder means your risk is greater than 50%."[8]

      Immunology: according to The Institute for the Study and Treatment of Endometriosis[9], "two different arms of the immune system may be involved in the development of Endometriosis. Cell-mediated immunity, in which specific immune cells fight disease; and humoral immunity, in which antibodies are formed to attack antigens." Studies suggest that migrating Endometriosis tissue affects women who have "deficient cell mediated immunity." In women without the deficiency, the transplanted cells are destroyed.

      Genetic makeup: In 1997, a team of researchers at University of Texas Southwestern found another genetic link to the disease [10]. Dr. Serdar E. Bulun and his team found that some women's genetic makeup determines their predisposition for contracting the disease. They also discovered that an unusual estrogen-synthesizing enzyme, called Aromatase, was expressed in the endometrial tissue of women with the disease but not in those without the disease. This enzyme allows the wayward tissues to implant themselves to a woman's reproductive and nearby organs, and in a further twist, allows the tissue to make its own estrogen and promote its own further growth. On the basis of these findings, the team began conducting preliminary research on the use of Aromatase Inhibitors like Letrozole as a treatment for Endometriosis.

      Mulleriosis: World expert Dr. David Redwine explains that Mullerian Duct of the fetus gives rise to the cells of the uterus, tubes, ovaries and peritoneum of the adult. He believes these Mullerian cells migrate along the pelvic wall and some get left behind. If the cells are endometrial, Endometriosis will arise.[11]

      There are other theories being investigated. Some experts such as Dr. Robert Albee of the Center for Endometriosis Care in Atlanta, GA[12] believe that it may actually be "a combination of several factors."

      The amount of pain and potential for infertility associated with the disease is not related to the extent or size of the implants ("stage"). Some women with Endometriosis have no symptoms, others have debilitating pain, miscarriage and infertility. While Endometriosis can only be definitively diagnosed via pelvic surgery like the laparoscopy, some signs that may indicate Endometriosis include:

      chronic or intermittent pelvic pain
      dysmenorrhea (painful menstruation is not normal!)
      infertility
      miscarriage(s)
      ectopic (tubal) pregnancy
      dyspareunia (pain associated with sexual intercourse).
      constipation, diarrhea, and/or abdominal cramping
      rectal pain
      blood in urine
      tenderness around the kidneys
      painful or burning urination
      flank pain radiating toward the groin
      urinary frequency, retention, or urgency

      Fatigue, chronic pain, allergies and other immune system-related problems are also commonly reported complaints of women who have Endometriosis.

      Endometriosis symptoms are somewhat non-specific, so it may masquerade as other conditions which need to be ruled out, including adenomyosis, appendicitis, ovarian cysts, bowel obstructions, colon cancer, diverticulitis, ectopic pregnancy, fibroid tumors, gonorrhea, inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, ovarian cancer, and PID (pelvic inflammatory disease).

      Often, younger women and teens who present to their healthcare providers with symptoms are dismissed and told they have PID or that they are too young to have Endometriosis. This is not the case. Endometriosis has been found in autopsies of infants[13] and in menopausal women. Endometriosis is indeed prevalent in the adolescent female population: far from the "rare" incidence once believed, studies have found that as many as 70% of teenagers with chronic pelvic pain had Endometriosis proven by laparoscopy.[14]

      Other reports indicate that as many as 41% of patients experienced Endometriosis pain as an adolescent.[15]

      While there is no definitive cure for Endometriosis, treatments exist that can help assuage some or all of the symptoms temporarily. These include surgical intervention, alternative therapies, oral and injectible contraceptive therapy, over the counter and prescription pain killers, immune therapy, diet/nutrition, exercise and medications like gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists (GnRH-a). GnRHs are drugs that suppress the implants by first stimulating the ovaries to produce more estradiol (the most potent form of estrogen) and then after 7-21 days of constant stimulation, shutting down the "messenger" hormones sent from the pituitary gland to the ovaries. The result is that the ovaries shut down, estradiol levels drop sharply and rapidly, and the patient ceases to ovulate or menstruate; a condition similar to that of menopause. Some women experience positive results with GnRH treatments, others do not. As with any treatment, each case will vary. Though the medications may temporarily shrink the lesions of Endometriosis, they will not shrink adhesions or scar tissue, which often play a part in the symptomatic pain of the disease. Common side effects that have been reported by women undergoing treatment include hot flashes, headaches, insomnia, vaginal dryness, decreased libido, depression, mood swings, fatigue, acne, dizziness, nausea, short term memory loss, diarrhea, hair loss, anxiety, and bruising at injection site. A growing movement is underway to prescribe empiric use of GnRH therapy in patients who have not undergone surgical diagnosis; however, organizations like the International Endometriosis Research Center have openly lobbied against this unorthodox approach.[16]

      Despite the perpetuation of myths by the less informed, pregnancy and hysterectomy are not cures for Endometriosis.

      The most effective step an Endometriosis patient can take when dealing with this disease is to find a specialist who treats Endometriosis and pelvic pain specifically. Specialty surgical centers the CEC in Atlanta (www.centerforendo.com) solely treat Endometriosis in patients from around the world, though the meticulous and advanced surgical procedure called Excision. Excision differs drastically from the ablation, fulguration, vaporization and cauterization techniques so commonly practiced by most gynecologists. Excision removes the entire disease from every location, unlike the other methods, which leaves disease behind to continue to cause pain and symptoms. Excision offers a better than 85% success rate for long term relief.

      Endometriosis is a serious disease, which requires serious treatment. Don't mess around with the local medical staff unless it happens to be an Endo expert you are dealing with. See http://groups.yahoo.com/group/EndoDocs to get referrals to docs who can truly treat the disease.

      Despite the conundrum of Endometriosis, there is hope. Extensive research us underway for faster - and non-invasive - diagnostics as well as new treatments for Endometriosis. Legislative efforts have begun pushing the envelope to fund further studies and have brought awareness of the disease to the forefront of society. Women and girls with Endometriosis, and their loved ones, should seek the assistance of an Endometriosis organization to remain educated, empowered and encouraged where the disease is concerned.

      References:
      1, 2 - Alexandra Alger, "The Danger Within." Forbes Magazine. December 13, 1999
      3 - National Alliance of Breast Cancer Organizations, "Breast Cancer Basics." http://www.nabco.org/index.php/39
      4 - Delthia Ricks, "Survey Links Endometriosis To Some Cancers." Newsday. April 1999
      5 - American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 1997;176:572-579
      6 - "Endometriosis Ups Cancer Risk," Reuters, NY
      7 - OXEGENE is a world-wide research study that aims to find genes responsible for causing Endometriosis. The study is based at the Nuffield Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology in the University of Oxford http://www.medicine.ox.ac.uk/ndog/oxegene/oxegene.htm
      8 - Colette Bouchez, "Genetic Links to Fertility-Related Disorder Revealed." HealthScoutNews. Mar 5, 2002
      9 - The Institute for the Study and Treatment of Endometriosis (ISTE), 2425 West 22nd Street, Oak Brook, IL 60523, Phone 630-954-0054, http://www.Endometriosisinstitute.com
      10 - The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, February 1997; Serdar E. Bulun, MD, Director, Division of Reproductive Biology, Northwestern University. http://www.medschool.northwestern.edu/obgyn/faculty/Bulun.htm
      11, 13- David B. Redwine, MD, St. Charles Medical Center Endometriosis Treatment Program, Bend, Oregon - 800/486-6368, http://www.scmc.org/Endo.html
      12 - Center for Endometriosis Care, 1140 Hammond Drive, Bldg F Suite 6230, Atlanta, GA 30328, 877-212-9900, http://www.centerforEndo.com
      14 - Michael D. Birnbaum, MD, FACOG, FACE, "Incidence of Endometriosis. http://www.infertilityphysician.com/endometriosis/incidence.html
      15- Dixie Farley, FDA/Office of Public Affairs, "On the Teen Scene: Endometriosis - Painful, but Treatable." http://www.fda.gov/fdac/reprints/ots_endo.html
      16-International Endometriosis Research Center. 630 Ibis Drive, Delray Beach, FL 33444. http://www.endocenter.org

  15. QUESTION:
    Can a bladder infection cause painful sex?
    I have been have been to the doctors and been tested for chlamydia, gonorreha, trichomosis and thrush but all have come back negative.
    I'm experiencing painful sex and have recently started feeling an urge to pee. I also have had some pain in the left side of my abdomen.
    Could this possibly be a bladder infection as I can't figure what else it would it be?

    • ANSWER:
      If you’re experiencing pain during or after sex there may be several factors that are contributing to the pain you feel. For women there are a number of physical conditions that may make sex hurt, including:

      * Pelvic Inflammatory Disease
      * Endometriosis
      * Ovarian cysts
      * Interstitial cystitis
      * Vaginismus
      * Vulvodynia
      * Some sexually transmitted diseases
      * Urinary infections
      * Yeast infections
      * Vaginal dryness
      * Physical injury and chronic pain

      I would recommend that if you still continue to experience pain during or after sex that you consult with another doctor/gynaecologist for further evaluation and a second opinion to rule out any serious causes.

      Good luck :)

  16. QUESTION:
    What can I do about a family doctor who won't give pain medication?
    I have been seeing my family doc for some time now, and I have severe stage 5 endometriosis and ARD. I've had four surgerys in the last three years and live in constant pain. The last time I had surgery my bowel was fused to my uterus and bladder. In January my doc told me he no longer gives pain meds to patients under the age of thirty, I am 26 and I can understand his decision. But, what about cases like mine or others who have legitimate pain. Do we have to suffer because of others mistakes? What are my options? Can he do that legally? Also can he suddenly stop giving narcotic pain meds to a patient who has been taking them for a while, what about withdrawal?

    • ANSWER:
      If you are in the US the general rule is that apart from abuse of meds a 30 day "bridge" prescription should be issued. Request this and ask for a referral for further care such as to a pain management specialist. This is a doctor with special training in pain management and the use of pain meds. If he refuses and he is not a sole practitioner see the head of the practice. Point blank ask the doctor how to handle possible withdrawal symptoms if you need to. If by chance there is no pain specialist in your area go back to the OBGYN who did your surgery or call state medical association for referral. Your insurance co may be able to offer you suggestions on other primary care doctors in the area who may be able to help. Ask any possible doctor in the first visit or ask his staff on the phone "are you comfortable treating a patient with chronic pain issues resulting from clearly documented medical problems?"

      DO NOT go suddenly off major pain meds even if it means a hospital admit for withdrawal. Too many bad things can happen. This is especially true with Morphine ahd hydrocodone related meds. If you have any med left from your last prescription cut your does by 1/2 or 1/4 and gradually go down. Be sure you have some way to get to an ER if you hit withdrawl symptoms even if you have to stay with a friend or relative a day or too. If they are freaky about pain meds just tell the the dr changed your med and you need to be sure you don't have a bad reaction to the change. Keep a copy or all meds and all surgeries etc in your wallet.

      My husband is a chronic pain sufferer due to spinal damage and I have seen this we don't do pain meds any more routine. It stinks. It resulted in his becoming comotose with no discernable pulse or respiration. He was revived but there is damage that unless or until God heals it is permanent.

      This organization is working to try to get some changes in the way chronic pain patients are treated. M G E. Good News Ministries P O BOx 2681 Cleveland GA 30528 . They are not a solution now but they are trying to become a voice ppl facing these issues.

  17. QUESTION:
    Why do I have such severe menstrual pain, and how do I help relieve it?
    Ever since I have had my period I have experienced severe menstrual pain in my lower abdomen pelvic area. What could be causing this? I endure this pain each and every period that I get. I've tried Aleve and Midol and they don't seem 2 work, so are there any other methods 2 stop this chronic pain? Please help :-)

    • ANSWER:
      Look into a diagnosis of Endometriosis. For info, see www.endocenter.org.

      Derived from the Greek words dys, meaning “difficult,” meno, meaning monthly, and rrhea, meaning “flow,” dysmenorrhea is the term used to describe painful menstrual cramping.

      Almost all menstruating women experience some cramping during their periods, referred to as either primary dysmenorrhea, which refers to "normal" menstrual pain, or secondary dysmenorrhea, which arises as a result of an underlying disease or disorder. The condition is among the leading complaint in women who present to their physicians for gynecologic pain. More than half of all menstruating women have pain associated with menses, and studies have shown that dysmenorrhea is one of the most common reasons women miss work and/or school. Nearly 10% of women with the condition are incapacitated for up to three days each month[1].

      "Normal" menstrual cramps occur in almost all women due to the release of hormones known as prostaglandins. These are hormones produced by the endometrium (the lining of the uterus), which cause the uterus to contract, sometimes quite painfully, in order to expel the menstrual debris. Some women produce higher levels of prostaglandins than others, so they may hurt more. Increased prostaglandin production can also cause the distressing gastrointestinal symptoms some women may experience. Primary dysmenorrhea most commonly occurs within a few years of menarche (a woman’s first period), while secondary dysmenorrhea can occur years after the onset of menarche.

      Pain with primary dysmenorrhea usually begins on or about the first day of a woman’s period and can last up to 72 hours. In a woman with secondary dysmenorrhea, she may have painful symptoms occurring a week or more prior to her period and lasting even after her flow has stopped. In the case of a woman who has secondary dysmenorrhea, there are other reasons for her pain, including diseases or conditions like Endometriosis, Adenomyosis, Pelvic Inflammatory Disease, cervical stenosis, structural abnormalities in the vagina or uterus itself, fibroids, or similar concern.

      Dysmenorrhea can be diagnosed based on symptoms, patient history, physical findings, and when appropriate, diagnostic tests such as vaginal or pelvic ultrasound, hysteroscopy (an examination of the inside of the uterus) and/or hysterosalpingogram (an evaluation of the uterus and fallopian tubes). In cases of secondary dysmenorrhea, laparoscopic surgery can be very beneficial at affording a diagnosis and treatment of the underlying cause. Symptoms often include painful pelvic or abdominal cramping, headache, suprapubic cramping (an area of the pelvis overlying the bladder), backache, pain radiating down into the thigh area, nausea/vomiting/diarrhea and even syncope (a temporary of consciousness). Upon physical exam, those with primary dysmenorrhea exhibit normal vital signs and a tender uterus, but no cervical or ovarian abnormalities. Patients with secondary dysmenorrhea may exhibit varied vital signs depending on the underlying cause and may be found to have tenderness, nodules, and/or enlargement of the uterosacral ligaments, the rectovaginal septum or other adnexa (the region of the pelvis that encompasses the ovary, fallopian tube and surrounding broad ligament).

      Treatment options are based on the underlying cause of the pain (primary v. secondary dysmenorrhea) and range from medical to alternative therapies. Commonly, Non-Steroidal Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) like aspirin or ibuprofen may be recommended to help with cramping, and more recently, COX-2 inhibitors have also been approved for treatment of dysmenorrhea. Prescription painkillers may also be recommended where appropriate. Combination (ethynylestradiol and progestin) oral contraceptives can also help reduce prostaglandin production, thereby alleviating the cramps. Heating pads can also offer temporary resolve of the pain. Avoidance of smoking (which has been shown increase cramps) and reduced intake or total avoidance of salt, sugar, high fat and dairy products, alcohol and caffeine can also afford relief, as can increasing the intake of fiber, calcium and complex carbohydrates. Recent studies also indicate that Vitamin B6 complex, calcium and magnesium supplements, and Omega III fatty acids (fish oil supplements) also may help relieve cramping. Pelvic massage, exercise (which releases endorphins, the body’s own natural painkillers), Yoga (the cat stretch and the pelvic tilt), visualization techniques, aromatherapy, acupuncture and herbs like Dong Quai, Ginseng, Stragalus root, Ligusticum root and White Peony root are also said to be helpful alternative techniques for managing the pain.

      If Endometriosis or another disorder is the underlying or secondary cause for dysmenorrhea, you will benefit most from having the disease diagnosed and effectively removed. It is important to determine if the cramps are "normal," or if they could be due to another cause. Pain that is crippling or incapacitating is never normal and should be investigated as soon as possible so that appropriate diagnosis and subsequent treatment can be rendered.

      Reference:
      [1] Jamieson DJ, Steege JF. The prevalence of dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia, pelvic pain, and irritable bowel syndrome in primary care practices. Obstet Gynecol. 1996;87(1):55-58.

  18. QUESTION:
    Has anyone had a laparoscopy for endometriosis?
    I am going to have a laparoscopy on july 6th for my endo and I am really nervous. Anybody have any advice or have any tips for before and after surgery? I here there can be quite a bit of pain while recovering, what can i do to help ease the pain or make recovery go by faster? Also, I know that even if the doctor goes in & removes as much endo as possible it can still grow back and the pain will come back. What are some other things I could do to help fight endometriosis? Thanks Alot.
    I pretty much know everything there is to know about endo I just wanted some tips on how to make the healing process go by faster. But thanks everybody! :D

    • ANSWER:
      First I'll try to answer the last part of your question. Endometriosis has no cure and many times will come back. Your best option that is closest to a cure and will give you a better chance at long lasting relief is to have a dr. that specializes in endo and will remove all of it by means of excision-lasering the endo will just about guarantee that it will be back as it does not remove all of it-excising it basically means they cut it out. Having a hysterectomy does not cure endo as endo is capable of producing it's own supply of estrogen-what endo thrives on. Many dr.'s think it is a cure b/c of the ovaries being removed and therefore estrogen goes away also but if any amount of endo is still inside lurking somewhere it can and eventually will start producing estrogen and then start to cause you pain/symptoms again. I would strongly suggest talking to your dr. about the method he will be using to remove the endo, how often is there endo left behind, what will happen if you need a laporatomy-(will he sew you back up and reschedule the surgery or will he just perform the laparotomy at that time), how often does a lap turn into a laporatomy, how comfortable is he removing endo from vital areas such as bladder/colon if it is found, how hard does he try to save certain organs like the ovaries? I hate to say this but if your dr. does not remove all of the endo by excision than you can certainly expect it to come back. Finding a good dr is very hard-try googling dr david redwine or dr andrew cook-these dr.'s know what they are doing and have the best success rates b/c pretty much all they do is treat endo-they have lots of good info on their sites. As far as the lap itself, the amount of pain/how long it will take you to recover is different for everyone but how much endo is removed and where it is removed from will have a lot to do with it. I myself took a week off from work and was in a lot of pain, but I also had it in several places and had adhesions that, among other places, had glued both ovaries to my pelvic sidewall, and had to have a ureter dissected. A lot of women find the gas very painful-especially in the shoulders. When you have the lap they pump gas into your abdomin so they can see better. I've heard many women, including myself, not have a lot of pain from it but a lot of women do-some dr.'s try to remove as much as they can before closing you up and the more they can get out the better. It may be hard but if you try to walk, just a little bit around the house every so often, it will help dispell the gas-I've also heard a few women swear by ben-gay. During your pre-op appt. I would ask for a pain med prescription and get it filled before surgery. Hard to believe but some women have only been given pain meds in recovery and were refused a script they could fill to use if needed in the following days. if you find you are very nervous about the surgery tell your dr and he should be able to give you something to take the night before to help calm you down so you can get some sleep-they can also give you something right before surgery if needed. many women find it very common to be nausous after surgery from the anesthesia-ask your dr. about that also-mine gave me something that looked like a tiny round bandaid to put behind my ear before and I was not nausous. You can expect at least 3 small incisions, 1 right above your pelvic bone and one on each side a little further up-some women get more-I had 4 incisions. they are very small and just about 2 years later and I have to really look to see them. A lot of women try to have someone stay with them the first night-if you live alone-to help them out. Some women suggest bringing your ipod with you and listening to relaxing music right before and also bringing anything you may find comforting such as pillows, blanket. Some women will also pack themselves a little bag with clothes, pads, books/magazines and anything else to help pass the time or if they have to end up having a laporotomy in which case you would be staying the night. I would ask the dr. about taking and giving you pics of the surgery and even doing a video-although most dr.'s do not do videos due to the legal ramifications in case anything should go wrong-but if in the unfortunate event that you deal with endo again in the future it is a great thing to give any new dr. you see. my mom went with me to my surgery and waited for the dr. to tell her how it went-I wrote down a few questions I wanted her to make sure she asked him so that I didn't have to wait until my post op-did you find endo and where? Was all of it removed-if not how much was not removed and where? How minimal/severe was it? Your dr. may have you do a bowel prep before surgery, kind of common. Many women find bringing a pillow to place against their stomach for the ride home helps as well. One thing that is kind of important, you will be given a consent form for surgery to sign-if you are wanting to have children and are adamint about keeping all of your reproductive organs inform the dr. of that and write it on the consent form. Some dr.'s will check your appendix for endo and will want to remove your appendix during surgery should they find endo. A lot of dr.'s before surgery will discuss what treatment they want you to start right after surgery to help the endo from coming back-such as birth control pills or lupron. I would research this so that you feel comfortable with whatever med they want to prescribe so you can make the best decision for you. I can't think of anything else and this is already very long-maybe try going to www.obgyn.net and then go to endo zone and go through the archives of the message boards for good info on the lap and what to expect-lots of info there. just plan on having movies/books/magazines and such for after, take it easy, wear comfortable, loose clothing and try to get lots of rest. the surgery is pretty much always better than you fear! Hope this helps and good luck to you!

  19. QUESTION:
    Pain on the left side of my pelvis area?
    I've been getting this really sharp pain near my pelvis area and I want to know if it could be something serious or just gas? Helpp, it hurts!

    • ANSWER:
      It can be Endometriosis, it is basically endometrial cells growing outside of your uterus, a bowel or bladder infection, or like you said, cramp or gas...

      Call your doctor to be safe and hope for the best!

  20. QUESTION:
    What are the signs and symptoms of endometriosis?
    What are the side effects without treatment, and what is the treatment, and how do they diagnose it. Does it always affect fertility.

    • ANSWER:
      From the Endo Research Center (www.endocenter.org):

      "About Endometriosis:

      With Endometriosis, tissue like that which lines the uterus (the endometrium) is found outside the womb in other areas of the body. Normally, the endometrium is shed each month through menses; however, with Endometriosis, these implants have no way of leaving the body. The implants still break down and bleed, but result is far different than in women and girls without the disease: internal bleeding, degeneration of blood and tissue shed from the growths, inflammation of the surrounding areas, and formation of scar tissue result. In addition, depending on the location of the growths, interference with the normal function of the bowel, bladder, intestines and other areas of the pelvic cavity can occur. Endometriosis has also been found lodged in the skin - and even the brain.

      Symptoms include chronic or intermittent pelvic pain, dysmenorrhea (painful menstruation is not normal!), infertility, miscarriage(s), ectopic (tubal) pregnancy, dyspareunia (pain associated with intercourse), nausea / vomiting / abdominal cramping, diarrhea / constipation (particularly with menses), painful bowel movements, painful or burning urination, urinary frequency, retention, or urgency; fatigue, chronic pain, allergies and immune system-related illnesses are also commonly reported complaints of women who have Endo. It is quite possible to have some, all, or none of these symptoms. Endo symptoms are varied and often nonspecific, so they can easily masquerade as several other conditions, including adenomyosis ("Endometriosis Interna"), appendicitis, ovarian cysts, bowel obstructions, colon cancer, diverticulitis, ectopic pregnancy, fibroid tumors, gonorrhea, inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, ovarian cancer, and PID.

      Despite today's age of medical advances, researchers remain unsure as what causes of Endometriosis. There is NO CURE, despite the continued propagation of such myths by the uninformed who still mistakenly believe that hysterectomy, pregnancy and/or menopause can "cure" the disease. Invasive surgery remains the gold standard of diagnosis, and current therapies continue to remain extremely limited, often carrying side effects.

      Mistakenly minimized as "painful periods," Endometriosis is more than just "killer cramps." It is a leading cause of female infertility, chronic pelvic pain and gynecologic surgery, and accounts for more than half of the 500,000 hysterectomies performed in the US annually. Despite being more prevalent than breast cancer, Endometriosis continues to be treated as an insignificant ailment. Recent studies have even shown an elevated risk of certain cancers and other serious illnesses in those with the disease, as well as malignant changes within the disease itself.

      Research has shown that genetics, immune system dysfunction, and exposure to environmental toxins like Dioxin may all be contributing factors to the development of the disease. Endometriosis knows no racial or socioeconomic barriers, and can affect women ranging from adolescence to post-menopause. The disease can be so painful as to render a woman or teen unable to care for herself or her family, attend work, school, or social functions, or go about her normal routine. It can negatively affect every aspect of a woman's life; from her self-esteem and relationships, to her capacity to bear children, to her ability to be a contributing member of society.

      The disease can currently only be diagnosed through invasive surgery, and the average delay in diagnosis is a staggering 9 years. A patient may seek the counsel of 5 or more physicians before her pain is adequately addressed.

      Once diagnosed, it is not unusual for a patient to undergo several pelvic surgeries and embark on many different hormonal and medical therapies in an attempt to treat her symptoms. None of the current treatments are entirely effective, and virtually all synthetic therapies carry significantly negative side effects; some lasting far beyond cessation of therapy. The exception to this is excision; see www.centerforendo.com to learn more about excision as the leading treatment.

      Though Endometriosis is one of the most prevalent illnesses affecting society today, awareness is sorely lacking and disease research continues to remain significantly under funded. For instance, in fiscal year 2000, the National Institutes of Health planned to spend .5 billion on research. Of that funding, only .7 million was earmarked for Endometriosis - amounting to approximately $.40/patient. This is in stark contrast to other illnesses such as Alzheimer's and Lupus, which received approximately 5.00 and .00 per patient, respectively. American businesses lose millions of dollars each year in lost productivity and work time because of Endometriosis. The cost of surgery required to diagnose the disease in each patient alone adds greatly to the financial burden of both consumers and companies alike.

      Once erroneously believed to be a disease of “Caucasian career women who have delayed childbearing,” we know that in fact, Endometriosis affects women of all ages, races and
      socioeconomic status. Endometriosis also can and does exist in the adolescent female population. Far from the “rare” incidence once believed, studies have found that as many as 70% of teenagers with chronic pelvic pain had Endometriosis proven by laparoscopy. Other reports indicate that as many as 41% of patients experienced Endometriosis pain as an adolescent. The illness can be quite disruptive and cause significant dysfunction, especially at a time in life when self-esteem, school attendance and performance, and social involvement are all critical. Many adolescents with Endometriosis find themselves unable to attend or participate in classes, social functions, extracurricular activities, and sports due to significant pain and other symptoms of Endometriosis. Sometimes, teens and young women lack support and validation from both the home and the school; told the pain is “in their head,” that they are “faking it,” that their debilitating cramps are “normal” and “a part of womanhood,” that they are merely suffering from “the curse,” or that they should just “grin and bear it.” Their symptoms may also be dismissed as a sexually transmitted disease, which Endometriosis absolutely is not. Failure to acknowledge and address symptoms early in the disease process can lead to significant delays in diagnosis and necessary, subsequent treatments. Lack of support from family and loved ones can also add to the patient’s pain and fear - at any age.

      Recent studies have also shown that Endometriosis may in fact have an even bigger impact on younger patients than older women. One such study discovered that in patients under 22 years of age, the rate of disease recurrence was
      double that of older women (35% versus 19%). The study also revealed that the disease behaves differently in
      younger women; leading some researchers to believe it is a
      different form of Endometriosis altogether. Surgery, considered necessary to accurately diagnose and
      effectively treat the disease, is often withheld from younger patients based on the injudicious belief that early surgery somehow negatively influences a young woman’s fertility. Extensive, cumulative research has shown this concern to be unfounded. What can impact fertility, however,
      is neglecting effective treatment of the disease. Some
      researchers also feel that symptomatic, adolescent-onset
      Endometriosis is most often a lifelong problem that will
      progress to severe fibrotic disease.

      While it is possible to become pregnant with Endometriosis, the key is to obtain early, effective treatment such as that offered by specialty treatment centers like the Center for Endo Care (see www.centerforendo.com to learn about the success of excision as treatment). Hysterectomy is not a cure for Endometriosis. Any disease left behind by the surgeon (whether by design because he or she 'couldn't get it all' or accident because they don't recognize the disease in all manifestations) will continue to thrive and cause pain and symptoms. It does not matter if the ovaries are removed or if HRT is withheld; Endo produces its own estrogen-synthesizing enzyme known as aromatase. Thus, it enables it's own vicious life cycle and sustains the disease process. You would be better off getting all disease truly excised from all locations at a specialty center like the CEC (www.centerforendo.com).

      Due in part to the efforts of foundations like the ERC, research is ongoing in some places as to the causes of Endometriosis and potential cures for the disease. Our organization will continue to push for more widespread research into the many facets of the disease, and ultimately, a cure.

      For more information:

      http://www.endocenter.org/

      Endo Self Test:

      Not sure if you have Endometriosis? While pelvic surgery is the only current way to definitively diagnose it, symptoms can lead you and your doctor to suspect the disease. Review the following and consider if any of these common symptoms apply to you. Review your answers with your gynecologist for further discussion.

      Do you experience so much pain during or around your period that you find yourself unable to work, attend school or social functions, or go about your normal routine? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have any relatives diagnosed with Endometriosis? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you find yourself with painful abdominal bloating, swelling or tenderness at any time in your cycle? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have a history of painful ovarian Endometriomas ("chocolate cysts")? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have a history of miscarriage, infertility or ectopic pregnancy? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you experience gastrointestinal symptoms during your cycle, such as nausea or vomiting and/or painful abdominal cramping accompanied by diarrhea and/or constipation? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have a history of fatigue and/or a lowered immunity (i.e., "sick and tired" all the time)? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have a history of allergies, which tend to worsen around your periods? _____YES / _____ NO

      If sexually active, do you experience pain during sexual activity? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you suffer from autoimmune diseases or other conditions (i.e., thyroid disease, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, fibromyalgia, multiple sclerosis, chronic migraines)? _____YES / _____ NO

      Have you ever undergone pelvic surgery like a laparoscopy, in which Endometriosis was suspected but not definitively diagnosed?
      _____YES / _____ NO

      If you have answered "yes" to one or more of these questions, you may have Endometriosis. Talk to your doctor about getting an accurate diagnosis and effective treatment today. Dull aching and cramping can occur during menstruation in many women and teens, due to uterine contractions and the release of various hormones including those known as prostaglandins. However, period pain that becomes so debilitating it renders you unable to go about your normal routine is not ordinary or typical! Pain is your body's way of signaling that something is WRONG. If you are suffering from pelvic pain at any point in your cycle, an Endometriosis diagnosis should be considered.

      Know the Facts:

      - Endometriosis can affect women and teens of all ages, even those as young as 10 or as old as 85!
      - Hysterectomy, menopause and pregnancy are NOT cures for Endometriosis; in fact, there is no definitive cure!
      - Delayed childbearing is NOT what causes Endometriosis; in fact, no one really knows for sure what causes the disease, but research points to multi-factorial origins like heredity, immunology and exposure to environmental toxicants!
      - Endometriosis can only be accurately diagnosed via surgery; diagnostic tests like MRIs and ultrasounds are not definitive!
      - GnRH therapies like Lupron should never be administered in those patients younger than 18 yrs. of age or before a surgical diagnosis!
      - You CAN live well in spite of Endometriosis. WE ARE HERE TO HELP!" ~ www.endocenter.org

  21. QUESTION:
    Can you explain the logistics of endometriosis?
    I read that basically instead of the lining exiting the body during a menstrual cyce it actually deposits in other area of the body creating fusion to other organs, creating pain.

    I thought from the uterus to the vaginal opening it was a straight path....HOW can the lining "get into" other areas of the body cavity??

    • ANSWER:
      because the lining cells (endometrial cells) can travel up your fallopian tubes into the peritoneal cavity and grow endometrial tissue on your ovaries, bladder, bowels, etc... Which then go with your cycle of hormones and proliferate and shed with your cycle.

      This causes bleeding in the peritoneal cavity that cannot be lost through the vagina and causes pain - almost like getting an infection in this body cavity every month.

  22. QUESTION:
    I have endometriosis and I need some questions answered?
    I have had endo. for over 6 years and the dr said I had the worse stage. I have taken the Lupron shot which I dont recommend then I have been on birth control for many years. I want to know if anyone elses feels like the are hungry all the time even after eating a really big meal. Does anyone have problems going to the bathroom you know #2. I dont have alot of pain but my stomach feels wierd alot. Is any of this stuff normal? What can I do to help clear up my condition. Dr's said birth control or hysterectomy but I am not having the hysterectomy I am only 26.

    • ANSWER:
      You might have bowel involvement with your Endo. Even a small, focal implant on or around the GI tract can wreak havoc on your system. Hysterectomy is not a cure for Endo and medical suppression is only temporary; your best bet is to find someone who can truly excise all disease from all locations - not simply laser the surface of the implants off from easily accessible locations and then send you on your way with disease intact. Look for someone who can remove disease (including on the bowels, bladder, etc.), not organs. Here are some good starting points:

      http://www.endometriosissurgeon.com
      http://www.pelvicpain.com
      http://www.centerforendo.com
      http://www.reproductivecenter.com
      http://www.endoexcision.com
      http://www.endocenter.org/pdf/2007ScreeningEducationKit.pdf

      And a referral site:

      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/EndoDocs

      Good luck and hope this helps get you on the right track.

  23. QUESTION:
    Why am I having menstrual like cramps everyday?
    For the past two and half months I have been having menstrual like cramps, at times with sharp pain in my lower back and abdomen under my navel and on either side. There is no chance that I am pregnant, also bowel movements and urination cause severe cramping afterwards.
    Does anyone have any idea what is going on?
    I have made an appointment with my Gynecologist, but the pain seems to get worse by the day. I do not have any break through bleeding and menstrual cycles are normal.

    • ANSWER:
      Do you drink coffee?? Sometimes that causes cramping. It could also be something simple like constipation or bladder infection. Try cranberry drinking juice or taking vitamin C until your appointment. It could also be more serious like endometriosis. Since it's been going on for so long make sure to keep your appointment even if the cramping goes away!!

  24. QUESTION:
    Do you have any personal experience with endometriosis of the bladder?
    Id like to know if and how it affected your fertility and how you managed the condition.

    • ANSWER:
      I was having alot of painful periods since I went off of BCP almost 2 years ago. We stopped BCP so I'd get pregnant and thats when my periods began to get very painful.
      My OB thought it was endometriosis by my symptoms but wasn't sure.. the only way to diagnosis this is through a laprascopy. I finally did this about 2 wks ago and my OB found endo that was pretty bad and he said it had attached one of my ovaries to my bladder.
      The pain that I was having was alot of times after I'd urinate I'd get sharp stabbing pains...
      He was able to remove all of the endometriosis and in Jan will be our 1st month to try w/out the endo. My OB did think that is why we weren't getting pregnant.
      I am pretty sure that is what has been affecting my fertility and there was no other way to manage it but having it removed or taking pain pills or of course possibly BCP which would obviously keep us from getting pregnant.
      HTH! : ) GOOD LUCK

  25. QUESTION:
    I'm peeing every half hour and have abdominal pain, is it worth going to the doctor?
    For the past couple of weeks I've noticed that my bladder has become smaller, I need to pee straight away after I drink something and wake up in the night to pee. This weekend I've been starting to get pain in my lower abdomen (just below my hipbones). The thing is, I have endometriosis so I get quite a lot of abdominal pain anyway. Is it worth seeing my GP?

    • ANSWER:
      It sounds like you have more than endometriosis. It sounds like you've developed a UTI or a urinary tract infection which since you didn't get treated for it has progressed to a kidney infection. YES go to your doctor and request a Urinalysis so that you can find out if that's the case and get treated for it before it severely damages your kidneys.

  26. QUESTION:
    Why do my insides hurt when I am having intercourse?
    Every time I have sex, it feels like my bladder or something else is being pinched? Is he too big for me? Could this be why I have being getting UTIs?

    • ANSWER:
      I use to have pain during intercourse and it turned out to be endometrosis. Have you seen your sexual health doctor yet?

      Also, being an Independent Pure Romance Consultant (an in home party plan for woman (18+) that sells sexual educational books, romance inhancement products, and novelties) - I speak with a lot of woman with your same problem. As a consultant, Pure Romance educates us very well.

      Here is the knowledge that I can share with you:

      This problem is so emotional and sensitive that many women find it difficult to consult a physician. But it's important to seek treatment, and in many cases the cause is a physical illness that can be treated.

      Painful intercourse, which a doctor may call dyspareunia, is a burning, tearing, ripping, or aching sensation associated with penetration. The pain can be at the vaginal opening, deep in the pelvis, or anywhere in between. It also may be felt throughout the entire pelvic area and the sexual organs, or may occur only with deep thrusting.

      The most common explanation is irritation of the vagina caused by having intercourse without being sufficiently aroused and lubricated. This experience can create a vicious cycle, leading a woman to fear intercourse which in turn makes it more difficult to become aroused. Women who have had a hysterectomy or mastectomy may have problems with arousal because of both the emotional and physical side effects. Stress or problems in your relationship with a partner can also block arousal. Counseling can help address these psychological issues (visit www.aasect.org to find a credible counselor or therapist in your area), as well as the use of lubrication to reduce discomfort.

      Another frequent explanation for painful intercourse is thinning and drying of the vaginal tissue as menopause begins. This happens because the body is producing less and less of the estrogen that is needed to maintain moist vaginal tissue. As the vagina's ability to make its own mucus declines, it becomes dry, itchy, and painful, leading to discomfort during intercourse. Estrogen creams and lubricating gels can help restore moisture, as can estrogen replacement therapy taken in pills or through a patch on the body.

      Unintentional muscle spasms of the thighs, pelvis, and vagina can make penetration impossible. This condition, called vaginismus, can develop along with any of the other causes of painful intercourse described here or can result from psychological factors. A traumatic sexual experience, rape, or an irrational fear of genital injury can lead to vaginismus. Counseling or therapy can be extremely helpful.

      Other causes of painful intercourse include:

      Infection—vaginal, pelvic, herpes, infected cysts or boils.
      Scars, tumors, or anything that narrows the vagina.
      Endometriosis (uterine tissue growing outside the uterus with bleeding, pain and scarring).
      Intact hymen (in virginal young women).
      Complications of surgery.
      Diseases that interfere with the physical process of arousal or orgasm (such as diabetes and multiple sclerosis).

      I highly encourage any women experiencing pain during intercourse to consult their physician as well as a trained sex therapist or counselor. Many times your family practice physician may not have all the answers, so it is important to speak to someone who is experienced in the field of sexual health, as well as consulting your regular doctor.

      Good luck!

  27. QUESTION:
    can eating more junk food than you or used to cause heart burn and indigestion?
    I had been getting dizzy and nauseous with rectal pain. At first i thought it might be dehydration because of BC or a bladder infection or even the endometriosis. Everything has checked out fine. I did notice that i get the same feeling if i overload on junk food or even water. Could it really just be indigestion?
    Side note: Theres gas but that may just be one of those random things.

    • ANSWER:
      usually when you have a healthy diet consistently, and then eat junk food out of the blue, your body will not like it.

      it's best to negate junk food and your body will appreciate it.

  28. QUESTION:
    Has anyone ever had surgery for endometriosis?
    I was wondering what happened aftewards. Did your symptoms return? I had it 3 years ago, and it seems like the pain is back. Also, what other symptoms do you have besides pain? What do you do, or have you done about the other symptoms?

    • ANSWER:
      i had 3 laparoscopy's to remove severe endometriosis. it always returned and i eventually had to have a hysterectomy including ovaries taken out at age 24. at the time of my hysterectomy, my doctor said it had come back even worse than from the last lap surgery and six months of lupron injections, it was all over my ovaries, fallopian tubes, and bladder. if you were diagnosed with it once, chances are it has come back...you should see your doctor asap for a consultation. good luck to you.

  29. QUESTION:
    What are the effects on your stomach or bladder after squirting?
    i'm really worried since my gf told me tiny drops of blood came out when she pee'd and the lower part of her stomach is hurting her... please help

    • ANSWER:
      Small drops of blood can come out after sex if the sex is too rough, she wasn't lubricated enough, or if she has a smaller vagina. Additionally, low stomach pain can have to do with endometriosis or a bladder problem. She should see a doctor about the pain, but don't be concerned about the blood. I bleed after sex occasionally- and have visited the doctor about this problem, and she has said that it is fine.

  30. QUESTION:
    why ther is pain in vagina and clitoris while urinating?
    i have severe pain in the. vaginal and clitoris area during urinating.during since i am not able to reach my climax my boy friend insert his finger inside the vagina.will ther be any cut due to sex . whether the pain is due to that?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi,

      When a woman feels pain while having sexual intercourse, it is called dyspareunia. Painful sex is fairly common. Nearly two out of three women have it at some time during their lives. The pain can range from very mild to severe.

      Painful sex can have both physical and emotional causes. To understand why the pain occurs, you should know what happens to your body during sex.

      A woman's body follows a regular pattern when she has sex. There are four stages:

      Desire — The feeling that you want to have sex.
      Arousal — Physical changes take place. Your vagina and vulva get moist and the muscles of the opening of the vagina relax. The clitoris swells and enlarges. The uterus lifts up, and the vagina gets deeper and wider.
      Orgasm — The peak of the response. The muscles of the vagina and uterus contract and create a strong feeling of pleasure. The clitoris can feel orgasm, too.
      Resolution — The vagina, clitoris and uterus return to their normal state.

      Types of Pain and solutions for that

      During sex a woman may feel pain in the vulva, at the opening of the vagina, within the vagina, or deep inside. Vulvar pain is pain felt on the surface (outside) of the vagina. Vaginal pain is felt within the vagina. Deep pain can occur in the lower back, pelvic region, uterus and bladder.
      Vulvar Pain
      Pain can occur when some part of the vulva is touched. The vulva may be tender or irritated from using soaps or over-the-counter vaginal sprays or douches. Other causes include scars, cysts or infections.

      Vaginal Pain
      Vaginal dryness. The most common cause of pain inside the vagina is lack of moisture. This can occur with certain medications, with certain medical conditions, or because you are not aroused. It can occur at certain times of your life such as during or just after pregnancy, while breastfeeding, or near or after menopause.

      Vaginitis. Another cause of vaginal pain is vaginitis — an inflammation of the vagina. The most common symptoms of vaginitis are discharge, itching and burning of the vagina and vulva. Vaginitis has many possible causes, such as yeast or bacterial infection.

      Vaginismus. Vaginismus is a spasm of the muscles at the opening of the vagina. It causes pain when your partner tries to enter the vagina. In some cases, vaginismus is present the first time a woman has — or tries to have — sex. The pain also may occur during a pelvic exam.

      Vaginismus also can be a response to a fear of some kind, such as being afraid of getting pregnant.

      Deep Pain
      Pain that starts deep inside may be a warning sign of an internal problem. Pain that happens when the penis touches the cervix can have many causes:

      Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)
      Problems with the uterus
      Endometriosis
      A pelvic mass
      Bowel or bladder disease
      Scar tissue (adhesions)
      Ovarian cysts

      Emotions Play a Role
      Pain during sex sometimes can be linked to a state of mind. Emotional factors, like memories or fears, can keep you from relaxing. Some women may feel guilty having sex. Or, some women may be afraid of getting pregnant or getting a sexually transmitted disease (STD). Sometimes, a past bad sexual experience, such as rape or sexual abuse, may be the cause. All these factors may make it hard to relax during sex. This prevents arousal and lubrication.
      Finally …
      Pain during sex is a sign there may be a problem. Talk to your doctor about the pain so that the cause can be found and treated as soon as possible. Proper treatment can help you enjoy your sex life.

  31. QUESTION:
    What is the recovery time after having a hysterectomy and is it like a c- section?
    I am having a hysterectomy in 12 days and I am so nervous. I had a C-Section 3 years ago and I know how painful that was, is it any thing like that? I know it will be abdominal. I am just trying to figure out how I am going to do this, it is bad enough I am going to have to climb 3 flights of stairs after the surgery to get to my apartment and have to take care of my 8 and 3 year old kids. I also had to move to this town with no family to help me (cause of hurricane katrina). I am just hoping I can do this by myself. My main worry is after the surgery I have 2 weeks until my son starts school and I am wondering if I will be ok to drive him to school ? Please let me know any experiences anyone have had .

    • ANSWER:
      Good luck with your upcoming surgery.

      Honestly, it depends on what you have done, how you have it done and why. I know you said abdominal, but why is that your doc's only option/choice for you? For example, an LAVH [laparoscopic assisted vaginal hyst] is less invasive and offers quicker recovery. An abdominal hyst is far more invasive and has longer recovery. Vaginal hyst is less invasive and has faster recovery overall than the others above, but can affect sexual function. Vaginal hysterectomy is preferable to abdominal hysterectomy where possible, however. Where vaginal hysterectomy is not possible, laparoscopic hysterectomy is preferable to abdominal hysterectomy, although it brings a higher chance of bladder or ureter injury [Methods of Hysterectomy: Systematic Review & Meta-analysis of Randomised Controlled Trials; BMJ. 2005 Jun 25;330(7506):1478].

      Also, how well you recuperate depends on how well you tolerate the procedure; i.e., any reaction to anesthesia, complications, etc. A hyst. is not that similar to a c-section in all honesty.

      You also need to discuss with your doc exactly what will be done, i.e., removal of uterus only, hysterectomy with oophorectomy [removal of one or both ovaries], hysterectomy with salpingoopherectomy [removal of one or both fallopian tubes], radical hysterectomy, which removes the uterus, cervix, the top portion of the vagina and most of the tissue that surrounds the cervix in the pelvic cavity. Pelvic lymph nodes may also be removed; supracervical hysterectomy, also referred to as a subtotal hysterectomy, which removes the uterus while leaving the cervix intact.

      It is a major operation, any way you cut it (no pun intended). It will take at least 2 weeks or longer to be completely healed, again, depending on what was done, how complicated your surgery was, etc. Abdominal surgery recovery is expected to be easily longer than 2 weeks till you feel "normal."

      As an aside, if heavy bleeding or similar concern is the "only" reason for your hysterectomy, you may want to look into alternatives, such as endometrial ablation or similar procedure. If you have having it because of Endometriosis or fibroids, please know that there are alternatives and that hyst is not a cure for Endo.

      I do NOT recommend climbing 3 flights of stairs afterwards. I honestly think you need to have a friend or neighbor help with the 3 yr. old following surgery for a few days. You will only be doing yourself harm and jeopardizing your recovery if you do too much, too soon. You will also be on narcotic pain meds and it's hard to be a great parent when you're feeling dopey from the pills. You really need some help - if you do too much, you can experience complications or adhesion development, etc. This is not a surgery I recommend recuperating alone with 2 children from.

      Again, good luck to you, I hope all turns out ok.

  32. QUESTION:
    How do you get rid of really bad period cramps?
    I went off BC and this is my first period since. It hurts really bad. Are periods worse when you're not on BC? How do I get rid of these?

    • ANSWER:
      Do you have Endometriosis? http://www.centerforendo.com, http://www.endocenter.org.

      Almost all menstruating women experience some cramping during their periods, referred to as either primary dysmenorrhea, which refers to "normal" menstrual pain, or secondary dysmenorrhea, which arises as a result of an underlying disease or disorder. The condition is among the leading complaint in women who present to their physicians for gynecologic pain. More than half of all menstruating women have pain associated with menses, and studies have shown that dysmenorrhea is one of the most common reasons women miss work and/or school. Nearly 10% of women with the condition are incapacitated for up to three days each month[1].

      "Normal" menstrual cramps occur in almost all women due to the release of hormones known as prostaglandins. These are hormones produced by the endometrium (the lining of the uterus), which cause the uterus to contract, sometimes quite painfully, in order to expel the menstrual debris. Some women produce higher levels of prostaglandins than others, so they may hurt more. Increased prostaglandin production can also cause the distressing gastrointestinal symptoms some women may experience. Primary dysmenorrhea most commonly occurs within a few years of menarche (a woman’s first period), while secondary dysmenorrhea can occur years after the onset of menarche.

      Pain with primary dysmenorrhea usually begins on or about the first day of a woman’s period and can last up to 72 hours. In a woman with secondary dysmenorrhea, she may have painful symptoms occurring a week or more prior to her period and lasting even after her flow has stopped. In the case of a woman who has secondary dysmenorrhea, there are other reasons for her pain, including diseases or conditions like Endometriosis, Adenomyosis, Pelvic Inflammatory Disease, cervical stenosis, structural abnormalities in the vagina or uterus itself, fibroids, or similar concern.

      Dysmenorrhea can be diagnosed based on symptoms, patient history, physical findings, and when appropriate, diagnostic tests such as vaginal or pelvic ultrasound, hysteroscopy (an examination of the inside of the uterus) and/or hysterosalpingogram (an evaluation of the uterus and fallopian tubes). In cases of secondary dysmenorrhea, laparoscopic surgery can be very beneficial at affording a diagnosis and treatment of the underlying cause. Symptoms often include painful pelvic or abdominal cramping, headache, suprapubic cramping (an area of the pelvis overlying the bladder), backache, pain radiating down into the thigh area, nausea/vomiting/diarrhea and even syncope (a temporary of consciousness). Upon physical exam, those with primary dysmenorrhea exhibit normal vital signs and a tender uterus, but no cervical or ovarian abnormalities. Patients with secondary dysmenorrhea may exhibit varied vital signs depending on the underlying cause and may be found to have tenderness, nodules, and/or enlargement of the uterosacral ligaments, the rectovaginal septum or other adnexa (the region of the pelvis that encompasses the ovary, fallopian tube and surrounding broad ligament).

      Treatment options are based on the underlying cause of the pain (primary v. secondary dysmenorrhea) and range from medical to alternative therapies. Commonly, Non-Steroidal Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) like aspirin or ibuprofen may be recommended to help with cramping, and more recently, COX-2 inhibitors have also been approved for treatment of dysmenorrhea. Prescription painkillers may also be recommended where appropriate. Combination (ethynylestradiol and progestin) oral contraceptives can also help reduce prostaglandin production, thereby alleviating the cramps. Heating pads can also offer temporary resolve of the pain. Avoidance of smoking (which has been shown increase cramps) and reduced intake or total avoidance of salt, sugar, high fat and dairy products, alcohol and caffeine can also afford relief, as can increasing the intake of fiber, calcium and complex carbohydrates. Recent studies also indicate that Vitamin B6 complex, calcium and magnesium supplements, and Omega III fatty acids (fish oil supplements) also may help relieve cramping. Pelvic massage, exercise (which releases endorphins, the body’s own natural painkillers), Yoga (the cat stretch and the pelvic tilt), visualization techniques, aromatherapy, acupuncture and herbs like Dong Quai, Ginseng, Stragalus root, Ligusticum root and White Peony root are also said to be helpful alternative techniques for managing the pain.

      If Endometriosis or another disorder is the underlying or secondary cause for dysmenorrhea, you will benefit most from having the disease diagnosed and effectively removed. It is important to determine if the cramps are "normal," or if they could be due to another cause. Pain that is crippling or incapacitating is never normal and should be investigated as soon as possible so that appropriate diagnosis and subsequent treatment can be rendered.

      Reference:
      [1] Jamieson DJ, Steege JF. The prevalence of dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia, pelvic pain, and irritable bowel syndrome in primary care practices. Obstet Gynecol. 1996;87(1):55-58.

  33. QUESTION:
    How much does a first penetration hurts? For how many sessions will it continue to hurt, usually?

    My wife was a virgin when I married her. We have been making love seven times and she's still crying. She's still hurt. I'm bothered because I hate to see her cry while I get all the pleasure. I love her so much!

    • ANSWER:
      It does NOT always go away after the first time. It took me a while for the pain to go away. Pain during sex is called dyspareunia.

      About 6 weeks after I lost my virginity, I saw the doctor because I was still having pain. It turned out to be the remnants of my hymen. It wasn't enough for a surgical intervention, but it was enough to keep the opening from stretching without a bit of coaxing every time. The doctor gave me a prescription for a numbing cream and told me to come back in five months.

      It turned out I didn't need it. I didn't like using it, and it went away on its own.

      In my case, it was the hymen. I think in MOST cases of it's lack of proper lubrication. Make sure she's very very wet before you enter. If she's not lubricating much on her own, you can buy lubricants at the store. Why not use your hands or lips to bring her to orgasm before you have sex? That way you know she will receive pleasure every time, and it should get her wet. Try exploring her vagina with your fingers... she should be very slippery inside.

      Another important consideration is that she could have Bacterial Vaginosis or a Yeast Infection. These are caused by imbalances of the normal bacteria, NOT by sexually transmitted diseases. If she's feeling a burning or chafing, it could be one of these. If thats the case, a simple antibiotic should clear things up quickly. She may not be showing any other symptoms.

      Its important to consider where she's having pain. Is it near the entrance? Is it deeper in? Does it feel like a burning sensation? Is it a dull pain? Is it spread out? Is it localized? Does it feel like she's cut or torn? Does she hurt for a long time or only during sex? A doctor can help sort all that out.

      A short list of possible causes:

      Common:
      - not enough lubrication
      - infection

      Less common:
      - stubborn hymen (broken, but not completely)
      - vaginismus (involuntary spasm of the vaginal muscles upon entry, sometimes related to fear of intimacy or expectation of pain).
      - vulvar vestibulitis (the glands that release lubrication become irritated and inflamed easily).
      - vulvodynia (lasting pain in the area around the opening of the vagina.)
      - Polycyststic Ovary Syndrome (an endochrine disorder)
      - Endometriosis (uterine tissue growing in the wrong places).
      - A pelvic mass (variety of causes. not cancer, but collected material).
      - Bowel or bladder disease (everything is close together in there. You can put pressure on both through penetration).
      - Scar tissue (prevents stretching. can result from infections.)
      - Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (deeper infection, seriously bad).
      - Menopause (lower estrogen causes problems)
      - Interstitial Cystitis (an autoimmune disorder)
      - Sjögren's syndrome (an autoimmune disorder)

      That's hardly everything it could be. Painful intercourse is a symptom of a lot of different things. Some of those things don't have to do with the reproductive organs at all. She probably doesn't have any of those things, but it would be a good idea to go see a doctor. She really should, just because it could be an infection, and those don't go away without treatment.

      I think most women only experience pain the first time, so this isn't completely normal. It warrants a check-up. However, its probably something simple, so don't be afraid.

      I'm glad she's with a caring husband who is doing everything he can to help solve this problem. I'm sure that it is easier for her to handle this difficult issue because you are being supportive.

      Good luck! I hope you and your wife are able to figure this out soon.

  34. QUESTION:
    What causes nausea/dizzy when you are on your period?
    When I'm cramping really bad, it is usually associated with bad nausea and dizzyness,
    cramps are down there it doesnt make sense to me that it all comes up to my head,
    Any ideas?

    • ANSWER:
      "Normal" menstrual cramps and symptoms like you describe occur in almost all women due to the release of hormones known as prostaglandins. These are hormones produced by the endometrium (the lining of the uterus), which cause the uterus to contract, sometimes quite painfully, in order to expel the menstrual debris. Some women produce higher levels of prostaglandins than others, so they may hurt more and feel worse. Increased prostaglandin production can also cause the distressing gastrointestinal symptoms some women may experience. Primary dysmenorrhea most commonly occurs within a few years of menarche (a woman’s first period), while secondary dysmenorrhea can occur years after the onset of menarche.

      Pain with primary dysmenorrhea usually begins on or about the first day of a woman’s period and can last up to 72 hours. In a woman with secondary dysmenorrhea, she may have painful symptoms occurring a week or more prior to her period and lasting even after her flow has stopped. In the case of a woman who has secondary dysmenorrhea, there are other reasons for her pain, including diseases or conditions like Endometriosis, Adenomyosis, Pelvic Inflammatory Disease, cervical stenosis, structural abnormalities in the vagina or uterus itself, fibroids, or similar concern.

      Dysmenorrhea can be diagnosed based on symptoms, patient history, physical findings, and when appropriate, diagnostic tests such as vaginal or pelvic ultrasound, hysteroscopy (an examination of the inside of the uterus) and/or hysterosalpingogram (an evaluation of the uterus and fallopian tubes). In cases of secondary dysmenorrhea, laparoscopic surgery can be very beneficial at affording a diagnosis and treatment of the underlying cause. Symptoms often include painful pelvic or abdominal cramping, headache, suprapubic cramping (an area of the pelvis overlying the bladder), backache, pain radiating down into the thigh area, nausea/vomiting/diarrhea and even syncope (a temporary of consciousness). Upon physical exam, those with primary dysmenorrhea exhibit normal vital signs and a tender uterus, but no cervical or ovarian abnormalities. Patients with secondary dysmenorrhea may exhibit varied vital signs depending on the underlying cause and may be found to have tenderness, nodules, and/or enlargement of the uterosacral ligaments, the rectovaginal septum or other adnexa (the region of the pelvis that encompasses the ovary, fallopian tube and surrounding broad ligament).

      Treatment options are based on the underlying cause of the pain (primary v. secondary dysmenorrhea) and range from medical to alternative therapies. Commonly, Non-Steroidal Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) like aspirin or ibuprofen may be recommended to help with cramping, and more recently, COX-2 inhibitors have also been approved for treatment of dysmenorrhea. Prescription painkillers may also be recommended where appropriate. Combination (ethynylestradiol and progestin) oral contraceptives can also help reduce prostaglandin production, thereby alleviating the cramps. Heating pads can also offer temporary resolve of the pain. Avoidance of smoking (which has been shown increase cramps) and reduced intake or total avoidance of salt, sugar, high fat and dairy products, alcohol and caffeine can also afford relief, as can increasing the intake of fiber, calcium and complex carbohydrates. Recent studies also indicate that Vitamin B6 complex, calcium and magnesium supplements, and Omega III fatty acids (fish oil supplements) also may help relieve cramping. Pelvic massage, exercise (which releases endorphins, the body’s own natural painkillers), Yoga (the cat stretch and the pelvic tilt), visualization techniques, aromatherapy, acupuncture and herbs like Dong Quai, Ginseng, Stragalus root, Ligusticum root and White Peony root are also said to be helpful alternative techniques for managing the pain.

      If Endometriosis or another disorder is the underlying or secondary cause for dysmenorrhea, you will benefit most from having the disease diagnosed and effectively removed. It is important to determine if the cramps are "normal," or if they could be due to another cause. Pain that is crippling or incapacitating is never normal and should be investigated as soon as possible so that appropriate diagnosis and subsequent treatment can be rendered.

  35. QUESTION:
    What do all the awareness ribbons represent?
    I want to know
    Green
    white
    yellow
    orange
    black/grey
    purple
    red
    ALL COLORS! what do they stand for?

    • ANSWER:
      Green:
      * Bipolar disorder awareness and support
      * Cerebral Palsy awareness and support
      * Gastroschisis
      * Depression
      * Aging Research awareness
      * Lyme Disease
      * Organ transplantation and donation awareness
      * Kidney Cancer aka Renal Cell Carcinoma Awareness
      * Environmental protection
      * Mitochondrial disease awareness
      * Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal infections
      * Pedestrian Safety

      White
      * Adoption Awareness
      * Methamphetamine Abuse Awareness
      * Forgiveness
      * Safe Childbirth & Motherhood
      * Multiple Hereditary Exostoses
      * Male on female violence
      * Lung Cancer (sometimes pearl-colored)

      Yellow
      * Bone Cancer / Osteosarcoma
      * American soldiers ("support our troops")
      * Suicide awareness and prevention
      * Endometriosis awareness
      * Bladder Cancer
      * Genocide awareness

      Orange
      * Self-injury awareness
      * Energy awareness in Nigeria
      * Animal protection awareness
      * Leukemia Awareness
      * Multiple Sclerosis awareness
      * Kidney cancer survivorship and awareness
      * ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder)
      * CPRS (Complex Regional Pain Syndrom)

      Black
      * Mourning and remembrance of the Virginia Tech massacre
      * Melanoma awareness

      Grey
      * Mental illness awareness
      * Borderline personality disorder awareness
      * Diabetes awareness
      * Brain cancer awareness
      * Asthma awareness

      Purple
      * Spirit Day and victims of homophobia
      * crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis
      * Horse Slaughter Prevention and Awareness
      * Chiari Malformation
      * Sarcoidosis
      * Lupus
      * Fibromyalgia
      * Show religious tolerance
      * Promoting remembrance and awareness of violence against women
      * Domestic violence awareness
      * Childhood stroke awareness
      * Cystic fibrosis awareness
      * Alzheimer's disease awareness
      * Pancreatic cancer awareness

      Red
      * Heart Disease/Heart Attack
      * AIDS awareness
      * Substance abuse awareness (Red Ribbon Week is commonly held in American schools)
      * Vasculitis awareness

      I would recommend checking out the page. There are many color variations, too.

  36. QUESTION:
    How large does an ovarian cyst have to get before it becomes bothersome?
    By bothersome, I mean causing lower abdominal discomfort and pressure.

    • ANSWER:
      Many women have ovarian cysts at some time during their lives. Most ovarian cysts present little or no discomfort and are harmless. The majority of ovarian cysts disappear without treatment within a few months.
      However, ovarian cysts — especially those that have ruptured — sometimes produce serious symptoms. The best way to protect your health is to know the symptoms and types of ovarian cysts that may signal a more significant problem, and to schedule regular pelvic examinations.
      You can't depend on symptoms alone to tell you if you have an ovarian cyst. In fact, you'll likely have no symptoms at all. Or if you do, the symptoms may be similar to those of other conditions, such as endometriosis, pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy or ovarian cancer. Even appendicitis and diverticulitis can produce signs and symptoms that mimic a ruptured ovarian cyst.

      Still, it's important to be watchful of any symptoms or changes in your body and to know which symptoms are serious. If you have an ovarian cyst, you may experience one or more of the following signs and symptoms:

      * Menstrual irregularities
      * Pelvic pain — a constant or intermittent dull ache that may radiate to your lower back and thighs
      * Pelvic pain shortly before your period begins or just before it ends
      * Pelvic pain during intercourse (dyspareunia)
      * Pain during bowel movements or pressure on your bowels
      * Nausea, vomiting or breast tenderness similar to that experienced during pregnancy
      * Fullness or heaviness in your abdomen
      * Pressure on your rectum or bladder — difficulty emptying your bladder completely

      When to see a doctor
      Seek immediate medical attention if you have:

      * Sudden, severe abdominal or pelvic pain
      * Pain accompanied by fever or vomiting

      These signs and symptoms — or those of shock, such as cold, clammy skin, rapid breathing, and lightheadedness or weakness — indicate an emergency and mean that you need to see a doctor right away.

  37. QUESTION:
    Why do girls get cramps when they are on their period?
    i'm on mine right now and i was doubled over in pain a few minutes ago and can sex ease the pain?

    • ANSWER:
      Derived from the Greek words dys, meaning “difficult,” meno, meaning monthly, and rrhea, meaning “flow,” dysmenorrhea is the term used to describe painful menstrual cramping.

      Almost all menstruating women experience some cramping during their periods, referred to as either primary dysmenorrhea, which refers to "normal" menstrual pain, or secondary dysmenorrhea, which arises as a result of an underlying disease or disorder. The condition is among the leading complaint in women who present to their physicians for gynecologic pain. More than half of all menstruating women have pain associated with menses, and studies have shown that dysmenorrhea is one of the most common reasons women miss work and/or school. Nearly 10% of women with the condition are incapacitated for up to three days each month[1].

      "Normal" menstrual cramps occur in almost all women due to the release of hormones known as prostaglandins. These are hormones produced by the endometrium (the lining of the uterus), which cause the uterus to contract, sometimes quite painfully, in order to expel the menstrual debris. Some women produce higher levels of prostaglandins than others, so they may hurt more. Increased prostaglandin production can also cause the distressing gastrointestinal symptoms some women may experience. Primary dysmenorrhea most commonly occurs within a few years of menarche (a woman’s first period), while secondary dysmenorrhea can occur years after the onset of menarche.

      Pain with primary dysmenorrhea usually begins on or about the first day of a woman’s period and can last up to 72 hours. In a woman with secondary dysmenorrhea, she may have painful symptoms occurring a week or more prior to her period and lasting even after her flow has stopped. In the case of a woman who has secondary dysmenorrhea, there are other reasons for her pain, including diseases or conditions like Endometriosis, Adenomyosis, Pelvic Inflammatory Disease, cervical stenosis, structural abnormalities in the vagina or uterus itself, fibroids, or similar concern.

      Dysmenorrhea can be diagnosed based on symptoms, patient history, physical findings, and when appropriate, diagnostic tests such as vaginal or pelvic ultrasound, hysteroscopy (an examination of the inside of the uterus) and/or hysterosalpingogram (an evaluation of the uterus and fallopian tubes). In cases of secondary dysmenorrhea, laparoscopic surgery can be very beneficial at affording a diagnosis and treatment of the underlying cause. Symptoms often include painful pelvic or abdominal cramping, headache, suprapubic cramping (an area of the pelvis overlying the bladder), backache, pain radiating down into the thigh area, nausea/vomiting/diarrhea and even syncope (a temporary of consciousness). Upon physical exam, those with primary dysmenorrhea exhibit normal vital signs and a tender uterus, but no cervical or ovarian abnormalities. Patients with secondary dysmenorrhea may exhibit varied vital signs depending on the underlying cause and may be found to have tenderness, nodules, and/or enlargement of the uterosacral ligaments, the rectovaginal septum or other adnexa (the region of the pelvis that encompasses the ovary, fallopian tube and surrounding broad ligament).

      Treatment options are based on the underlying cause of the pain (primary v. secondary dysmenorrhea) and range from medical to alternative therapies. Commonly, Non-Steroidal Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) like aspirin or ibuprofen may be recommended to help with cramping, and more recently, COX-2 inhibitors have also been approved for treatment of dysmenorrhea. Prescription painkillers may also be recommended where appropriate. Combination (ethynylestradiol and progestin) oral contraceptives can also help reduce prostaglandin production, thereby alleviating the cramps. Heating pads can also offer temporary resolve of the pain. Avoidance of smoking (which has been shown increase cramps) and reduced intake or total avoidance of salt, sugar, high fat and dairy products, alcohol and caffeine can also afford relief, as can increasing the intake of fiber, calcium and complex carbohydrates. Recent studies also indicate that Vitamin B6 complex, calcium and magnesium supplements, and Omega III fatty acids (fish oil supplements) also may help relieve cramping. Pelvic massage, exercise (which releases endorphins, the body’s own natural painkillers), Yoga (the cat stretch and the pelvic tilt), visualization techniques, aromatherapy, acupuncture and herbs like Dong Quai, Ginseng, Stragalus root, Ligusticum root and White Peony root are also said to be helpful alternative techniques for managing the pain.

      If Endometriosis or another disorder is the underlying or secondary cause for dysmenorrhea, you will benefit most from having the disease diagnosed and effectively removed. It is important to determine if the cramps are "normal," or if they could be due to another cause. Pain that is crippling or incapacitating is never normal and should be investigated as soon as possible so that appropriate diagnosis and subsequent treatment can be rendered.

  38. QUESTION:
    Would I need to see my Obgyn or my family dr?
    I've been having a lot of lower abdominal pains, center, right and left sides, as well as pain during sex, especially deep penetration. I'm not sure which dr I should call?

    • ANSWER:
      It sounds to me like it you could have endometriosis. I experienced the same symptoms and pain you are experiencing, especially the lower pelvic pain (mostly around the area of my left ovary). I had intense period pain and cramping and this pain would continue throughout my entire cycle.

      Other symptoms I experienced was pain with bowel movements, pain with intercourse, painful urination and a feeling like I have a full bladder most of the time, lower back pain and tiredness/fatigue even after just an hour of getting up in the mornings.

      The only way to diagnose endometriosis at this stage is to have a laparoscopy as no ultrasound (pelvic or abdominal), CT-scan, MRI or any other tests are able to diagnose endometriosis.

      Until you have the laparoscopy done and your gyno says for sure that you do have endo, don't get too concerned yet and don't drive yourself crazy worrying about it. You could have another gynaecological problem all together. Something that is far more treatable like an ovarian cyst as ovarian cysts can sometimes be missed even with ultrasound, especially if a sonography technician is not experienced enough to know about ovarian cysts and sometimes ovarian cysts can’t be seen on ultrasound due to their location behind the ovary for example.

      There is no cure for endo and the only major medical treatments treat the symptoms itself not the disease. In other words pain management through drugs etc or surgery to burn/excise the endo implants.

      I would recommend that you see your OB/GYN for further evaluation.

      Good luck :)

  39. QUESTION:
    What are the signs and symptoms of ovarian cysts?
    Trying to figure something out.

    • ANSWER:
      You can't depend on symptoms alone to tell you if you have an ovarian cyst. In fact, you'll likely have no symptoms at all. Or if you do, the symptoms may be similar to those of other conditions, such as endometriosis, pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy or ovarian cancer. Even appendicitis and diverticulitis can produce signs and symptoms that mimic a ruptured ovarian cyst.

      Still, it's important to be watchful of any symptoms or changes in your body and to know which symptoms are serious. If you have an ovarian cyst, you may experience one or more of the following signs and symptoms:

      Menstrual irregularities
      Pelvic pain — a constant or intermittent dull ache that may radiate to your lower back and thighs
      Pelvic pain shortly before your period begins or just before it ends
      Pelvic pain during intercourse (dyspareunia)
      Pain during bowel movements or pressure on your bowels
      Nausea, vomiting or breast tenderness similar to that experienced during pregnancy
      Fullness or heaviness in your abdomen
      Pressure on your rectum or bladder — difficulty emptying your bladder completely

  40. QUESTION:
    How to treat an ovarian cyst?
    I just found out I have a little ovarian cyst. I've already been in pain for two weeks. I can't take anymore. What's gonna happen?? Supposebly they go away on their own, how long till it goes awayy? Help

    • ANSWER:
      Hi,
      You can't depend on symptoms alone to tell you if you have an ovarian cyst. In fact, you'll likely have no symptoms at all. Or if you do, the symptoms may be similar to those of other conditions, such as endometriosis, pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy or ovarian cancer. Even appendicitis and diverticulitis can produce signs and symptoms that mimic a ruptured ovarian cyst.

      Still, it's important to be watchful of any symptoms or changes in your body and to know which symptoms are serious. If you have an ovarian cyst, you may experience one or more of the following signs and symptoms:

      ■Menstrual irregularities
      ■Pelvic pain — a constant or intermittent dull ache that may radiate to your lower back and thighs
      ■Pelvic pain shortly before your period begins or just before it ends
      ■Pelvic pain during intercourse (dyspareunia)
      ■Pain during bowel movements or pressure on your bowels
      ■Nausea, vomiting or breast tenderness similar to that experienced during pregnancy
      ■Fullness or heaviness in your abdomen
      ■Pressure on your rectum or bladder — difficulty emptying your bladder completely
      When to see a doctor
      Seek immediate medical attention if you have:

      ■Sudden, severe abdominal or pelvic pain
      ■Pain accompanied by fever or vomiting
      These signs and symptoms — or those of shock, such as cold, clammy skin, rapid breathing, and lightheadedness or weakness — indicate an emergency and mean that you need to see a doctor right away.
      Treatment depends on your age, the type and size of your cyst, and your symptoms. Your doctor may suggest:

      ■Watchful waiting. You can wait and be re-examined in one to three months if you're in your reproductive years, you have no symptoms and an ultrasound shows you have a simple, fluid-filled cyst. Your doctor will likely recommend that you get follow-up pelvic ultrasounds at periodic intervals to see if your cyst has changed in size.

      Watchful waiting, including regular monitoring with ultrasound, is also a common treatment option recommended for postmenopausal women if a cyst is filled with fluid and is less than 2 centimeters in diameter.

      ■Birth control pills. Your doctor may recommend birth control pills to reduce the chance of new cysts developing in future menstrual cycles. Oral contraceptives offer the added benefit of significantly reducing your risk of ovarian cancer — the risk decreases the longer you take birth control pills.
      ■Surgery. Your doctor may suggest removal of a cyst if it is large, doesn't look like a functional cyst, is growing or persists through two or three menstrual cycles. Cysts that cause pain or other symptoms may be removed.

      Some cysts can be removed without removing the ovary in a procedure known as a cystectomy. Your doctor may also suggest removing the affected ovary and leaving the other intact in a procedure known as oophorectomy. Both procedures may allow you to maintain your fertility if you're still in your childbearing years. Leaving at least one ovary intact also has the benefit of maintaining a source of estrogen production.

      If a cystic mass is cancerous, however, your doctor will advise a hysterectomy to remove both ovaries and your uterus. After menopause, the risk of a newly found cystic ovarian mass being cancerous increases. As a result, doctors more commonly recommend surgery when a cystic mass develops on the ovaries after menopause.

  41. QUESTION:
    What can cause pms to never go away?
    I have occasional breast cramps,pelvic cramps,side pains, and brown spotting, my vagina also feels strange. My vagina canal is sore when I insert 2 fingers. I've been tested for stds,stis,kidney&bladder infections all neg. There now giving me an ultrasound. My boobs also cramp and my nipples itch sometimes. My blood pregnancy test was neg. Have anyone experienced this? Do anyone know what might be wrong?

    • ANSWER:
      You could have something like endometriosis or PCOS. These may interfere with your hormonal levels which may trick you body into thinking it was undergoing PMS all the time.

      Unfortunately only the doctors will be ale to figure this out.

      Good luck!

  42. QUESTION:
    what are the main symptoms of cervical cancer?
    what if I had a normal period and my last pap smear was in January and Feb, and everything was just fine, but I have alot of pain at the bottom of my stomach,and I sometimes have alot of pain when I have sex with my fiance.

    • ANSWER:
      Since abnormal cervical cell changes rarely cause symptoms, it is important to have regular Pap test screening. If cervical cell changes progress to cervical cancer, symptoms may develop. Symptoms of cervical cancer may include:
      Abnormal vaginal bleeding or a significant unexplained change in your menstrual cycle.
      Bleeding when something comes in contact with the cervix, such as during sexual intercourse or insertion of a diaphragm.
      Pain during sexual intercourse.
      Abnormal vaginal discharge containing mucus that may be tinged with blood.
      Symptoms that may occur when your cervical cancer has progressed include:
      Anemia because of abnormal vaginal bleeding.
      Ongoing pelvic, leg, or back pain.
      Urinary problems because of blockage of a kidney or ureter.
      Leakage of urine or fecal content into the vagina because an abnormal opening (fistula) has developed between the vagina and the bladder or rectum.
      Weight loss

      What Causes Painful Sex in Women?
      In many cases, a woman can experience painful sex if there is not sufficient vaginal lubrication. When this occurs, the pain can be resolved if the female becomes more relaxed, if the amount of foreplay is increased, or if the couple uses a sexual lubricant.

      In some cases, a woman can experience painful intercourse if one of the following conditions is present:

      Vaginismus. This is a common condition in which there is a spasm in the vaginal muscles, mainly caused by the fear of being hurt.
      Vaginal infections. These conditions are common and include yeast infections.
      Problems with the cervix (opening to the uterus). In this case, the penis can reach the cervix at maximum penetration, so problems with the cervix (such as infections) can cause pain during deep penetration.
      Problems with the uterus. These problems may include fibroids that can cause deep intercourse pain.
      Endometriosis. A condition in which the endometrium (tissue lining the uterus) grows outside the uterus.
      Problems with the ovaries. Such problems might include cysts on the ovaries.
      Pelvic Inflammatory Disease. The tissues deep inside become badly inflamed and the pressure of intercourse causes deep pain.
      Ectopic pregnancy. A pregnancy in which a fertilized egg develops outside of the uterus.
      Menopause. The vaginal lining can lose its normal moisture and become dry.
      Intercourse too soon after surgery or childbirth
      Sexually transmitted diseases. These may include genital warts, herpes sores or other STDs.
      Injury to the vulva or vagina. These injuries may include a tear from childbirth or from a cut (episiotomy) in the perenium (area of skin between the vagina and the anus) that is made during labor.

  43. QUESTION:
    How can i get rid of period cramps?
    ive already tried advil, laying down, heating pads, and none of them seem to work. what else can i try? PLEASE HELP!!

    • ANSWER:
      Derived from the Greek words dys, meaning “difficult,” meno, meaning monthly, and rrhea, meaning “flow,” dysmenorrhea is the term used to describe painful menstrual cramping.

      Almost all menstruating women experience some cramping during their periods, referred to as either primary dysmenorrhea, which refers to "normal" menstrual pain, or secondary dysmenorrhea, which arises as a result of an underlying disease or disorder. The condition is among the leading complaint in women who present to their physicians for gynecologic pain. More than half of all menstruating women have pain associated with menses, and studies have shown that dysmenorrhea is one of the most common reasons women miss work and/or school. Nearly 10% of women with the condition are incapacitated for up to three days each month[1].

      "Normal" menstrual cramps occur in almost all women due to the release of hormones known as prostaglandins. These are hormones produced by the endometrium (the lining of the uterus), which cause the uterus to contract, sometimes quite painfully, in order to expel the menstrual debris. Some women produce higher levels of prostaglandins than others, so they may hurt more. Increased prostaglandin production can also cause the distressing gastrointestinal symptoms some women may experience. Primary dysmenorrhea most commonly occurs within a few years of menarche (a woman’s first period), while secondary dysmenorrhea can occur years after the onset of menarche.

      Pain with primary dysmenorrhea usually begins on or about the first day of a woman’s period and can last up to 72 hours. In a woman with secondary dysmenorrhea, she may have painful symptoms occurring a week or more prior to her period and lasting even after her flow has stopped. In the case of a woman who has secondary dysmenorrhea, there are other reasons for her pain, including diseases or conditions like Endometriosis, Adenomyosis, Pelvic Inflammatory Disease, cervical stenosis, structural abnormalities in the vagina or uterus itself, fibroids, or similar concern.

      Dysmenorrhea can be diagnosed based on symptoms, patient history, physical findings, and when appropriate, diagnostic tests such as vaginal or pelvic ultrasound, hysteroscopy (an examination of the inside of the uterus) and/or hysterosalpingogram (an evaluation of the uterus and fallopian tubes). In cases of secondary dysmenorrhea, laparoscopic surgery can be very beneficial at affording a diagnosis and treatment of the underlying cause. Symptoms often include painful pelvic or abdominal cramping, headache, suprapubic cramping (an area of the pelvis overlying the bladder), backache, pain radiating down into the thigh area, nausea/vomiting/diarrhea and even syncope (a temporary of consciousness). Upon physical exam, those with primary dysmenorrhea exhibit normal vital signs and a tender uterus, but no cervical or ovarian abnormalities. Patients with secondary dysmenorrhea may exhibit varied vital signs depending on the underlying cause and may be found to have tenderness, nodules, and/or enlargement of the uterosacral ligaments, the rectovaginal septum or other adnexa (the region of the pelvis that encompasses the ovary, fallopian tube and surrounding broad ligament).

      Treatment options are based on the underlying cause of the pain (primary v. secondary dysmenorrhea) and range from medical to alternative therapies. Commonly, Non-Steroidal Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) like aspirin or ibuprofen may be recommended to help with cramping, and more recently, COX-2 inhibitors have also been approved for treatment of dysmenorrhea. Prescription painkillers may also be recommended where appropriate. Combination (ethynylestradiol and progestin) oral contraceptives can also help reduce prostaglandin production, thereby alleviating the cramps. Heating pads can also offer temporary resolve of the pain. Avoidance of smoking (which has been shown increase cramps) and reduced intake or total avoidance of salt, sugar, high fat and dairy products, alcohol and caffeine can also afford relief, as can increasing the intake of fiber, calcium and complex carbohydrates. Recent studies also indicate that Vitamin B6 complex, calcium and magnesium supplements, and Omega III fatty acids (fish oil supplements) also may help relieve cramping. Pelvic massage, exercise (which releases endorphins, the body’s own natural painkillers), Yoga (the cat stretch and the pelvic tilt), visualization techniques, aromatherapy, acupuncture and herbs like Dong Quai, Ginseng, Stragalus root, Ligusticum root and White Peony root are also said to be helpful alternative techniques for managing the pain.

      If Endometriosis or another disorder is the underlying or secondary cause for dysmenorrhea, you will benefit most from having the disease diagnosed and effectively removed. It is important to determine if the cramps are "normal," or if they could be due to another cause. Pain that is crippling or incapacitating is never normal and should be investigated as soon as possible so that appropriate diagnosis and subsequent treatment can be rendered.

      Reference:
      [1] Jamieson DJ, Steege JF. The prevalence of dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia, pelvic pain, and irritable bowel syndrome in primary care practices. Obstet Gynecol. 1996;87(1):55-58.

  44. QUESTION:
    Every month at around the same time I get a really sore upper back?
    What does that mean? I don't do anything really different, it just happens. Every single month, around two weeks before my period - my upper back kills! It hurts so bad that I can't go about my things on that day every month :(
    Wow! Yeah I'll have to go see a doctor. Funny that you mention that, as I also get stomach pain throughout the month as well for no reason.. Thank you for your answer!

    • ANSWER:
      Go and visit your doctor to check it isn't related to your menstrual cycle. There's a condition called endometriosis which isn't as well known as it should be. Basically, as you know on your period your endometrium layer breaks down in your womb and comes out as blood through your vagina. In endometriosis, the cells which produce the endo layer plant themselves all over the place outside of the womb. They can grow on your stomach, kidneys, ovaries, bladder, even your lungs. Every month when your hormones tell the endo layer to shed, these stray cells also shed which causes pain. One of the symptoms is back pain, which is why I mention it to you now. But like I said so many people have no idea what endometriosis is...It's well worth you seeing your doctor about it.

      EDIT: I'm glad I could help :) Here's a site for you if you want more information. They're a friendly bunch, so don't be afraid to register and ask questions :) http://www.endometriosis.org.uk/endolounge/

  45. QUESTION:
    Has anyone had problems with using Depo Provera injections?
    I have used Depo Proera on and off now for about 8 years. I began due to Endometriosis and it was a perfect solution to cease menstration and try to reduce the severity and pain. NOTHING ELSE HAD WORKED! (Even steriods and i had been diagnosed at twelve so i had many years of experiements). I stopped having the injection to conceive our children (and was very fortunate - it only took about a year). Now, due to painful menstration AND wanting adequate contraception, i commenced the injections once again. I have now been experiencing several side effects including headaches - everyday, joint pain, and i began menstrating again etc etc. Sick of whinging. So now i have stopped them for about two months. In that time i have been menstrating every week. One week off, one week on etc.

    Have you experienced this? Any suggestions? Doc is at a loss and i feel like im back to square one. Any sites you can suggest? It would be most welcomed.

    • ANSWER:
      I had significant problems as a result of depo injections, mostly related to regaining fertility - 18 months from date of last shot, I still hadn't started cycling again. From there, it took 3 rounds of assorted medications to induce my cycle, and overall, about 4 years to conceive. However, that doesn't seem to be what you are looking for.

      Other problems I had related to the depo were muscle cramps and joint pain. The joint pain was so severe at times that I was forced to use elevators instead of stairs, and I couldn't grip a bottle/jar top to twist it open. In addition, I had some gall bladder problems that were attributed to the depo.

      Interestingly, I only had these problems the 2nd time I used depo. I was on it before my first child, loved it, had no issues conceiving after, and went on it again after my 1st. The 2nd time around brought on all my trouble.

      If the depo was working for you, maybe Mirena's IUD would too? Theres a site here (http://www.endo-resolved.com/treatment.html) that indicates there has been some success with this.
      Good luck to you.

  46. QUESTION:
    Ive been haveing really bad pains on the left side of my stomach, what can this be?
    It's been accuring every other day or so, and its painfull. What could it be and how do i prevent it?

    • ANSWER:
      Ovarian Cysts

      Doctor's PCOS Healthy Diet eBook
      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      An ovarian cyst is a fluid-filled sac usually found on the surface of an ovary. There are many types of ovarian cysts, each with a different underlying cause. Many women will have them at some point during their childbearing years. Most are completely without symptoms. However, some types can cause serious health problems.

      You have two walnut-sized ovaries. These are located on either side of the uterus, nestled under the fringed ends of the fallopian or uterine tubes. These tubes create a pathway for a released egg to reach the center of the uterus. During the menstrual cycle, one ovary will develop and mature an egg. The egg is encased in a sac called a follicle. About day 14 of the menstrual cycle, ovulation occurs and the egg is released from the ovary.

      Are They Dangerous?
      Symptoms
      Types of Ovarian Cysts
      How They Are Diagnosed
      How They Are Treated
      Can They Be Prevented?
      Diet and Ovarian Cysts

      Picture of Ovarian Cyst

      Are Ovarian Cysts Dangerous?
      Most are harmless "functional” or "physiologic" cysts. Between 4% and 10% of women of childbearing age develop a potentially serious metabolic dysfunction, known as polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Multiple cysts are one hallmark of PCOS. PCOS also includes hormonal disruptions that can result in persistent acne, excessive body hair, thinning scalp hair, infertility, obesity, and increased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and uterine or breast cancer.

      Ovarian cysts can cause discomfort during intercourse. They may bleed, rupture, or twist the ovary, causing significant pelvic pain. Sudden or severe pelvic pain, especially with vomiting or a fever, should be treated as a medical emergency.

      Some ovarian cysts can become cancerous. These are all rare cancers and are most common in women in their fifties. Cancerous ovaries are usually not painful unless they grow very large before they are discovered. Annual pelvic exams are the best preventative method for detecting gynecologic cancers in the early, most treatable stages.

      Top

      Ovarian Cyst Symptoms
      It’s not easy to know whether you have ovarian cysts. You can have cysts without any symptoms at all, or you may have vague abdominal symptoms that could suggest a number of health problems that are completely unrelated to ovarian cysts.

      Some abdominal conditions with symptoms similar to painful ovarian cysts are: appendicitis, diverticulitis, intestinal inflammation or obstruction, gall bladder disease, kidney stone, or bladder infection. Gynecologic problems with symptoms similar to ovarian cysts are: pelvic inflammatory disease, endometriosis, ectopic or tubal pregnancy, or mittleschmirtz, the pain some women feel at mid-cycle, after normal ovulation.

      In general, one or more of the following symptoms could be related to ovarian cysts:

      Menstrual irregularities.
      Pelvic pain – a dull ache, either constant or intermittent, possibly radiating to the low back or thighs.
      Pelvic pain during intercourse.
      Pelvic pain just before your period begins or just after it ends.
      A fullness or heaviness in your abdomen.
      Feeling of pressure on your bladder or rectum.
      Nausea or breast tenderness similar to when you’re pregnant.
      Continuous, creamy or clear-like-eggwhite vaginal discharge that persists unchanged for a month or more.
      Any of these symptoms are sufficient cause to consult with your health professional.

      If you have sudden, severe or spasmodic pain in your lower abdomen, especially if accompanied by fever, vomiting, or signs of shock (cold, clammy skin, rapid breathing, weakness), go immediately to the emergency room of the nearest hospital.

      Top
      Types of Benign Ovarian Cysts
      1) Functional (physiologic) cysts. The most common type of ovarian cyst is the functional cyst, also called a physiologic cyst. "Physiologic" means the cyst is non-pathogenic. It develops from tissue that changes during the process of ovulation. Your ovaries normally grow cystic structures called follicles each month. Typically, these resolve back to normal ovarian tissue after ovulation. But sometimes there is a glitch and the fluid-filled cyst stays on for a while.

      Functional cysts fall into two categories; follicular cyst, and corpus luteum cyst.

      Follicular cyst. The pituitary gland in your brain sends a message, by increasing luteinizing hormone (LH), to the follicle holding the ripening egg. This is called a “LH surge”. Normally, the egg is released from the follicle and starts down the fallopian tube where it may then become fertilized by a sperm cell. If the LH surge does not occur, the follicle doesn’t rupture or release its egg. Instead, it grows until it becomes a cyst. These cysts seldom cause pain, are usually harmless, and may disappear within two or three menstrual cycles.

      Corpus luteum cyst. When there is a successful LH surge and the egg is released, the follicle responds by becoming a new, temporarily little secretory gland called the corpus luteum. The corpus luteum produces large amounts of progesterone and a little bit of estrogen, to prepare the uterus for conception.
      But occasionally, after the egg is released, the escape hatch seals off prematurely and tissue accumulates inside, causing the corpus luteum to enlarge. This type of cyst will usually disappear after a few weeks. Rarely, a corpus luteum cyst can grow to 3"-4" in diameter and potentially bleed into itself, or twist your ovary, thus causing pelvic or abdominal pain.

      2) Dermoid cyst. A dermoid cyst is mainly fat but can also contain a mix of different tissues. They are often small and usually don’t cause symptoms. Very rarely, they become large and rupture, causing bleeding into the abdomen, which is a medical emergency.

      3) Endometrioma or "chocolate cyst". These are cysts that form when endometrial tissue (the type that lines the inside of the uterus) invades an ovary. It is responsive to monthly hormonal changes, which causes the cyst to fill with blood. It’s called a “chocolate cyst” because the blood is a dark, reddish-brown color. Multiple endometriomas are found in the condition called "endometriosis". Although often asymptomatic, chocolate cysts can be painful, especially during your period or during intercourse.

      4) Cystadenoma. Cystadenomas are cysts that develop from cells on the surface of your ovary. They are usually benign. Occasionally, they can become quite large and thus interfere with abdominal organs and cause pain.

      5) Multiple cysts – the polycystic ovary. Women who don’t ovulate on a regular basis can develop multiple cysts. The ovaries are often enlarged and contain many small cysts clustered under a thickened, outer capsule. There are many factors causing a woman to not ovulate and develop polycystic ovaries. Polycystic ovarian syndrome is a complex condition that involves multiple hormonal and organ system dysfunction. Multiple ovarian cysts are just one facet of this disorder.

      Top

      How Ovarian Cysts are Diagnosed
      Pelvic Exam. An ovarian cyst may be discovered by your doctor during a pelvic exam, while she is palpating your ovaries. If a cyst is suspected, an ultrasound is usually the next step.

      Pelvic Ultrasound. Ultrasound is a painless procedure where sound waves are transmitted through your pelvic area and an image of your ovaries and uterus is shown on a video screen. The image is analyzed to determine the nature of the cyst.

      Laparoscopy. Laparoscopy is a surgical procedure performed when your doctor wants to see the cyst. A thin, lighted telescope, called a laparoscope, is inserted through a small incision into your abdomen. Laparoscopy may be used for treatment as well as diagnosis.

      Top

      How Ovarian Cysts are Usually Treated
      Watchful Waiting. If you have no symptoms and ultrasound shows a small, fluid-filled cyst, your doctor may simply schedule another pelvic exam and ultrasound in six weeks. The concept behind watchful waiting is to not actively treat the cyst until does not go away as your hormones change. An unchanging or growing cystic ovary needs further investigation.

      Birth Control Pills. If you have a functional cyst that is larger in size and causing some symptoms, birth control pills may be prescribed. The purpose of birth control pills is to alter your hormone levels so the cyst will shrink. Birth control pills will reduce the probability of other cysts growing.

      Surgery. Your cyst may be surgically removed if it is large, solid or filled with debris, persistently growing, irregularly shaped, or causing pain or other symptoms. If the cyst is not cancerous, it can be surgically removed without also removing the ovary. This is called a cystectomy. In some cases, the doctor may want to remove the affected ovary, while leaving the other intact in order to maintain your ability to have a normal hormone cycle.

      Top

      Can Ovarian Cysts Be Prevented?
      It may not be possible to completely eliminate ovarian cysts. However, you can minimize the probability that they will form and grow.

      You can do this in several fundamental ways:

      Improve the quality of your diet.
      Increase your exercise.
      Control chronic stress.
      Use bio-identical hormones, supplements and herbs to help balance your hormonal system.
      Improve your overall health.

      Top

      Diet and Ovarian Cysts
      A recent study from the Institute of Research Pharmacology in Italy analyzed the diet over a ten-year span of 225 women with benign ovarian cysts and 450 women who did not have ovarian cysts.

      The researchers discovered that the type of food eaten influenced the development of cysts. For example, they said that women who consumed the most beef and cheese developed the most ovarian cysts. In contrast, consumption of green vegetables provided a strong protective effect. This study makes it clear that what you eat will influence whether or not you develop ovarian cysts.

      We have written an in-depth diet ebook for women with PCOS. But the dietary recommendations in the ebook are the same for ovarian cysts. If you have this problem, consider purchasing The Natural Diet Solution to PCOS and Infertility ebook.

      Source: Chiaffarino F et al, Diet and risk of seromucinous benign ovarian cysts, Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 2003 Oct 10;110(2):196-200.

  47. QUESTION:
    Can vaginal yeast infections cause bladder pain?
    I do not have a UTI, I was tested, but have had chronic bladder fullness or pain for a week. I thought it might be due to an allergic reaction to doxycycline, but it's been 6 days since I stopped taking it, and the bladder problem still exists. i don't think i have a vaginal yeast infection, but it is possible. Anyone experience bladder fullness with a yeast infection...

    • ANSWER:
      see im not sure what exact symtoms you might be speaking of, but the fact you made a coment about bladder fullness, and pain. im thinking it might be the same issue i have, except mine doesnt usuraly last more then a few days at a time, and is at random.

      im now going to copy and paste what someone told me:
      them:
      get checked out (and check out online) interstitial cystitis... it seems to be common with endo.... and you really sound exactly like me with your bladder....

      me:
      someone gave me that term b4, but that term is for anythign that has no other explination, and endo pain can cause such issues, therefor being an explination, thats how i understand it at least?

      i spoke with my 2 gyn's about it (one who is private, and one who is doing my surgery) and an ER doctor.

      ive been checked for infections, but the fact it for a while at least (not really any more) came about the same time before my period would start) now it comes when it wants to, like all of yesterday.

      but no matter what, so if thats what it is... what can be done about it???

      Them:
      if i had a scanner i'd show you that it's not for anything with no other explanation... my bladder looks worse than anything the endo has done for me... let me see if i can find a good explanation for you... hold on...
      http://ic-network.com/ there's one org for it.... http://www.ic-network.com/whatisinterstitialcystitis/ and an explanation from them. (If you don't want to follow links right now, here's the biggest part of their explanation for you to know - When an IC bladder is examined using a procedure called hydrodistention with cystoscopy physicians often find small, bleeding wounds, also known as petechial hemorrhages or glomerulations. These are usually caused by recurring irritation, such as coffee or soda. About ten percent of patients may have larger, more painful wounds, called Hunner’s Ulcers. Some patients with mild IC may have bladders that appear normal during a cystoscopy. IC patients rarely test positive for infection in standard urinalysis and urine cultures" -
      and another ic org http://www.ichelp.org/ and their explanation: http://www.ichelp.org/PatientInformation/TreatmentOptions/Brochures/WhatisIC/tabid/209/Default.aspx (Rule out other diseases and/or conditions that have symptoms resembling IC. These diseases may include bladder cancer, kidney problems, tuberculosis, vaginal infections, sexually transmitted diseases, endometriosis, radiation cystitis and neurological disorders.
      Perform a cystoscopy with hydrodistention under general anesthesia if no infection is present and no other disorder is discovered. If distention under anesthesia is not performed, the diagnosis of IC may be missed. Cystoscopy during a routine office visit may not reveal the characteristic abnormalities of IC and can be painful for those who have IC. It is necessary to distend the bladder under general or regional anesthesia in order to see the pinpoint hemorrhages on the bladder wall that are the hallmark of this disease. A biopsy of the bladder wall may be necessary at this time to rule out other diseases such as bladder cancer and to assist in the diagnosis of IC. IC is not associated with bladder cancer. )

      ...................................................................................
      going to stop now, if you want more then email me and i will explain more of what i learned from this girl.

  48. QUESTION:
    What is the correct name for a vaginal disorder.......?
    that causes extreme pain during sex? and you can't get anything up there not even the smallest tampon and even if you are successful it is extremely painful? Whether you have delayed puberty(and over the age of 20) or not?
    If you don't know, DONT ANSWER!!!

    • ANSWER:
      It may be endometriosis, or dyspareunia. If you are positive you don't suffer from endometriosis, then read this.

      During sex a woman may feel pain in the vulva, at the opening of the vagina, within the vagina, or deep inside. Vulvar pain is pain felt on the surface (outside) of the vagina. Vaginal pain is felt within the vagina. Deep pain can occur in the lower back, pelvic region, uterus and bladder.
      Vulvar Pain
      Pain can occur when some part of the vulva is touched. The vulva may be tender or irritated from using soaps or over-the-counter vaginal sprays or douches. Other causes include scars, cysts or infections.

      Vaginal Pain
      Vaginal dryness. The most common cause of pain inside the vagina is lack of moisture. This can occur with certain medications, with certain medical conditions, or because you are not aroused. It can occur at certain times of your life such as during or just after pregnancy, while breastfeeding, or near or after menopause.

      Vaginitis. Another cause of vaginal pain is vaginitis — an inflammation of the vagina. The most common symptoms of vaginitis are discharge, itching and burning of the vagina and vulva. Vaginitis has many possible causes, such as yeast or bacterial infection.

      Vaginismus. Vaginismus is a spasm of the muscles at the opening of the vagina. It causes pain when your partner tries to enter the vagina. In some cases, vaginismus is present the first time a woman has — or tries to have — sex. The pain also may occur during a pelvic exam.

      Vaginismus also can be a response to a fear of some kind, such as being afraid of getting pregnant.

      Deep Pain
      Pain that starts deep inside may be a warning sign of an internal problem. Pain that happens when the penis touches the cervix can have many causes:

      Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)
      Problems with the uterus
      Endometriosis
      A pelvic mass
      Bowel or bladder disease
      Scar tissue (adhesions)
      Ovarian cysts

      In any case, you are entitled to enjoy a healthy sexual life, so start looking for help before it damages your self esteem.

      VAGINISMUS! Ok?

  49. QUESTION:
    Why do i have abdominal pain?
    Before I pee i have really bad pains and it feels weird when i walk, and it feels like A lott of pressure.
    and recently i've been having really bad stomach pains leading tonauseaa. especially when i wake up in the morning my stomach moves weird like something is just moving around in mystomache like air bubbles and then ill get really bad stomach pain, and it hurts so bad, it will make me nauseated. Any idea what it could be?

    • ANSWER:
      See your health care provider as soon as possible. Abdominal pain can be a sign of a serious condition. Fortunately, minor causes are much more frequent. Location of the pain can help in suggesting the cause.

      Appendix pain usually occurs in the right lower quarter of the abdomen
      Diverticulitis usually hurts in the left lower quarter of the abdomen
      Kidney pain, the back
      Gallbladder, the right upper quarter
      Stomach, the upper abdomen
      Bladder or female organs, the lower areas

      Exceptions to these rules do occur.
      Pain from hollow organs--such as the bowel or gallbladder--tends to be intermittent and resembles gas pains or colic. Pain from solid organs--kidneys, spleen, liver-- tends to be more constant. Stomach ulcers tend to create burning pain in the upper abdomen which usually gets better after a meal or a dose of antacid. There are exceptions to these rules as well.
      If the pain is very severe or if bleeding from the bowel occurs, see a doctor. Similarly, if there has been a significant recent abdominal injury, see the doctor--a ruptured spleen or other major problem is possible.
      Pain during pregnancy is potentially serious and must be evaluated. An "ectopic pregnancy"--in the fallopian tube rather than in the uterus--can occur before a women is even aware she is pregnant. Pain in only one area suggests a more serious problem than generalized pain; again, there are exceptions. Pain that recurs with the menstrual cycle, especially premenstrualally, is typical of endometriosis; or difficult periods. Pain relievers such as Tagamet and Pepcid AC, may help. See your doctor. I hope this helps you. And good luck.

  50. QUESTION:
    Who has had experience with the merena/ Women only please?
    I have been asked by my gynocologist if i want to have the merena put into my ovary to help prevent endometriosis and periods.
    They gave me a pamphlet but i cant decide whether to have it put in or not. I understand what it is but i am on 17 and i dont know what to do.

    Please help.

    I have to make a decision by the 3rd November

    • ANSWER:
      They don't put the Mirena into your ovary, they put it in your uterus.

      I had severe endometriosis, not only on my ovaries but also on the utero-sacral ligaments, bladder and colon. I was in severe pain for years, starting when I was 13. I've had 7 laparoscopies so far and been on a dozen medications and nothing helped. Then a new doctor suggested the Mirena. I was 22 years old and willing to try anything. The Pill didn't work (I'd been on about 5 different ones by then) I'd also been on Depo Provera which just made matters worse because I was bleeding non-stop and picked up 10kg.

      The Mirena was a blessing from above. I haven't had problems since!

      As far as I'm concerned the Mirena was the best thing that ever happened to me. Try it, if it doesn't work you can always have it removed.

endometriosis bladder pain

Does Dr Miracle Hair Products Work

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Hi, I would like to know if there are distributors of Dr Miracles hair products in Nigeria.Could please send?
    me their email address.I am intrested in purchasing the Dr Miracles hair products in Nigeria.Thank you.

    Emily.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Emily. I wrote to Dr Miracles, and this is the information they sent me. This company distributes Dr. Miracles products in Africa, specifically Nigeria. Good Luck!!

      Source4 Africa
      Brian
      Tel 212.684.5700
      info@source4africa.com
      www.Source4Africa.com

  2. QUESTION:
    What are some good hair products to make your hair grow faster?
    I want my hair to grow faster and Im looking for some hair products i can use that will moisturize it and help it grow longer fast.

    Ive looked at these products:
    V05 hot oil treatments
    Dr. Miracle

    Let me know if you used any of these on your hair and tell me if they worked or not?

    • ANSWER:

  3. QUESTION:
    What are the best hair products for hair growth(without harsh chemicals)?
    Most hair care products have harsh chemicals!I wanted to use Dr.Miracle's hair products, but heard bad things about those products!Just wondering what products benefit healthy,thick,growing hair!

    • ANSWER:
      Mane and Tail horse shampoo. You can buy it at Walmart.

  4. QUESTION:
    What is the best hair color brand for minority women who relax their hair?
    Help!! I am a Black American female with damage hair. I use a relaxer to straighten my hair, but December 2006, I started to use permanet color too (due to gray hair). Now I have damaged my hair using two chemicals.

    1. Has anyone tried Dr. Miracle's hair products for damage hair?

    2. What is the best and least damaging product in hair colors to use?

    Thanks !!

    • ANSWER:
      Definatley Semi Permanents. Especially after relaxing your hair. The Relaxer chemicals have already opened up your cuticles which means the semi color is enough to sink a little deeper and last longer than usual. Permanent color is too strong because it also does the work of opening up your cuticle layer to deposit color. You don't need to double process like that. Sodium Hydroxide is a very harsh chemical and is sometimes taken for granted, it's nothing to play around with. Go to your stylist whenever you need color. Highlights are also not a good idea when you have relaxed hair.

  5. QUESTION:
    How Can I make My hair Grow Faster??
    I Just Bought DR MIRACLES Hair products and was wondering does it make you hair grow if so how long does it take to work is ther anything i can use

    • ANSWER:
      It's not going to make your hair grow overnight but because I used it I can definitly say that it works. The best thing to do to make your hair grow is go natural, no perms, stay away from dyes no matter how bad you want to change the color, keep heat out of your hair, and dont wash it no more than 2 times a week. Oh yeah and if you have split ends no matter how short it already is, in order for it to grow get your ends clip. And grease your scalp not just your hair and when you grease it dont drown it in grease just enough to keep your scalp from being dry

  6. QUESTION:
    how can you make african american hair grow?
    If you have african american hair that is breaking, like really bad, how can you make it grow faster. Besides cutting the ends to make it even, how can you make it grow faster and stop breaking? Like, any hair products besides Dr.Miracles. Maybe a regimen that worked for you.

    • ANSWER:
      You can't make hair grow faster, but there are things you can do to start retaining length - like keeping breakage to a minimum.

      Firstly, do you know why your hair is constantly breaking off? If not, you need to get to the bottom of this immediately so that you can stop damaging it. If you relax your hair then cut down on how often you relax. Stop using heat and bleaching your hair if that's what you're doing. Don't roughly comb or brush your hair and don't wear tight hairstyles. All of these things contribute to breakage. Start learning about the ingredients they put in hair products because some of them will dry out your hair and make it worse. It does matter if you're relaxed or natural because they're different hair types.

      Start doing a regular protein treatment. Find a product that purports to stop breakage, is anti-breakage, a reconstructor, or something that infers that it helps prevent or stop breakage and start using it regularly. I love Nexxus Emergency, but it shouldn't be used on relaxed hair (warning on the package). There are also home-made hair treatments you can do to make your hair stronger.

      Buy buttermilk (protein), non-bleached wheat flour, honey (moisture and shine, and olive oil (strengthens and adds shine. Mix all the ingredients except the flour. Put the mixed ingredients in the microwave for a few seconds until it's warm (not hot). The ingredients still won't be properly mixed together, but it just needs to be warm. Add the flour and mix it together until it's a paste that you can slather on your hair. Apply it to your hair and add a shower cap or clear plastic cap and leave it on for about 5-10 minutes. Rinse your hair completely. It doesn't smell too good because of the buttermilk, but it works wonders. I've always noticed my hair is stronger after doing this treatment and others have noticed a difference in my hair too. How much of each ingredient you use will depend on what your hair needs, so just experiment with different proportions of the ingredients.

      You can also do hot oil treatments with the olive oil to make your hair stronger. You can use the honey by itself to give your hair shine (or sheen, if you're natural).

      Make sure you're keeping your hair and scalp clean by washing regularly. Andre Walker, Oprah's hairstylist, says that healthy hair is hair that's clean and conditioned. I usually wash my hair about once a week. I used to do it more when my hair was shorter, but now it takes too much time.

      Don't expect results overnight. If your hair is severely damaged then you might have to cut off the damaged hair and grow it healthy again. Make sure you give your products at least 2 weeks to start showing results, and make sure you use those products regularly for the best benefit. Your hair is damaged, so you most likely won't see results after one use.

  7. QUESTION:
    What is the best hair product for african americans that stimulates growth and healthness?
    I just need some answers.. Is Dr. Miracles products good? And what about Doo Gro? Which one is better

    • ANSWER:
      i'm using Dr. Miracle
      but i just started using it
      it seems like i need a perm more often
      so that's a sign that my hair's growing faster
      but i dont know for sure yet

  8. QUESTION:
    Is there anyone out there that has tried any Dr.Miracle hair products? If so, how did it work for you?
    I need to find hair care products that promote hair growth and will also make my hair more healthy, and I seen the commercials about Dr. Miracle and wanted to get some opinions on how they worked for you.

    • ANSWER:
      I currently use Dr. Miracles Relaxer. I love it. My hair has new growth already and I just applied the relaxer to my hair 3 weeks ago. More new growth than the other relaxers. But I also use Mane 'N Tail Hair products too. Mane 'N Tail products works great also. I've used all of their products. Shampoo, Conditioner, Leave - In Conditioner, Carrot Oil Cream and Olive Oil Cream. I notice a lot of growth, especially when I message my scalp with the Carrot Oil Cream and Olive Oil Cream. Moisture and messaging the scalp promotes hair growth, and less usage of heat type appliances will also help.

  9. QUESTION:
    Has anyone ever used the Dr. Miracle hair growth product?
    Have you ever used the Dr. Miracle hair products? If so did you like it and what were the results.
    (The hair growth products for African american hair)

    • ANSWER:
      i have used Dr.Miracle growth hair product, and i like it except after a while when u use it it makes ur head tingle alot. and when i say alot i mean alot

  10. QUESTION:
    How can I get my hair to be longer and thicker?
    I usually have my braids because it's soo short. Most of my hair is broken and damamged especially in the middle. And most of my hair has cut off at the front.
    I want longer thicker hair. What products do I use?
    I've heard about Dr. Miracle, does it really work, which one should I use, how much is it?

    What relaxers should I use and how often.

    Please help.
    I am African American

    • ANSWER:
      well herbal essences has some really good products for several different kinds of hair including dry, damaged, oily, frizzy, curly, straight, and color treated hair, so you can probably find what you're looking for in their products, and most of them are around maybe 5 or 6 dollars.

  11. QUESTION:
    Does the Docter Miracle hair product really work ? Have you gotten good results?
    My hair is badly damaged and i heard about Dr. Miracle but i wanted get some feedback before i went out and bought it .

    • ANSWER:
      Doctor Miracle is a phony and I wouldn't recommend it to my worst enemy.
      Come visit me on my facebook, my hair grew from 2 inches long to past my waist, look up Steffie Francais Hair Care.

  12. QUESTION:
    What is the best product for hair growth?
    I have eczema and bad hair damage.
    I am deciding between:
    Mane 'n Tail Deep Moisturizing Shampoo
    Doo Gro
    Dr. Miracle
    I am african-american, so I don't want Pantene, Avon, and stuff like that cause I know it won't work for my type of hair.
    What is the best product that can help hair growth?
    Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      You can try braiding your hair and keeping moisture in it.

      Wrapping your hair often allows your hair to grow a lot.

      You should comb your hair everyday this lets the air flow through and gives the roots time to breathe and stretch out. Doo Gro does work and so does Dr. Miracle. I do not use either one of them but my mom has and it doesn good for her. You may want to try finding a beauty shop where you can go to either bi-weekly or weekly or if that is not available, you can do a hot oil treatment just by using a shower cap and either hair grease or some kind of oil. I know a lot of tricks when it comes to hair growth its all about you take care and treat your hair. but if you think you have a serious problem you may want to go to the doctor. you can email me at brejackson1980@yahoo.com for more tips if you'd life.

  13. QUESTION:
    What kind of Hair growth products out there are really good?
    My sister is trying to grow her hair out. She's tried Dr. Miracle and Doo Grow and Baby don't be Bald and some others I can't remember, it showed little results after 5-7 months of use. So is there any other good hair growth products that she can use that can show some results?

    • ANSWER:
      Hair Care for African American Women

      It`s a fact that healthy hair has faster growth, vibrancy and resilience. But how do you achieve healthy hair?

      Start With Proper Nutrition

      This is probably the single most important factor to having healthy hair. Just like any part of the body, the hair needs certain nutrients in certain amounts to be healthy. The problem is that the average person`s diet doesn`t supply all of these nutrients in the proper amounts. There are many ways to increase your vitamin intake – eat dark vegetables, nuts, whole grains and pure oils. Or try a hair vitamin. Look for products with essential oils like vitamins E and A, flax seed and borage oils. Be sure your hair vitamin also includes significant amounts of B6, B12, Niacin, Biotin, pantothenic acid and folic acid – the elements found in healthy hair. Be sure any products you use inside or outside are formulated for relaxed or chemically treated hair.

      Be Sure Your Hair Is Properly Moisturized

      Dry hair is unhealthy and can lead to problems like split ends. Some people are lucky enough not to have dry hair naturally, but they are in the minority. Look for products that contain jojoba oil. Adding Jojoba Oil to your skin cream can help improve skin tone. It is a natural emollient, making the skin softer, cleaner, and all around healthier. These properties make it ideal for use on the scalp to clear away build-up that can inhibit healthy hair growth. In addition to helping relieve dry, itchy, and flaky scalp, jojoba oil can also nourish and condition hair follicles, thus preventing or repairing damaged hair.

      Keep Your Scalp Clean

      Having a clean scalp is essential to healthy hair growth. Over time sebum can build up in the hair follicles which will stunt the growth of the hair and cause a "thinning" look. It`s important to clean the scalp thoroughly to prevent this. Look for products that contain de-ionized water, emu oil )which acts as a super moisturizer that infuses dry, brittle hair with vibrant shine), Shou Wu extract, silk protein, calcium, vitamin E, vitamin B12, vitamin B6, vitamin B2, folic acid, collagen and citric acid. These nutrients promote healthy, fast growing hair and are reported to work together to simultaneously soften and strengthen hair. Again, be sure your product is formulated for not only relaxed, color treated, and braided hair, but for natural hair as well.

      Avoid Harsh Chemicals

      Unfortunately, chemical treatments like relaxers, curly perms, and coloring can cause damage to the hair. Relaxers can be particularly damaging because they work by bringing down the bonds that hold the hair together resulting in breakage. Use products that contain natural ingredients. These ingredients should be the first listed in an ingredient list on your product label.

  14. QUESTION:
    How to be a natural beauty?
    I am an african american young woman and I just want tips on how to be a natural beauty no makeup, fake nail, false hair. I might add that my hair is really damaged, broken off, and short, and I wondering if dr. miracles is a good hair product. I just need tips on how to be natural and what products to use.

    • ANSWER:
      To be a natural beauty, you need to make sure to take care of yourself.

      -have proper nutrition - nutrition is important because fruits, vegetables , healthy fats have plenty of antioxidents in them which can improve the look of your skin, eyes, hair, nails, etc. and keep your body trim : take a mutivitamin & fish oil capsule every day; eat plenty of fruits & vegetables; eat plenty of healthy fats; consume at least 8 cups of water per day; drink green tea; don't consume too much caffeine, alcohol, or sugar because they are not only not good for your organs but can diminish the glow of your skin

      -have a beauty routine: wash your face every morning and night; moisturize every morning with a moisturizer that contains spf and every night with a night cream; exfoliate your skin to remove dead skin cells (mix 2 parts brown sugar w/ 1 part olive oil to make a natural scrub); brush your teeth with a whitening tooth paste (arm and hammer makes a really good one); use a clarifying shampoo on your hair once a week or so to reduce any buildup; use olive oil (or mayo or eggs) in your hair to help repair it

      -exercise: you don't need to have a specific exercise routine, but by getting outside and moving for at least 30 min per day can really improve how you look .. it increases your blood flow and will help your skin glow. you don't need to go to the gym, you can just walk around the neighbourhood, jump rope, run stairs, go swimming, etc . you could also incorporate some light weights into your routine to help improve muscle tone (don't worry, you won't get bulky!)

      what natural beauty comes down to is being healthy on the inside. treat your body like a temple and you will see results. if you're interested in improving your diet/exercise check out sparkteens.com .. I use it's sister site sparkpeople.com and can say it has helped me immensely with being healthy. it's completely free and has tons of info on how to be healthy

  15. QUESTION:
    Why do a lot of the black hair products stink?
    I just got Dr. Miracles for my hair and put it on and it stinks so bad! It stank for about a day. I felt the "tingle" all day though and I still feel it two days later.. is this normal? And also why do our hair products stink when we need to grow our hair?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes Dr.Miracle stink something bad so I personally dont use it, But as to why all our hair products do actually stink idk. Im gonna start going to a big salon like in the mall and buy thier products.

  16. QUESTION:
    Can i use Organic deep penetration shampoo and conditioner for my clip in hair extensions?
    i use organic products on my natural hair, can i also use Dr. Miracle products for my clip- in hair extensions?

    • ANSWER:
      anything organic is probably best for your extensions. The hair is so processed so sulfates and that in other shampoos just do more damadge, organic is deffinitley the way to go, especially deep penetration, because it will easly get all the product you've used out the hair cuticles where the is no natural oils in the hair to repel it. :)

  17. QUESTION:
    What are the best hair growth products for African American hair with severe breakage?
    I get my ends clipped regularly, but some reason i still have breakage and my hair doesn't seem to be growing. I wash my hair every three weeks (I have to extend my washes because my hair is very dry and frequent washes make it brittle) and condition with cholestrol but my growth is VERY slow. Any recommendations???
    I have used DooGro, B&B Super Gro and Dr. Miracle's.

    • ANSWER:
      Look for products that have protien in them. Stay away from products with petrolum and mineral oil, they're VERY bad for your hair. Look for products with Shea butter and coconut oil. Don't limit your hair product selection only to the ethnic sections of the store. Dont use so much heat on your hair. Wash hair no more than 1x per week and learn to use conditioner in between washes. Products i recommend: Organic Root Stimulator Olive Oil Shampoo and conditioner, Doo Groo Mega Thick Growth Oil, Vitamin E oil (can purchase this at CVS). Deep Condition once a week, wear satin cap at night or sleep on satin pillow cases. Keep straightened hair wrapped. Use 100% boar bristle brush only, use wide toothed combs when combing hair. Oil scalp every other day/night. NEVER EVER USE DR. MIRACLE'S!!!! It's a load of CRAP!

  18. QUESTION:
    How to care for my three year old african-american daughter's hair?
    I have noticed that my daughter's hair stays dry no matter what products I use and she is also showing breakage around the edges. I put her hair up in hair balls is that part of the reason why? What product can I use around her edges. I have used Dr. Miracle products but the seem to make her hair real dry and nappy. There is also breakage in the back of her hair and it is thinning. She has thick hair like mine. How should I style and take care of it?

    • ANSWER:
      Aww.. poor thing...

      Well she's too young for a perm.. i would suggest waiting until she's at least 8 years old. But Im guessing that youre not black so i would suggest taking her to a black hair salon and letting them do it, because if its done wrong then you will not only burn her half to death but her hair will fall out also.

      If im not mistaken... Dr. Miracle is not for 3 year olds. The most u can do to her at that age is grease her scalp with hair grease... it doesnt really matter what brand. I would also advise using hair wax on her hair when you put it in the little afro puffs. I think the correct name for it is "curl wax" and its typically dark orange. This will help with the breakage. And only wash her hair once a week bcuz washing it everyday will also cause breakage...

      If u have anymore questions... feel free to email me..

  19. QUESTION:
    What are some good product for thick hair to make my hair grow longer?
    okay i have very thick hair and i was wondering what could i use to make my hair grow longer. I heard that Dr. Miracle grease can help grow hair, but i don't know if it can work for girls with thick hair. DOES IT?

    • ANSWER:
      Any nutritional deficiencies can slow hair growth or stop your hair from growing. Your hair ultimately reflects the overall condition of your body.

      If your body is healthy and well-nourished, your hair will be your shining glory. If you are having any health problems or suffering from any nutritional deficiencies, your hair may stop growing or show damage or become brittle. If your body is in good health, you can maximize your genetic growth cycle through taking the proper blend of amino acids and B-vitamins.

      It is also important to include B-6, biotin, inositol and folic acid in the supplemental program. It has been found that certain minerals including magnesium, sulfur, silica and zinc are also very important toward maintaining healthy hair.

      Beta-carotene is also important to hair growth because beta-carotene is converted to vitamin A as the body needs it, helps maintain normal growth and bone development, protective sheathing around nerve fibers, as well as promoting healthy skin, hair and nails!

  20. QUESTION:
    Does relaxing your hair cause it to break and fall out?
    My daughter's hair has began to break very badly. I have taken her to hair dressers and permed it myself as well. What can I do to stop it from completely falling out. Within the last month her hair has thinned around the edges, ends are split, and it short in different spots. Is there a good product such as Dr. Miracle that will help?

    • ANSWER:
      Okay, i hate to say this but you've totally ruined your daughters hair.
      perms and relaxers are horrible for anyones hair . if your daughter has black or mixed hair like me, i would reccommend first getting a trim to reduce split ends.
      i would also reccommend doing a deep condition once a week
      and a hot oil treatment once a week as well.

      its going to take time to recover from all the damage you've put it through, but eventually it will work.

      some products i use.

      Dr. Miracles Growth oil
      Doo Grow Anti Thinning Lotion
      Doo Grow Shampoo and Conditoner
      Generic Brand Shampoo and Conditioner
      Just for Me conditoning spray and smoothing cream

      for homemade remedies you can

      peal and mash one avocado into a bowl with olive oil and apply to her hair. Let it harden and wash out.
      this is a great way to make her hair feel soft and be moisturized.

      And one more thing.
      NEVER EVER EVER GET A RELAXER OR PERM EVER AGAIN.

      please...

      dont do that.

      hope i helped

      :)

  21. QUESTION:
    Do Dr.miracles hair products make your hair grow if so how much?
    My hair is to myneck right above my shoulders and I want it to grow about 4-5 inches before I go back ot school.

    • ANSWER:
      try using biotin. you can buy that at a vitamin or nutrition store. that helps hair growth. and its probably cheaper

  22. QUESTION:
    Is minoval a good hair product to use on dry breaking hair?
    Ok i have black nappy hair and lately my hairs been breaking and i've lost alot of hair. My hair is also very dry and i dont know which hair product is the best to use. My friend has recommended i use minoval or Dr.miracles as a hair treatment. Somebody please help me!!! if u have anything else to suggest please be free to tell me! ASAP

    • ANSWER:
      It is impossible to "undamage" hair. Sorry.

  23. QUESTION:
    What is the best relaxer and permanent hair color for Black women?
    I'm trying to find the best hair products on the market, I'm tired of using the old stuff!

    • ANSWER:
      For me the best relaxer I've ever tried and had great results with is Revlon Realistic Relaxer and Dr. Miracles Relaxer and Hawaiian Silky.

      For me the best hair color I had great results with is Clairol Texture & Tones Haircolor for African American woman the color is called Cherrywood. Very pretty shade.

  24. QUESTION:
    Does Dr. Miracle really make your hair grow and if so, which product is best?
    My boyfriend just left for college and when he comes back i want my hair to be longer! I bought a Dr. Miracle product, but before i do it i want to make sure there are not very bad side effects. I have caucasian hair and has been chemically treated before. Good idea or no? HELP!

    • ANSWER:
      i would not use it on caucasian hair. it is ment for african american. You may wash your hair everyday because of the oil and this will defeat the purpose of the product. I use dr. miracle along with a multivitam and has my hair growing wild and long. But I also am african american

  25. QUESTION:
    Does Dr. Miracles really make African American hair grow?
    My hair used to be a lot longer but it started to break off. Will Dr. Miracles make it grow back? Or is there a better product on the market?

    • ANSWER:
      I LOVE IT I JUST PUT SOME ON A COPLE OF MIN AGO I RECOMMEND THIS PRODUCT I HAD THE SAME PROBLEM AS YOU BUT WHEN I STARTED USING DR.MIRICALS DEEP CONDITIONING, MY HAIR STARTED TO SHOW IMPROVMENTS IT GOT ABOUT AN INCH LONGER SINCE I STARTED USING IN 5 WEEKS AGO AND THATS A PRETTY BIG IMPROVEMENT FOR AFRICAN AMERICANS. GIVE IT A TRY! YOULL LOVE IT!!

  26. QUESTION:
    Is it bad to use too many different products?
    I use a different shampoo and conditioner. My shampoo is Dr. Miracles, and my conditioner alternates between Pantene and Nexxus. For a heat protector I use Loreal, and I also use various other products for finishing touches or hairspray and stuff. Is this bad or should I try to use the same brand throughout my hair process?

    • ANSWER:
      it is no necessarily "bad" but it's not always the best either. shampoos and conditioners are typically formulated to work together so what your shampoo doesn't have in a particular brand the conditioner will and so on. when you use a mixture of products you run a higher risk of your hair missing a key ingredient and therefore none of our products will be working at their maximum potential.

      however, as a stylist, i have found many brands that have a wonderful conditioner but lousy sprays, oils, and even shampoos so it is sometimes necessary to use other brand names.

      i think your biggest concern should be looking at the ingredients on your product labels and making sure all of them are healthy for your hair. that means no harsh chemicals such as isopropyl (alcohol), etc. these things are what causes damage moreso than the brand names.

      hope this helps

  27. QUESTION:
    What are the best products to use for African American Hair Growth and Health?
    I have been using Dr.Miracles scalp treatment for 2 months now while i have in kinky twists at the moment. What are some other good products?

    • ANSWER:
      The best products to use on our hair are Motions and Aphogee.

      There are a few products that are made for horses that can grow your hair extremly fast, Shapley's MTG, and Eqyss Mega Tek. I have use both produts and they can grow your hair an inch or more a month. MTG has a strong smell but will grow your hair if u can ignore the smell and Mega Tek should only be applied 2-3 times a week. There is a human product for growth made by MTG called Sulu Max Gro which is really just MTG at a higher price. Mega Tek also has a human version at a higher price so i suggest starting off with the horse type, i started with MTG and got great results. Deep condition your hair with the Aphogee products also try hair, skin, and nail pills from GNC. Im African american my hair is type 4c and stops at the middle of my back. Also take Biotin supplement.

      Essential oils will also help-

      Arnica: a rinse with arnica is known to treat with dry, itchy scalp and hair loss

      Basil: a beneficial herb that stimulates and promotes hair growth; Massaging basil mixed with a carrier oil of your choice promotes healing, health and imporved scalp circulation - which, in turn promotes hair growth

      Bay: add a few drops of bay oil to your daily hair cleanser to stimulate hair growth

      Burdock: using burdock essential oil will stimulate blood flow to your hair's root helping with hair loss and encouraging hair growth

      Lavendar: lavendar is widely used to treat hair loss and assist in getting hair growing again; this oil promotes hair growth

      Peppermint (one of my faves): stimulates blood flow in your scalp (and the tingle proves it) which encourgages hair root nourishment and growth; peppermint has been beneficial to thos whose hair is thinning or slow growing

      Rosemary (one of my faves): regular use of rosemary has a stimulating effect on hair bulbs to prevent premature balding and "jump start" growth activity; rosemary has been noted to be extremely beneficial to help grow hair

      Sage: using sage as a part of your hair regimen will not only keep your hair dark, but will assist in hair loss reduction

      Tea Tree: regular use of tea tree oil in your hair regimen will not only moisturize your strands, but tea trea oil helps reduce oil production on the scalp and helps with dry, itchy scalp (a healthy scalp is the necessary for hair growth)

  28. QUESTION:
    Is there anything to help my Caucasian hair to grow faster?
    I have been using Dr.Miracles gro oil but I think that is for African hair?? It has made my hair feel a lot more softer, more manageable and stronger.. but is there anything out there made for Caucasian hair?

    • ANSWER:
      there's sooooo much more.
      i don't know about growing faster but there are products that make your hair healthier.
      healthy hair does typically grow faster.
      any smoothing or conditioning products work well.
      got2b has a pretty wide variety of products.
      prenatal vitamins are also very helpful for growing out hair or nails.
      anyone can get them over the counter.

  29. QUESTION:
    Is it safe using two different brands of hair grease on your hair?
    Well i use Dr. Miracles hot gro super strength for the short parts of my hair and Blue Magic for the rest. And i spray Aphogee leave-in conditioner
    daily. It doesn't say put in daily but it doesn't say not to. And i wear individuals. Can any of that make my hair break off?

    Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Using them together won't cause any problems. As long as your hair doesn't seem too greasy or weighed down in product, you'll be fine. It might be a good idea to use a clarifying shampoo every few weeks just to get your hair completely free of everything you've put in it.

  30. QUESTION:
    How long can my hair grow this summer?
    I have African American hair
    I'm 13 with short hair
    I wash my hair every week with mane n tail shampoo
    I don't use heat on my hair anymore
    I cut my split ends
    I braid my hair every week
    I work out daily/ eat healthy
    I use Dr miracle gro oil twice daily
    should I buy some biotin too? How much do they cost?
    & what else should I do to grow my hair?
    Can it grow about 3 inches?

    • ANSWER:
      I am also African American currently growing my hair out.
      -I take 5000mcg of Biotin and sometimes folic acid.
      -keep washing your hair everyweek and keep it clean.
      - you can still use heat but more like once or twice a week not everyday
      -Brading should help it grow.
      - i have tried dr. miracles but it did not work best for me.
      There is this all natural hair growth product for African American hair called Wild Growth Hair Oil. It really does work and if you use it as directed(a few times a week). you can get about 2 inches of hair growth in just one month. peopl have started to compliment my hair and tell me that it is growing. i must say that it does not smell the best and you will smell like grass but that is because it is all natural but you can just cover it up will oil sheen apray or something. You can get it at sally's and i just bought my second botte the other day.
      Good luck on your hair journey!

  31. QUESTION:
    What the best Hair products for black women?
    My hair is very damaged and I just got a trim. And I want to start treating my hair to make it grow healthy instead of a waste of time of getting it trim and growing back damaged. What sre some good hair products (by name) that I can use to help it grow healthy. I need Deep Conditioners, Hot oil Treatments, Oil or Grease names.

    • ANSWER:
      hair mayonnaise by organics root stimulator
      http://www.organicrootstimulator.com/products/mayo.htm
      carrot oil or olive oil by organics root stimulator
      http://www.organicrootstimulator.com/products/carrotoil.htm
      dr miracles padDr Miracle's Intensive Healing Oil and Scalp Treatment
      http://store.goldenmartbeautysupply.com/drmiinheoila.html

      Generally this are two good brands with good quality products here are their web also:
      http://www.drmiracles.com/
      http://www.organicrootstimulator.com/

      Good luck!!You can also try their other products too!

  32. QUESTION:
    Is there a hair salon in Baton Rouge area that actually is cheap?
    Im an african-american woman
    Have thick, coarse hair, medium length
    Looking 4 a stylist that does braids to weave extensions.
    Also I noticed some stylists dont use dr miracle products.
    My friend goes 2 regis in cortana and she says they do everything so i may check them out. thanks

    • ANSWER:
      damm baby i need to go to school for hair and fly all around the world to do hair because i got skills i grew up in baltimore in a hairsalon called perfect 10 hair salon and if you had it going on as a black woman fly up there to b mo and do you

  33. QUESTION:
    Hey I am an African American woman and I would like to know hair products that can make my hair grow.?
    I do have long hair but I to be longer. I also have hair breakage. So I need yall to give me your advice on what hair products to get to make my hair grow and that will stop breakage. Easy 10 Points!

    • ANSWER:
      dr.miracle,my edges and hair was pretty bad then I used it and my hair is healthy now and it grew some

  34. QUESTION:
    What are some GREAt products to help my hair grow ?
    I am african american , and i was wondering some of your opinions of what i should use to help my hair grow long, right now its just passed my shoulders. I just started using dr. miracle scalp and nape grow and i also, use pink lotion . If you could give me some suggestions that would be GREAT .

    • ANSWER:
      1. Growing long hair takes a commitment.
      2. Hair, except in rare cases, when it is growing at its optimal genetic rate - will only grow 6-8 inches per year.
      3. If your have hair that is currently chin length and want it to be below your bra - take a ruler and measure the space between where your hair is currently and where you want it to be.
      4. If you need 6 inches to reach your bra strap, plan on it taking 10-12 months for your hair to grow to your goal length. Every person is different and it may take you a longer or short time depending on a wide variety of factors.
      5. It is very important if you make the personal commitment to grow your hair long that you do all the right things which includes the following things:

      Proper nutrition.

      Drinking enough daily fluids.

      Minimizing unhealthy hair care habits (chemicals, hot tool use, damaging hair care product use).

      Eliminating hair growth retarding lifestyle habits (excessive caffeine, sugar, nicotine, alcohol, junk foods).

      Getting enough sleep, rest and relaxation.

      Taking vitamins, minerals & herbs. Because of the current condition of the earth and exhausted soil, human beings must take nutritional supplements to operate at their maximum hair growth rates. Whether you take a good multi-vitamin or a product designed to grow hair - this is an essential component for growing hair at your maximum potential.
      List of Supplements
      In addition to making lifestyle changes, taking the following supplements every day can boost hair growth for many people:

      Vitamin B-complex - 50 mg. of the major B-vitamins (including folate, biotin and inositol)
      Vitamin B-6 - 50 mg. of vitamin B-6
      Vitamin C with bioflavonoids - one to two grams daily
      Vitamin E - 400 to 800 IU daily
      Beta-Carotene - 10,000 to 15,000 IU of beta-carotene daily
      One recommended daily dose of magnesium, sulfur, zinc
      Silica (horsetail) - 300 mg. daily
      Nettle - 250 mg. three times daily
      Flaxseed oil - one tbsp daily or one tablet
      Beta-Carotene - 10,000 to 15,000 IU of beta-carotene daily
      I

  35. QUESTION:
    What can I do for my hair damage?
    I have recently moved from Little Rock Arkansas to Fort Stewart Georgia (3hrs away from Atlanta). My hair is breaking off tremendously from heat damage. I have heard of the beauty brands of Dr. Miracle for African American hair. I was wondering what product(s) from the Dr. Miracle hair family will help my hair to growing and keep it safe from the heat. I know that moisture is the key but the heat is a tremendous change and even that seems not to help.

    • ANSWER:
      put dove shampoo! & let your boyfriend or husband make chucchu on your head but not on your ass nor on your dodoes.have a nice peacefull time and enjoy doing it.

  36. QUESTION:
    Do Organics Root Stimulator OR Dr Miracles Products Work?
    I need to figure out if they work because i'm planning on taking my hair out and i really need it to grow, i also have thinning hair and bald spots at the temple areas. There advertisments seem to be good but i'm not sure, if there are any other products please tell and any routines i need to follow. THANK YOU!

    • ANSWER:
      Yes these products do work (try the temple/nape balm Dr. Miracles for your bald spots)...but I would like to recommend that you try ApHogee product line! It is amazing, it has repaired my hair and is making it stronger. I have been using the products for almost two months.

      Make SURE YOU FOLLOW THE DIRECTIONS ON THE LABEL!

      **The 2-STEP protein treatment should only be used ONCE per month or 1 to 2 weeks prior to relaxing.

      Message me if you have any questions on my regimen.

  37. QUESTION:
    What is the best hair product that will make my hair longer?
    My hair is really hard to grow out and I only go to get it trimmed every other month.....But I want my hair long! What is the best way to get really long, really fast.

    • ANSWER:
      We are not really experts who can tell you truthfully. I have lost my hair and grown it back successfully but I could not really tell you how I did it. I know I used mane and tale, do groo, dr miracle, and I wrap my hair. I also trim my hair like you do. they always told me to trim my hair every 2 weeks. And also keeping your hair up on pony tail or something it help it grow faster for some reason. That works on me.Also something that has helped me is using MAYO on your hair. but your regular mayonnaise at any store, and put it on your dry hair, not wet for about 3 times a week, and leave it in for 1 hour, and then you rince it of. It is wonderful.....

      But I can provide honest links for you and you can read and try what suits you.

      http://www.bellaonline.com/ArticlesP/art2341.asp
      http://visual-makeover.com/hairstyle-advice/how-can-i-make-my-hair-grow-faster/
      http://www.hair-styles.org/hair-grow-long.html

  38. QUESTION:
    Is Garnier Fructis good for African American hair?
    I've been using Dr. Miracles "Feel it Formula" for about 2yrs and it just seems to be doing nothing for me. I've tried getting all the products, as they suggested and still didn't see any results. The only thing I felt was the tingle. I'm just looking to get some feedback on this product (Garnier) or any other(s) that are pretty good for African American hair.

    • ANSWER:
      Garnie Fructis is ok....it works wel at first, but most hair does not respond well to fruit oils....

      The kind of products you use depend on the condition of your hair and what type of hair you have. If your hair is curly or natural, you want to use products for curly hair. If it's colored, you want products for colored hair. If it's damaged, you want products for damaged hair.

      These are some good lines....but don't feel obligated to but the whole line.

      for relaxed hair:
      Mizani
      Keracare (good styling products too)
      Motions (good styling products too
      Nexxus
      Paul Mitchell
      Creme of Nature

      for natural/curly hair
      Organic Root Stimulator
      Pantene Hydrating Curls
      Suave or V05 shampoos and conditioners
      Cantu (the whole line is great)
      Creme of Nature

      Trader Joes makes the best shampoo and conditioner. It's called Nourish and it's about or . In the future buy products from places with good reutrn policies. That way, you can return the items you don't like and get your money back.

      Hope this helps.

  39. QUESTION:
    Do you know any really good hair growth products?
    Or oils, treatments, etc. I'm using Mane 'n Tail shampoo and conditioner, I take vitamins like Biotin (I feel like it only works for my nails), and I use Dr. Miracle's Hot Gro Hair and Scalp Treatment sometimes. I barely put heat on my hair, like I only use a hair dryer sometimes. I know hair isn't going to grow super fast, and it takes patience but still..anyways, what's your advice?

    • ANSWER:
      According Dr. Melissa Piliang, a dermatologist at the Cleveland Clinic. Americans spent an estimated 6 million on hair loss products last year, and chances are some of that money was not well spent. Don’t let charming salon owners, seductive ads or fancy gimmicks convince you otherwise.

      CNN, Slate, Consumer Reports, MSN, YAHOO have posted them online for years how people spend billion per year on vitamins and supplements.  According to Everyday Health, here's an article that will tell you why . . . those PRODUCTS by any other name do NOT WORK.  It is false advertisements.

      Google: Are Supplements Good For You? About 58,000,000 results (0.13 seconds)

      THEN Google: Are vitamins & supplements good for you? About 230,000,000 results (0.17 seconds). Some can actually shorten your life!

      Google: Hair growth lawsuits. Hair growth caused other men nationwide in class-action lawsuits. About 1,640,000 results (0.10 second. Jan. 24, 2011.

      Best advice from Hollywood's well known hairstylist in the 80's once said: "Keep foods in your mouth and hair products on your hair."

      If you've straightened your hair in the past, it may grow slowly or none at all.
      Google: "Foods for Healthy Hair" - Your hair may be the fastest-growing tissue in the body but, unlike the skin, it cannot repair itself. That is why getting the right balance of vitamins and proteins is imperative. Don't expect to look like you've stepped out of a hair commercial the day after you've changed your diet. It is likely to take at least three months before you actually see tangible results.

      Growing healthy hair doesn't come from a bottle or pills and hair products do not speed hair growth. Any hair oil, is another form to keep hair moisturized, nothing more. If you're in HS, your hair & nails should be growing normally, and as healthily as possible, since you're eating healthy foods. But when hair isn't growing as fast, it's because they've been tampered with: chemicals, hair straightening, etc. . .

      The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) doesn’t have to approve supplements — no agency in the United States does. Because of inadequate quality control and inspection, supplements contaminated with heavy metals, pesticides, or prescription drugs have been sold to unsuspecting consumers. And FDA rules covering manufacturing quality don’t apply to the companies that supply herbs, vitamins, and other raw ingredients.
      Beginning in February 2008, they experienced one symptom after another: diarrhea, joint pain, HAIR LOSS, lung problems, and fingernails and toenails that fell off. FDA has received numerous reports of harm associated with the use of these products, including stroke, liver injury, kidney failure, heart palpitations, and death. 3-15-11

      Google: MSN "Vitamins Can Do More Harm Than Good."

  40. QUESTION:
    What is the Most best hair product for black hair that been dyed before and permed a lot?
    I am looking for shampoo /conditioner that is the best product? I only think of Pantene, is it? Some ppl think it is Suave, Dove, Oil Olive, or whatever but what is your opinion?

    • ANSWER:
      There are a lot of crappy products out there that claim to be good... anything containing sulfates are crappy and will dry out your hair over time, silicoones (chemicals that end in "cone") are as equally crappy. I like Creme of Nature for shampoo and Suave Naturals Coconut for a regular rinse out conditioner. For deep conditioners I use ApHogee and other stuff of that calibur. Pantene Relaxed and Natural is crap, a horrible line of products, so is Dr. Miracles and most other hair care directed toward black people. Go to blackhairmedia.com and go to the discussion board, they have a bunch of people that make it their priority to have beautiful hair and buying quality products.

  41. QUESTION:
    What Dr.miracle product is better or should i not use an?
    what dr.miracle product is better dr.miracle hot gro hair scalp treatment conditioner or the stimulating moisturising gro oil.

    • ANSWER:
      it will burn ya scalp
      dnt use these products
      like the ladies say above
      mineral oil and petroleum is bad for your hair

      look at this forum if you want to learn how to grow your hairhttp://forum.blackhairmedia.com/forum_topics.asp?FID=6

  42. QUESTION:
    I had micro-braids a year ago. The braids left a bald spot in one area. ?
    I have tried many hair growth products, such as Dr Miracles and Wild Growth oil. Neither have helped speed up the process of hair growth. Does anyone have any suggestions as to what I can use to stimulate growth on the spot where the micros took my hair out. Thx!!

    • ANSWER:
      I am so sorry about your hair hun. I am going through the same thing, My hair was pulled out from really tight corn rows. The truth is there could but follicle damage which mean it will take a long time to grow back if ever. Mine is growing back slowly BUT surly!!! YAY ME!!!! What I do is go to get my hair treated every 6 weeks and stay away from the chemicals!!! I am keeping my hair natural at the moment. I get loose corn rows now and put on my lace wigs and that looks just like my hair growing from my head. So hun don't expect much change very fast but it will come. Try one of the wonderful wig I tried . The web site is www.lacewigs.me

      and stay away from the braids tight braids!!!

  43. QUESTION:
    Any1 know what the best hair care products are for black hair? I use relaxers so great conditioner are a must?
    I'm trying to save money by cutting out the hair dresser. I have the skill but lack the knowledge of the best hair care products. I would also love tips on what types of products stop breakage.....I know I'm asking a lot but your help is greatly appreciated. Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      These are the brands I use, Im pretty sure you will find what you looking for,they have conditioners, shampoos, hair growth treatments, ect

      Dr.Miracles-http://www.drmiracles.com/home.php

      Softsheen Carson-http://www.softsheencarson.com/_us/_en/index.aspx

      Fantasia-http://www.fantasiahaircare.com/index.html

  44. QUESTION:
    What hair products should I try to stop my hair from thinning?
    What hair treatments work best
    My hair tends to break a lot easily like its not strong enough

    • ANSWER:
      Dr. Miracles!!!!!!!!

      My dad uses that :]

  45. QUESTION:
    What Dr. Miracles product can grow hair?
    I'm trying to grow my hair for prom and i want something that works. I hear dr. miracles does but i dont know what product to get.

    • ANSWER:
      None of them really. Instead try a search for home made natural hair growth products. You will be surprised. Narrow your search by inserting type of hair (ethnic group). Healthy hair is the first step which means a healthy you. HTH

  46. QUESTION:
    What products will help my hair grow?my hair was NEVER EVER long ! wut do u suggest i use that's the best?
    and is it true that dr.miracles makes your hair fall out? i just wanna kno b4 i try it! please help me .my hair just won't grow period and i need advice. please list THE BEST hair care products that promote growing hair.

    • ANSWER:
      Hair grows from excess protein in the body. All the protein not needed for normal function goes to finger nails and hair.

  47. QUESTION:
    Is there a difference in Black Hair Care Products such as relaxers and conditioners?
    After two years of being natural I went back to relaxing my hair. So far the products I've been using seem to work but is there really a difference between products by lets say Dark n Lovely and Mr. Miracle. If so which is the best product to use.

    • ANSWER:
      Dr. Miracles has the best relaxer out there. I just re-did my hair last night. My hair is really straight and whatever is in their product promotes hair growth so that is why I prefer Dr. Miracles.

      I also love Doo Grow hair care products. I have notice a big difference in the length of my hair after four months of use.

      Revlon Realistic is the next best thing. Your hair stays straight for a long time.

      Dark n Lovely products and Motions are just a waste of money.

  48. QUESTION:
    Which product works better to grow your hair faster?
    Okay, my hair is medium. I want to grow it out pretty long. Ive heard alot of products work and dont work. Which one of these products works better to help hair grow faster?

    ~ Mane n' Tail

    ~ Doo Gro (Grow)?

    ~Dr. Miracles

    THX~ Plz answer!

    • ANSWER:
      None, no product can make hair grow faster, that does not even make seance. Hair isn't alive and it doesn't grow. Hair is an accumulation of a protein called keratin inside the follicle. As it builds up on the bottom it is pushed out the top, creating "hair growth". This is a biological process so nothing that you do to your hair, like trimming it or using some "special" shampoo, product, or oil can help. Eat a healthy, protein rich diet and take a regular multivitamin daily. Since hair is protein, eating foods rich in protein like peanut butter, eggs, and fish can help to accelerate growth.

      Hair growth is almost entirely genetic, and a little bit diet, so all that you can do it change your diet. Split ends cause breakage on the bottom of your hair, not at the base. Hair is an inanimate strand of protein, nothing that you do to the bottom if it can have any effect on the top of it. So again, trimming your hair has no effect on growth! Hair does not grow from the ends, it grows from the root! Hair growth is entirely biological and has nothing to do with the hair that you already have, so having healthy hair DOES NOT mean that it will grow faster, damaged hair grows at the exact same pace as healthy hair.

  49. QUESTION:
    How do you eat bee pollen or jelly to boost energy?
    I've heard that these are "miracle" products that can boost your energy and even make pregnant women have no morning sickness. How do you take it? And where can I get it?
    By the way, I'm not pregnant. It was just something that I read and was curious about. Thanks for all the great answers so far!

    • ANSWER:
      Bee pollen is great for energy. It is a much better source of protein than whey and has more protien pound for pound than a steak. It has complex carbs to feed your muscles and add energy. Plus it is very high in B vitamins that are needed by your body to make energy. It has also been shown to be a libido enhancer for men. It could be because the pollen is collected from the "male" part of the plants.

      Royal jelly has the highest natural source of vitamin B5 and biotin. These B vitamins are responsible for healthy skin. hair and nails. It has collagen to help repair cartillage damage. It has RNA and DNA the "precursers to life". It has been shown to naturally increase hormone levels in both men and women.

      You should read the book written by Dr.Cass Ingram called "The Longevity Solutiuon". It has a lot of information in it. As for calling them "miracle" products, I don't know about that, but they are probably the best natural product, because they are so packed full of vitamins and mineral. You would be hard pressed to find another food that has as many nutrients.

      If you are considering royal jelly or bee pollen? I would recommend getting it fresh and not freeze dried. My personal observation has been that the freeze dried does not seem to be as affective as the fresh liquid royal jelly and unprocessed bee pollen. The best place to find it is at beeroyalproducts.com.

      To take fresh royal jelly, you eat a spoonful (bee royal sends a spoon that is the proper serving size) in the monrning on an empty stomach. It is very bitter so drink a little orange juice and the taste will immediatley go away. DO NOT drink or eat anything hot for 20 minutes after taking it.

      Bee pollen can be taken by a teaspoon (start out in smaller doses because some people get an upset stomach because they are not used to the high ammounts of nutrients and need to become acclimated to it). You can sprinkle it on cereal or mix it in your favorite smoothie.

      I hope I helped. There is so much more information I could give but then the post would be to long.

      Sorry about the spelling but the spell check is not working.

  50. QUESTION:
    What should i use on my hair to make it shiny,full of volume & grow?
    I want my hair to be full of volume
    yess i am african american[black]
    wat products is good for my hair?
    is dr.miracles good?
    i heard it was!
    what kind of shampoo is the best?
    thanks:)

    • ANSWER:

does dr miracle hair products work

Do Fibroids Cause Blood Clots

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What was your best and worst experience with a fibroid tumor when pregnant?
    I knew something was wrong. I just didn't know what. I have the worst time getting up, going to the bathroom and still have trouble holding my food. Being five months along the dr when hearing my symtoms became concerned. When checking for the baby we found what looked to be like a blood clot. Dr placed me on meds and we waited two weeks. Went back on thursday to take another look. I told the Dr that I am still sick and I felt bad. Another sonogram to chk the baby and there was this mass that got larger. Then the Dr confirmed it is a Fibroid tumor. As he rolls over the area where the fibroid is located the sensitivity to my stomach is rather tender and somewhat painful. No more work for me and nothing but bedrest. I am 5 months as of Sunday. What was some of your experiences? Any full term deleveries? What happened to you after delivery with the tumor. I was reallly worried, but a call came from the dr Fri. Test were in from the amnio. Baby is heathy and it's a boy! Tumor still scary!

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroids are actually pretty common. My doc discovered mine when I was pregnant with my second child. She was full term. She has disabilities, but it is a chromosome abnotmality, nothing to do with the fibroid at all. Estrogen can may fibroids swell. That's why they get so big when your close to starting your period or are pregnant. By the time my daughter was born, it was the size of her head! Then it shrank a little after I had her. With my my third child, we knew it was there and knew what to expect. He was also born full term and healthy as a horse. I did measure further along than what I really was because of the mass, but my doc knew that was the reason. Keep up with your OB after you have that baby boy. Fibroids can often cause heavy periods and make you look slightly prego if they are too big. In that case you have them removed. Not a big deal either. Good Luck with a beautiful baby boy.

  2. QUESTION:
    How bad does your monthly friend get? What do you do to make the pain go away?
    My period is very heavy and I get cramps that kill me and I have a lot of blood clots... So what can I do or take to help me out!

    • ANSWER:
      Do you have Endometriosis?

      Treatment options are based on the underlying cause of the pain (primary v. secondary dysmenorrhea) and range from medical to alternative therapies. Commonly, Non-Steroidal Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) like aspirin or ibuprofen may be recommended to help with cramping, and more recently, COX-2 inhibitors have also been approved for treatment of dysmenorrhea. Prescription painkillers may also be recommended where appropriate. Combination (ethynylestradiol and progestin) oral contraceptives can also help reduce prostaglandin production, thereby alleviating the cramps. Heating pads can also offer temporary resolve of the pain. Avoidance of smoking (which has been shown increase cramps) and reduced intake or total avoidance of salt, sugar, high fat and dairy products, alcohol and caffeine can also afford relief, as can increasing the intake of fiber, calcium and complex carbohydrates. Recent studies also indicate that Vitamin B6 complex, calcium and magnesium supplements, and Omega III fatty acids (fish oil supplements) also may help relieve cramping. Pelvic massage, exercise (which releases endorphins, the body’s own natural painkillers), Yoga (the cat stretch and the pelvic tilt), visualization techniques, aromatherapy, acupuncture and herbs like Dong Quai, Ginseng, Stragalus root, Ligusticum root and White Peony root are also said to be helpful alternative techniques for managing the pain.

      Derived from the Greek words dys, meaning “difficult,” meno, meaning monthly, and rrhea, meaning “flow,” dysmenorrhea is the term used to describe painful menstrual cramping.

      Almost all menstruating women experience some cramping during their periods, referred to as either primary dysmenorrhea, which refers to "normal" menstrual pain, or secondary dysmenorrhea, which arises as a result of an underlying disease or disorder. The condition is among the leading complaint in women who present to their physicians for gynecologic pain. More than half of all menstruating women have pain associated with menses, and studies have shown that dysmenorrhea is one of the most common reasons women miss work and/or school. Nearly 10% of women with the condition are incapacitated for up to three days each month[1].

      "Normal" menstrual cramps occur in almost all women due to the release of hormones known as prostaglandins. These are hormones produced by the endometrium (the lining of the uterus), which cause the uterus to contract, sometimes quite painfully, in order to expel the menstrual debris. Some women produce higher levels of prostaglandins than others, so they may hurt more. Increased prostaglandin production can also cause the distressing gastrointestinal symptoms some women may experience. Primary dysmenorrhea most commonly occurs within a few years of menarche (a woman’s first period), while secondary dysmenorrhea can occur years after the onset of menarche.

      Pain with primary dysmenorrhea usually begins on or about the first day of a woman’s period and can last up to 72 hours. In a woman with secondary dysmenorrhea, she may have painful symptoms occurring a week or more prior to her period and lasting even after her flow has stopped. In the case of a woman who has secondary dysmenorrhea, there are other reasons for her pain, including diseases or conditions like Endometriosis, Adenomyosis, Pelvic Inflammatory Disease, cervical stenosis, structural abnormalities in the vagina or uterus itself, fibroids, or similar concern.

      Dysmenorrhea can be diagnosed based on symptoms, patient history, physical findings, and when appropriate, diagnostic tests such as vaginal or pelvic ultrasound, hysteroscopy (an examination of the inside of the uterus) and/or hysterosalpingogram (an evaluation of the uterus and fallopian tubes). In cases of secondary dysmenorrhea, laparoscopic surgery can be very beneficial at affording a diagnosis and treatment of the underlying cause. Symptoms often include painful pelvic or abdominal cramping, headache, suprapubic cramping (an area of the pelvis overlying the bladder), backache, pain radiating down into the thigh area, nausea/vomiting/diarrhea and even syncope (a temporary of consciousness). Upon physical exam, those with primary dysmenorrhea exhibit normal vital signs and a tender uterus, but no cervical or ovarian abnormalities. Patients with secondary dysmenorrhea may exhibit varied vital signs depending on the underlying cause and may be found to have tenderness, nodules, and/or enlargement of the uterosacral ligaments, the rectovaginal septum or other adnexa (the region of the pelvis that encompasses the ovary, fallopian tube and surrounding broad ligament).

      If Endometriosis or another disorder is the underlying or secondary cause for dysmenorrhea, you will benefit most from having the disease diagnosed and effectively removed. It is important to determine if the cramps are "normal," or if they could be due to another cause. Pain that is crippling or incapacitating is never normal and should be investigated as soon as possible so that appropriate diagnosis and subsequent treatment can be rendered.

  3. QUESTION:
    is it normal for my period to have big blood clots in it and make me feel tired and sick?
    my fiance is bleeding alot of blood and it has big blood clots in it. she said it is also making her feel tired and sick to her stomach. we are getting concerned. she normaly dont do this.

    • ANSWER:
      well it seems like its d time 4 wierd periods cause d samething is happening to me now it never usually happens like this i guess it is normal but is kinda alarming cause it is d first time we have ever experienced this other people experiences it monthlyso idk maybe she should check to see if she has fibroids or something if she is at the age to get fibroids.

  4. QUESTION:
    Is it bad to get little blood clots while on your period?
    I'm not currently on my period but have always wondered this... When my flow is heavy, I get little clots on the tissue when I wip. And sometimes larger ones. I also get really bad cramps every other period and some I just feel really tired. Is this bad?

    • ANSWER:
      It seems completely normal. You will have issues for the first 3 years of your cycle as your body goes through changes.

      It's normal for a girl's period to be heavier on some days than others. But signs of menorrhagia (excessively heavy or long periods) can include soaking through at least one sanitary napkin (pad) an hour for several hours in a row or periods that last longer than 7 days. Girls with menorrhagia sometimes stay home from school or social functions because they're worried they won't be able to control the bleeding in public.

      The most frequent cause of menorrhagia is an imbalance between the levels of estrogen and progesterone in the body, which allows the endometrium (the lining of the uterus) to keep building up. When the endometrium is finally shed during menstruation, the resulting bleeding is particularly heavy.

      Because many adolescents have slight hormone imbalances during puberty, menorrhagia isn't uncommon in teens. But in some cases, heavy menstrual bleeding can be caused by problems such as:

      Fibroids (benign growths) or polyps in the uterus
      Thyroid conditions
      Clotting disorders
      Inflammation or infection in the vagina or cervix

      http://kidshealth.org/parent/growth/grow…

  5. QUESTION:
    what does it mean when i have blood clots in my period?
    i've had my period for 2 weeks, and it was light at first. then it got heavy, and then it got really bad, and then huge blood clots have been appearing. what does this mean?
    i've had my period for 2 weeks, and it was light at first. then it got heavy, and then it got really bad, and then huge blood clots have been appearing. what does this mean? and yes i do have an irregular period.

    • ANSWER:
      i think you should get checked for fibroids. they tend to cause long, heavy and irregular periods as well as large blood clots. if you have fibroids, you should look into natural treatment as theres a lot of them out there. the worst thing you could do is have a hysterectomy, which is what a lot of doctors recommend. problem is that they cause even more problems. good luck!

  6. QUESTION:
    Natural ways of shrinking uterine fibroids and ovarian cysts?
    Today I was diagnosed with three uterine fibroids (3 cm each) and a small ovarian cyst. I don't want to get surgery as it could be dangerous for other organs. Are there any natural ways of shrinking them?

    Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroids are benign uterine growths. Many women have no symptoms while others experience bleeding, increased urination, bladder displacement, urine retention, constipation, infertility, miscarriage, pain during intercourse and anemia. Ovarian cysts are enlarged follicles that fail to rupture and release an egg. Women may experience general pain, disrupted periods, pain in the back and abdomen and painful intercourse. Both of these conditions are caused by imbalances in estrogen production. There are many natural treatments to deal with both of these conditions. Talk to your doctor about any natural supplements you are using.

      Herbal Treatments for Fibroids

      Herbal treatments that address bleeding often work quite quickly, but supplements that control hormone levels take about three months of use before bringing about noticeable results.

      Black cohosh controls bleeding and relieves pain; take 500 milligrams daily. Cinnamon oil has a long history of use in traditional American medicine to control bleeding fibroids. Use 10-to-15 drops every 15 minutes until the bleeding stops. Dan shen, which should only be used under professional supervision, treats congealed blood, dark red clots during menstruation, and relieves pelvic congestion. Reishi tincture alleviates pelvic inflammation. Take one tablespoon in ¼ cup of water three times daily.

      There are three traditional Chinese formulas that are commonly used to treat uterine fibroids. Take as directed on the product label.

      Augmented Rambling powder lowers estrogen levels and is most useful for women who are also suffering from painful or difficult urination. Cinnamon Twig and Poria Pill lowers estrogen levels without interfering with the menstrual cycle or causing weight gain. Four Substance Decoction treats fibroids and is especially useful for women who eat a poor diet.
      Herbal Treatments for Ovarian Cysts

      Dioscorea tincture, also known as wild yam, alleviates cramping caused by ovarian cysts. Take as directed on the label. Dong quai relieves pain resulting from this condition. Take 1,000 milligrams daily during the two-week period after menstruation and then discontinue for two weeks.

      There are several Chinese formulas used to treat ovarian cysts. Use as directed on the product label.

      Dong Quai and Peony Powder reduces estrogen levels and the formation of inflammatory substances in the tissues that line the uterus. Two Cured Decoction reduces estrogen levels. Augmented Rambling Powder and Cinnamon Twig and Poria pill, which are listed above, can also be used for ovarian cysts

      Estrogen is produced from body fat. Excess weight increases the amount of estrogen in the body, so make an effort to maintain a normal weight. Do your best to exercise regularly and reduce stress levels. Avoid the following herbs that stimulate estrogen production: Coleus, Cordyceps, fennel seed, licorice, and moutan.
      What Are Uterine Fibroid Cysts?
      Uterine fibroid cysts are noncancerous tumors that grow in or around the uterus. Uterine fibroids are a common medical complaint, occurring in up to 80 percent of ...
      Uterine Cysts
      Uterine cysts are tumors that can vary in size from less than 1 inch to as large as a melon. Also referred to as uterine fibroids, or simply fibroids, these growths ...
      Dong Quai Benefits

      Dong quai (Angelica sinensis) is a plant found at high altitudes in the mountain regions of China, Korea and Japan. It has been used for thousands of years to treat a ...
      How to Cure Ovarian Cysts & Uterine Fibroids

      Ovarian cysts and uterine fibroids are two problems that commonly affect women. In many cases, they go away on their own, without requiring treatment. However, they ...
      Uterine Fibroid Laser Treatment

      Uterine fibroids are quite common, and usually go away on their own. Even when this does not occur, these fibroids are usually benign. However, when they result in ...
      How to Treat Uterine Fibroids With Natural Medicine

      Uterine fibroids are hard growths that occur in the muscle tissue of the uterus, particularly in women between the ages of 35 and 45. Often fibroids cause little or ...
      Herbs to Take for Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

      Polycystic ovary syndrome is a disorder of the ovaries that causes multiple follicles to develop and form into clumps. Rather than disintegrate during menstruation ...
      Ovarian Fibroid Procedures

      According to the University of Pennsylvania, fibroids are a common abnormal growth within the uterus and are the No. 1 reason U.S. women have a hysterectomy. Fibroids ...
      Homeopathic Treatment Help for Shrinking a Uterus Fibroid

      In some cases, homeopathic medicine can be extremely helpful in shrinking uterine fibroids. A fibroid is a muscle tumor that can produce heavy menstrual bleeding ...

  7. QUESTION:
    Can a small fibroid cause excessive bleeding during your cycle?
    I had a hysteroscopy in Sept and since then I started bleeding heavy at first then went 2 months with only spotting. They removed some polyps but the fibroid was under the lining of my uterus so they left it. It is very small but not my cycles come regularly but I pass huge clots. I can go all day without any blood but around 8pm I pass a huge clot and mess up my clothes. What should I do?

    • ANSWER:
      i don't think so.

  8. QUESTION:
    Does anybody have an idea how to increase your platelet levels in a natural way?
    I was admitted to the hospital on Christmas for super heavy period. They found out my platelets were extremely low they were at 3,000. I was loosing to much blood so I had to have a blood transfusion and a platelet transfusion, which helped alot. But now im at home worried and wondering if there is a natural way or something i can do at home to increase my platelets, i would really appreciate it. Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      Seriously? No.

      The best way to resolve this problem would be to manage your heavy periods and/or the cause. I assume management has been prescribed? If not, you need to discuss this with your GP, otherwise the same thing will happen again.

      If blood clotting disorders, uterine abnormalities, fibroids and hormone problems, etc have been excluded and this is just a case of heavy periods, a rational suggestion would be a class of drug containing levonorgestrel or Tranexamic acid tablets. However, I am not privy to your diagnosis, so you need to discuss this with your GP.

      Alt.Med has nothing to offer, of course.

  9. QUESTION:
    What can cause mulitple periods in one month?
    Im 19 years old and ive had my period since i was 12 and this has never happened before... This month ive had THREE period all with like three to four days between them. Ive tried researching it but nothing so far has helped me. Can someone please tell me what may cause multiple periods monthly? or a link to a medical page that can help me out?

    • ANSWER:
      Hello, I found an article on the internet in regards to irregular periods and their reasons for being late, early, heavy, abnormally long and heavy bleeding. I hope this helps you to answer a few of your questions. Take care.

      Hormonal Imbalance One of the prime reasons for periods to go irregular is hormonal imbalance. In a female's body, in order to produce a period, the body creates hormones such as estrogen and progesterone. Various parts of the body need to send signals to each other in order to trigger menstruation. However, due to hormonal imbalance, many a time, these signals are missed or skipped, thus, resulting in irregular periods.

      Sudden Weight Gain or Loss Have you gained or lost a lot of weight lately? If yes, you've got an answer. When your body works at a constant pace, the hormones learn to process in similar manner. However, the moment you start doing rigorous workout, or eat a lot, your body takes a while to adjust to it. Hence, hormones become imbalanced, and lead to irregularity in periods. However, this is not a tense situation as it happens with every woman who has lost or gained weight quickly.

      Stress Workload? Job issues? Relationship turmoil? Mental dissatisfaction? Reduce your stress, female, for it's affecting the regularity of your periods. Yes, stress contributes to the most common reasons for a late period. With increasing stress, you are affecting the hormonal balance of your body, and hence, not only do your periods become irregular, but they also result in excessive weight gain, and anxiety.

      Polycystic Ovarian Disease So, you aren't pregnant, but you're still worried. Well, if your pregnancy test result came out to be negative, get a check up done, for chances, even though very less, are that you are suffering from Polycystic Ovarian Disease which is caused due to irregular ovulation as a result of hormonal imbalance. With proper treatment, your gynecologist will help you get your periods back to regular. However,

      Medications
      The Mayo Clinic advises that certain medications and result in excess bleeding including anti-coagulants that prevent blood clots and anti-inflammatory medicines. Not only can these medications result in heavy bleeding but they can also prolong your bleeding. If you are improperly taking hormone medication, this can also result in menorrhagia

      Anovulation, Fibroids
      When a woman fails to ovulate, this is called Anovulation. You can have a menstrual period but not ovulate. When this happens, the hormones may become unbalanced, resulting in excess bleeding.

      Cervical polyps are small, fragile growths that begin in either the mucosal surface of the cervix, or the endocervical canal and protrude through the opening of the cervix.

      Endometrial polyps are typically non-cancerous, growths that protrude from the lining of the uterus.

      Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is an infection of one or more organs that affects the uterus, fallopian tubes, and cervix. PID is, most often, a sexually transmitted disease; however, it sometimes occurs following childbirth, abortion, or other gynecological procedures.

      Cervical cancer is a type of cancer that occurs when cells in the cervix become abnormal, multiply out of control, and damage healthy parts of the body. The human papillomavirus, or HPV, is the cause of over ninety percent of all cervical cancers.

      Endometrial cancer occurs when abnormal cells in the uterus or the endometrium (the lining of the uterus) multiply out of control and damage to the uterus and other organs. While the cause of endometrial cancer is unknown, it is known that women diagnosed with this type of cancer tend are usually over fifty.

      IUDs or intrauterine devices used for contraception are a potential cause of heavy menstrual bleeding or menorrhagia. Women who experience prolonged or heavy periods while using the IUD should have the device removed and choose an alternate method of birth control.

      Bleeding disorders occur when it is hard for a person to stop bleeding. While there are several types of bleeding disorders, the most common type in women is von Willebrand Disease or VWD.

      Source(s):
      http://www.buzzle.com/articles/reasons-f…
      http://womenshealth.about.com/od/abnorma…

  10. QUESTION:
    Why do i keep getting spotting and cramps while not on my period?
    My period has been acting really bizarre lately. I shouldn't be starting for a while and i keep getting spotting and cramps here and there but not constant. Im 20 years old and am NOT on birth control. I have never had this happen so Im just a little concerned. And its not that much blood either. My normal periods are very heavy. Anyone have any ideas or explanations why it might be happening? Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      This is actually much more common than you might think. Most irregular periods are benign - nothing to worry about. Missed periods, too frequent periods, spotting, or bouts of heavy clotting and bleeding are usually caused by an underlying hormonal imbalance that is easily treated.

      A wide variety of factors can be responsible for irregular periods, among them:

      Significant weight gain or loss
      Over-exercise
      Poor nutrition (or a diet too high in carbohydrates)
      Smoking
      Drug use
      Caffeine
      Excessive alcohol use (interfering with how the liver metabolizes estrogen and progesterone)
      Eating disorders
      Increased stress
      Polycystic ovarian syndrome/estrogen dominance
      Uterine abnormalities (fibroids/cysts/polyps/endometriosis)
      Hormonal imbalance related to perimenopause
      Medications
      Chemotherapy
      Recent childbirth, miscarriage, or D&C
      Breastfeeding

      Check here for more information.

      http://www.womentowomen.com/menstruation/irregularperiods.aspx

  11. QUESTION:
    What does it mean if yu get your period 3 times in one month?
    I had got my regular 7day period on the 3rd of April. Then last week Tuesday I was spoting for a day in a half very light. N now today the 29th I got my period agian. What can cause this?

    • ANSWER:
      Hello, I found an article on the internet in regards to irregular periods and their reasons for being late, early, heavy, abnormally long and heavy bleeding. I hope this helps you to answer a few of your questions. Take care.

      Hormonal Imbalance- One of the prime reasons for periods to go irregular is hormonal imbalance. In a female's body, in order to produce a period, the body creates hormones such as estrogen and progesterone. Various parts of the body need to send signals to each other in order to trigger menstruation.

      Sudden Weight Gain- When your body works at a constant pace, the hormones learn to process in similar manner. However, the moment you start doing rigorous workout, or eat a lot, your body takes a while to adjust to it. Hence, hormones become imbalanced, and lead to irregularity in periods.

      Stress Workload- Yes, stress contributes to the most common reasons for a late period. With increasing stress, you are affecting the hormonal balance of your body, and hence, not only do your periods become irregular, but they also result in excessive weight gain, and anxiety.

      Polycystic Ovarian Disease- Polycystic Ovarian Disease is caused due to irregular ovulation as a result of hormonal imbalance.

      Medications- The Mayo Clinic advises that certain medications and result in excess bleeding including anti-coagulants that prevent blood clots and anti-inflammatory medicines. Not only can these medications result in heavy bleeding but they can also prolong your bleeding.

      Anovulation, Fibroids- When a woman fails to ovulate, this is called Anovulation. You can have a menstrual period but not ovulate. When this happens, the hormones may become unbalanced, resulting in excess bleeding.

      Cervical polyps are small, fragile growths that begin in either the mucosal surface of the cervix, or the endocervical canal and protrude through the opening of the cervix.

      Endometrial polyps are typically non-cancerous, growths that protrude from the lining of the uterus.

      Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)-Iis an infection of one or more organs that affects the uterus, fallopian tubes, and cervix.

      Cervical cancer- Cancer that occurs when cells in the cervix become abnormal, multiply out of control, and damage healthy parts of the body.

      Endometrial cancer- Abnormal cells in the uterus or the endometrium (the lining of the uterus) multiply out of control and damage to the uterus and other organs.

      Bleeding disorders occur when it is hard for a person to stop bleeding. While there are several types of bleeding disorders, the most common type in women is von Willebrand Disease or VWD.

      Source(s):
      http://www.buzzle.com/articles/reasons-f…
      http://womenshealth.about.com/od/abnorma…

  12. QUESTION:
    does anyone know if nattokinase help with fibroid tumors?the vitamin store recommended to me?
    i have fibroid tumor, and i started take nattokinase, my tumor actually shranked some,it was amazing...its been only 1 week since taking it,,but i do know that when you read up on the product it does mention fibrodlysis or something like that..but fibroids are caused by blood clotting i know that..i just wondered if some one knew

    • ANSWER:
      What is Nattokinase?:
      Nattokinase is an enzyme extracted from natto, a Japanese food made from fermented soybeans. To make natto, boiled soybeans are combined with the bacteria Bacillus subtilis natto.

      Natto is a popular breakfast food in Japan, where it is eaten with rice. Natto has a strong, cheese-like smell; a nutty, salty flavor; and a sticky consistency.

      The supplement nattokinase is purified from natto and made into tablets and capsules, so it doesn't have the same strong smell or taste as the food. It's available in health food stores and online.

      Why Do People Use Nattokinase?:
      Nattokinase is thought to be help dissolve abnormal blood clots. Abnormal blood clots can cause heart attacks and strokes, as well as conditions such as phlebitis, pulmonary embolism, or deep vein thrombosis.

      How is Nattokinase Believed to Work?:
      One theory is that it dissolves the tiny fibers (fibrin) that form the strong mesh in blood clots. Streptokinase and urokinase, drugs administered intravenously after a heart attack or stroke, work the same way. Nattokinase, however, is absorbable by mouth and believed to be longer-acting.

      Nattokinase is said to have similar clot-dissolving abilities as plasmin, a natural enzyme in blood.

      In contrast, aspirin reduces stickiness of blood cells (platelets) that, together with fibrin strands, make up blood clots. The drug Coumadin (warfarin) works on abnormal clotting by preventing fibrin strands from forming a clot.

  13. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know what could cause frequent menstraul blood clotting?
    My period has been very abnormal the last few months. It is very light and sporadic. It is also very clotty. Some days it is only a clot. I have also gained close to 20 pounds int he last few months and am a little more tired than normal. I have taken two home pregnancy tests and both have come back negative. Any help or suggestions would be much appreciated. I do have a doctor's appointment, but the soonest I can get in is next month. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Hello. Blood naturally has the tendency to clot so if you are bleeding more heavily, you are more likely to be seeing clots.

      Reasons for heavy menstrual bleeds are numerous. They include uterine fibroids and other lesions of the uterus and cervix. Early pregnancy and/or miscarriage can be associated with it and ectopic pregnancies as well.

      You mentioned a weight gain of 20 pounds. I don't know what your actual weight is but some very 'heavy' ladies may have some hormonal problems as well and this may reflect in abnormal periods or low fertility.

      You are feeling more tired than usual because of the heavy blood loss. Chances are that you are getting anemic and need some haematinics(blood tonics or medication to optimize the rate of blood cell production) and iron to help your body replace the loss. I don't know which country you are in but if you can get seen earlier than next month by someone, that would be ideal at least so something is done until next month's appointment comes up.

      All the best

  14. QUESTION:
    Is motherwort safe to take if you have fibroids?
    I have heard from some websites that you should not take motherwort if you have fibroids, and other websites say that its good for fibroids.

    Which is it??

    • ANSWER:
      Motherwort (Leonurus cardiaca [Latin]), also called leonurus, lion’s tail, and heartwort, has been used to treat heart disease and depression for thousands of years. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) recommends motherwort to promote longevity and treat menstrual disorders. Today motherwort is still recommended by herbalists for treatment of heart palpitations and anxiety, and to encourage normal menstrual cycles.
      Recent studies performed in China have shown that motherwort helps prevent blood clots relax the heart muscle, and lower blood pressure. Of course, anyone with a diagnosed or suspected heart condition should be under a doctor’s care.
      Motherwort contains lionurine and stachydrine, alkaloids that not only help lower blood pressure but also have a sedating effect on the central nervous system, which supports motherwort’s traditional use as a treatment for depression anxiety.
      The tranquilizing effects of this herb may benefit those experiencing anxiety as well as those having trouble sleeping. Laboratory studies have shown that the lionurine in motherwort also causes uterine contractions. Motherwort may indeed benefit women who are trying to induce menstruation, but those that are pregnant or trying to get pregnant should avoid motherwort altogether.
      Motherwort is easy to grow; watch this plant or it could take over the garden! You can cut this plant and use the stem, leaves, or flowers in homemade herbal tea—use 2 teaspoons of dried motherwort to 1 cup of hot water for a homemade tea. You can drink up to 2 cups daily. Motherwort is also available at health food stores and some pharmacies in extracts, teas, capsules, and tablets. Just be sure to follow the dosage instructions on the package—too much motherwort can cause diarrhea and upset stomach.
      Pregnant or nursing women should not take this herb. People taking blood thinners also should not consume motherwort since it may increase the effects of these drugs.
      from Vitaminstuff.com

      If it causes uterine contractions and induces menstruation it will likely irritate fibroids.

      The real issue is what do you want to take motherwort for? Whatever it is, there are other options.
      Homeopathic treatment can get rid of fibroids permanently and whatever other issues you have.

  15. QUESTION:
    is it normal to have such a heavy period with clots?
    I had a baby via c-section two months ago (also took out some fibroids-no problems there). I got the Paraguard IUD on July 1st. I had normal after baby blood; bled a few days after insertion of IUD and a few days ago i started my "regular" period but its soooo heavy and tons of clots. I know iud can cause heavy flow but is this normal?

    • ANSWER:
      Sound fairly normal for after pregnancy. If it doesn't get better after a few months or gets worse, call your doctor.

  16. QUESTION:
    How long to stay on birth control pills?
    Is there anything to the rumor that its best to stay on the pill for long periods of time (like 1 year) so your body gets used to the hormones?

    • ANSWER:
      As usual, the playground has only part of the story right. Let's see if we can dig out the nugget of truth in this rumor. It is not necessary to take the pill for long periods of time for it to be an effective method of birth control. It is important to use a back up method of birth control with your first pack of pills, or for however long your clinician recommends. But, it usually only takes a cycle or two for your body to adjust to the artificial hormone levels. Slight weight gain, breast swelling and nausea are fairly common side effects when you first begin taking oral contraception. But these side effects should go away after a cycle or two. If they persist or become excessive, contact your clinician. This is usually a sign that the level of estrogen is too high, and you can easily be switched to a lower formulation. Don't let them jerk you around. You know the difference between a little breast swelling and all of a sudden morphing into Anna Nicole Smith, and you don't have to take it.

      There are a number of medications that will affect how the pill works. You will have to use a back up method of birth control or temporarily discontinue use of the pill if you go on anticoagulants, barbiturates, Penicillin, Dilantin, Mysoline, Tetracycline or a number of other drugs. The pill can also increase the effect of alcohol and decrease the effect of anti depressants. Always tell you doctor and pharmacist you are on the pill - a responsible clinician should always ask. Did you know that you should not take high dose vitamin C supplements when you are on the pill? Taking 1 gram of vitamin C can increase the level of estrogen in the blood by 50%, turning a low dose pill into a high dose pill. Along with this comes all of the short and long term problems caused by extra estrogen floating around in your body. If you take vitamin C supplements while on the pill, you should take no more than 100 mg per day. So be careful about the other drugs you take while using the pill because they can have an affect on how your body responds to the hormones, or to the medication itself.

      Now for the nugget of truth. Use of oral contraceptives is associated with a lower risk of ovarian and uterine cancer, etopic pregnancy, cysts, fibroids, pelvic inflammatory disease, and endometriosis. A recent study has shown that the longer you use the pill, the lower your risk for ovarian cancer, one of the deadliest cancers in women. This study showed that women who used the pill had about half the risk of ovarian cancer of those who never used it. Women who took the pill for 10 or more years had only one-third the risk of developing ovarian cancer. Each successive year of pill use seemed to decrease the risk of ovarian cancer by 8 percent. Aren't you glad to get some good news? Of course, using the pill if you smoke is a bad, bad thing to do. The pill and smoking work together to increase your risk for heart attacks, strokes and blood clotting problems. This appears to be especially risky for women over 35. So maybe you should skip that post-coital cigarette.

      To sum up, its not necessary to use the pill for a long period of time to make it effective or relieve side effects. But the use of other medications can affect how well your body responds the pill, or how your body responds to those medications. Long term use of the pill does seem to have benefits to your health as long as you don't smoke or have certain other risk factors which your clinician should ask you about before prescribing you the pill. And finally, asking questions that reveal the grammatical ignorance of your advice columnist can lead to serious bodily harm.

  17. QUESTION:
    On my period and passing HUGE blood clots?
    Since yesterday, I have been bleeding very heavily and I am passing a large blood clot as often as every half hour. I passed one yesterday that looked bigger than the palm of my hand. Most of them range from about the size of a silver dollar or a bit larger though I have gotten a few more that was nearly as big as the palm-size one. I am seriously getting scared but I have no insurance or money to go to a doctor.

    • ANSWER:
      Dear Kanna:
      This is what I have learned in my own experience, what I have seen among my family, friends and what I have read about it.
      Many women have clots in their menstrual blood from time to time. The clots may be bright red or dark in color. Often, these clots are shed on the heaviest days of bleeding. The presence of multiple clots in your flow may make your menstrual blood seem thick or denser than usual.
      Your body typically releases anticoagulants to keep menstrual blood from clotting as it's being released. But when your period is heavy and blood is being rapidly expelled, there's not enough time for anticoagulants to work. That enables clots to form.
      If you have excessive clotting or clots larger than a quarter, you should see your health care provider to rule out any conditions that might be causing an abnormal period.
      Blood clots show up sometimes a different ages. .
      But for most women, is a good reason to see a gynecologist right away as it may be a sign of miscarriage, fibroids or hormonal changes.
      Many hospitals, especially city hospital, have a state supplemental health insurance available to those with little or no income at all.
      I started getting them when I developed fibroids, I also had heavy bleeding and a lot of pain.
      The situation got better after I had one of them removed.
      For women in their 40s or 50s, gynecologists usually recommended partial or total hysterectomy (removal of the uterus) to take care of the fibroids, the bleeding and discomfort.
      When you see the gynecologist don't be afraid to talk about everything that worries about these clots.
      Take notes with you and ask all the questions you have.
      Your doctor will check your blood for anemia and other complicacions.
      The best of luck to you. I hope it turns out to be nothing to worry about.

  18. QUESTION:
    What causes miscarriages in a woman?
    I have been pregnant twice and i have been having miscarriages. The doctor's say there is nothing wrong with me but i am worried i might be unable to have a baby of my own.

    • ANSWER:
      I have had a miscarriage and i know the pain you are going through..sorry for your losses....

      What causes a miscarriage?
      Most first-trimester miscarriages are caused by chance chromosomal errors that happen when the embryo is first forming. (Chromosomes are parts of a cell that carry a person's genes.) This is usually a one-time event that does not repeat itself in a woman's next pregnancy.2 Many miscarriages have no known cause.

      After the first 12 weeks of pregnancy, or when the fetal heartbeat is seen on ultrasound, miscarriage risk drops significantly.3

      Risk factors that may increase chances of a miscarriage include:

      Increasing age, especially at age 35 and older.
      A history of two or more miscarriages.4
      Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use (such as ibuprofen or naproxen) at the time of conception or during early pregnancy.5
      Alcohol or drug use during pregnancy.
      Cigarette smoking during pregnancy.
      Exposure to dangerous chemicals, such as benzene, arsenic, or formaldehyde, before or during pregnancy.
      Heavy caffeine use during pregnancy.
      Certain gynecological problems, such as uterine fibroids or other abnormalities of the uterus.
      Disease or infection during pregnancy, including an autoimmune disease.
      Physical trauma.
      An immunologic cause—a woman's immune system rejects the pregnancy—which is a factor in a small number of miscarriages.
      Recent research suggests that low folic acid levels may also increase the risk of miscarriage.6

      It is unusual for a woman to have three or more miscarriages. Repeat miscarriages can be caused by an underlying medical problem. Known causes of repeat miscarriage include polycystic ovary syndrome, a blood-clotting disorder called antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, an abnormal uterus, and a chromosome abnormality in either parent.

      After a miscarriage, am I at risk for miscarrying again?
      Miscarriage is usually a chance event, not a sign of an ongoing reproductive problem. If you have had one miscarriage, your chances for future successful pregnancies are good. Less than 1% of women have three or more miscarriages in a row (called recurrent miscarriages).8

      If you have had three or more miscarriages, talk to your health professional about testing and treatment for a possible underlying cause
      Risk factors for miscarriage
      Factors that may increase your risk of miscarriage include:

      Increasing age , especially at age 35 and older.
      A history of recurrent miscarriage (three or more).
      Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use (such as ibuprofen or naproxen) at the time of conception or during early pregnancy.5
      Alcohol use during pregnancy.3
      Cigarette smoking during pregnancy.9
      Cocaine use during pregnancy.9
      Exposure to dangerous chemicals, such as benzene, arsenic, or formaldehyde, before or during pregnancy.
      Heavy caffeine use during pregnancy.
      Other risk factors include having:

      A history of miscarriages on your mother's side of the family.
      Polycystic ovary syndrome, which can cause ovulation problems, obesity, increased male hormone levels, and an increased risk of diabetes.
      A poorly controlled ongoing disease (such as diabetes or an autoimmune disease).
      Certain bacterial or viral infections during pregnancy.
      A blood-clotting disorder such as antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.
      Problems with the structure of the uterus (such as a T-shaped uterus). Between 12% and 15% of women who have recurrent miscarriages have problems with the structure of the uterus.3
      A history of pregnancy with a birth defect.
      A physical injury.
      A chorionic villus sampling (CVS) or amniocentesis to test for birth defects or genetic problems. (CVS has a slightly higher risk of miscarriage [1 in 100] than amniocentesis [1 in 200].)10
      There are also known factors that do not increase the risk of miscarriage, such as exposure to computer monitors or electric blankets, sexual intercourse, and exercise.

      Coping with a miscarriage
      It is normal to go through a grieving process after a miscarriage, regardless of the length of your pregnancy. Guilt, anxiety, and sadness are common and normal reactions after a miscarriage. It is also normal to want to know why a miscarriage has happened. However, in most cases a miscarriage is a natural event that could not have been prevented.

      To help you and your family cope with your loss, consider meeting with a support group, reading about the experiences of other mothers, and talking to friends or a counselor or member of the clergy. For more information, see the topic Grief and Grieving.

      Your local bookstore or library may have books on coping with miscarriage. Also, your health professional will be able to address your questions and concerns about the miscarriage.

      The intensity and duration of the grief varies from woman to woman, but most women find that they can return to the daily demands of life in a fairly short time. It is important to call your health professional if you have symptoms of depression that last for more than 2 weeks.15 The loss and the hormonal swings that result from a miscarriage can cause symptoms like postpartum depression.

      A healthy, full-term pregnancy is possible for most women who have had a miscarriage, and even after having repeated miscarriages. If you want to become pregnant again, check with your doctor or nurse-midwife. Most health professionals recommend waiting until you have had at least one normal menstrual period before attempting to become pregnant after a miscarriage.

      I know i don't know where you live but i know a wonderful doctor that helps women get pregnant
      Dr. Richard Levin http://www.babies-by-levin.com

  19. QUESTION:
    I had just finished my period a week ago and all of a sudden i start bleeding,again?
    I had my period a week and a half ago after i had my period yes i did have sex so yesturday i went to restroom and a lil bit blood it was light and so today i woke up to,use the restroom and i wiped my self and it was blood what could of happen?

    • ANSWER:
      Hello, here is an article I found on a great teen web site that explains teen periods and the reasons for them to be irregular. I hope this information helps to answer a few of your questions. Take care.

      It can take 2 to 3 years from a girl's first period for her body to develop a regular cycle. During that time, the body is essentially adjusting to the influx of hormones unleashed by puberty. And what's "regular" varies from person to person. The typical cycle of an adult female is 28 days, although some are as short as 21 days and others are as long as 35.

      Changing hormone levels might make a girl's period last a short time during one month (just a few days) and a long time the next (up to a week). She may skip months, get two periods almost right after each other, or alternate between heavy and light bleeding from one month to another.

      It's normal for a girl's period to be heavier on some days than others. But signs of menorrhagia (excessively heavy or long periods) can include soaking through at least one sanitary napkin (pad) an hour for several hours in a row or periods that last longer than 7 days. Girls with menorrhagia sometimes stay home from school or social functions because they're worried they won't be able to control the bleeding in public.

      The most frequent cause of menorrhagia is an imbalance between the levels of estrogen and progesterone in the body, which allows the endometrium (the lining of the uterus) to keep building up. When the endometrium is finally shed during menstruation, the resulting bleeding is particularly heavy.

      Because many adolescents have slight hormone imbalances during puberty, menorrhagia isn't uncommon in teens. But in some cases, heavy menstrual bleeding can be caused by problems such as:

      Fibroids (benign growths) or polyps in the uterus
      Thyroid conditions
      Clotting disorders
      Inflammation or infection in the vagina or cervix

      http://kidshealth.org/parent/growth/grow…

  20. QUESTION:
    My period is on day 11, should I see a doctor?
    I am 40 years old and I rarely have a period. However, I started my period 11 days ago and I am still experiencing heavy bleeding, without any sign of diminishing. I would have sworn that I was in early menopause because of my lack of period, hot flashes, and severe night sweats. When should I seek medical assistance? I am exhasuted and still passing blood clots.

    • ANSWER:
      I was the same--a few years older than you but not many. regular for years, no problems and then all went haywire.
      Some doctors are more helpful than others but worth checking there are no fibroids that can cause heavy bleeding.

  21. QUESTION:
    How heavy is too heavy for my period?
    I started my period yesterday morning. Everything seems ok just a little heavy. This morning I woke up this morning got out of bed and when I stood (sorry gonna get graphic) up blood pooled at my feet. It never happened to me. And I'm having major clots sorry so gross. It freaked me out help!

    • ANSWER:
      If this is a new problem it could be a number of things.Have you had a IUD fitted,or suffering from stress,irregular,it could be an hormonal imbalance,You could have a under active thyroid,pelvic inflammatory disease,endometriosis polyps,fibroids,or it just could be unexplained just 1 of those things,there is help so see your Dr.Especially if you have just started menstruating not just the start of the regular 1. you really need to see a gynecologist for a diagnoses if it's continuous it could cause anemia,hope it helps .Good Luck.

  22. QUESTION:
    What would cause light blood in between period?
    i have regular periods every month
    i had regular ovulation pains around a week ago,
    and had sex (As my partner and i are trying for children)
    yesterday i noticed i had very light blood when i wiped, now today i had it again but also im getting pains like im about to start a period, but i know im not because im not due nor have my usual period symptoms like sore breast, so i guess to ease my mind i was wondering what could the causes be and why?
    Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      There could be any number of reasons. This is actually much more common than you might think. Most irregular periods are benign - nothing to worry about. Missed periods, too frequent periods, spotting, light periods, or bouts of heavy clotting and bleeding are usually caused by an underlying hormonal imbalance that is easily treated.

      A wide variety of factors can be responsible for irregular periods, among them:

      Significant weight gain or loss
      Over-exercise
      Poor nutrition (or a diet too high in carbohydrates)
      Smoking
      Drug use
      Caffeine
      Excessive alcohol use (interfering with how the liver metabolizes estrogen and progesterone)
      Eating disorders
      Increased stress
      Polycystic ovarian syndrome/estrogen dominance
      Uterine abnormalities (fibroids/cysts/polyps/endometriosis)
      Hormonal imbalance related to perimenopause
      Medications
      Chemotherapy
      Recent childbirth, miscarriage, or D&C
      Breastfeeding

      Check here for more information.

      http://www.womentowomen.com/menstruation/irregularperiods.aspx

  23. QUESTION:
    What are other cases of having a missed or a late period.?
    Insted of insisting that you are pregnant when you miss a period, is there any other occasions that may happen in result of missing your period or having it late?

    • ANSWER:
      Hello, I found an article on the internet in regards to irregular periods and their reasons for being late, early, heavy, abnormally long and heavy bleeding. I hope this helps you to answer a few of your questions. Take care.

      Hormonal Imbalance One of the prime reasons for periods to go irregular is hormonal imbalance. In a female's body, in order to produce a period, the body creates hormones such as estrogen and progesterone. Various parts of the body need to send signals to each other in order to trigger menstruation. However, due to hormonal imbalance, many a time, these signals are missed or skipped, thus, resulting in irregular periods.

      Sudden Weight Gain or Loss Have you gained or lost a lot of weight lately? If yes, you've got an answer. When your body works at a constant pace, the hormones learn to process in similar manner. However, the moment you start doing rigorous workout, or eat a lot, your body takes a while to adjust to it. Hence, hormones become imbalanced, and lead to irregularity in periods. However, this is not a tense situation as it happens with every woman who has lost or gained weight quickly.

      Stress Workload? Job issues? Relationship turmoil? Mental dissatisfaction? Reduce your stress, female, for it's affecting the regularity of your periods. Yes, stress contributes to the most common reasons for a late period. With increasing stress, you are affecting the hormonal balance of your body, and hence, not only do your periods become irregular, but they also result in excessive weight gain, and anxiety.

      Polycystic Ovarian Disease So, you aren't pregnant, but you're still worried. Well, if your pregnancy test result came out to be negative, get a check up done, for chances, even though very less, are that you are suffering from Polycystic Ovarian Disease which is caused due to irregular ovulation as a result of hormonal imbalance. With proper treatment, your gynecologist will help you get your periods back to regular. However,

      Medications
      The Mayo Clinic advises that certain medications and result in excess bleeding including anti-coagulants that prevent blood clots and anti-inflammatory medicines. Not only can these medications result in heavy bleeding but they can also prolong your bleeding. If you are improperly taking hormone medication, this can also result in menorrhagia

      Anovulation, Fibroids
      When a woman fails to ovulate, this is called Anovulation. You can have a menstrual period but not ovulate. When this happens, the hormones may become unbalanced, resulting in excess bleeding.

      Cervical polyps are small, fragile growths that begin in either the mucosal surface of the cervix, or the endocervical canal and protrude through the opening of the cervix.

      Endometrial polyps are typically non-cancerous, growths that protrude from the lining of the uterus.

      Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is an infection of one or more organs that affects the uterus, fallopian tubes, and cervix. PID is, most often, a sexually transmitted disease; however, it sometimes occurs following childbirth, abortion, or other gynecological procedures.

      Cervical cancer is a type of cancer that occurs when cells in the cervix become abnormal, multiply out of control, and damage healthy parts of the body. The human papillomavirus, or HPV, is the cause of over ninety percent of all cervical cancers.

      Endometrial cancer occurs when abnormal cells in the uterus or the endometrium (the lining of the uterus) multiply out of control and damage to the uterus and other organs. While the cause of endometrial cancer is unknown, it is known that women diagnosed with this type of cancer tend are usually over fifty.

      IUDs or intrauterine devices used for contraception are a potential cause of heavy menstrual bleeding or menorrhagia. Women who experience prolonged or heavy periods while using the IUD should have the device removed and choose an alternate method of birth control.

      Bleeding disorders occur when it is hard for a person to stop bleeding. While there are several types of bleeding disorders, the most common type in women is von Willebrand Disease or VWD.

      Source(s):
      http://www.buzzle.com/articles/reasons-f…
      http://womenshealth.about.com/od/abnorma…

  24. QUESTION:
    Does anyone get a period while on Lybrel?
    I have been on Lybrel for 1 month. I have had some breakthrough/spotting bleeding but now I am getting my usual heavy/clotting period. This period is just a bad as it was before the Lybrel. I also know that this is not breakthrough/spotting bleeding. Does anyone know why?

    • ANSWER:
      Every woman's body is different, but I would wait another month before I get too concerned, because with Lybrel this breakthrough bleeding is very common, especially during the first 3 months. Tell your doctor if this bleeding continues past several months or starts to get real heavy. Has he/she rulled out fibroids?

      I know the heavy periods are such a pain. Hang in there and keep bugging your doc if you're not satisfied with how it's working. I ended up having a hysterectomy after years of the heavy 'chunky' type bleeding due to fibroids and it has been wonderful ever since. Best of luck to you.

      (I'm sure you know that Lybrel can cause birth defects, so don't use if you think you are pregnant. Tell your doctor right away if you miss two periods in a row. Also, don't smoke while using it, especially if you are older than 35. Smoking can increase your risk of blood clots, stroke, or heart attack when on birth control pills).

  25. QUESTION:
    Had blood transfusion and operated fibroids and came out with red eyes now 9 months. wats the cause?
    I was very anemic and my HB was 4.5 and was transfused before undergoing operation of fibroids. But after operation I came out with red eyes and my Dr told me to see the eye specialist which I did. Got some eye drop 4 red eyes but have never stabilized. What could be the cause? Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      please do not accuse your transfusion after 9 months, if it is persisting your blood clotting ability must be tested,better consult a hematologist

  26. QUESTION:
    I took the depo shot and now something weird happened while on my period?
    I got the shot in April and I just got my first period since then... but a big clump of tissue or something came out while I was on my period.. it wasn't like a typical clot it didn't break up.. it almost looked like a sac or something.. freaked out and a little scared.. what was it?

    • ANSWER:
      Causes of Blood Clots

      Hormonal Changes
      Hormones called estrogen and progesterone, are responsible for the production and shedding of the uterine lining. If this balance is disturbed, blood clots can be formed. The main reasons of hormonal changes and hormonal imbalance in young women are given below:

      Enlarged Uterus
      The uterus enlarges during pregnancy so that it becomes easy to accommodate the child. After pregnancy, the uterus shrinks back to the normal size. However, it may not happen in some cases. At such times, blood gets collected and forms a clot before it is released from the body, and that is when you see blood clots during menstrual cycle.

      Endometriosis
      Endometriosis is another reason that can cause hormonal changes. This is a medical condition which occurs due to the wrong growth of a tissue. This tissue is supposed to form on the lining of the uterus, but if it grows inside or any other place, it results in heavy bleeding and blood clots. Endometriosis should be treated by a physician only.

      Side Effects
      If you are undergoing some medical treatment, specially if the prescribed medicines are steroids, than you can experience blood clots during your period. Steroids also cause weight gain, which is another reason for these clots.

      These were the hormonal changes that are responsible for blood clot during period. Besides these, there are some other reasons which are given further.

      Fibroids
      Fibroids are tumors which are non-cancerous and grow in the womb. A woman having uterine fibroids can experience blood clots during menstruation. Heavy flow is also seen along with blood clots. Premenstrual syndrome can also be one of the reasons.

      Miscarriage
      Women who have had a miscarriage in the past, may pass blood clots or gray clumps of tissues from the vagina. The women with a history of miscarriage should immediately consult a doctor if they notice these symptoms, during the next pregnancy.

      Heavy Periods
      A heavy flow can also be one of the reasons for blood clots during periods. A woman's body has high anti-clotting ability, but during heavy periods, this ability is used up, and this results in clots.

      Quarter-sized or small blood clots are no reason to worry about. But if they are bigger than that, consult your doctor immediately.

  27. QUESTION:
    Hello, I wonder if anyone can help me, I am 37, and have really heavy periods with clotting and flooding?
    I had to come home from work today as I flooded (towards the end of my period) and had to change my clothes, I have been to the GP and had some blood tests which have come back OK, and have been taking Mefenamic Acid which doesn't seem to have made a great deal of difference - I am still clotting and flooding - I am due back to the doctors next week, but does anyone know what it could be?

    • ANSWER:
      Mefenamic acid is not all that effective only reducing flow by 10-20% a much better choice might have been Tranexamic acid which is much more effective. Hormones need to be avoided until the cause of your menorrhagia is determined. There are a plethora of causes, most fairly benign, you are however at the almost classical age for uterine fibroids and these need to be excluded.

  28. QUESTION:
    Herbal supplements for heavy periods?
    Im 16 and was taken off the birth control pill because they suspect it was causing blood clots in my leg...

    So...I was wondering if anyone knew of any herbs that are good for heavy periods or ones that regulate hormones and such.

    I've heard red clover, red raspberry, and evening primrose but a lot of that seems to be more for pregnancy??

    can anyone help?

    • ANSWER:
      Homeopathic Remedies for Menustrational Complaints (You must read it carefully) these are 100% cures which cure without any side effects or complications :-

      Dark, clotted; copious or scanty menses, during day time only; 1st menses delayed and painful; intermittent and irregular; changing moods; likes open air Pulsatilla 30 or 200, 4 hourly

      Early and profuse; copious; during night on lying down; frequently; intermittent; painful Kreosote 30 or 200, 3 hourly (3)

      Menses dark; acrid, excoriating,during night only, after lying down Bovista 30 or 200, 4 hourly

      Copious and dark; worse after injury Hamamellis 30, 3 hourly (3)

      Dark, clotted, painful and frequent, due to displaced uterus; during night only Trillium p.Q or 6X, 3 hourly

      Copious; gushing and frequent; worse after exertion; every 2 weeks or every few days;lasting for a week or more Medorrhinum 200 or 1M monthly (3)

      Copious, offensive, clotted and painful,due to uterine fibroid; difficult to wash Platina 200 or 1M, 3 hourly (3)

      Menses bright red, copious, clotted, painful and frequent; worse during menopause; walking ameliorates; history of abortion Sabina 30 or 200 6 hourly

      Menses bright red, mingled with dark clots; offensive Belladonna 30, 4 hourly

      Mense bright red; gushing; nausea or vomiting, clean tongue Ipecac 30, 4 hourly

      Menses bright red; copious and frequent Millefolium Q or 30 4 hourly

      Menses bright red; vicarious; patient desires icy cold water Phosphorus 30 or 200, 4 hourly(3)

      Menses acrid; excoriating;copious after miscarriage; frequent; intermittent China 6 or 30, 4 hourly

      Menses copious; continues upto next period; dark and clotted; irregular Secale Cor 30 4 hourly

      Menses profuse and early; copious with dark clots and abdominal distention Nux vomica 30 or 200, 6 hourly

      Early and excessive; bright red, long lasting with headache; copious; worse after exertion; early in young girls lasting for long; late in adults Calc-phos 12X or 30, 3 hourly (3)

      Copious; lasting a week or more,frequent, every 2 weeks; intermittent Sulphur 200 or 1M, 4 hourly (3)

      Amenorrhoea; dark clotted blood; copious, frequent, delayed; first menses delayed; exhausting; pale, thin blood Ferrum met.3X or 6X, 4 hourly

      Irregular; painful, delayed or frequent; worse after exertion Sepia 30 or 200, 3 hourly (3)

      Early; profuse and frequent; every 2 weeks; during lactation; lasting a week or more; returns after excitement; suppressed after working in water or becoming wet Calcarea carb.200 or 1M, 3 hourly (3)

      Menses copious, frequent,dark, intermittent and irregular; during day time only; offensive, painful and thick Lilium tig.30 or 200, 4 hourly (3)

      Menstrual flow suppressed after fright or shock; in plethoric young girls; menses profuse with nose bleed; late; marked fear and restlessness Aconite 30 or 200, 3 hourly

      Menses frequent and copious; offensive; passive bleeding Helonias Q or 6, 4 hourly

      All complaints better during menstruation; copious or scanty; painful for very short period only; dark, lumpy and black Lachesis 200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Copious; worse after injury or coition; bruised pains Arnica 200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Menses copious; late or suppressed; worse while sitting; feels better after flow starts Zincum met.30 or 200, 3 hourly(3)

      Dark, clotted, stringy, offensive, painful and frequent; worse from least movements Crocus sat.Q or 6X, 4 hourly

      Delayed; specially first menses; irregular,painful,pale and scanty; stools constipated Graphites 30 or 200 3 hourly(3)

      Delayed and painful; flow aggravates the complaints; neuralgic, rheumatic pain;scanty or suppressed due to emotions or fever Actaea race.30 or 200 4 hourly (3)

      Delayed, scanty,stopped due to cold; putting hands in cold water, due to cold; breast becomes enlarged, sore and painful during menstrual cycle Conium mac.200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Delayed or stopped; by putting hands in cold water; suppressed after drinking milk Lac-def.200 3 hourly (3)

      Early or delayed; exhausting,scanty or profuse; stools hard and constipated; haemorrhage between periods Thlaspi b-p.Q or 6 4 hourly

      Copious; alternate periods more profuse; frequent and painful;very slight (1st day only), 2nd day with vomiting; mentrual colic with large clots Cyclamen 30 4 hourly

      Painful and scanty;increases while sitting and less while walking Alumina 30 or 0/5 4 hourly

      Menses with neuralgic pain; dysmenorrhoea with pains flying to other parts of the body Caulophyllum 30 or 200 4 hourly (3)

      Early, dark and stringy with neuralgic pain; better after flow starts; menstrual colic; membranous dysmenorrhoea Magnesia phos.12X or 30 3 hourly

      menses lasts for long; thick and dark; irregular Nux mosch.200 3 hourly (3)

      Early and profuse; menses returns after over exertion; long walk, passing hard stools etc; discharge of blood between periods Ambra gr.200 3 hourly (3)

      Painful; only for one day or one hour; late and scanty; amenorrhoea with opthalmia Euphrasia 30 or 200 4 hourly

      Menses appear only for one day; scanty, pain in small of back and stomach during menstruation Baryta carb.200 4 hourly (3)

      Clotted,stringy, passive and bright red; profuse after miscarriage; worse after slightest provocation Ustilago Q or 6 4 hourly

      Early and profuse; suppressed after bathing in river or swimming pool; tongue thickly whitish coated Antim-crud.200 4 hourly (3)

      Suppressed with colic; better bending double and by pressure Colocynth 200 3 hourly (3)

      Acrid,early, profuse and prolonged; suppressed after getting feet wet Rhus tox.200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Early and profuse; epistaxis instead of menses; worse by motion Bryonia 30 or 200 4 hourly

      Totally exhausted during menstruation, can hardly speak; lasting for long, though not profuse Carbo an.200 3 hourly(3)

      Menses early or late; scanty or profuse; pain with soreness about genitals; pain from back passes down through left labium Kali carb.200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Gushing; exhausting with colic as from sharp stones rubbing together; irregular and painful Cocculus ind.30 or 200 4 hourly

      Scanty; early or delayed; clots of black blood; menstrual flow aggravates all the complaints Thuja oc.200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Frequent; early or delayed during day time only; no menses at night; scanty and offensive Causticum 200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Frequent and gushing; membranous; painful and stringy; breasts swollen and painful before menses and better afterwards; excessive menstruation; discharge of bloody mucous after menses at the time of new moon Lac-can.200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Menses during lactation period; while nursing the child Silicea 200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Membranous; early and profuse, with griping in abdomen; nausea and pain in stomach extending to small of back Borax 30 4 hourly

      Early with thick and strong odour; offensive; premature and too copious Carbo Veg.30 or 200 3 hourly (3 Doses)

      Menses offensive; vicarious; mammae swollen and painful Psorinum 200 or 1M, monthly (3)

      Menses painful; suppressed; colic before the appearance of discharge Verat Vir 30X or 200 4 hourly (3 Doses)

      Dysmenorrhoea; menses usually delayed Pneumococcus 30X or 200, 3 hourly (3 Doses)

      Take the remedy which is similar to your symptoms. No side effects or complications if taken as directed, please do not exceed the given dosage and under any circumstances do not try to mix any remedies and avoid Chocolates, Mints, Coffee, Red Meat, Alcoholic and Carbonated drinks, Spicy Rich Food while taking any Homeopathic remedies, and keep the medicines away from direct sunlight, heat strong smells and perfumes and do not store them in the fridge.
      Curing without any side effects or Complications Thats the Beauty of Homeopathic Medicine

      For more information on Homeopathy and women's problems please look up under the appropriate header :- http://www.hpathy.com/diseases

      I hope and pray that the provided information proves helpful to you.

      Best of Health to you.

      Take Care and God Bless

  29. QUESTION:
    Should I be seeing a doctor for my periods?
    I started my period when I was young, (around 12), and they have always been heavy. I always try to change regularly, which amounts to every 30 minutes to an hour because I go so heavy. Just now it was so bad that it had went through my shorts and was dripping down my leg. I tell my parents I think I need to see a doctor, because I don't think I should be going this heavy. I'm only 16!

    • ANSWER:
      Hello Brea,

      Experiencing a heavy flow during your period once in a while can be considered normal. However, if this continues on a regular basis, then it could be a matter of concern. If the flow during your period has been heavy for quite some time now, do not take it lightly. Your body may be trying to tell you something. This Buzzle article will help you identify this gynecological problem better and find some possible solutions for it.

      Why it Happens

      •Hormones: Generally, a woman nearing menopause or a young girl may experience heavy bleeding at least once within the first year of getting her period. This is a normal situation resulting from hormonal changes, but should be monitored closely because if either loses too much blood, it may lead to other complications.
      •Uterine Fibroids: Some women may develop uterine fibroids as a result of the excessive or quick production of estrogen in the body. It is important to note that a fibroid tumor is benign and non cancerous. However, it can lead to bleeding more than usual which causes much discomfort. Since it is caused due to estrogen, the tumor develops quickly during menstruation and pregnancy when estrogen is produced more.
      •Lochia: It is natural to experience excess bleeding after pregnancy. This bleeding after a normal delivery or a c-section is termed as Lochia. It is the body's way of discharging any excess fluids like mucus or placental tissue that remains inside you before childbirth. It begins almost immediately after delivery and lasts for about 6 weeks.
      •Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID): PID is caused due to an infection in the uterine lining, the ovaries or the fallopian tubes. The causes of PID can be unprotected sex, surgical procedures like abortion or cesarean delivery, etc. This is a very serious problem and many sexually active teens are falling prey to PID without realizing its dangers.
      •Polyps: Uterine polyps are small in growths on the lining of the uterus. Polyps are generally caused by hormonal changes in a woman's body. Women in their late 20s to mid 40s have a greater tendency of experiencing polyps in the uterus, which is also a cause of heavy blood flow during one's period.
      •Medications: Some women may experience heavy flow while on birth control pills or medication for some other ailment. Other medications for inflammations may also cause heavy and continuous flow for quite some time. Hence, women must take care of what medications they're taking and take them only if prescribed.

      Most Common Symptoms Experienced

      The amount of blood flow experienced even during a heavy period varies from woman to woman. So, it is necessary to know what exactly are the symptoms of heavy flow so that you can identify if you indeed are bleeding in excess.

      •Generally, a discharge of more than 80 ml of blood from the body during a single period (that is the 5 day period) is considered heavy.
      •Another symptom is when you experience a period that lasts more than the usual duration of a period. For instance, a normal period lasts for 4 to 5 days. If you are bleeding for a continuous period of more than 10 days, then it is advisable to consult a doctor.
      •If you feel the need to keep changing your tampon or your sanitary napkin almost an hourly rate, then it is a sign that you're bleeding more than normal. Also, make sure that you change your protection at least twice a day to prevent any possible infection.
      •Some women also happen to discharge blood clots along with blood during their period.
      •Are your clothes getting stained more often during your period lately? It could be after a night's sleep or after a long day of sitting in one position. Sometimes, you may not realize it, but this too could be a sign
      •Heavy bleeding, in some cases, is also accompanied by severe abdominal cramps. In such a situation, you may also begin to feel dizzy and weak. This happens due to the excess blood loss from your body.

      If you experience all or even a combination of a couple of these symptoms, make sure you visit a medical professional who can diagnose you with the appropriate condition and provide expert advice.

  30. QUESTION:
    Are these just symptoms of being on the pill or something more severe?
    I've had slight bloating. I'm currently on Microgynon 30 which are 21 day birth control pills, will these affect my stomach like this? My periods during the first few months were fairly heavy/normal, but lighter than usual. About three months ago my period was very light and I had some spotting about a week and a half before I was due for my seven day break, and after my last period ( about a week after I'd finished) I passed blood clots and the blood was darker than period blood. What's going on?
    I'm 16, been on the pill since mid May, I didn't have a pelvic exam but I did have blood pressure, weight checked etc.. I used to have heavy periods, and up until a few months ago my periods were lighter than pre-pill but not that much different. Now they are light. No history of fibroid cysts either. I'm going to go to my clinic tomorrow for a check up though.

    • ANSWER:
      You had a full pelvic exam when they prescribed your pill and they didn't find anything unusual? You don't have a history of heavy periods?

      How old are you? Any history of fibroid cysts? The older you get the more heavy periods and 'clotty' bleeding are likely.

      Usually the pill keeps a woman that typically gets heavy periods having lighter ones.

      I had bright red bleeding with a large fibroid cyst or tumor (benign) that caused heavy bleeding and anemia.

      An exam with possibly and ultrasound to make sure there isn't another problem may be in order.

  31. QUESTION:
    My period is really heavy and i have clots ?
    i'm using a super tampon in less than an hour and i feel like i'm dizzy . should i go to school today ?

    • ANSWER:
      Heavy Menstruation Bleeding
      During menstruation, the egg is released from the ovary. If this egg is fertilized by the sperm, it goes to the uterus through the fallopian tube and gets attached to the lining of the uterus. Hence to support the fertilized egg, the lining of the uterus thickens. If the egg is not fertilized, the lining of the uterus starts shedding which can be seen as blood. The normal menstruation cycle is of 28 days but it may vary in some women. Some women may have a cycle of 21 days and some may have a 35 days cycle. The period normally lasts for 2 to 7 days and the amount of blood lost is around 4 to 12 teaspoons. But some women experience heavy bleeding during periods which can be serious. Due to the heavy bleeding the body is not able to excrete the entire amount of blood which results in blood clots.

      Causes of Heavy Menstrual Bleeding Clots

      There are many reasons behind prolonged menstrual bleeding which need to get diagnosed.

      Following are some of the possible reasons behind it.

      •Uterine fibroids can be a major cause of severe blood flow during periods. These are non-cancerous tumors which form inside the uterus. They do not have any other symptoms but they restrict the flow of the blood which results in clots and heavy bleeding.
      •Very heavy menstrual bleeding may be a sign of a miscarriage. If you are pregnant and are experiencing this condition then consult the doctor immediately. You will observe blood clots or gray clumps of tissue.
      •Hormonal changes can also cause severe bleeding during periods. Progesterone and estrogen are two hormones which regulate the thickening and shedding of the uterus lining. Any problem with these hormones may result in excess bleeding clots.
      •During pregnancy the uterus enlarges and usually comes back to its original size after the childbirth. But in some cases, the uterus size does not decrease completely which results in a large uterus. Hence the blood takes time to collect inside the uterus which results in blood clots during periods.
      •Any type of obstruction in the blood flow may result in blood clots. The flow of the blood slows down at the time of menopause which may further result in collection of blood which clots.
      Symptoms of Menorrhagia
      Menorrhagia symptoms can be easily noticed. Following are some of them.
      •Dark brown to black big blood clots.
      •Heavy blood flow for more than 7 days.
      •Severe menstrual cramps with fatigue.
      •Pale complexion with some anemic symptoms.

  32. QUESTION:
    What are the causes of placenta abrutio in pregnancy?

    • ANSWER:
      The exact cause of a placental abruption may be hard to determine.
      Direct causes are rare, but include:
      •Injury to the belly area (abdomen) from a fall, hit to the abdomen, or automobile accident
      •Sudden loss of uterine volume (can occur with rapid loss of amniotic fluid or after a first twin is delivered)

      Risk factors include:
      •Blood clotting disorders (thrombophilias)
      •Cigarette smoking
      •Cocaine use
      •Diabetes
      •Drinking more than 14 alcoholic drinks per week during pregnancy
      •High blood pressure during pregnancy (about half of placental abruptions that lead to the baby's death are linked to high blood pressure)
      •History of placenta abruptio
      •Increased uterine distention (may occur with multiple pregnancies or very large volume of amniotic fluid)
      •Large number of past deliveries
      •Older mother
      •Premature rupture of membranes (the bag of water breaks before 37 weeks into the pregnancy)
      •Uterine fibroids

      Placental abruption, which includes any amount of placental separation before delivery, occurs in about 1 out of 150 deliveries. The severe form, which can cause the baby to die, occurs only in about 1 out of 800 to 1,600 deliveries.

  33. QUESTION:
    What are the side effects of estrogen?
    What does it do besides the obvious for transitioning?
    By transitioning, I mean hormone replacement.
    I meant what are the side effects of a man taking estrogen for hormone replacement therapy?

    • ANSWER:
      The most common side effects include enlargement or tenderness of the breasts (both sexes), swelling of the ankles and legs, loss of appetite, weight changes, retention of water, nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramps, and feeling of bloatedness. The estrogen patch can cause skin rash, irritation, and redness at the patch site.

      Less common side effects are bleeding gums, breakthrough vaginal bleeding, vaginal spotting, changes in menstrual flow, painful menstruation. pre-menstrual syndrome, no menstrual period during and after estrogen use, enlargement of uterine fibroids, vaginal infection with Candida, a cystitis-like syndrome, mild diarrhea, jaundice or yellowing of the skin or whites of the eyes, rash, loss of scalp hair, and development of new hairy areas. Lesions of the eye and contact-lens intolerance have also been associated with estrogen therapy. You may experience migraine headache, mild dizziness, depression, and increased sex drive (women) or decreased sex drive (men).

      Rare side effects include stroke, blood-clot formation, dribbling or sudden passage of urine, loss of coordination, chest pains, leg pains, difficulty breathing, slurred speech, and vision changes. Men who receive large estrogen doses as part of the treatment for prostate cancer are at a greater risk for heart attack, phlebitis, and blood clots in the lungs.

  34. QUESTION:
    Why does my period have big blood clots?
    My period is normally heavy but this time I'm having big blood clots

    • ANSWER:
      Causes of Blood Clots in Period
      •Enlarged Uterus: This cause of menstrual blood clots applies to new moms only. A woman's uterus expands itself to accommodate the growing fetus. After childbirth the uterus shrinks to its normal size, just as it had expanded. However sometimes it does not shrink, which is why blood pools inside and then passes when you have a period. Now there might be gap between the time it gets collected in the uterus to the time it is passed out, which is why blood clots form.
      •Miscarriage: Miscarriage and blood clots are closely related. The history of miscarriage can be a reason of blood clots during period. If one is passing blood clots and there is a possibility of pregnancy, one should immediately contact the gynecologist as there might be a possibility of miscarriage. As stated earlier, blood clots in period after miscarriage are common, so one should consult a gynecologist during the next pregnancy.
      •Endometriosis: Endometriosis is a medical condition which causes hormonal changes, which lead to menstrual blood clots. What happens in this condition is that a tissue, which is supposed to grow on the lining of the uterus, grows at some other place instead. If endometriosis is the cause of blood clots, one needs to take proper treatment from an experienced gynecologist.
      •Leiomyoma: Leiomyomata, also known as uterine fibroid are non-cancerous tumors that are formed in the womb. One of the symptom of leiomyomata can be blood clots. If the fibroid are small, there might be no symptoms at all.
      •Blockage: If due to some reason the menstrual blood gets obstructed, one might notice blood clots in period. Menopause or benign polyps can be two reasons behind this. Benign polyps change the flow of blood during menstruation, which is why clots might form. And during menopause, the cervical canal might become smaller due to lowered estrogen levels which leads to menstruation blood clots.
      •Medication: Certain medications like steroids or anti coagulants can also cause blood clots during menstruation. Oral contraceptive pills can also cause blood clots during period as they bring about a change in the normal hormonal balance of the body.

  35. QUESTION:
    Periods with bad pains and blood clots?
    For a long time during my period I had blood clots and I thought it was normal but now the pains and the clotting is starting to get worse!!! And I'm starting to worry because after seven days of the end of my last cycle I'm spotting a little and last night i was have really bad cramps down their. I tried to schedule an appointment with the gynecologist two weeks ago but they don't have any openings. I leave for college in three days, what should I do?

    • ANSWER:
      Severe period pains should always be investigated to check for a treatable cause. As a rough guide, if you've had severe period pain (known as dysmenorrhoea) since around the time your periods first started, it's less likely a particular cause will be found.

      There are exceptions to this. Conditions such as endometriosis can sometimes cause severe pain from an early age (although the pain typically gets worse as the disease does more damage with each monthly cycle). Other causes include fibroids, pelvic inflammatory disease and sometimes a narrowing of the cervix. Bear in mind, though, that period pains are rarely a sign of disease, especially in younger women.

      If the pain interferes with your life, preventing you from working, going to school or coping with daily tasks, I would recommend you consult with a doctor/gynaecologist for further evaluation.

      Good luck :)

  36. QUESTION:
    I have had 3 miscarriages in a row, and I have one healthy son who is 4. Has this happened to anyone else?
    I am very worried I wont be able to have anymore kids. The first time I lost a baby I was 5 weeks, the 2nd time I was 10 weeks but the baby measured 7 weeks 6 days, this time I was 11 weeks and the baby measured 9 weeks.... Any advise? Please no rude comments, this has been horrible for me and my husband.

    • ANSWER:
      yes I have had an ectopic and a multitude of miscarriages before going to a reproductive endocrinologist. An educated guess says that there are some fertility issues. The chance of miscarriage is 20% so for you having four pregnancies you might expect one miscarriage statistically. The ability to get pregnant is very reassuring for you to be able to have more kids. You may have something as simple as fibroids (scarring) that are causing the loss. This can be checked by an outpatient procedure called a laparoscopy. I have had this done. Also, it could be something simple like a hormone imbalance like your progesterone level is too low to hold the pregnancy. The progesterone is produced in the ovaries the first trimester then the placenta produces it. I have had this. It was fixed by taking progesterone. The pregnancy went to term. It could be you have an incompetent cervix. The cervix is dilating and opening due to the pressure of the baby. They do a curclage (sp.?) which is just a few stitches. I haven't had this. It could be do to a blood clotting issue such as a +lupus anti-coagulent also called ACLA anti-cardiolipid antibody. If your gyno hasn't suggested testing consider getting a new one. This is a simple blood test. Most women don't know they have it but more than two miscarriages is a suspected diagnosis. I have had this. Treatment are blood thinners. What happens is that the thick sludgy blood cuts off the babies oxygen supply and the baby dies. If you jump on this there is a really good chance of you having a baby next year. You are fortunate that your issue is only staying preggers instead of most of us who have issues we have problems getting and staying preggers. Good Luck! It is hard to relax but it is much easier and quicker to be successful if you can just stay calm

  37. QUESTION:
    Heavy bleeding and heavy pain during my period with black clots?
    Is it normal or what should i do?
    Pls advise

    • ANSWER:
      Hormonal changes. Your body relies on a delicate balance of the hormones progesterone and estrogen. These hormones regulate the production and shedding of the uterine lining. When this balance is disturbed, it can lead to the development of an excessively thick uterine lining. This thickness can contribute to more bleeding than usual. It can also cause clots in the menstrual blood when the lining is shed.
      There r so many reasons for this as Endometriosis, fibroid, polyps etc
      to find out correct reason u should visit a local specialist in ur town.

  38. QUESTION:
    What are the chances of having a second placental abruption?
    We would love to have another baby but I am still very apprehensive after having a placental abruption last pregnancy. We have 3 daughters, with my last daughter 3 years ago my Obstetrician was concerned my placenta was not functioning and I was induced at 37 weeks. After being induced, my waters would not break and I just received mild contractions that went away. I went home later that evening and this is when the abruption occured. I would like to know if I am more at risk now because I have already experienced this? thankyou

    • ANSWER:
      I would definetly consult a doctor.
      Who's most at risk for placental abruption?
      No one knows for sure what causes most cases of placental abruption, but the condition is more common in women who:

      • Had an abruption in a previous pregnancy (and if you've had an abruption in two or more pregnancies, the risk is even higher)

      • Have chronic hypertension, gestational hypertension, or preeclampsia

      • Have a blood clotting disorder

      • Have their water break prematurely

      • Have too much amniotic fluid (polyhydramnios)

      • Had bleeding earlier in their pregnancy

      • Are carrying multiples (abruption is especially common just after the first baby is delivered)

      • Are involved in an accident (particularly a car accident), are assaulted (with blows to the abdomen), or have other trauma to the abdomen

      • Smoke tobacco or use cocaine

      • Have had many babies or are older (the risk gradually goes up with age)

      • Have a uterine abnormality or fibroids (particularly if there's a fibroid behind the place where the placenta is attached)

  39. QUESTION:
    My right side of my body is numb from the stomach down!?
    I am 22 years old, 2 days ago i noticed my foot felt cold, then my leg going up to my groin, stomach and right bum cheek! I am going to the doctors tomorrow but was wondering if anyone had any ideas! I am not in pain AT ALL but it is a bit daunting!

    I do drink quite a bit but no more than any other city slicker... I do not exercise but I do eat reasonably well... It is just strage that it is numb just down one side, it is also going up my body....

    I have a history of circulation problems in my family but my foot is not blue!

    Any ideas? Please help if you can.

    • ANSWER:
      You could just have circulation problems or it could be a blood clot. If you are female you could have fibroid tumors (which is non cancerous) that need to be removed. There is not much you can do until you find out what is causing your problem. Good luck at the doctor.

  40. QUESTION:
    my sister has excessive bleeding like having a period for over a month now. she has lost a lot of weight?
    and says she has little to no energy from this. does anyone know what she has. she is taking iron supplements but now is really scared because her weakness has increased and she still is bleeding.

    • ANSWER:
      MENORRHAGIA Causes
      In some cases, the cause of heavy menstrual bleeding is unknown, but a number of conditions may cause menorrhagia. Common causes include:

      Hormonal imbalance. In a normal menstrual cycle, a balance between the hormones estrogen and progesterone regulates the buildup of the lining of the uterus (endometrium), which is shed during menstruation. If a hormonal imbalance occurs, the endometrium develops in excess and eventually sheds by way of heavy menstrual bleeding. Hormonal imbalance occurs most often in adolescent girls and in women approaching menopause. If menorrhagia is caused by a specific hormonal imbalance, such as thyroid disease, the heavy menstrual flow often can be controlled with hormone medications. However, improper use of hormone medications can also be a direct cause of menorrhagia.
      Uterine fibroids. These noncancerous (benign) tumors of the uterus appear during your childbearing years. Uterine fibroids may cause heavier than normal or prolonged menstrual bleeding.
      Polyps. Small, benign growths on the lining of the uterine wall (uterine polyps) may cause heavy or prolonged menstrual bleeding. Polyps of the uterus most commonly occur in women of reproductive age as the result of high hormone levels.
      Dysfunction of the ovaries. Lack of ovulation (anovulation) may cause hormonal imbalance and result in menorrhagia.
      Adenomyosis. This condition occurs when glands from the endometrium become embedded in the uterine muscle, often causing heavy bleeding and pain. Adenomyosis is most likely to develop if you're a middle-aged woman who has had many children.
      Intrauterine device (IUD). Menorrhagia is a well-known side effect of using a nonhormonal intrauterine device for birth control. When an IUD is the cause of excessive menstrual bleeding, you'll often need to remove it.
      Pregnancy complications. A single, heavy, late period may be due to a miscarriage. If bleeding occurs at the usual time of menstruation, however, miscarriage is unlikely to be the cause. An ectopic pregnancy — implantation of a fertilized egg within the fallopian tube instead of the uterus — also may cause menorrhagia.
      Cancer. Rarely, uterine cancer, ovarian cancer and cervical cancer can cause excessive menstrual bleeding.
      Medications. Certain drugs, including anti-inflammatory medications and anticoagulants (to prevent blood clots), can contribute to heavy or prolonged menstrual bleeding.
      Other medical conditions. A number of other medical conditions, including pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), thyroid problems, endometriosis, and liver or kidney disease, may cause menorrhagia.

      Complications
      Excessive or prolonged menstrual bleeding can lead to other medical conditions, including:

      Iron deficiency anemia. In this common type of anemia, your blood is low on hemoglobin, a substance that enables red blood cells to carry oxygen to tissues. Low hemoglobin may be the result of insufficient iron. Menorrhagia may deplete iron levels enough to increase the risk of iron deficiency anemia. Symptoms include pallor, weakness and fatigue.

      Although diet plays a role in iron deficiency anemia, the problem is complicated by heavy menstrual periods. Most cases of anemia are mild, but even mild anemia can cause weakness and fatigue. Moderate to severe anemia can also cause shortness of breath, rapid heart rate, lightheadedness and headaches.

      Severe pain. Heavy menstrual bleeding often is accompanied by menstrual cramps (dysmenorrhea). Sometimes the cramps associated with menorrhagia are severe enough to require prescription medication or a surgical procedure.

  41. QUESTION:
    Can I still have sex if I have Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding?
    I have been recently diagnosed with Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding (DUB), and I'm marriend. Of course, me and my husband want to have sex, but we're not sure if it's safe to have sex! Will it cause more bleeding?! Will it make the condition worsen?!

    • ANSWER:
      I am really not sure.. I am not surprised that you doctor didn't say anything to you whether or not you could. I looked on webmd. It didn't say you couldn't or couldn't.

      Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding - Topic Overview
      Is this topic for you?
      Irregular vaginal bleeding is usually related to changing hormone levels. This can affect your menstrual cycle. However, vaginal bleeding can be caused by disease, infection, or pregnancy complications. For more information on these possible causes of this condition, see the topic Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding.

      What is dysfunctional uterine bleeding?
      Dysfunctional uterine bleeding is irregular vaginal bleeding. For example, your monthly menstrual period may happen more often than every 21 days or farther apart than 35 days. Your period may last longer than 7 days. In most cases, dysfunctional uterine bleeding is related to changes in hormone levels.

      Dysfunctional uterine bleeding is not bleeding caused by medical conditions such as miscarriage, uterine growths such as fibroids, cancer of the cervix or uterus, or blood diseases. If you are having vaginal bleeding, your health professional must rule out these other conditions before diagnosing you with dysfunctional uterine bleeding.

      What causes dysfunctional uterine bleeding?
      Irregular vaginal bleeding is usually caused by changes in hormone levels. In some cases the cause of the bleeding isn't known.

      Normally one of your ovaries releases an egg during your menstrual cycle. This is called ovulation. Most women who have dysfunctional uterine bleeding get it when their ovaries don't release an egg. This causes changes in hormone levels and in some cases can lead to unexpected vaginal bleeding.

      Less often, some women have dysfunctional uterine bleeding even though they ovulate. Experts don't fully understand this type of vaginal bleeding. It may be caused by changes in certain body chemicals.1

      What are the symptoms?
      You may have dysfunctional uterine bleeding if you have one or more of the following symptoms:

      Menstrual bleeding that occurs more often than every 21 days or farther apart than 35 days (a normal menstrual cycle is 21 to 35 days long).
      Menstrual bleeding that lasts longer than 7 days (normally 4 to 6 days).
      Blood loss of more than 80 mL each menstrual cycle (normally about 30 mL). If you are passing large clots or soaking a large pad per hour for 8 hours, your bleeding is considered heavy.
      How is dysfunctional uterine bleeding diagnosed?
      Your health professional must first rule out all other medical causes of vaginal bleeding before diagnosing dysfunctional uterine bleeding. These causes may include miscarriage, pregnancy complications, and common and less serious causes such as adenomyosis and uterine fibroids.

      If you have had frequent vaginal bleeding for three or more menstrual cycles, or your symptoms are affecting your daily functioning, see your health professional. By reviewing the frequency, duration, and amount of bleeding you have been having, combined with a pelvic examination, urine test, blood tests, and possibly an ultrasound, your health professional will be able to check for a number of causes of your symptoms. A biopsy of endometrial tissue may also be helpful.

      Your health professional may diagnose dysfunctional uterine bleeding, if after testing no other diseases or conditions are causing your symptoms.

      How is it treated?
      A number of treatment options are available for dysfunctional uterine bleeding. Some are meant to return the menstrual cycle to normal; others are used to reduce bleeding or to eliminate menstruation. Each of these options works effectively for some women but not others. Treatments include:

      Watchful waiting, which is a wait-and-see approach. Watchful waiting may be appropriate for a teen or a woman approaching menopause. Some teens have times of irregular vaginal bleeding. But hormone levels usually even out as a teen matures and the menstrual cycle becomes more regular. Women nearing the age of menopause can expect menstrual cycles to stop.
      Hormones, such as a progestin pill or daily birth control pill (progestin and estrogen). These hormones help regulate the menstrual cycle and reduce bleeding and cramping.
      A short course of high-dose estrogen. Estrogen is a hormone that is often used to stop dangerously heavy bleeding.
      Use of the levonorgestrel IUD, which releases a progesterone-like hormone into the uterus. This reduces bleeding while preventing pregnancy.
      Rarely used medications that stop estrogen production and menstruation, such as gonadotropin-releasing hormones. These medications can cause severe side effects but are used in special cases.
      Surgery, such as endometrial ablation.
      In cases of severe uterine bleeding, blood transfusion may be used to quickly restore needed blood volume before a longer-term treatment is used.

      You may have your uterus removed (hysterectomy) if you have uncontrollable uterine bleeding or can't take medicine to control it.

      Frequently Asked Questions

      Learning about dysfunctional uterine bleeding:
      What is dysfunctional uterine bleeding?
      What causes dysfunctional uterine bleeding?
      What are symptoms of dysfunctional uterine bleeding?
      What increases my risk of dysfunctional uterine bleeding?

      Being diagnosed:
      How is dysfunctional uterine bleeding diagnosed?

      Getting treatment:
      What treatment options do I have for dysfunctional uterine bleeding?
      What kinds of medication can I take to reduce dysfunctional uterine bleeding?
      What is the levonorgestrel IUD, and how does it help dysfunctional uterine bleeding?
      What kinds of surgery are used to treat dysfunctional uterine bleeding?
      What is endometrial ablation?
      What is a hysteroscopy?
      Should I use hormone therapy to treat dysfunctional uterine bleeding?

      I would definately call the doctor just incase

  42. QUESTION:
    Recurring pain on right side of abdomen?
    It usually is a sharp pain. Sometimes it comes as fast as it goes. Sometimes it could take about 15 mins and I'm frozen scared. I read that if it were appendicitis, it wouldn't go away within 48 hrs. And I don't have any other of the symptoms for appendicitis. I'm worried though because it can happen any time of the day. Usually, this happens when I can't move my bowels. But I don't know that to be a factor for the pain.

    • ANSWER:
      It could be fibroid. A friend of mine was experiencing the same thing with her body. Pain in the right side of her abdomen. One day we were out eating, prior to us being seated we went to the restroom, where she lost a clot of blood. She said she uses protection during sex, so she couldn't have been pregnant. Long story short- I had advised her to see the emergency right away, in which she did a week later due to the continuous pain. Well she found out that she had a several case of fibroid, and some other conditions may exist, but as I answer you today, she does not know as she will have some more testing done next week. But I would go to the doctor for some x-rays to see if it could be friboids that causing the severe pain in your side.

  43. QUESTION:
    My period has been going on for a long time? should i be scared?
    I am 47 years old and my period usually lasts maximum 5 days but it has already been 12 days and i feel very weak and tired. What could this be from? I am ending my period forever? Please HELP!

    • ANSWER:
      Anything over a week is concerning. You need to go to your dr. S/he will be able to give you something to stop your bleeding. You may be developing fibroids which can cause long periods with lots of clots. There is a chance you are starting to go through "the change", but fibroids are more likely. Either way, it's time to be checked, especially since you are feeling week and tired. You've lost too much blood.

  44. QUESTION:
    I have had 3 period this month whats wrong?
    I have had a period every other week this month. I just switched from desogen to orthocyclyn. And these are full fledged periods cramps and heavy bleeding please help!

    • ANSWER:
      Orthocyclyn sucks! Simple as that. I know when I was on it I was moody and mean, I had heavy bleeding and it wouldn't stop until I was at the end of the first week of the new pack. But, I had to take it to reduce cysts and balance hormones, and all that good stuff.
      First, is your blood black in color - if so, get to the doctor ASAP. Black blood is a sign of cancer. If you're clotting and they are bigger than golf balls, thats another bad sign. Cramps don't really mean much unless its like stabbing pain - that could be a cyst or fibroids. But, if its straight blood with no to minimal clots, it most likely hormonal due to switching meds. It will take a few packs to get normal. Also, Orthocyclyn can cause abnormal vaginal bleeding. So you might be having a minor side-effect.
      Your doctor knows your condition best, you should ask him/her about it. Most-likely orthocyclyn isn't for you. Some people need to go through many types of birth control before they find the right one. I know it took me five or six before I got on the right one to keep my cyst problem under control. Good luck, I hope everything turns out well for you.

  45. QUESTION:
    Am anemic an i have really heavy periods an blood clots with bad cramps is that normal?

    • ANSWER:
      No it isn't normal. I'm older than u's & have
      a female decease "Endometriosis" & u may
      want to wright that down for r Dr. appt. as I was in my teens when it was diagnosed. It's
      like the wall of r uterus is lined with a tissue & forms fibroids, (tumours) always beniegn!
      I am going for a 2nd Balloon Abulation in Sept. u girls look that up o.k? As the 1st did not work. I too am Anemic & bruising alot even a pinch'll do it. 1st I'd like u both to go 2 r Dr.s have blood taken enzymes, white & red Blood Cells, the Endo test above & the whole kit of blood work as well. It's not alot o' needles, just 1 prick of the needle & they gather tubes for more. You both r have an Iron Deficency, this'll make u tired, depressd
      & more Bitchy than the averge period. Also
      0 normal & alone, as u don't know why it's only u too that have this. Now U know R not
      going crazy! 1 trip to GYN office bloodwork, & probably a uterus exam when he gives them to u, no B.S. I've been through that! Tell him u need Results as there is something wrong with U! Hopefully u guys have different Dr.'s so u can compare notes. If he tries to hand u crap, tell him U DID R homework!!!!!!
      All my best to U 2 Gal's & don't think cause r a teen U have to settle for 2nd best. Speak R Mind! U all know this isn't Normal.
      LOL, Diana D
      P.S. I know r pain, Good Luck!

  46. QUESTION:
    Is it normal to have 4 periods a year when I'm 19 and not on birth control? Should I see a doctor?
    I started today (April 27th) and my last period was Jan. 25th. I'm 19 and not on birth control.

    • ANSWER:
      Hello Daphne, Many women experience months of missed periods. There were a few times I had to take a pill that jump started them again. I don't feel anything is wrong but I found an article on the internet in regards to irregular periods and their reasons for being late, early, heavy, abnormally long and heavy bleeding. I hope this helps you to answer a few of your questions. Take care.

      Hormonal Imbalance One of the prime reasons for periods to go irregular is hormonal imbalance. In a female's body, in order to produce a period, the body creates hormones such as estrogen and progesterone. Various parts of the body need to send signals to each other in order to trigger menstruation. However, due to hormonal imbalance, many a time, these signals are missed or skipped, thus, resulting in irregular periods.

      Sudden Weight Gain or Loss Have you gained or lost a lot of weight lately? If yes, you've got an answer. When your body works at a constant pace, the hormones learn to process in similar manner. However, the moment you start doing rigorous workout, or eat a lot, your body takes a while to adjust to it. Hence, hormones become imbalanced, and lead to irregularity in periods. However, this is not a tense situation as it happens with every woman who has lost or gained weight quickly.

      Stress Workload? Job issues? Relationship turmoil? Mental dissatisfaction? Reduce your stress, female, for it's affecting the regularity of your periods. Yes, stress contributes to the most common reasons for a late period. With increasing stress, you are affecting the hormonal balance of your body, and hence, not only do your periods become irregular, but they also result in excessive weight gain, and anxiety.

      Polycystic Ovarian Disease So, you aren't pregnant, but you're still worried. Well, if your pregnancy test result came out to be negative, get a check up done, for chances, even though very less, are that you are suffering from Polycystic Ovarian Disease which is caused due to irregular ovulation as a result of hormonal imbalance. With proper treatment, your gynecologist will help you get your periods back to regular. However,

      Medications
      The Mayo Clinic advises that certain medications and result in excess bleeding including anti-coagulants that prevent blood clots and anti-inflammatory medicines. Not only can these medications result in heavy bleeding but they can also prolong your bleeding. If you are improperly taking hormone medication, this can also result in menorrhagia

      Anovulation, Fibroids
      When a woman fails to ovulate, this is called Anovulation. You can have a menstrual period but not ovulate. When this happens, the hormones may become unbalanced, resulting in excess bleeding.

      Cervical polyps are small, fragile growths that begin in either the mucosal surface of the cervix, or the endocervical canal and protrude through the opening of the cervix.

      Endometrial polyps are typically non-cancerous, growths that protrude from the lining of the uterus.

      Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is an infection of one or more organs that affects the uterus, fallopian tubes, and cervix. PID is, most often, a sexually transmitted disease; however, it sometimes occurs following childbirth, abortion, or other gynecological procedures.

      Cervical cancer is a type of cancer that occurs when cells in the cervix become abnormal, multiply out of control, and damage healthy parts of the body. The human papillomavirus, or HPV, is the cause of over ninety percent of all cervical cancers.

      Endometrial cancer occurs when abnormal cells in the uterus or the endometrium (the lining of the uterus) multiply out of control and damage to the uterus and other organs. While the cause of endometrial cancer is unknown, it is known that women diagnosed with this type of cancer tend are usually over fifty.

      IUDs or intrauterine devices used for contraception are a potential cause of heavy menstrual bleeding or menorrhagia. Women who experience prolonged or heavy periods while using the IUD should have the device removed and choose an alternate method of birth control.

      Bleeding disorders occur when it is hard for a person to stop bleeding. While there are several types of bleeding disorders, the most common type in women is von Willebrand Disease or VWD.

      Source(s):
      http://www.buzzle.com/articles/reasons-f…
      http://womenshealth.about.com/od/abnorma…

  47. QUESTION:
    What causes some periods to be extremely heavy?

    • ANSWER:
      It depends if you mean the occasional period heavy, or some peoples periods to be heavy.

      If all of a woman's periods are heavy it's know as menorrhagia, it can be caused by health problems like anemia, fibroids, endometriosis, polyps, pelvic inflamatory diseases, blood clotting disorders, underactive thyroid gland or hormone imbalances...or in most cases it can have no underlying cause, but there are a lot of ways to help lessen flow and make it easier to manage.

      If it's the occasional heavy period it can be down to stress or emotional problems as the psyche can have a profound effect on menstrual cycles, if you have problems in your life this can cause menstrual problems, also menstrual problems are often exacerbated when you internalise conflicting signals from society about yourself, your body, menstruation or sexuality. It can be down to lifestyle, particularly bad dietary choices limiting intake of essential nutrients and weight gain can be a contributing factor. It can also simply be down to late periods, increase in uterus lining build up, and hormonal problems such as slight imbalances.

  48. QUESTION:
    Why is my period longer and heavier?
    Last year at this time my period was about 6 days, and then when the summer came it was for about 4 days and much lighter. Could it be because i was swimming everyday? And then when the winter came it got longer and heavier, not it's 6 almost 7 days and heavier, could it be because of inactivity and because i gained about 2-3 pounds during winter?
    What can i do to make them a little bit shorter and lighter?

    • ANSWER:
      Hello, I found an article on the internet in regards to irregular periods and their reasons for being late, early, heavy, abnormally long and heavy bleeding. I hope this helps you to answer a few of your questions. Take care.

      Hormonal Imbalance One of the prime reasons for periods to go irregular is hormonal imbalance. In a female's body, in order to produce a period, the body creates hormones such as estrogen and progesterone. Various parts of the body need to send signals to each other in order to trigger menstruation. However, due to hormonal imbalance, many a time, these signals are missed or skipped, thus, resulting in irregular periods.

      Sudden Weight Gain or Loss Have you gained or lost a lot of weight lately? If yes, you've got an answer. When your body works at a constant pace, the hormones learn to process in similar manner. However, the moment you start doing rigorous workout, or eat a lot, your body takes a while to adjust to it. Hence, hormones become imbalanced, and lead to irregularity in periods. However, this is not a tense situation as it happens with every woman who has lost or gained weight quickly.

      Stress Workload? Job issues? Relationship turmoil? Mental dissatisfaction? Reduce your stress, female, for it's affecting the regularity of your periods. Yes, stress contributes to the most common reasons for a late period. With increasing stress, you are affecting the hormonal balance of your body, and hence, not only do your periods become irregular, but they also result in excessive weight gain, and anxiety.

      Polycystic Ovarian Disease So, you aren't pregnant, but you're still worried. Well, if your pregnancy test result came out to be negative, get a check up done, for chances, even though very less, are that you are suffering from Polycystic Ovarian Disease which is caused due to irregular ovulation as a result of hormonal imbalance. With proper treatment, your gynecologist will help you get your periods back to regular. However,

      Medications
      The Mayo Clinic advises that certain medications and result in excess bleeding including anti-coagulants that prevent blood clots and anti-inflammatory medicines. Not only can these medications result in heavy bleeding but they can also prolong your bleeding. If you are improperly taking hormone medication, this can also result in menorrhagia

      Anovulation, Fibroids
      When a woman fails to ovulate, this is called Anovulation. You can have a menstrual period but not ovulate. When this happens, the hormones may become unbalanced, resulting in excess bleeding.

      Cervical polyps are small, fragile growths that begin in either the mucosal surface of the cervix, or the endocervical canal and protrude through the opening of the cervix.

      Endometrial polyps are typically non-cancerous, growths that protrude from the lining of the uterus.

      Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is an infection of one or more organs that affects the uterus, fallopian tubes, and cervix. PID is, most often, a sexually transmitted disease; however, it sometimes occurs following childbirth, abortion, or other gynecological procedures.

      Cervical cancer is a type of cancer that occurs when cells in the cervix become abnormal, multiply out of control, and damage healthy parts of the body. The human papillomavirus, or HPV, is the cause of over ninety percent of all cervical cancers.

      Endometrial cancer occurs when abnormal cells in the uterus or the endometrium (the lining of the uterus) multiply out of control and damage to the uterus and other organs. While the cause of endometrial cancer is unknown, it is known that women diagnosed with this type of cancer tend are usually over fifty.

      IUDs or intrauterine devices used for contraception are a potential cause of heavy menstrual bleeding or menorrhagia. Women who experience prolonged or heavy periods while using the IUD should have the device removed and choose an alternate method of birth control.

      Bleeding disorders occur when it is hard for a person to stop bleeding. While there are several types of bleeding disorders, the most common type in women is von Willebrand Disease or VWD.

      Source(s):
      http://www.buzzle.com/articles/reasons-f…
      http://womenshealth.about.com/od/abnorma…

  49. QUESTION:
    What are the symptoms of taking to much estrogen?

    • ANSWER:
      Too much estrogen:

      1.Causes endometrium to proliferate

      2.Causes breast stimulation that can lead to breast cancer

      3.Increases body fat

      4.Increase endometrial cancer risk

      5.Increase gallbladder disease risk

      6.Restrains osteoclast function slightly

      7.Increases blood clot risk

      Too musch estrogen is the root cause of a myriad of illnesses. Conditions associated with this include fibrocystic breast disease, PMS, uterine fibroids, breast cancer, endometriosis, infertility problem, endometrial polyps, PCOS, auto-immune disorders, low blood sugar problems, and menstrual pain.

      For men, too much estrogen and too little testosterone is the increased risk of heart attack or stroke, urogenital disease and cardiovascular disease.

  50. QUESTION:
    Question to anyone who has been pregnant?
    At the beginning of this year, I started feeling weird in my stomach and was having really horrible cramps and my period was all messed up. I was passing really large blood clots about the size of a quarter. It was a really weird hurting feeling in my stomach. I thought I was pregnant but then I had my period and was passing large blood clots. That hadn't happened before. My husband and I are newly married and weren't sure what happened. Does anyone know what that could have been or if that couldv'e meant I was pregnant and had a miscarriage?

    • ANSWER:
      You could have gotten pregnant and had a miscarriage. Or you could have fibroid tumors in your uterus. They cause you to bleed heavy and pass large blood clots. The only way to determine if you were pregnant is to call your obgyn and have them do a blood test to determine the hormone levels. My aunt tried for two years to get pregnant and every month her period was screwy and painful she had very bad cramping and after 2 yrs and thousands of dollars on fertility specialist they found a fibroid tumor in her uterus. She had it removed and was able to get pregnant that next month on her own.

do fibroids cause blood clots

Cure Natural Remedies Uterine Fibroids

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Has anyone had success with herbal treatment of fibroids?
    I am seeking information on natural methods to cure/treat uterine fibroids. I would like to know if anyone has tried this method ( or knows of anyone who has ) and had convincing success? Serious, polite, constructive answers only please.

    • ANSWER:
      Homeopathic treatment for uterine fibroids can be very efficient and in many cases may be the only treatment you will ever need to get healthy again. (I consider homeopathy to be a 100% natural method of treatment).

      I have personally treated uterine fibroids with relative success.

      Homeopathic prescription for tumors of the Uterus (Fibroid Tumors).

      Take homeopathic remedies Sulfur and Bryonia both in 200 together on the first day but just two doses per week; on the second day Belladonna and Podophylum and Caulophyllum, all 3 in 200, again just twice a week but not on the same day when you take the 1st two Sulfur and Bryonia. Also take these cell salts (3-4 tablets) every four hours regularly Ferrum Phos 6X,Calcarea Flour 6 X Kali Mur 6X and Silicea 6X.

      Homeopathic remedy dosage

      I suggest that remedies be used as follows: Take 2-3 drops of selected remedy in ¼ th glass of water, preferably empty stomached.

  2. QUESTION:
    How can you get rid of Uterine Fibroids without having surgery?
    I have a uterine fibroid that's 8cm in diameter, about the size of an orange. Anyway, what other ways besides surgery can I get rid of it?

    • ANSWER:
      There is nothing you can do naturally. My MIL has one the size of a grapefruit and she's one of those herbal loving people who is convinved herbs/natural remedies can cure all. So she set out on taking a bunch of weird crap like tree bark and pussywillow fluff...( LOL I don't know the exact names but this is good enough) and told herself it would shrink her fibroid. Well,....it didn't. It's now even larger than before and she risks rupturing her uterus because she won't get it treated by a medical doctor. Please don't follow her steps. These can be really dangerous if you leave them untreated.

  3. QUESTION:
    Natural ways to reduce extremely heavy menstrual bleeding?
    My mother had uterine fibroid tumors, and I think I may have them, too. I am bleeding extremely heavily, enough to soak a tampon within half an hour. I have made a doctor's appointment, but they cannot see for a month.

    Are there natural ways to reduce this bleeding? HELP!

    • ANSWER:
      Homeopathic Remedies for Menustrational Complaints (You must read it carefully) these are 100% cures which cure without any side effects or complications :-

      Dark, clotted; copious or scanty menses, during day time only; 1st menses delayed and painful; intermittent and irregular; changing moods; likes open air Pulsatilla 30 or 200, 4 hourly

      Early and profuse; copious; during night on lying down; frequently; intermittent; painful Kreosote 30 or 200, 3 hourly (3)

      Menses dark; acrid, excoriating,during night only, after lying down Bovista 30 or 200, 4 hourly

      Copious and dark; worse after injury Hamamellis 30, 3 hourly (3)

      Dark, clotted, painful and frequent, due to displaced uterus; during night only Trillium p.Q or 6X, 3 hourly

      Copious; gushing and frequent; worse after exertion; every 2 weeks or every few days;lasting for a week or more Medorrhinum 200 or 1M monthly (3)

      Copious, offensive, clotted and painful,due to uterine fibroid; difficult to wash Platina 200 or 1M, 3 hourly (3)

      Menses bright red, copious, clotted, painful and frequent; worse during menopause; walking ameliorates; history of abortion Sabina 30 or 200 6 hourly

      Menses bright red, mingled with dark clots; offensive Belladonna 30, 4 hourly

      Mense bright red; gushing; nausea or vomiting, clean tongue Ipecac 30, 4 hourly

      Menses bright red; copious and frequent Millefolium Q or 30 4 hourly

      Menses bright red; vicarious; patient desires icy cold water Phosphorus 30 or 200, 4 hourly(3)

      Menses acrid; excoriating;copious after miscarriage; frequent; intermittent China 6 or 30, 4 hourly

      Menses copious; continues upto next period; dark and clotted; irregular Secale Cor 30 4 hourly

      Menses profuse and early; copious with dark clots and abdominal distention Nux vomica 30 or 200, 6 hourly

      Early and excessive; bright red, long lasting with headache; copious; worse after exertion; early in young girls lasting for long; late in adults Calc-phos 12X or 30, 3 hourly (3)

      Copious; lasting a week or more,frequent, every 2 weeks; intermittent Sulphur 200 or 1M, 4 hourly (3)

      Amenorrhoea; dark clotted blood; copious, frequent, delayed; first menses delayed; exhausting; pale, thin blood Ferrum met.3X or 6X, 4 hourly

      Irregular; painful, delayed or frequent; worse after exertion Sepia 30 or 200, 3 hourly (3)

      Early; profuse and frequent; every 2 weeks; during lactation; lasting a week or more; returns after excitement; suppressed after working in water or becoming wet Calcarea carb.200 or 1M, 3 hourly (3)

      Menses copious, frequent,dark, intermittent and irregular; during day time only; offensive, painful and thick Lilium tig.30 or 200, 4 hourly (3)

      Menstrual flow suppressed after fright or shock; in plethoric young girls; menses profuse with nose bleed; late; marked fear and restlessness Aconite 30 or 200, 3 hourly

      Menses frequent and copious; offensive; passive bleeding Helonias Q or 6, 4 hourly

      All complaints better during menstruation; copious or scanty; painful for very short period only; dark, lumpy and black Lachesis 200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Copious; worse after injury or coition; bruised pains Arnica 200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Menses copious; late or suppressed; worse while sitting; feels better after flow starts Zincum met.30 or 200, 3 hourly(3)

      Dark, clotted, stringy, offensive, painful and frequent; worse from least movements Crocus sat.Q or 6X, 4 hourly

      Delayed; specially first menses; irregular,painful,pale and scanty; stools constipated Graphites 30 or 200 3 hourly(3)

      Delayed and painful; flow aggravates the complaints; neuralgic, rheumatic pain;scanty or suppressed due to emotions or fever Actaea race.30 or 200 4 hourly (3)

      Delayed, scanty,stopped due to cold; putting hands in cold water, due to cold; breast becomes enlarged, sore and painful during menstrual cycle Conium mac.200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Delayed or stopped; by putting hands in cold water; suppressed after drinking milk Lac-def.200 3 hourly (3)

      Early or delayed; exhausting,scanty or profuse; stools hard and constipated; haemorrhage between periods Thlaspi b-p.Q or 6 4 hourly

      Copious; alternate periods more profuse; frequent and painful;very slight (1st day only), 2nd day with vomiting; mentrual colic with large clots Cyclamen 30 4 hourly

      Painful and scanty;increases while sitting and less while walking Alumina 30 or 0/5 4 hourly

      Menses with neuralgic pain; dysmenorrhoea with pains flying to other parts of the body Caulophyllum 30 or 200 4 hourly (3)

      Early, dark and stringy with neuralgic pain; better after flow starts; menstrual colic; membranous dysmenorrhoea Magnesia phos.12X or 30 3 hourly

      menses lasts for long; thick and dark; irregular Nux mosch.200 3 hourly (3)

      Early and profuse; menses returns after over exertion; long walk, passing hard stools etc; discharge of blood between periods Ambra gr.200 3 hourly (3)

      Painful; only for one day or one hour; late and scanty; amenorrhoea with opthalmia Euphrasia 30 or 200 4 hourly

      Menses appear only for one day; scanty, pain in small of back and stomach during menstruation Baryta carb.200 4 hourly (3)

      Clotted,stringy, passive and bright red; profuse after miscarriage; worse after slightest provocation Ustilago Q or 6 4 hourly

      Early and profuse; suppressed after bathing in river or swimming pool; tongue thickly whitish coated Antim-crud.200 4 hourly (3)

      Suppressed with colic; better bending double and by pressure Colocynth 200 3 hourly (3)

      Acrid,early, profuse and prolonged; suppressed after getting feet wet Rhus tox.200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Early and profuse; epistaxis instead of menses; worse by motion Bryonia 30 or 200 4 hourly

      Totally exhausted during menstruation, can hardly speak; lasting for long, though not profuse Carbo an.200 3 hourly(3)

      Menses early or late; scanty or profuse; pain with soreness about genitals; pain from back passes down through left labium Kali carb.200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Gushing; exhausting with colic as from sharp stones rubbing together; irregular and painful Cocculus ind.30 or 200 4 hourly

      Scanty; early or delayed; clots of black blood; menstrual flow aggravates all the complaints Thuja oc.200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Frequent; early or delayed during day time only; no menses at night; scanty and offensive Causticum 200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Frequent and gushing; membranous; painful and stringy; breasts swollen and painful before menses and better afterwards; excessive menstruation; discharge of bloody mucous after menses at the time of new moon Lac-can.200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Menses during lactation period; while nursing the child Silicea 200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Membranous; early and profuse, with griping in abdomen; nausea and pain in stomach extending to small of back Borax 30 4 hourly

      Early with thick and strong odour; offensive; premature and too copious Carbo Veg.30 or 200 3 hourly (3 Doses)

      Menses offensive; vicarious; mammae swollen and painful Psorinum 200 or 1M, monthly (3)

      Menses painful; suppressed; colic before the appearance of discharge Verat Vir 30X or 200 4 hourly (3 Doses)

      Dysmenorrhoea; menses usually delayed Pneumococcus 30X or 200, 3 hourly (3 Doses)

      Take the remedy which is similar to your symptoms. No side effects or complications if taken as directed, please do not exceed the given dosage and under any circumstances do not try to mix any remedies and avoid Chocolates, Mints, Coffee, Red Meat, Alcoholic and Carbonated drinks, Spicy Rich Food while taking any Homeopathic remedies, and keep the medicines away from direct sunlight, heat strong smells and perfumes and do not store them in the fridge.
      Curing without any side effects or Complications Thats the Beauty of Homeopathic Medicine

      For more information on Homeopathy and women's problems please look up under the appropriate header :-
      http://www.hpathy.com/diseases

      I hope and pray that the provided information proves helpful to you.

      Best of Health to you.

      Take Care and God Bless.

  4. QUESTION:
    where can i get natural remedies to eat or drink to solve lost of menstrual problems?
    what type of natural products in the supermarket that can help improve menstrual flow

    • ANSWER:
      Homeopathic Remedies for Menustrational Complaints (You must read it carefully) these are 100% cures which cure without any side effects or complications :-

      Dark, clotted; copious or scanty menses, during day time only; 1st menses delayed and painful; intermittent and irregular; changing moods; likes open air Pulsatilla 30 or 200, 4 hourly

      Early and profuse; copious; during night on lying down; frequently; intermittent; painful Kreosote 30 or 200, 3 hourly (3)

      Menses dark; acrid, excoriating,during night only, after lying down Bovista 30 or 200, 4 hourly

      Copious and dark; worse after injury Hamamellis 30, 3 hourly (3)

      Dark, clotted, painful and frequent, due to displaced uterus; during night only Trillium p.Q or 6X, 3 hourly

      Copious; gushing and frequent; worse after exertion; every 2 weeks or every few days;lasting for a week or more Medorrhinum 200 or 1M monthly (3)

      Copious, offensive, clotted and painful,due to uterine fibroid; difficult to wash Platina 200 or 1M, 3 hourly (3)

      Menses bright red, copious, clotted, painful and frequent; worse during menopause; walking ameliorates; history of abortion Sabina 30 or 200 6 hourly

      Menses bright red, mingled with dark clots; offensive Belladonna 30, 4 hourly

      Mense bright red; gushing; nausea or vomiting, clean tongue Ipecac 30, 4 hourly

      Menses bright red; copious and frequent Millefolium Q or 30 4 hourly

      Menses bright red; vicarious; patient desires icy cold water Phosphorus 30 or 200, 4 hourly(3)

      Menses acrid; excoriating;copious after miscarriage; frequent; intermittent China 6 or 30, 4 hourly

      Menses copious; continues upto next period; dark and clotted; irregular Secale Cor 30 4 hourly

      Menses profuse and early; copious with dark clots and abdominal distention Nux vomica 30 or 200, 6 hourly

      Early and excessive; bright red, long lasting with headache; copious; worse after exertion; early in young girls lasting for long; late in adults Calc-phos 12X or 30, 3 hourly (3)

      Copious; lasting a week or more,frequent, every 2 weeks; intermittent Sulphur 200 or 1M, 4 hourly (3)

      Amenorrhoea; dark clotted blood; copious, frequent, delayed; first menses delayed; exhausting; pale, thin blood Ferrum met.3X or 6X, 4 hourly

      Irregular; painful, delayed or frequent; worse after exertion Sepia 30 or 200, 3 hourly (3)

      Early; profuse and frequent; every 2 weeks; during lactation; lasting a week or more; returns after excitement; suppressed after working in water or becoming wet Calcarea carb.200 or 1M, 3 hourly (3)

      Menses copious, frequent,dark, intermittent and irregular; during day time only; offensive, painful and thick Lilium tig.30 or 200, 4 hourly (3)

      Menstrual flow suppressed after fright or shock; in plethoric young girls; menses profuse with nose bleed; late; marked fear and restlessness Aconite 30 or 200, 3 hourly

      Menses frequent and copious; offensive; passive bleeding Helonias Q or 6, 4 hourly

      All complaints better during menstruation; copious or scanty; painful for very short period only; dark, lumpy and black Lachesis 200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Copious; worse after injury or coition; bruised pains Arnica 200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Menses copious; late or suppressed; worse while sitting; feels better after flow starts Zincum met.30 or 200, 3 hourly(3)

      Dark, clotted, stringy, offensive, painful and frequent; worse from least movements Crocus sat.Q or 6X, 4 hourly

      Delayed; specially first menses; irregular,painful,pale and scanty; stools constipated Graphites 30 or 200 3 hourly(3)

      Delayed and painful; flow aggravates the complaints; neuralgic, rheumatic pain;scanty or suppressed due to emotions or fever Actaea race.30 or 200 4 hourly (3)

      Delayed, scanty,stopped due to cold; putting hands in cold water, due to cold; breast becomes enlarged, sore and painful during menstrual cycle Conium mac.200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Delayed or stopped; by putting hands in cold water; suppressed after drinking milk Lac-def.200 3 hourly (3)

      Early or delayed; exhausting,scanty or profuse; stools hard and constipated; haemorrhage between periods Thlaspi b-p.Q or 6 4 hourly

      Copious; alternate periods more profuse; frequent and painful;very slight (1st day only), 2nd day with vomiting; mentrual colic with large clots Cyclamen 30 4 hourly

      Painful and scanty;increases while sitting and less while walking Alumina 30 or 0/5 4 hourly

      Menses with neuralgic pain; dysmenorrhoea with pains flying to other parts of the body Caulophyllum 30 or 200 4 hourly (3)

      Early, dark and stringy with neuralgic pain; better after flow starts; menstrual colic; membranous dysmenorrhoea Magnesia phos.12X or 30 3 hourly

      menses lasts for long; thick and dark; irregular Nux mosch.200 3 hourly (3)

      Early and profuse; menses returns after over exertion; long walk, passing hard stools etc; discharge of blood between periods Ambra gr.200 3 hourly (3)

      Painful; only for one day or one hour; late and scanty; amenorrhoea with opthalmia Euphrasia 30 or 200 4 hourly

      Menses appear only for one day; scanty, pain in small of back and stomach during menstruation Baryta carb.200 4 hourly (3)

      Clotted,stringy, passive and bright red; profuse after miscarriage; worse after slightest provocation Ustilago Q or 6 4 hourly

      Early and profuse; suppressed after bathing in river or swimming pool; tongue thickly whitish coated Antim-crud.200 4 hourly (3)

      Suppressed with colic; better bending double and by pressure Colocynth 200 3 hourly (3)

      Acrid,early, profuse and prolonged; suppressed after getting feet wet Rhus tox.200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Early and profuse; epistaxis instead of menses; worse by motion Bryonia 30 or 200 4 hourly

      Totally exhausted during menstruation, can hardly speak; lasting for long, though not profuse Carbo an.200 3 hourly(3)

      Menses early or late; scanty or profuse; pain with soreness about genitals; pain from back passes down through left labium Kali carb.200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Gushing; exhausting with colic as from sharp stones rubbing together; irregular and painful Cocculus ind.30 or 200 4 hourly

      Scanty; early or delayed; clots of black blood; menstrual flow aggravates all the complaints Thuja oc.200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Frequent; early or delayed during day time only; no menses at night; scanty and offensive Causticum 200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Frequent and gushing; membranous; painful and stringy; breasts swollen and painful before menses and better afterwards; excessive menstruation; discharge of bloody mucous after menses at the time of new moon Lac-can.200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Menses during lactation period; while nursing the child Silicea 200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Membranous; early and profuse, with griping in abdomen; nausea and pain in stomach extending to small of back Borax 30 4 hourly

      Early with thick and strong odour; offensive; premature and too copious Carbo Veg.30 or 200 3 hourly (3 Doses)

      Menses offensive; vicarious; mammae swollen and painful Psorinum 200 or 1M, monthly (3)

      Menses painful; suppressed; colic before the appearance of discharge Verat Vir 30X or 200 4 hourly (3 Doses)

      Dysmenorrhoea; menses usually delayed Pneumococcus 30X or 200, 3 hourly (3 Doses)

      Take the remedy which is similar to your symptoms. No side effects or complications if taken as directed, please do not exceed the given dosage and under any circumstances do not try to mix any remedies and avoid Chocolates, Mints, Coffee, Red Meat, Alcoholic and Carbonated drinks, Spicy Rich Food while taking any Homeopathic remedies, and keep the medicines away from direct sunlight, heat strong smells and perfumes and do not store them in the fridge.
      Curing without any side effects or Complications Thats the Beauty of Homeopathic Medicine

      For more information on Homeopathy and women's problems please look up under the appropriate header :- http://www.hpathy.com/diseases

      I hope and pray that the provided information proves helpful to you.

      Best of Health to you.

      Take Care and God Bless

  5. QUESTION:
    What are some natural ways to relieve the pain associated with menstrual cramps?
    No medicine please.

    • ANSWER:
      Homeopathic Remedies for Menustrational Complaints (You must read it carefully) these are 100% cures which cure without any side effects or complications :-

      Dark, clotted; copious or scanty menses, during day time only; 1st menses delayed and painful; intermittent and irregular; changing moods; likes open air Pulsatilla 30 or 200, 4 hourly

      Early and profuse; copious; during night on lying down; frequently; intermittent; painful Kreosote 30 or 200, 3 hourly (3)

      Menses dark; acrid, excoriating,during night only, after lying down Bovista 30 or 200, 4 hourly

      Copious and dark; worse after injury Hamamellis 30, 3 hourly (3)

      Dark, clotted, painful and frequent, due to displaced uterus; during night only Trillium p.Q or 6X, 3 hourly

      Copious; gushing and frequent; worse after exertion; every 2 weeks or every few days;lasting for a week or more Medorrhinum 200 or 1M monthly (3)

      Copious, offensive, clotted and painful,due to uterine fibroid; difficult to wash Platina 200 or 1M, 3 hourly (3)

      Menses bright red, copious, clotted, painful and frequent; worse during menopause; walking ameliorates; history of abortion Sabina 30 or 200 6 hourly

      Menses bright red, mingled with dark clots; offensive Belladonna 30, 4 hourly

      Mense bright red; gushing; nausea or vomiting, clean tongue Ipecac 30, 4 hourly

      Menses bright red; copious and frequent Millefolium Q or 30 4 hourly

      Menses bright red; vicarious; patient desires icy cold water Phosphorus 30 or 200, 4 hourly(3)

      Menses acrid; excoriating;copious after miscarriage; frequent; intermittent China 6 or 30, 4 hourly

      Menses copious; continues upto next period; dark and clotted; irregular Secale Cor 30 4 hourly

      Menses profuse and early; copious with dark clots and abdominal distention Nux vomica 30 or 200, 6 hourly

      Early and excessive; bright red, long lasting with headache; copious; worse after exertion; early in young girls lasting for long; late in adults Calc-phos 12X or 30, 3 hourly (3)

      Copious; lasting a week or more,frequent, every 2 weeks; intermittent Sulphur 200 or 1M, 4 hourly (3)

      Amenorrhoea; dark clotted blood; copious, frequent, delayed; first menses delayed; exhausting; pale, thin blood Ferrum met.3X or 6X, 4 hourly

      Irregular; painful, delayed or frequent; worse after exertion Sepia 30 or 200, 3 hourly (3)

      Early; profuse and frequent; every 2 weeks; during lactation; lasting a week or more; returns after excitement; suppressed after working in water or becoming wet Calcarea carb.200 or 1M, 3 hourly (3)

      Menses copious, frequent,dark, intermittent and irregular; during day time only; offensive, painful and thick Lilium tig.30 or 200, 4 hourly (3)

      Menstrual flow suppressed after fright or shock; in plethoric young girls; menses profuse with nose bleed; late; marked fear and restlessness Aconite 30 or 200, 3 hourly

      Menses frequent and copious; offensive; passive bleeding Helonias Q or 6, 4 hourly

      All complaints better during menstruation; copious or scanty; painful for very short period only; dark, lumpy and black Lachesis 200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Copious; worse after injury or coition; bruised pains Arnica 200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Menses copious; late or suppressed; worse while sitting; feels better after flow starts Zincum met.30 or 200, 3 hourly(3)

      Dark, clotted, stringy, offensive, painful and frequent; worse from least movements Crocus sat.Q or 6X, 4 hourly

      Delayed; specially first menses; irregular,painful,pale and scanty; stools constipated Graphites 30 or 200 3 hourly(3)

      Delayed and painful; flow aggravates the complaints; neuralgic, rheumatic pain;scanty or suppressed due to emotions or fever Actaea race.30 or 200 4 hourly (3)

      Delayed, scanty,stopped due to cold; putting hands in cold water, due to cold; breast becomes enlarged, sore and painful during menstrual cycle Conium mac.200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Delayed or stopped; by putting hands in cold water; suppressed after drinking milk Lac-def.200 3 hourly (3)

      Early or delayed; exhausting,scanty or profuse; stools hard and constipated; haemorrhage between periods Thlaspi b-p.Q or 6 4 hourly

      Copious; alternate periods more profuse; frequent and painful;very slight (1st day only), 2nd day with vomiting; mentrual colic with large clots Cyclamen 30 4 hourly

      Painful and scanty;increases while sitting and less while walking Alumina 30 or 0/5 4 hourly

      Menses with neuralgic pain; dysmenorrhoea with pains flying to other parts of the body Caulophyllum 30 or 200 4 hourly (3)

      Early, dark and stringy with neuralgic pain; better after flow starts; menstrual colic; membranous dysmenorrhoea Magnesia phos.12X or 30 3 hourly

      menses lasts for long; thick and dark; irregular Nux mosch.200 3 hourly (3)

      Early and profuse; menses returns after over exertion; long walk, passing hard stools etc; discharge of blood between periods Ambra gr.200 3 hourly (3)

      Painful; only for one day or one hour; late and scanty; amenorrhoea with opthalmia Euphrasia 30 or 200 4 hourly

      Menses appear only for one day; scanty, pain in small of back and stomach during menstruation Baryta carb.200 4 hourly (3)

      Clotted,stringy, passive and bright red; profuse after miscarriage; worse after slightest provocation Ustilago Q or 6 4 hourly

      Early and profuse; suppressed after bathing in river or swimming pool; tongue thickly whitish coated Antim-crud.200 4 hourly (3)

      Suppressed with colic; better bending double and by pressure Colocynth 200 3 hourly (3)

      Acrid,early, profuse and prolonged; suppressed after getting feet wet Rhus tox.200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Early and profuse; epistaxis instead of menses; worse by motion Bryonia 30 or 200 4 hourly

      Totally exhausted during menstruation, can hardly speak; lasting for long, though not profuse Carbo an.200 3 hourly(3)

      Menses early or late; scanty or profuse; pain with soreness about genitals; pain from back passes down through left labium Kali carb.200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Gushing; exhausting with colic as from sharp stones rubbing together; irregular and painful Cocculus ind.30 or 200 4 hourly

      Scanty; early or delayed; clots of black blood; menstrual flow aggravates all the complaints Thuja oc.200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Frequent; early or delayed during day time only; no menses at night; scanty and offensive Causticum 200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Frequent and gushing; membranous; painful and stringy; breasts swollen and painful before menses and better afterwards; excessive menstruation; discharge of bloody mucous after menses at the time of new moon Lac-can.200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Menses during lactation period; while nursing the child Silicea 200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Membranous; early and profuse, with griping in abdomen; nausea and pain in stomach extending to small of back Borax 30 4 hourly

      Early with thick and strong odour; offensive; premature and too copious Carbo Veg.30 or 200 3 hourly (3 Doses)

      Menses offensive; vicarious; mammae swollen and painful Psorinum 200 or 1M, monthly (3)

      Menses painful; suppressed; colic before the appearance of discharge Verat Vir 30X or 200 4 hourly (3 Doses)

      Dysmenorrhoea; menses usually delayed Pneumococcus 30X or 200, 3 hourly (3 Doses)

      Take the remedy which is similar to your symptoms. No side effects or complications if taken as directed, please do not exceed the given dosage and under any circumstances do not try to mix any remedies and avoid Chocolates, Mints, Coffee, Red Meat, Alcoholic and Carbonated drinks, Spicy Rich Food while taking any Homeopathic remedies, and keep the medicines away from direct sunlight, heat strong smells and perfumes and do not store them in the fridge.
      Curing without any side effects or Complications Thats the Beauty of Homeopathic Medicine

      For more information on Homeopathy and women's problems please look up under the appropriate header :-
      http://www.hpathy.com/diseases/

      I hope and pray that the provided information proves helpful to you.

      Best of Health to you.

      Take Care and God Bless.

  6. QUESTION:
    Has anyone tried any natural cures for Uterine Fibroids? & Did it really work?
    I am concerned that I may have uterine fibroids. My period has changed signifcantly from my norm of 3 days of light bleeding to 1 day of spotting, 2 days of very heavy bleeding (leaking through super plus tampon ever 2 hours), 2 days of regular bleeding and another 2 days of spotting for a total of 7 days now. My period has also changed from every 28 days to every 26 days. Each month my period has gotten longer and heavier. My mother had fibroid tumors and had to have a hysterectomy. It is my understanding fibroids are hereditary. I would like to know about natural obtainable cures that actually work.

    • ANSWER:
      i suffer from uterine fibroids, as did my mother, older sister, and 4 of my 1st cousins. one natural cure that i saw and only used once was Cheyenne pepper. one teaspoon at nite in a full glass of water. it is a very hot nasty taste. i battled fibroids for maybe 10 yrs. before i ended up in the er with hemorrhage. i didn't have a hysterectomy. i had a myomectomy. they cut the fibroid off the outside of my uterus. i have a cut from my naval down, i was in the hospital for 3 days and out of work for 6 wks. the 1st 2 periods were bad and then the were great, but that only can last 6 yrs, its been 8 for me, I'm now starting to have problems again. I'm 48 now and if i have to be cut again i will just have the hysterectomy. a co-worker had a myomectomy, and she went on to have 2 full-term healthy babies. i considered my age at the time. you can get a book of home remedies at a major book store, try some of what you may find in them. good luck! in short do what's best for you and your lifestyle. you have to live with the results.

  7. QUESTION:
    Natural remedies for painful, heavy periods?
    I have always had quite heavy periods, but since coming off the pill they are very heavy with alot of big clots, does anyone know of any naturals remedies?

    • ANSWER:
      Homeopathic Remedies for Menustrational Complaints (You must read it carefully) these are 100% cures which cure without any side effects or complications :-

      Dark, clotted; copious or scanty menses, during day time only; 1st menses delayed and painful; intermittent and irregular; changing moods; likes open air Pulsatilla 30 or 200, 4 hourly

      Early and profuse; copious; during night on lying down; frequently; intermittent; painful Kreosote 30 or 200, 3 hourly (3)

      Menses dark; acrid, excoriating,during night only, after lying down Bovista 30 or 200, 4 hourly

      Copious and dark; worse after injury Hamamellis 30, 3 hourly (3)

      Dark, clotted, painful and frequent, due to displaced uterus; during night only Trillium p.Q or 6X, 3 hourly

      Copious; gushing and frequent; worse after exertion; every 2 weeks or every few days;lasting for a week or more Medorrhinum 200 or 1M monthly (3)

      Copious, offensive, clotted and painful,due to uterine fibroid; difficult to wash Platina 200 or 1M, 3 hourly (3)

      Menses bright red, copious, clotted, painful and frequent; worse during menopause; walking ameliorates; history of abortion Sabina 30 or 200 6 hourly

      Menses bright red, mingled with dark clots; offensive Belladonna 30, 4 hourly

      Mense bright red; gushing; nausea or vomiting, clean tongue Ipecac 30, 4 hourly

      Menses bright red; copious and frequent Millefolium Q or 30 4 hourly

      Menses bright red; vicarious; patient desires icy cold water Phosphorus 30 or 200, 4 hourly(3)

      Menses acrid; excoriating;copious after miscarriage; frequent; intermittent China 6 or 30, 4 hourly

      Menses copious; continues upto next period; dark and clotted; irregular Secale Cor 30 4 hourly

      Menses profuse and early; copious with dark clots and abdominal distention Nux vomica 30 or 200, 6 hourly

      Early and excessive; bright red, long lasting with headache; copious; worse after exertion; early in young girls lasting for long; late in adults Calc-phos 12X or 30, 3 hourly (3)

      Copious; lasting a week or more,frequent, every 2 weeks; intermittent Sulphur 200 or 1M, 4 hourly (3)

      Amenorrhoea; dark clotted blood; copious, frequent, delayed; first menses delayed; exhausting; pale, thin blood Ferrum met.3X or 6X, 4 hourly

      Irregular; painful, delayed or frequent; worse after exertion Sepia 30 or 200, 3 hourly (3)

      Early; profuse and frequent; every 2 weeks; during lactation; lasting a week or more; returns after excitement; suppressed after working in water or becoming wet Calcarea carb.200 or 1M, 3 hourly (3)

      Menses copious, frequent,dark, intermittent and irregular; during day time only; offensive, painful and thick Lilium tig.30 or 200, 4 hourly (3)

      Menstrual flow suppressed after fright or shock; in plethoric young girls; menses profuse with nose bleed; late; marked fear and restlessness Aconite 30 or 200, 3 hourly

      Menses frequent and copious; offensive; passive bleeding Helonias Q or 6, 4 hourly

      All complaints better during menstruation; copious or scanty; painful for very short period only; dark, lumpy and black Lachesis 200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Copious; worse after injury or coition; bruised pains Arnica 200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Menses copious; late or suppressed; worse while sitting; feels better after flow starts Zincum met.30 or 200, 3 hourly(3)

      Dark, clotted, stringy, offensive, painful and frequent; worse from least movements Crocus sat.Q or 6X, 4 hourly

      Delayed; specially first menses; irregular,painful,pale and scanty; stools constipated Graphites 30 or 200 3 hourly(3)

      Delayed and painful; flow aggravates the complaints; neuralgic, rheumatic pain;scanty or suppressed due to emotions or fever Actaea race.30 or 200 4 hourly (3)

      Delayed, scanty,stopped due to cold; putting hands in cold water, due to cold; breast becomes enlarged, sore and painful during menstrual cycle Conium mac.200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Delayed or stopped; by putting hands in cold water; suppressed after drinking milk Lac-def.200 3 hourly (3)

      Early or delayed; exhausting,scanty or profuse; stools hard and constipated; haemorrhage between periods Thlaspi b-p.Q or 6 4 hourly

      Copious; alternate periods more profuse; frequent and painful;very slight (1st day only), 2nd day with vomiting; mentrual colic with large clots Cyclamen 30 4 hourly

      Painful and scanty;increases while sitting and less while walking Alumina 30 or 0/5 4 hourly

      Menses with neuralgic pain; dysmenorrhoea with pains flying to other parts of the body Caulophyllum 30 or 200 4 hourly (3)

      Early, dark and stringy with neuralgic pain; better after flow starts; menstrual colic; membranous dysmenorrhoea Magnesia phos.12X or 30 3 hourly

      menses lasts for long; thick and dark; irregular Nux mosch.200 3 hourly (3)

      Early and profuse; menses returns after over exertion; long walk, passing hard stools etc; discharge of blood between periods Ambra gr.200 3 hourly (3)

      Painful; only for one day or one hour; late and scanty; amenorrhoea with opthalmia Euphrasia 30 or 200 4 hourly

      Menses appear only for one day; scanty, pain in small of back and stomach during menstruation Baryta carb.200 4 hourly (3)

      Clotted,stringy, passive and bright red; profuse after miscarriage; worse after slightest provocation Ustilago Q or 6 4 hourly

      Early and profuse; suppressed after bathing in river or swimming pool; tongue thickly whitish coated Antim-crud.200 4 hourly (3)

      Suppressed with colic; better bending double and by pressure Colocynth 200 3 hourly (3)

      Acrid,early, profuse and prolonged; suppressed after getting feet wet Rhus tox.200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Early and profuse; epistaxis instead of menses; worse by motion Bryonia 30 or 200 4 hourly

      Totally exhausted during menstruation, can hardly speak; lasting for long, though not profuse Carbo an.200 3 hourly(3)

      Menses early or late; scanty or profuse; pain with soreness about genitals; pain from back passes down through left labium Kali carb.200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Gushing; exhausting with colic as from sharp stones rubbing together; irregular and painful Cocculus ind.30 or 200 4 hourly

      Scanty; early or delayed; clots of black blood; menstrual flow aggravates all the complaints Thuja oc.200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Frequent; early or delayed during day time only; no menses at night; scanty and offensive Causticum 200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Frequent and gushing; membranous; painful and stringy; breasts swollen and painful before menses and better afterwards; excessive menstruation; discharge of bloody mucous after menses at the time of new moon Lac-can.200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Menses during lactation period; while nursing the child Silicea 200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Membranous; early and profuse, with griping in abdomen; nausea and pain in stomach extending to small of back Borax 30 4 hourly

      Early with thick and strong odour; offensive; premature and too copious Carbo Veg.30 or 200 3 hourly (3 Doses)

      Menses offensive; vicarious; mammae swollen and painful Psorinum 200 or 1M, monthly (3)

      Menses painful; suppressed; colic before the appearance of discharge Verat Vir 30X or 200 4 hourly (3 Doses)

      Dysmenorrhoea; menses usually delayed Pneumococcus 30X or 200, 3 hourly (3 Doses)

      Take the remedy which is similar to your symptoms. No side effects or complications if taken as directed, please do not exceed the given dosage and under any circumstances do not try to mix any remedies and avoid Chocolates, Mints, Coffee, Red Meat, Alcoholic and Carbonated drinks, Spicy Rich Food while taking any Homeopathic remedies, and keep the medicines away from direct sunlight, heat strong smells and perfumes and do not store them in the fridge.
      Curing without any side effects or Complications Thats the Beauty of Homeopathic Medicine

      For more information on Homeopathy and women's problems please look up under the appropriate header :- http://www.hpathy.com/diseases

      I hope and pray that the provided information proves helpful to you.

      Best of Health to you.

      Take Care and God Bless

  8. QUESTION:
    my friend has been having sharp pain in her vagina and she is a virgin what could it be?
    she has no discharge and no smell but have pains that come and go what could it be?

    although she said her doc said a few months ago she has tiny uterine fibroids on her uterus, and not to worry, but now she has this problem.

    does anyone think they know what it could be?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi

      Uterine fibroids do cause pain but in the abdominal area only- normally when the size of fibroids tumor are small the symptoms are not noticeable. However as they increase in size or numbers symptoms like bloating abdominal pain and excessive bleeding starts. It is best if you start the treatment for uterine fibroids early. It is very simple to get rid of fibroids and shrink them naturally with the help of natural remedies in the initial stages.

      http://ezinearticles.com/?How-to-Shrink-Fibroids-Naturally---Alternative-Cures-to-Avoid-Surgery&id=4746643

  9. QUESTION:
    What is a natural remedy for long(7-9days) heavy and painful periods? Tried the pill.?
    Seventeen and have had problems for two years.

    • ANSWER:
      Homeopathic Remedies for Menustrational Complaints (You must read it carefully) these are 100% cures which cure without any side effects or complications :-

      Dark, clotted; copious or scanty menses, during day time only; 1st menses delayed and painful; intermittent and irregular; changing moods; likes open air Pulsatilla 30 or 200, 4 hourly

      Early and profuse; copious; during night on lying down; frequently; intermittent; painful Kreosote 30 or 200, 3 hourly (3)

      Menses dark; acrid, excoriating,during night only, after lying down Bovista 30 or 200, 4 hourly

      Copious and dark; worse after injury Hamamellis 30, 3 hourly (3)

      Dark, clotted, painful and frequent, due to displaced uterus; during night only Trillium p.Q or 6X, 3 hourly

      Copious; gushing and frequent; worse after exertion; every 2 weeks or every few days;lasting for a week or more Medorrhinum 200 or 1M monthly (3)

      Copious, offensive, clotted and painful,due to uterine fibroid; difficult to wash Platina 200 or 1M, 3 hourly (3)

      Menses bright red, copious, clotted, painful and frequent; worse during menopause; walking ameliorates; history of abortion Sabina 30 or 200 6 hourly

      Menses bright red, mingled with dark clots; offensive Belladonna 30, 4 hourly

      Mense bright red; gushing; nausea or vomiting, clean tongue Ipecac 30, 4 hourly

      Menses bright red; copious and frequent Millefolium Q or 30 4 hourly

      Menses bright red; vicarious; patient desires icy cold water Phosphorus 30 or 200, 4 hourly(3)

      Menses acrid; excoriating;copious after miscarriage; frequent; intermittent China 6 or 30, 4 hourly

      Menses copious; continues upto next period; dark and clotted; irregular Secale Cor 30 4 hourly

      Menses profuse and early; copious with dark clots and abdominal distention Nux vomica 30 or 200, 6 hourly

      Early and excessive; bright red, long lasting with headache; copious; worse after exertion; early in young girls lasting for long; late in adults Calc-phos 12X or 30, 3 hourly (3)

      Copious; lasting a week or more,frequent, every 2 weeks; intermittent Sulphur 200 or 1M, 4 hourly (3)

      Amenorrhoea; dark clotted blood; copious, frequent, delayed; first menses delayed; exhausting; pale, thin blood Ferrum met.3X or 6X, 4 hourly

      Irregular; painful, delayed or frequent; worse after exertion Sepia 30 or 200, 3 hourly (3)

      Early; profuse and frequent; every 2 weeks; during lactation; lasting a week or more; returns after excitement; suppressed after working in water or becoming wet Calcarea carb.200 or 1M, 3 hourly (3)

      Menses copious, frequent,dark, intermittent and irregular; during day time only; offensive, painful and thick Lilium tig.30 or 200, 4 hourly (3)

      Menstrual flow suppressed after fright or shock; in plethoric young girls; menses profuse with nose bleed; late; marked fear and restlessness Aconite 30 or 200, 3 hourly

      Menses frequent and copious; offensive; passive bleeding Helonias Q or 6, 4 hourly

      All complaints better during menstruation; copious or scanty; painful for very short period only; dark, lumpy and black Lachesis 200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Copious; worse after injury or coition; bruised pains Arnica 200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Menses copious; late or suppressed; worse while sitting; feels better after flow starts Zincum met.30 or 200, 3 hourly(3)

      Dark, clotted, stringy, offensive, painful and frequent; worse from least movements Crocus sat.Q or 6X, 4 hourly

      Delayed; specially first menses; irregular,painful,pale and scanty; stools constipated Graphites 30 or 200 3 hourly(3)

      Delayed and painful; flow aggravates the complaints; neuralgic, rheumatic pain;scanty or suppressed due to emotions or fever Actaea race.30 or 200 4 hourly (3)

      Delayed, scanty,stopped due to cold; putting hands in cold water, due to cold; breast becomes enlarged, sore and painful during menstrual cycle Conium mac.200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Delayed or stopped; by putting hands in cold water; suppressed after drinking milk Lac-def.200 3 hourly (3)

      Early or delayed; exhausting,scanty or profuse; stools hard and constipated; haemorrhage between periods Thlaspi b-p.Q or 6 4 hourly

      Copious; alternate periods more profuse; frequent and painful;very slight (1st day only), 2nd day with vomiting; mentrual colic with large clots Cyclamen 30 4 hourly

      Painful and scanty;increases while sitting and less while walking Alumina 30 or 0/5 4 hourly

      Menses with neuralgic pain; dysmenorrhoea with pains flying to other parts of the body Caulophyllum 30 or 200 4 hourly (3)

      Early, dark and stringy with neuralgic pain; better after flow starts; menstrual colic; membranous dysmenorrhoea Magnesia phos.12X or 30 3 hourly

      menses lasts for long; thick and dark; irregular Nux mosch.200 3 hourly (3)

      Early and profuse; menses returns after over exertion; long walk, passing hard stools etc; discharge of blood between periods Ambra gr.200 3 hourly (3)

      Painful; only for one day or one hour; late and scanty; amenorrhoea with opthalmia Euphrasia 30 or 200 4 hourly

      Menses appear only for one day; scanty, pain in small of back and stomach during menstruation Baryta carb.200 4 hourly (3)

      Clotted,stringy, passive and bright red; profuse after miscarriage; worse after slightest provocation Ustilago Q or 6 4 hourly

      Early and profuse; suppressed after bathing in river or swimming pool; tongue thickly whitish coated Antim-crud.200 4 hourly (3)

      Suppressed with colic; better bending double and by pressure Colocynth 200 3 hourly (3)

      Acrid,early, profuse and prolonged; suppressed after getting feet wet Rhus tox.200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Early and profuse; epistaxis instead of menses; worse by motion Bryonia 30 or 200 4 hourly

      Totally exhausted during menstruation, can hardly speak; lasting for long, though not profuse Carbo an.200 3 hourly(3)

      Menses early or late; scanty or profuse; pain with soreness about genitals; pain from back passes down through left labium Kali carb.200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Gushing; exhausting with colic as from sharp stones rubbing together; irregular and painful Cocculus ind.30 or 200 4 hourly

      Scanty; early or delayed; clots of black blood; menstrual flow aggravates all the complaints Thuja oc.200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Frequent; early or delayed during day time only; no menses at night; scanty and offensive Causticum 200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Frequent and gushing; membranous; painful and stringy; breasts swollen and painful before menses and better afterwards; excessive menstruation; discharge of bloody mucous after menses at the time of new moon Lac-can.200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Menses during lactation period; while nursing the child Silicea 200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Membranous; early and profuse, with griping in abdomen; nausea and pain in stomach extending to small of back Borax 30 4 hourly

      Early with thick and strong odour; offensive; premature and too copious Carbo Veg.30 or 200 3 hourly (3 Doses)

      Menses offensive; vicarious; mammae swollen and painful Psorinum 200 or 1M, monthly (3)

      Menses painful; suppressed; colic before the appearance of discharge Verat Vir 30X or 200 4 hourly (3 Doses)

      Dysmenorrhoea; menses usually delayed Pneumococcus 30X or 200, 3 hourly (3 Doses)

      Take the remedy which is similar to your symptoms. No side effects or complications if taken as directed, please do not exceed the given dosage and under any circumstances do not try to mix any remedies and avoid Chocolates, Mints, Coffee, Red Meat, Alcoholic and Carbonated drinks, Spicy Rich Food while taking any Homeopathic remedies, and keep the medicines away from direct sunlight, heat strong smells and perfumes and do not store them in the fridge.
      Curing without any side effects or Complications Thats the Beauty of Homeopathic Medicine

      For more information on Homeopathy and women's problems please look up under the appropriate header :- http://www.hpathy.com/diseases

      hope and pray that the provided information proves helpful to you.

      Best of Health to you.

      Take Care and God Bless

  10. QUESTION:
    What are the benefits of Chinese vitex?

    • ANSWER:
      Biological Name: Vitex agnus-castus, Vitex rotundifolia, Vitex trifolia, Fructus viticis
      Verbenaceae

      Other Names: Chaste Berry, Vitex, Chasteberry, Monk's pepper, Cloister pepper, Agnus Castus, Man jing zi

      Parts Used: The fruit

      Remedies For:
      Diaphoretic, antipyretic, regulatory, Uterine Tonic

      Useful for the treatment of:

      • Fibrocystic Breast Disease
      • Infertility (Female)
      • Menopause
      • Menorrhagia (Heavy Menstruation)
      • Menstrual Difficulties (Secondary Amenorrhea)
      • Premenstrual Syndrome

      Chasteberry has the effect of stimulating and normalizing pituitary gland functions, especially its progesterone function. It may be called an amphoteric remedy, as it can produce apparently opposite effects though in truth it is simply normalizing. It will usually enable what is appropriate to occur. The greatest use of Chasteberry lies in normalizing the activity of female sex hormones and it is thus indicated for dysmenorrhoea, premenstrual stress and other disorders related to hormone function. Beneficial during menopausal changes. May be used to aid the body to regain a natural balance after the use of the birth control pill.

      Vitex helps restore a normal estrogen-to-progesterone balance. It can not only ease but, with time, actually cure premenstrual syndrome, which has been linked to abnormally high levels of estrogen, especially if symptoms tend to disappear when menstruation begins. Vitex can also help with irregular menstruation (especially if accompanied by endometriosis). Vitex also helps resolve hormonally-related constipation. Vitex may help cure fibroid cysts that occur in the smooth muscle tissue.

      Vitex may also help reduce some of the undesirable symptoms of menopause such as hot flashes associated with the reduction in the production of progesterone. Vitex can stabilize the cycle after withdrawal from progesterone birth control pills.

      Several studies indicate that vitex can help control acne in teenagers, young women and men.

      For women who are trying to get pregnant, vitex may be helpful to help regulate the ovulatory cycle. It may be taken throughout the end of the third month of pregnancy, which may help prevent miscarriage, according to German research. After the third month it is still safe to take but is not recommended, because it may bring on the flow of milk too early.

      Traditional Chinese Medicine:

      Relieves wind heat, clears heat from the liver channel. The Chinese variety is particularly useful for headache, dizziness, eye pain, and muscular aches and pains. The Western variety has a somewhat different usage-as a female hormonal regulator.

      Description:
      Vitex grows in the Mediterranean countries and Central Asia. The dried fruit, which has a pepper- like aroma and flavor, is used.

      Dosage:
      Infusion: pour a cup of boiling water onto l teaspoonful of the ripe berries and leave to infuse for l0-l5 minutes. This should be drunk three times a day.

      Tincture: take 1 ml of the tincture three times a day.

      Clinical research shows that vitex may start working to treat imbalances after about 10 days, but for full benefit it should be taken up to 6 months or longer. With PMS, a positive result may be felt by the second menstruation, but permanent improvement may take up to a year or longer.

      Safety:
      Vitex should be used with caution by those who are weak or anemic.

      Side effects of using vitex are rare. Minor gastrointestinal upset and a mild skin rash with itching have been reported in less than 2% of the women monitored while taking vitex. Vitex is not recommended for use during pregnancy

  11. QUESTION:
    i just found out i have 2 cm fibroid in uterus and cyst in left ovary?
    my question is why did this happend to me im only 27 and have 2 kids should i worry please help has this happen to any one else.

    • ANSWER:
      Dont panic. You will be surprised to know that almost half of the women the world over, irresspective of age suffer from fibroids. It is rarely life threatening and responds very well to natural remedies.
      since you still are in the child bearing age , it does not make sense to go in for surgical treament. Natural cure for treatment of uterine fibroids should be the first option which you must explore. To learn about my story please visit http://naturalremediesforfibroidtreatment.weebly.com/

  12. QUESTION:
    Fibroids and Breast Cysts
    Hello All,
    I have uterine fibroids and breast cysts. I am estrogen dominant and began taking steps to repair the damage. I have begun exercising as well as changing my diet free from red meats, dairy and coffee. My doctor and I discussed possible options and since I am fairly young (36), invasive procedures are not beneficial for me since I plan (hope) to have more children and the Fibroids are not yet severely large enough to cause serious damage, however they are uncomfortable.

    I also don't want to take Hormone Therapy due to side affects and my age.

    I researched online various sites advising the use of Natural Herbs to reduce and shrink Fibroids, but there are so many I want to know which herbs are BEST or more EFFECTIVE at eliminating Fibroids.
    I understand that using Natural Herbs it will take abit of a longer time to reduce the Fibroids and I'm ok with that, I just want to "pin-point" the BEST and MOST EFFECTIVE herbs to obtain.

    I've read the following are good choices:
    Vitex (Chasteburry)
    Milk Thistle
    Lady’s Mantle
    Dandelion root
    Flaxseed

    Please if I've missed anything please let me know or advise the best most effective herb remedy to use. Thanks everyone in advance, greatly appreciate it!

    • ANSWER:
      Although this might seem rather strange, I have found the primary causative agent for breast cysts to be wearing bras, and every women I've known with the problem had it get better once she stopped wearing a bra for a few weeks.
      I can understand why you would be hesitant to do that, but there's actually a lot of information showing bras are bad for your health (especially tight restrictive ones). They cut the lymph flow, which amongst other things leads to cysts.

      Beyond that, I know a few people who have cured both by using the disolving process (which is explained in a book called opening the energy gates of your body), along with a few others that did it via energy movement forms which made the fluids flow within their body (the best one in that regards was known as gods playing in the clouds).

      I've also read a lot of research data supporting the notion that DMSO applied to the are a cysts or fibroids in can cure it, but I've never had any first hand experience with this approach, mainly because I haven't come to the point where it was necessary to do.

      There are a few herbal remedies which can help to mitigate it etc, but I am of the opinion they're less effective than DMSO so I wouldn't personally use them.

      Hope that helps!

      *I should also note none of the girls had their breasts get aesthetically worse after they stopped wearing them, an increase in size was the only noticeable effect.

  13. QUESTION:
    Uterus fibroid surgery? ?
    I have uternine fibroids and I've avoided this for over 10 years. I'm scared. I might want surgery to get rid of it,but I'm surgery phobic. Anyone know what is involved? and is it like a C section?
    I am done with childbearing and have witnessed the massage, chirporactor, supplement route for attempting to cure other ailments but haven't tried it on myself. I dunno; its all so confusing when traditional medicine and alternatie medicine disagrees with the other adn frustrating for the patient.

    • ANSWER:
      From what i have seen there are a few different options for surgery and most of them are at least a little bit untrusive. There are also statistics that show the fibroids can grow back after these surgeries and some can make it very hard to get pregnant afterwards as well.
      There are soem who suggest you can shrink them naturally though, this article might help:
      ***

      Natural Cures For Fibroids - Do They Work?

      Fibroids or Uterine Fibroids are growths that occur in a woman's uterus (the womb) that can grow quite large and cause problems for the woman who suffers from this malady. Natural cures for fibroids are often treated with very little respect by traditional medical doctors who will often recommend dangerous surgery options to remove the fibroids as the only path forward.

      This is strange as natural cures for other female afflictions such as PCOS and more have been used to help women that modern medicine cannot cure for years. Herbal remedies, Chinese medicine, massage, acupuncture, diet and many other options that do not include surgery are often said to cure almost anything and even skeptics admit that there is a definite benefit to many of these things but how do they stack up versus modern medicine and surgery for uterine fibroid reduction?

      Read the rest here:
      http://ezinearticles.com/?Natural-Cures-For-Fibroids---Do-They-Work?&id=1422581

  14. QUESTION:
    trying to decide on myomectomy or hysterectomy?
    My doctor told me he felt fibroid at my last Pap exam and he sent me to get a trans vag ultrasound, which I had done yesterday and the doctor hadn't recieved the results before closing today so now i have to wait til monday to hear from him. The thing is I didn't have a pap for 5 years, i know thats really bad, and so when i went this time my pap came back normal no cancerous cells but he said my pelvis had tilted way down and that if I was lucky im done having kids because he said i would have a hard time getting pregnant now. He also had a really hard time getting the thing they use for the exam in because it was so tilted which is why sex is painful in certian positions. My period had been really heavy the last couple years and even worse the last few months. I have been married for 10 years and have 2 kids and my husband has had a vesectomy so we wre done having kids without a doubt so should I have the hysterectomy so they cant grow back or the myomectomy and risk having to have this done again in the future. Im only 28 i just seems wierd to me to have had a hysterectomy at that age. Will i still want sex if i have the hysterectomy? That would really take a tole on our marriage if i hardly ever wanted it. If you have had fibriods im interested in finding out what you did and how thats working for you now.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi

      fibroids is quite common in women- you are lucky to have already had children bcoz at times it can affect a womans fertility. You have not mentioned the size of your fibroid tumors and its symptoms. Are you symptoms bearable- if so considering you age it would be worthwhile to give natural fibroid treatment method a try. This kind of alternative healing does not produce any harmful side effects since only natural remedies are used for fibroid cure. At times surgical treatment for fibroids can lead to early menopause and loss of libido too.

      http://ezinearticles.com/?Surgical-Treatment-For-Uterine-Fibroids-Can-Lead-to-Early-Menopause-and-Loss-of-Libido&id=3020406

  15. QUESTION:
    How to make period regular?
    Is there some sort of herbal medicine or natural way to make my period more regular? It used to be very regular, but I've been on and off birth control so many times in the last 7 years that I think it has permanently messed up my cycle and it's driving me so completely crazy!!!

    I've been off for 6 months now, and my body should have re-adapted by now.

    Obviously BC regulates your period, but I'm looking for something different. I seriously can't take the sporadic emotional and physical changes, I feel like a mess.

    Anything tried/tested that's worked for you? I don't trust advertisers and drug companies!
    thanks tink, but that was for pre- and post-menopause, and since I'm 23, I'm pretty sure that's not my problem.
    thank you soul doctor!

    I've never seen a list of so many complications women can have with their natural menstrual cycle (geesh).

    Reading them all, I felt like maybe I fell into a few categories, yet none exactly, but I'll have to just pick something to try, and if it doesn't work, try the next.

    • ANSWER:
      Homeopathic Remedies for Menustrational Complaints (You must read it carefully) these are 100% cures which cure without any side effects or complications :-

      Dark, clotted; copious or scanty menses, during day time only; 1st menses delayed and painful; intermittent and irregular; changing moods; likes open air Pulsatilla 30 or 200, 4 hourly

      Early and profuse; copious; during night on lying down; frequently; intermittent; painful Kreosote 30 or 200, 3 hourly (3)

      Menses dark; acrid, excoriating,during night only, after lying down Bovista 30 or 200, 4 hourly

      Copious and dark; worse after injury Hamamellis 30, 3 hourly (3)

      Dark, clotted, painful and frequent, due to displaced uterus; during night only Trillium p.Q or 6X, 3 hourly

      Copious; gushing and frequent; worse after exertion; every 2 weeks or every few days;lasting for a week or more Medorrhinum 200 or 1M monthly (3)

      Copious, offensive, clotted and painful,due to uterine fibroid; difficult to wash Platina 200 or 1M, 3 hourly (3)

      Menses bright red, copious, clotted, painful and frequent; worse during menopause; walking ameliorates; history of abortion Sabina 30 or 200 6 hourly

      Menses bright red, mingled with dark clots; offensive Belladonna 30, 4 hourly

      Mense bright red; gushing; nausea or vomiting, clean tongue Ipecac 30, 4 hourly

      Menses bright red; copious and frequent Millefolium Q or 30 4 hourly

      Menses bright red; vicarious; patient desires icy cold water Phosphorus 30 or 200, 4 hourly(3)

      Menses acrid; excoriating;copious after miscarriage; frequent; intermittent China 6 or 30, 4 hourly

      Menses copious; continues upto next period; dark and clotted; irregular Secale Cor 30 4 hourly

      Menses profuse and early; copious with dark clots and abdominal distention Nux vomica 30 or 200, 6 hourly

      Early and excessive; bright red, long lasting with headache; copious; worse after exertion; early in young girls lasting for long; late in adults Calc-phos 12X or 30, 3 hourly (3)

      Copious; lasting a week or more,frequent, every 2 weeks; intermittent Sulphur 200 or 1M, 4 hourly (3)

      Amenorrhoea; dark clotted blood; copious, frequent, delayed; first menses delayed; exhausting; pale, thin blood Ferrum met.3X or 6X, 4 hourly

      Irregular; painful, delayed or frequent; worse after exertion Sepia 30 or 200, 3 hourly (3)

      Early; profuse and frequent; every 2 weeks; during lactation; lasting a week or more; returns after excitement; suppressed after working in water or becoming wet Calcarea carb.200 or 1M, 3 hourly (3)

      Menses copious, frequent,dark, intermittent and irregular; during day time only; offensive, painful and thick Lilium tig.30 or 200, 4 hourly (3)

      Menstrual flow suppressed after fright or shock; in plethoric young girls; menses profuse with nose bleed; late; marked fear and restlessness Aconite 30 or 200, 3 hourly

      Menses frequent and copious; offensive; passive bleeding Helonias Q or 6, 4 hourly

      All complaints better during menstruation; copious or scanty; painful for very short period only; dark, lumpy and black Lachesis 200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Copious; worse after injury or coition; bruised pains Arnica 200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Menses copious; late or suppressed; worse while sitting; feels better after flow starts Zincum met.30 or 200, 3 hourly(3)

      Dark, clotted, stringy, offensive, painful and frequent; worse from least movements Crocus sat.Q or 6X, 4 hourly

      Delayed; specially first menses; irregular,painful,pale and scanty; stools constipated Graphites 30 or 200 3 hourly(3)

      Delayed and painful; flow aggravates the complaints; neuralgic, rheumatic pain;scanty or suppressed due to emotions or fever Actaea race.30 or 200 4 hourly (3)

      Delayed, scanty,stopped due to cold; putting hands in cold water, due to cold; breast becomes enlarged, sore and painful during menstrual cycle Conium mac.200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Delayed or stopped; by putting hands in cold water; suppressed after drinking milk Lac-def.200 3 hourly (3)

      Early or delayed; exhausting,scanty or profuse; stools hard and constipated; haemorrhage between periods Thlaspi b-p.Q or 6 4 hourly

      Copious; alternate periods more profuse; frequent and painful;very slight (1st day only), 2nd day with vomiting; mentrual colic with large clots Cyclamen 30 4 hourly

      Painful and scanty;increases while sitting and less while walking Alumina 30 or 0/5 4 hourly

      Menses with neuralgic pain; dysmenorrhoea with pains flying to other parts of the body Caulophyllum 30 or 200 4 hourly (3)

      Early, dark and stringy with neuralgic pain; better after flow starts; menstrual colic; membranous dysmenorrhoea Magnesia phos.12X or 30 3 hourly

      menses lasts for long; thick and dark; irregular Nux mosch.200 3 hourly (3)

      Early and profuse; menses returns after over exertion; long walk, passing hard stools etc; discharge of blood between periods Ambra gr.200 3 hourly (3)

      Painful; only for one day or one hour; late and scanty; amenorrhoea with opthalmia Euphrasia 30 or 200 4 hourly

      Menses appear only for one day; scanty, pain in small of back and stomach during menstruation Baryta carb.200 4 hourly (3)

      Clotted,stringy, passive and bright red; profuse after miscarriage; worse after slightest provocation Ustilago Q or 6 4 hourly

      Early and profuse; suppressed after bathing in river or swimming pool; tongue thickly whitish coated Antim-crud.200 4 hourly (3)

      Suppressed with colic; better bending double and by pressure Colocynth 200 3 hourly (3)

      Acrid,early, profuse and prolonged; suppressed after getting feet wet Rhus tox.200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Early and profuse; epistaxis instead of menses; worse by motion Bryonia 30 or 200 4 hourly

      Totally exhausted during menstruation, can hardly speak; lasting for long, though not profuse Carbo an.200 3 hourly(3)

      Menses early or late; scanty or profuse; pain with soreness about genitals; pain from back passes down through left labium Kali carb.200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Gushing; exhausting with colic as from sharp stones rubbing together; irregular and painful Cocculus ind.30 or 200 4 hourly

      Scanty; early or delayed; clots of black blood; menstrual flow aggravates all the complaints Thuja oc.200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Frequent; early or delayed during day time only; no menses at night; scanty and offensive Causticum 200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Frequent and gushing; membranous; painful and stringy; breasts swollen and painful before menses and better afterwards; excessive menstruation; discharge of bloody mucous after menses at the time of new moon Lac-can.200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Menses during lactation period; while nursing the child Silicea 200 or 1M 3 hourly (3)

      Membranous; early and profuse, with griping in abdomen; nausea and pain in stomach extending to small of back Borax 30 4 hourly

      Early with thick and strong odour; offensive; premature and too copious Carbo Veg.30 or 200 3 hourly (3 Doses)

      Menses offensive; vicarious; mammae swollen and painful Psorinum 200 or 1M, monthly (3)

      Menses painful; suppressed; colic before the appearance of discharge Verat Vir 30X or 200 4 hourly (3 Doses)

      Dysmenorrhoea; menses usually delayed Pneumococcus 30X or 200, 3 hourly (3 Doses)

      Take the remedy which is similar to your symptoms. No side effects or complications if taken as directed, please do not exceed the given dosage and under any circumstances do not try to mix any remedies and avoid Chocolates, Mints, Coffee, Red Meat, Alcoholic and Carbonated drinks, Spicy Rich Food while taking any Homeopathic remedies, and keep the medicines away from direct sunlight, heat strong smells and perfumes and do not store them in the fridge.
      Curing without any side effects or Complications Thats the Beauty of Homeopathic Medicine

      For more information on Homeopathy and women's problems please look up under the appropriate header :- http://www.hpathy.com/diseases

      I hope and pray that the provided information proves helpful to you.

      Best of Health to you.

      Take Care and God Bless

cure natural remedies uterine fibroids

Cervical Polyps Natural Remedies

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    what is the reason for the women having bleeding at the age of 56years, after menopause ,?
    My wife is having slight bleeding at the age of 56 years , but after menopause she don't having any bleeding for more than 10 years, is it possible and normal, or any other reason ?

    • ANSWER:
      Bleeding After Menopause

      Menopause is the transition phase in the life of a woman in which her ovaries stop producing eggs, body produces less progesterone, and estrogen, menstrual cycle becomes less frequent, and her period stopping altogether. Early Menopause symptoms also known as Premature menopause symptoms, may include irregular menstrual cycles, hot flashes, irritability, night sweats, and sleep deprivation. There are treatments for Menopause which includes hormone replace therapy, and herbal remedies. Herbal remedies may include natural supplements and foods made from soy.

      If you have bleeding after menopause, make sure to call your Doctor!
      A woman will be fully menopausal if she has gone at least 1 year or 365 days without having her period. If bleeding continues after being fully menopausal, it may be only confined to spotting, this is also known as post menopausal bleeding. It is not considered unusual for this to happen. There are situations when post menopausal bleeding maybe a sign of a more serious condition.
      Spotting may occur if you are undergoing therapy for hormone replacement HRT but it can also occur if you aren’t. Generally, spotting occurs due to the hormonal balances persisting after menopause. Breast tenderness in addition to spotting can be a sign that you’re experiencing an actual menstrual period. If this occurs, you will need to wait 1 full year from your last menstrual cycle to be fully menopausal.

      Estrogen levels need to remain stable or it can cause spotting. Having low estrogen levels can cause irregular spotting and high estrogen levels may cause a heavy menstrual cycle. Progesterone levels may also rise because the endometrial lining is atrophying.

      There are women who may develop Type II diabetes after experiencing menopause. Women who are insulin resistant have higher estrogen levels than women who aren’t diabetic. A woman who is insulin resistant can experience progesterone converting into estrogen, which can result in post menopausal bleeding that is unusual.

      Rapid weight loss can cause you to spot or bleed after experiencing menopause. Estrogen is stored in fat tissue in a woman’s body so when rapid weight loss occurs, the estrogen goes into her bloodstream, her hormones are disrupted, and she may spot or bleed.

      Although it maybe a benign condition, post menopausal bleeding should not be ignored. Make sure to bring this to your Physician’s attention due to the fact that it maybe a serious health issue. Post menopause bleeding may originate from the vagina which may have dried up and atrophied from lack of estrogen. May also come from lesions and cracks on the vulva, and can also occur from intercourse. Upper reproductive system bleeding can come from endometrial cancer, hormone replacement, cervical cancer or lesions, endometrial polyps, ovarian cancer, uterine tumors or from tumors that secret estrogen. Most common reason for post menopause bleeding is hormone replacement therapy also known as HRT.
      There are good remedies in Homeopathy too.

  2. QUESTION:
    Pea Sized Lump - Side of Cervix?
    I'm very worried. 5 years ago I had cervical dysplasia due to an HPV infection with HPV type 16 - high cancer risk. I had 3 separate biopsies, which came back cancer free, then 3 months later my next pap came back normal.

    Fast forward. For the last 6 months, I have had a lump on the side of my cervix that is growing in size. It is in the spot of my most painful biopsy (this area was very painful during the procedure.) At first I thought it was nothing, I get tiny little cysts which are normal, but this is very different. It is growing and becoming painful.

    To describe it, it is large, round, somewhat hard (firm,) smooth, and painful. When I touch it, it aches and causes sharp pains. It's not a polyp (those are fingerlike growths) and it is about 3 cm in diameter. I have an appointment with my OBGYN, but first I have to get a pap, I can't request a biopsy.

    I am truly afraid of cervical cancer. I have read nabothian cyst (which I do get) are small and pimple like, this is not that. It's on the side of my cervix, not the opening and it's much larger than that. It is not a polyp either (which hangs down from the cervix.)

    Is there anything else this could be? If it is cancer, is the 3 mm size considered small? Yes, I am going to the doctor, but I don't think a pap is going to tell me much of anything and looking for other women who have gone through this...
    Yes, I booked an appointment already, I go in Tuesday. They refuse to book an appointment for a biopsy, first I have to get a pap (sigh.) Looking for other women who have gone through this be it cancer or cysts or an abscess.
    UK Oldie - Did you also have a tumor like growth? Tomorrow's appointment can't come fast enough.

    • ANSWER:
      I had cervical cancer 34 years ago. I had surgery. There were 10 years of follow-ups in cancer clinic (1 a year after 1st 6 months). I have had absolutely no problem ever since. It was a smear test (I think you call it pap) which found it so I don't think it is a waste of time.
      I am glad you have an appointment soon. Worrying won't help but you do have my sympathy. If stress gets too bad try Valerian. It is a herbal natural remedy available over the counter in Herbalist shops. Best wishes and good luck from UK

  3. QUESTION:
    What can this be?
    Ok so this past saturday me and my fiance were having sex..And like about 30-35minutes later i noticed very little blood..I thought i was going to start my menstural period again which was about a week ago i got it,but i didnt start again.The bleeding didnt even last that long..I was basically spotting,and i stopped that same day.I know it cant be implantation bleeding because it's to soon so thats out of the question..Or do you think my fiance could have done it hard enough to make me bleed?I mean this aint my first time having sex so that could be out of the question,but the weird thing is..When me and my fiance have sex we always have rough sex,but this never happened to me before..For the first time i actually bled while having sex with him?..So can somebody help me out on this one?

    • ANSWER:
      there can be a few reasons for bleeding after sex. these are supposed to be the top 10 reasons for bleeding after sex:

      Cervical dysplasia: Cervical dysplasia is precancerous changes of the epithelial cells that line the cervix. Risk increases with multiple sexual partners, sex before age 18, childbirth before age 16, or a past history of STDs. Treatment is usually cryosurgery or conisation.

      Chlamydia: A bacterial infection that is usually transmitted through sexual activity or contact with semen, vaginal fluid, or blood.

      Gonorrhea: A usually sexually transmitted disease caused by a bacteria.
      Sponsored Links
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      Several pharmaceutical treatments are available.

      Vaginitis or Cervicitis: Inflammation or swelling and infection of the vagina or cervix. Treatment depends on the cause.

      Cervical polyps: Cervical polyps are smooth, red or purple, finger-like growths that grow out of the mucuos layer of the cervix or the cervical canal. Cervical polyps are extremely fragile, extending out of the cervix, and easily and painlessly removed.

      Trichomoniasis: A usually sexually transmitted disease caused by protozoan. Can also be passed to newborns during vaginal birth by infected mothers. Although rare, transmission is also possible in tap water, hot tubs, urine, on toilet seats, and in swimming pools. May cause vaginitis.

      Vaginal Yeast Infection: An overgrowth of the normal fungi that inhabits the vaginal area. Common symptoms include itching, burning, and an odorless, white, cheese-like discharge.

      Endometritis or adenomyosis: Endometritis is defined by Dorland's Medical Dictionary, 27th Edition as an inflammation of the endometrium (the innermost layer of the uterus). Both conditions are associated with endometriosis. Adenomysis is when endometrial tissue attaches itself to the uterus, or another organ such as the ovaries, and grows outside of the uterus.

      Uterine polyps: Uterine polyps occur when the endometrium overgrows causing these protrusions into the uterus. It is extremely rare for these growths to grow in a way that is either benign or malignant. Women with uterine polyps frequently experience bleeding between periods (metrorrhagia), other symptoms includes vaginal bleeding after sex, spotting, menorrhagia, bleeding after menopause, and breakthrough bleeding during hormone therapy. Hysteroscopic-guided curettage is the prefered treatment, since the normal D&C is basically an unguided procedure that may miss many of the uterine polyps.

      Fibroid tumors: Uterine fibroid tumors are usually benign tumors. They are solid masses made of fibrous tissue. Fibroid tumors are rarely malignant. Symptoms of fibroid tumors vary among women, with some women never experiencing any symptoms at all. Women who can wait until menopause will see their fibroids shrink and disappear once their bodies stop producing estrogen. It's important that women with fibroids make sure they never take estrogen, in any form including birth control pills, since estrogen increases fibroid growth. Several treatments are currently available for uterine fibroid tumors from myomectomy and uterine artery embolization to the traditional hysterectomy.

      Granted, these are extreme reasons for the bleeding. If this is the first time you have had bleeding with rough sex, then it might just be from it being rough and u not being properly lubed up. if it happens again, i would go to the doctor to make sure there is nothing more serious going on.

cervical polyps natural remedies

Causes Fibroid Growth Uterus

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Is there a way to prevent or reduce the growth of fibroids?
    I understand that fibroids are common and once developed, it really doesn't go away. But is there a way to prevent getting any more of them or having them grow larger? Is there a certain diet or lifestyle that can be contributed to them?

    I thought I read somewhere that although it is not a certain cause, fibroids seem to occur often in women who experience weight gain.

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroids develop from abnormal cell growth in the uterus (womb). The exact cause of these benign tumors is not known. However, both genetic and environmental conditions have been identified as contributing risk factors for fibroids. A number of factors may increase a woman’s likelihood of developing uterine fibroids. These include:

      Age. Although they can occur at any age after puberty, fibroids most frequently appear in women aged 30 to 40 years old. In addition, early age at menarche, especially before age 10, is considered a risk factor for the condition later in life.

      Genetics and heredity. Research indicates that many fibroids contain alterations in genes that code for uterine muscle cells. Women who have a mother or sister with fibroids appear to be at increased risk of developing them.

      Ethnicity. Fibroids tend to appear more frequently among black women than Caucasians. Also, black women tend to develop fibroids at younger ages, and also typically experience numerous and/or larger fibroids.

      Hormonal changes. Research indicates that the hormones estrogen and progesterone appear to influence the growth of uterine fibroids. When a woman with uterine fibroids experiences hormonal changes during pregnancy, the fibroids typically enlarge. However, after childbirth the fibroids tend to shrink back to the original size. In addition, when women stop menstruating (menopause), uterine fibroids usually shrink or disappear altogether. Other studies indicate that hormones that help the body maintain tissues, such as the insulin-like growth factor, may also affect fibroid growth.

      High-fat diet and alcohol consumption. Significant consumption of red meats (e.g., beef, ham) and alcoholic beverages, especially beer, is associated with an increased risk of developing fibroids in the uterus.

      Obesity. Having a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or greater appears to increase a woman’s risk of developing these benign tumors of the uterus.

      There's really a lot of great information on fibroids - their prevention, treatment, signs and symptoms at the women's site below. Take a look - I'm sure you'll find it helpful!

      http://obgyn.health.ivillage.com/uterineovarianhealth/uterinefibroids.cfm

  2. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of uterine fibroid without surgery?
    I want to kow if there is any natural method of getting rid of a fibroid. I have a very huge fundal fibroid outside my uterus, though it is not creating any discomfort, I am only 28 and this may cause complications in my pregnancy.

    Can anyone suggest any natural methods for treating this

    • ANSWER:
      It is perfectly possible to learn how to get rid of uterine fibroids naturally but first and foremost you must understand that this is not a quick fix approach and will require a committed and systematic approach from yourself.

      Your fibroids did not grow overnight and although common, not every woman will have fibroids. There are various causes of uterine fibroids and most of these are caused by lifestyle and dietary issues. Certain conditions need to exist for uterine fibroids to grow-there is never any single cause of this condition, but it happens due to the subtle interaction of various factors which cause an environment which triggers off growth.

      By neutralising the conditions which caused fibroid growth in the first place, this will cause the fibroids to shrink naturally and once the conditions cease to exist, fibroids cannot grow any more. There is certainly a strong connection between the Western lifestyle fibroid growth. This does not just apply to our Western diet, but also factors such as stress, lack of exercise and poor sleep patterns all come into play.

      To get rid of uterine fibroids naturally, you will need to use a tried and tested plan. Implementing ad-hoc treatments may help give symptomatic relief, but will not provide a proper solution.

      The components of a successful plan will include:-

      * A robust detox to help eliminate toxins

      * Systems to rebalance hormone levels

      * The correct diet for fibroid sufferers

      * How to control stress levels

      * The role of herbs

      * The link between yeast and fibroids

      Combining these elements makes for an extremely powerful method to rid you of your uterine fibroids.

  3. QUESTION:
    Natural ways of shrinking uterine fibroids and ovarian cysts?
    Today I was diagnosed with three uterine fibroids (3 cm each) and a small ovarian cyst. I don't want to get surgery as it could be dangerous for other organs. Are there any natural ways of shrinking them?

    Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroids are benign uterine growths. Many women have no symptoms while others experience bleeding, increased urination, bladder displacement, urine retention, constipation, infertility, miscarriage, pain during intercourse and anemia. Ovarian cysts are enlarged follicles that fail to rupture and release an egg. Women may experience general pain, disrupted periods, pain in the back and abdomen and painful intercourse. Both of these conditions are caused by imbalances in estrogen production. There are many natural treatments to deal with both of these conditions. Talk to your doctor about any natural supplements you are using.

      Herbal Treatments for Fibroids

      Herbal treatments that address bleeding often work quite quickly, but supplements that control hormone levels take about three months of use before bringing about noticeable results.

      Black cohosh controls bleeding and relieves pain; take 500 milligrams daily. Cinnamon oil has a long history of use in traditional American medicine to control bleeding fibroids. Use 10-to-15 drops every 15 minutes until the bleeding stops. Dan shen, which should only be used under professional supervision, treats congealed blood, dark red clots during menstruation, and relieves pelvic congestion. Reishi tincture alleviates pelvic inflammation. Take one tablespoon in ¼ cup of water three times daily.

      There are three traditional Chinese formulas that are commonly used to treat uterine fibroids. Take as directed on the product label.

      Augmented Rambling powder lowers estrogen levels and is most useful for women who are also suffering from painful or difficult urination. Cinnamon Twig and Poria Pill lowers estrogen levels without interfering with the menstrual cycle or causing weight gain. Four Substance Decoction treats fibroids and is especially useful for women who eat a poor diet.
      Herbal Treatments for Ovarian Cysts

      Dioscorea tincture, also known as wild yam, alleviates cramping caused by ovarian cysts. Take as directed on the label. Dong quai relieves pain resulting from this condition. Take 1,000 milligrams daily during the two-week period after menstruation and then discontinue for two weeks.

      There are several Chinese formulas used to treat ovarian cysts. Use as directed on the product label.

      Dong Quai and Peony Powder reduces estrogen levels and the formation of inflammatory substances in the tissues that line the uterus. Two Cured Decoction reduces estrogen levels. Augmented Rambling Powder and Cinnamon Twig and Poria pill, which are listed above, can also be used for ovarian cysts

      Estrogen is produced from body fat. Excess weight increases the amount of estrogen in the body, so make an effort to maintain a normal weight. Do your best to exercise regularly and reduce stress levels. Avoid the following herbs that stimulate estrogen production: Coleus, Cordyceps, fennel seed, licorice, and moutan.
      What Are Uterine Fibroid Cysts?
      Uterine fibroid cysts are noncancerous tumors that grow in or around the uterus. Uterine fibroids are a common medical complaint, occurring in up to 80 percent of ...
      Uterine Cysts
      Uterine cysts are tumors that can vary in size from less than 1 inch to as large as a melon. Also referred to as uterine fibroids, or simply fibroids, these growths ...
      Dong Quai Benefits

      Dong quai (Angelica sinensis) is a plant found at high altitudes in the mountain regions of China, Korea and Japan. It has been used for thousands of years to treat a ...
      How to Cure Ovarian Cysts & Uterine Fibroids

      Ovarian cysts and uterine fibroids are two problems that commonly affect women. In many cases, they go away on their own, without requiring treatment. However, they ...
      Uterine Fibroid Laser Treatment

      Uterine fibroids are quite common, and usually go away on their own. Even when this does not occur, these fibroids are usually benign. However, when they result in ...
      How to Treat Uterine Fibroids With Natural Medicine

      Uterine fibroids are hard growths that occur in the muscle tissue of the uterus, particularly in women between the ages of 35 and 45. Often fibroids cause little or ...
      Herbs to Take for Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

      Polycystic ovary syndrome is a disorder of the ovaries that causes multiple follicles to develop and form into clumps. Rather than disintegrate during menstruation ...
      Ovarian Fibroid Procedures

      According to the University of Pennsylvania, fibroids are a common abnormal growth within the uterus and are the No. 1 reason U.S. women have a hysterectomy. Fibroids ...
      Homeopathic Treatment Help for Shrinking a Uterus Fibroid

      In some cases, homeopathic medicine can be extremely helpful in shrinking uterine fibroids. A fibroid is a muscle tumor that can produce heavy menstrual bleeding ...

  4. QUESTION:
    Does anybody know what it means to have an enlarged uterus?
    I went to gyn for pap and breast exam. she is running 3 different test on some stuff leaking out of my nipples. now i have to go to the hospital for an ultrasound because my uterus is enlarged. it cant be pregnancy because my tubes are tied. I am so scared. Please someone give me some good advice or share an experience you have had.

    • ANSWER:
      Why do Fibroids Cause an Enlarged Uterus?

      The uterus is designed to expand to accommodate a growing baby. When fibroids develop, the uterus enlarges in response to fibroid growth. Some women notice a distended abdomen similar to pre-menstrual bloat; others experience expansion as big as a full term pregnancy.
      Adenomysis

      Occasionally, an enlarged uterus may be the result of Adenomyosis, a disease which mimics fibroids. Adenomyosis can only be diagnosed with biopsy and imaging studies.
      Can the Uterus Shrink Back?

      When fibroids are removed by surgery (Myomectomy) or are shrunk by Uterine Fibroid Embolization, the uterus will return to normal size. Unfortunately, Myomectomy can damage the uterine lining, impairing fertility. There is also a 30% chance of fibroid re-growth. Embolization has neither of these problems. As a non-surgical procedure, it also won't leave scars on the stomach or bikini area.

  5. QUESTION:
    What causes fibroids in the uterus and what the recommended treatment?

    • ANSWER:
      The exact cause of uterine fibroids is not known. Fibroids begin when cells overgrow in the muscular wall of the uterus. Once a fibroid develops, the hormones estrogen and progesterone appear to influence its growth. A woman's body produces the highest levels of these hormones during her childbearing years. After menopause, when hormone levels decline, fibroids usually shrink or disappear.
      Estrogen is thought to play a major role in fibroid growth because fibroids tend to grow larger when a woman's body produces more estrogen (during pregnancy), and usually shrink when a woman's body produces less estrogen (after menopause). Progesterone also seems to stimulate fibroid growth, even when estrogen is not present. Some women do not receive treatment because they do not have symptoms. Other treatments include: pain medication, medical therapy, and surgery to remove just the fibroid, to cut off the blood supply to the fibroid, or to remove the entire uterus.
      Doctors are exploring less-invasive surgeries and hormone therapy as other options.

  6. QUESTION:
    What may cause someone to be on their period for over 2 weeks?
    My friend has had relatively regular periods. She had a d&c last year due to a developed sac but no baby. Not sure if thats related. Shes had cramping and bleeding since Dec 23. What may cause this? I told her to get checked but am asking in the meantime.

    • ANSWER:
      First, I have to say she needs to go to the doctor. That being said, it could be a number of things. I'm not looking to scare anyone, but if she had a D & C, she may need another one because several things could've happened. Because of that procedure you can develop scar tissue which can cause problems healing after your period. Another thing could be uterine fibroids, or if she is on any medication which can cause prolonged bleeding. For example if she is taking depo-provera, or another birth control she might experience "breakthrough bleeding". If she just started taking a birth control, she might also start unusual bleeding. Another thing to consider would be poly-cystic ovary syndrome. Which is when cysts routinely develop on the ovaries, but do not go away. This can cause severe cramping, and hirsutism (unwanted facial hair growth), mood swings, and other problems. This will usually develop in overweight females, but does occur in average women as well. It will cause abnormal bleeding as well as abnormal periods. The last thing that I'm thinking it could be in endometriosis. Which is where the lining of the uterus can start growth elsewhere in the body and cause unusual bleeding. Whatever is going on definitely needs to be checked out. I wish her luck, and think positively!

  7. QUESTION:
    Can Uterus fibroid be cared with Homeophathy medicine ?
    Fibroid is inside the Uterus.

    • ANSWER:
      Homeopathy is effective for treating a number of ailments including fibroids. In case of fibroids normally the cause can be varied. Hence any type of uterine fibroids treatment should adopt a holistic approach. It should concentrate on a number of aspects like
      a) diet changes
      b) liver detox
      c) physical exercise
      d) practices to reduce stress like meditation, yoga accupuncture
      Hence in addition to medicines you will have in incorporate a few other measure to help shrink your fibroids naturally and prevent the growth of new ones
      http://ezinearticles.com/?Fibroid-Treatment---Side-Effects-of-Medical-Procedures-and-Alternative-Options-Available&id=4550401

  8. QUESTION:
    Can an ultrasound detect cancerous fibroids?
    My first test showed fibroids in my uterus. My second ultrasould can in a the finding we some what the same, but now it is stating cancerous notings. My gyn told me not possible cause they can tell that in an ultrasoul. He then gave me another gyn for him the take a look at the test. Kind of funny y send my to another doctor when it is not possible. Should I be worried?

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroids are usually not cancerous, but growths of tissue that many women have. They are hereditary and can be painful at times. I was diagnosed with them when pregnant by ultrasound and I was told that they are very, vey rarely cancerous. If they were cancerous they would need to take a sample of the tissue to biopsy it for cancer.

  9. QUESTION:
    What can cause mulitple periods in one month?
    Im 19 years old and ive had my period since i was 12 and this has never happened before... This month ive had THREE period all with like three to four days between them. Ive tried researching it but nothing so far has helped me. Can someone please tell me what may cause multiple periods monthly? or a link to a medical page that can help me out?

    • ANSWER:
      Hello, I found an article on the internet in regards to irregular periods and their reasons for being late, early, heavy, abnormally long and heavy bleeding. I hope this helps you to answer a few of your questions. Take care.

      Hormonal Imbalance One of the prime reasons for periods to go irregular is hormonal imbalance. In a female's body, in order to produce a period, the body creates hormones such as estrogen and progesterone. Various parts of the body need to send signals to each other in order to trigger menstruation. However, due to hormonal imbalance, many a time, these signals are missed or skipped, thus, resulting in irregular periods.

      Sudden Weight Gain or Loss Have you gained or lost a lot of weight lately? If yes, you've got an answer. When your body works at a constant pace, the hormones learn to process in similar manner. However, the moment you start doing rigorous workout, or eat a lot, your body takes a while to adjust to it. Hence, hormones become imbalanced, and lead to irregularity in periods. However, this is not a tense situation as it happens with every woman who has lost or gained weight quickly.

      Stress Workload? Job issues? Relationship turmoil? Mental dissatisfaction? Reduce your stress, female, for it's affecting the regularity of your periods. Yes, stress contributes to the most common reasons for a late period. With increasing stress, you are affecting the hormonal balance of your body, and hence, not only do your periods become irregular, but they also result in excessive weight gain, and anxiety.

      Polycystic Ovarian Disease So, you aren't pregnant, but you're still worried. Well, if your pregnancy test result came out to be negative, get a check up done, for chances, even though very less, are that you are suffering from Polycystic Ovarian Disease which is caused due to irregular ovulation as a result of hormonal imbalance. With proper treatment, your gynecologist will help you get your periods back to regular. However,

      Medications
      The Mayo Clinic advises that certain medications and result in excess bleeding including anti-coagulants that prevent blood clots and anti-inflammatory medicines. Not only can these medications result in heavy bleeding but they can also prolong your bleeding. If you are improperly taking hormone medication, this can also result in menorrhagia

      Anovulation, Fibroids
      When a woman fails to ovulate, this is called Anovulation. You can have a menstrual period but not ovulate. When this happens, the hormones may become unbalanced, resulting in excess bleeding.

      Cervical polyps are small, fragile growths that begin in either the mucosal surface of the cervix, or the endocervical canal and protrude through the opening of the cervix.

      Endometrial polyps are typically non-cancerous, growths that protrude from the lining of the uterus.

      Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is an infection of one or more organs that affects the uterus, fallopian tubes, and cervix. PID is, most often, a sexually transmitted disease; however, it sometimes occurs following childbirth, abortion, or other gynecological procedures.

      Cervical cancer is a type of cancer that occurs when cells in the cervix become abnormal, multiply out of control, and damage healthy parts of the body. The human papillomavirus, or HPV, is the cause of over ninety percent of all cervical cancers.

      Endometrial cancer occurs when abnormal cells in the uterus or the endometrium (the lining of the uterus) multiply out of control and damage to the uterus and other organs. While the cause of endometrial cancer is unknown, it is known that women diagnosed with this type of cancer tend are usually over fifty.

      IUDs or intrauterine devices used for contraception are a potential cause of heavy menstrual bleeding or menorrhagia. Women who experience prolonged or heavy periods while using the IUD should have the device removed and choose an alternate method of birth control.

      Bleeding disorders occur when it is hard for a person to stop bleeding. While there are several types of bleeding disorders, the most common type in women is von Willebrand Disease or VWD.

      Source(s):
      http://www.buzzle.com/articles/reasons-f…
      http://womenshealth.about.com/od/abnorma…

  10. QUESTION:
    What are your experiences with depot lupron?
    I have had horrible side effects from the Depot Lupron shot (3-months doasage), now I am not talking about depot provera, this is a stronger shot to treat endometriosis. It has helped with the pain and lessened the growths, but I have bad hot flashes, weight gain, dryness, the list goes on. Anyone have better experience with it? Can anyone suggest an alternative treatment?? BCPs don't work, i tried them already.

    • ANSWER:
      Stay FAR away from Lupron!!!!!

      Endo is an estrogen dominance disease. You need to replace the progesterone that your body is missing with a NATURAL PROGESTERONE CREAM! Email me and I can tell you more.

      This is some very nasty stuff. :(
      Here is an article I found....

      Be Careful of Lupron for Endometriosis, It Could Be the Kiss of Death
      By Nicholas Regush

      This particular saga began a decade ago with an injection of a powerful prescription drug called Lupron. Lynne Millican took the shot for endometriosis, a condition in which pieces of the lining of the uterus are found in other parts of the body, especially in the pelvic cavity.

      Ten years later, Millican believes she is still suffering from the effects of that injection. Her many symptoms have included the development of a noncancerous tumor, breast cysts, cardiac arrythmias, dizziness, swelling and fatigue.

      Millican is a registered nurse (and paralegal) living in the Boston area who has become deeply involved in a grass-roots movement to force the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and Members of Congress to take a close look at Lupron.

      The FDA first approved Lupron in 1985 for treatment of men with advanced prostate cancer, and then approved it for treatment of endometriosis in 1990 and uterine fibroids in 1995.

      "There are thousands in the United States who say they have been victimized by this drug," Millican said, emphasizing that symptoms can be severe, such as tremors, seizures and memory loss.

      "Many women I know say their symptoms didn't stop when they stopped taking the drug."

      The FDA has received a wide range of reports of serious side-effects, including death, suspected to be associated with the use of Lupron, but the agency, which holds that the drug's benefits outweigh the risks, does not believe there is sufficient proof to blame Lupron.

      TAP Pharmaceuticals Inc., jointly owned by Abbott Laboratories and Takeda Chemical Industries of Japan, has steadfastly maintained that Lupron is safe.

      Millican, who feels that the FDA has been very slow on the draw with Lupron, is also frustrated by the lack of response from almost all of the many senators and representatives in Congress to whom she has written. She has even submitted written testimony to various committee hearings - but to no avail.

      "It seems that no one but the people who suffer from Lupron are interested in looking into this drug," she said.

      Millican cannot even recall anyone with an MD degree who has voiced strong concern about Lupron.

      At the very least, she feels Lupron's safety should be an issue because doctors use it for purposes that were never approved by the FDA. While legal under federal law - once approved for an indication, a drug can be used for other purposes - unapproved use often occurs without the benefit of appropriate safety and efficacy studies.

      One of Millican's main concerns is Lupron's unapproved use in fertility clinics. The drug is essentially used to suppress female hormones which produce a mature egg. This allows fertility doctors to then induce "controlled" stimulation of multiple eggs.

      "I am concerned that women who undergo these procedures are not being sufficiently informed about Lupron's side-effects," Millican said.

      There is even much more at stake, according to Millican. On September 5, she provided testimony to congressional committee hearings on stem cell research, pointing out that the use of Lupron in the process of creating embryos may cause "the very diseases that are being claimed as those
      diseases necessitating embryonic stem cell research for a cure."

      Millican finds it hard to swallow that the debate over stem cell research has totally ignored Lupron.

      Redflagsweekly January 25, 2002

      Dr. Mercola's Comment:

      Folks, Lupron is a disaster drug that in no way shape or form treats the cause of the problem.

      I have seen it absolutely devastate many women's lives. It is one of the few drugs that I actually cringe when patients tell me that they have taken it.

      It is my experience and belief that this drug causes permanent neurological damage.

      This drug needs to be avoided at all costs.

      It is usually used for endometriosis, which is an estrogen dominance problem and is typically treated quite nicely with natural progesterone, a dietary program, and addressing the emotional stresses which cause the adrenal glands to become impaired

      Since the adrenals is the main biological of estrogen and progesterone, it is important to restore the proper functioning of this gland.

      One could take adrenal glandulars, or DHEA and pregnenolone, but those tend to be natural band-aids that don't address the reasons the adrenal became impaired.

  11. QUESTION:
    What causes a fetus to lie in a transverse position?
    My son did this, he didn't turn head down until a couple weeks before my due date. i am carrying a little girl now, is it likely that she will be transverse too? also i was GBS positive when i gave birth to my son so will that repeat itself too?

    • ANSWER:
      Sarah !
      The causes of transverse position are not fully known. However,it is more common :

      *
      In subsequent pregnancies
      *
      In pregnancies of multiples
      *
      When there is history of premature delivery
      *
      When the uterus has too much or too little amniotic fluid
      *
      In an abnormal shaped uterus or a uterus with abnormal growths, such as fibroids.
      *
      For women with placenta previa

      To know much more about transverse positioned baby visit
      http://birthdefectcauses.blogspot.com
      http://www.pregnancy-guidelines.com

  12. QUESTION:
    What are the causes of continuous menstration?
    By continuous I mean Daily. I was diagnosed with PCOS 6 years ago by a obgyn but then a few years ago another doctor said the diagnoses was incorrect. That my ovaries looked fine and there was no explanation to why I did not have periods for over a year 1/2. Slowly they started returning ... one every 5 - 6 months for a couple days then longer ... then every month .. then twice a month ... now EVERY DAY ! sometimes so much I bleed right through the tampon and have to wear multiple pads ... WHAT IS GOING ON???!! I recently am starting up insurance again after a year off due to new employment...I would like as many opinions of this as possible? I am very confused... frustrated that the doctors don't seem to know what is going on with me ! I hope this next doctor can give me some answers but while I'm waiting for the insurance to kick in at the end of the month I am getting impatient and am trying to look for some answers online...but can't seem to find any. HELP! Weight gain also!
    I was also once told my insulin is 'off' ... when I try to diet I feel dizzy and light headed ... I see a dramatic difference when I don't have sugar. It seems a normal meal for me is not possible without gaining which does not seem normal. If I eat less I feel faint. In order to loose, which I can't do without feeling horrbly sick I have to do this crazy nothing but liquids thing ... vitamin shakes, fruit smoothies, v8 and will start loosing but have to sacrifice it due to the light headedness and headaches. I was put on Glucophage ... but it made me horribly sick and I had to stop taking it, but was not offered any other options. As for exercise ... yes when I am feeling ok ... but that is not very often. If I try to exercise anyway I get sick and need to stop. ?

    • ANSWER:
      when you are able to get to the doctor, be sure he checks your thyroid this is done with bloodwork. an overactive or underactive thyroid can cause irregular menstrual cycles. also need a pelvic sonogram to check for fibroids which are tumerous growths in the uterus (usually not cancerous) but can cause irregular bleeding.

  13. QUESTION:
    What could a growth in the vagina be?
    I know someone who had been experiencing problems with heavy bleeding during her menstrual cycle
    So she had an x-ray and two growths inside her vagina were found, one of them is a cyst, but the other one is apparently "more complex"
    I'm not expecting any perfect medical answers, but does anyone know if it could be anything besides a cancerous growth? Because I know cysts aren't necessarily harmful, but is there anything else it might be that is harmless?
    I'd be interested in anyone's knowledge, from experience or having heard things...
    I'm just anxious
    thanks

    • ANSWER:
      I had a hysterectomy last yr because of fibroids whiich are benign growths of the uterus. They caused me to have very long and heavy periods.
      If she has vaginal growths, they could be polyps (no big deal). Other than that, i don't know.

  14. QUESTION:
    What does it mean if yu get your period 3 times in one month?
    I had got my regular 7day period on the 3rd of April. Then last week Tuesday I was spoting for a day in a half very light. N now today the 29th I got my period agian. What can cause this?

    • ANSWER:
      Hello, I found an article on the internet in regards to irregular periods and their reasons for being late, early, heavy, abnormally long and heavy bleeding. I hope this helps you to answer a few of your questions. Take care.

      Hormonal Imbalance- One of the prime reasons for periods to go irregular is hormonal imbalance. In a female's body, in order to produce a period, the body creates hormones such as estrogen and progesterone. Various parts of the body need to send signals to each other in order to trigger menstruation.

      Sudden Weight Gain- When your body works at a constant pace, the hormones learn to process in similar manner. However, the moment you start doing rigorous workout, or eat a lot, your body takes a while to adjust to it. Hence, hormones become imbalanced, and lead to irregularity in periods.

      Stress Workload- Yes, stress contributes to the most common reasons for a late period. With increasing stress, you are affecting the hormonal balance of your body, and hence, not only do your periods become irregular, but they also result in excessive weight gain, and anxiety.

      Polycystic Ovarian Disease- Polycystic Ovarian Disease is caused due to irregular ovulation as a result of hormonal imbalance.

      Medications- The Mayo Clinic advises that certain medications and result in excess bleeding including anti-coagulants that prevent blood clots and anti-inflammatory medicines. Not only can these medications result in heavy bleeding but they can also prolong your bleeding.

      Anovulation, Fibroids- When a woman fails to ovulate, this is called Anovulation. You can have a menstrual period but not ovulate. When this happens, the hormones may become unbalanced, resulting in excess bleeding.

      Cervical polyps are small, fragile growths that begin in either the mucosal surface of the cervix, or the endocervical canal and protrude through the opening of the cervix.

      Endometrial polyps are typically non-cancerous, growths that protrude from the lining of the uterus.

      Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)-Iis an infection of one or more organs that affects the uterus, fallopian tubes, and cervix.

      Cervical cancer- Cancer that occurs when cells in the cervix become abnormal, multiply out of control, and damage healthy parts of the body.

      Endometrial cancer- Abnormal cells in the uterus or the endometrium (the lining of the uterus) multiply out of control and damage to the uterus and other organs.

      Bleeding disorders occur when it is hard for a person to stop bleeding. While there are several types of bleeding disorders, the most common type in women is von Willebrand Disease or VWD.

      Source(s):
      http://www.buzzle.com/articles/reasons-f…
      http://womenshealth.about.com/od/abnorma…

  15. QUESTION:
    What is the average size of a human uterus ??
    I have been scanned and found to have two large fibroids but not sure how their size compares to the size of my uterus. Or what the treament may be.

    • ANSWER:
      The uterus varies in size depending on the woman's age and whether she has had previous pregnancies. The average adult uterus is about 3 inches long, 2 inches wide, and 1 inch thick. After menopause, the uterus shrinks to the pre-adolescent size.

      Uterine fibroids are tumors or growths, made up of muscle cells and other tissues that grow within the wall of the uterus (or womb). Although fibroids are sometimes called tumors, they are almost always benign (not cancerous). The medical term for fibroids is uterine leiomyomata (you-ter-in lie-oh-my-oh-mah-tah). Fibroids can grow as a single growth or in clusters (or groups). Their size can vary from small, like an apple seed (or less than one inch), to even larger than a grapefruit, or eight inches across or more.

      Uterine fibroids are the most common, benign tumors in women of childbearing age, but no one knows exactly what causes them. They can be frustrating to live with when they cause symptoms. Not all women with fibroids have symptoms, but some have pain and heavy menstrual bleeding. Fibroids also can put pressure on the bladder, causing frequent urination.

  16. QUESTION:
    What causes heavy flow during menstraution?
    Is the egg bigger than normal? If so, what makes it bigger?

    • ANSWER:
      Heavy Bleeding- Why it Happens

      •Hormones: Generally, a woman nearing menopause or a young girl may experience heavy bleeding at least once within the first year of getting her period. This is a normal situation resulting from hormonal changes, but should be monitored closely because if either loses too much blood, it may lead to other complications.

      •Uterine Fibroids: Some women may develop uterine fibroids as a result of the excessive or quick production of estrogen in the body. It is important to note that a fibroid tumor is benign and non cancerous. However, it can lead to bleeding more than usual which causes much discomfort. Since it is caused due to estrogen, the tumor develops quickly during menstruation and pregnancy when estrogen is produced more.

      •Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID): PID is caused due to an infection in the uterine lining, the ovaries or the fallopian tubes. The causes of PID can be unprotected sex, surgical procedures like abortion or cesarean delivery, etc. This is a very serious problem and many sexually active teens are falling prey to PID without realizing its dangers.

      •Polyps: Uterine polyps are small in growths on the lining of the uterus. Polyps are generally caused by hormonal changes in a woman's body. Women in their late 20s to mid 40s have a greater tendency of experiencing polyps in the uterus, which is also a cause of heavy blood flow during one's period.

      •Medications: Some women may experience heavy flow while on birth control pills or medication for some other ailment. Other medications for inflammations may also cause heavy and continuous flow for quite some time. Hence, women must take care of what medications they're taking and take them only if prescribed.

      Buzzle

  17. QUESTION:
    What are the signs and symptoms of endometriosis?
    What are the side effects without treatment, and what is the treatment, and how do they diagnose it. Does it always affect fertility.

    • ANSWER:
      From the Endo Research Center (www.endocenter.org):

      "About Endometriosis:

      With Endometriosis, tissue like that which lines the uterus (the endometrium) is found outside the womb in other areas of the body. Normally, the endometrium is shed each month through menses; however, with Endometriosis, these implants have no way of leaving the body. The implants still break down and bleed, but result is far different than in women and girls without the disease: internal bleeding, degeneration of blood and tissue shed from the growths, inflammation of the surrounding areas, and formation of scar tissue result. In addition, depending on the location of the growths, interference with the normal function of the bowel, bladder, intestines and other areas of the pelvic cavity can occur. Endometriosis has also been found lodged in the skin - and even the brain.

      Symptoms include chronic or intermittent pelvic pain, dysmenorrhea (painful menstruation is not normal!), infertility, miscarriage(s), ectopic (tubal) pregnancy, dyspareunia (pain associated with intercourse), nausea / vomiting / abdominal cramping, diarrhea / constipation (particularly with menses), painful bowel movements, painful or burning urination, urinary frequency, retention, or urgency; fatigue, chronic pain, allergies and immune system-related illnesses are also commonly reported complaints of women who have Endo. It is quite possible to have some, all, or none of these symptoms. Endo symptoms are varied and often nonspecific, so they can easily masquerade as several other conditions, including adenomyosis ("Endometriosis Interna"), appendicitis, ovarian cysts, bowel obstructions, colon cancer, diverticulitis, ectopic pregnancy, fibroid tumors, gonorrhea, inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, ovarian cancer, and PID.

      Despite today's age of medical advances, researchers remain unsure as what causes of Endometriosis. There is NO CURE, despite the continued propagation of such myths by the uninformed who still mistakenly believe that hysterectomy, pregnancy and/or menopause can "cure" the disease. Invasive surgery remains the gold standard of diagnosis, and current therapies continue to remain extremely limited, often carrying side effects.

      Mistakenly minimized as "painful periods," Endometriosis is more than just "killer cramps." It is a leading cause of female infertility, chronic pelvic pain and gynecologic surgery, and accounts for more than half of the 500,000 hysterectomies performed in the US annually. Despite being more prevalent than breast cancer, Endometriosis continues to be treated as an insignificant ailment. Recent studies have even shown an elevated risk of certain cancers and other serious illnesses in those with the disease, as well as malignant changes within the disease itself.

      Research has shown that genetics, immune system dysfunction, and exposure to environmental toxins like Dioxin may all be contributing factors to the development of the disease. Endometriosis knows no racial or socioeconomic barriers, and can affect women ranging from adolescence to post-menopause. The disease can be so painful as to render a woman or teen unable to care for herself or her family, attend work, school, or social functions, or go about her normal routine. It can negatively affect every aspect of a woman's life; from her self-esteem and relationships, to her capacity to bear children, to her ability to be a contributing member of society.

      The disease can currently only be diagnosed through invasive surgery, and the average delay in diagnosis is a staggering 9 years. A patient may seek the counsel of 5 or more physicians before her pain is adequately addressed.

      Once diagnosed, it is not unusual for a patient to undergo several pelvic surgeries and embark on many different hormonal and medical therapies in an attempt to treat her symptoms. None of the current treatments are entirely effective, and virtually all synthetic therapies carry significantly negative side effects; some lasting far beyond cessation of therapy. The exception to this is excision; see www.centerforendo.com to learn more about excision as the leading treatment.

      Though Endometriosis is one of the most prevalent illnesses affecting society today, awareness is sorely lacking and disease research continues to remain significantly under funded. For instance, in fiscal year 2000, the National Institutes of Health planned to spend .5 billion on research. Of that funding, only .7 million was earmarked for Endometriosis - amounting to approximately $.40/patient. This is in stark contrast to other illnesses such as Alzheimer's and Lupus, which received approximately 5.00 and .00 per patient, respectively. American businesses lose millions of dollars each year in lost productivity and work time because of Endometriosis. The cost of surgery required to diagnose the disease in each patient alone adds greatly to the financial burden of both consumers and companies alike.

      Once erroneously believed to be a disease of “Caucasian career women who have delayed childbearing,” we know that in fact, Endometriosis affects women of all ages, races and
      socioeconomic status. Endometriosis also can and does exist in the adolescent female population. Far from the “rare” incidence once believed, studies have found that as many as 70% of teenagers with chronic pelvic pain had Endometriosis proven by laparoscopy. Other reports indicate that as many as 41% of patients experienced Endometriosis pain as an adolescent. The illness can be quite disruptive and cause significant dysfunction, especially at a time in life when self-esteem, school attendance and performance, and social involvement are all critical. Many adolescents with Endometriosis find themselves unable to attend or participate in classes, social functions, extracurricular activities, and sports due to significant pain and other symptoms of Endometriosis. Sometimes, teens and young women lack support and validation from both the home and the school; told the pain is “in their head,” that they are “faking it,” that their debilitating cramps are “normal” and “a part of womanhood,” that they are merely suffering from “the curse,” or that they should just “grin and bear it.” Their symptoms may also be dismissed as a sexually transmitted disease, which Endometriosis absolutely is not. Failure to acknowledge and address symptoms early in the disease process can lead to significant delays in diagnosis and necessary, subsequent treatments. Lack of support from family and loved ones can also add to the patient’s pain and fear - at any age.

      Recent studies have also shown that Endometriosis may in fact have an even bigger impact on younger patients than older women. One such study discovered that in patients under 22 years of age, the rate of disease recurrence was
      double that of older women (35% versus 19%). The study also revealed that the disease behaves differently in
      younger women; leading some researchers to believe it is a
      different form of Endometriosis altogether. Surgery, considered necessary to accurately diagnose and
      effectively treat the disease, is often withheld from younger patients based on the injudicious belief that early surgery somehow negatively influences a young woman’s fertility. Extensive, cumulative research has shown this concern to be unfounded. What can impact fertility, however,
      is neglecting effective treatment of the disease. Some
      researchers also feel that symptomatic, adolescent-onset
      Endometriosis is most often a lifelong problem that will
      progress to severe fibrotic disease.

      While it is possible to become pregnant with Endometriosis, the key is to obtain early, effective treatment such as that offered by specialty treatment centers like the Center for Endo Care (see www.centerforendo.com to learn about the success of excision as treatment). Hysterectomy is not a cure for Endometriosis. Any disease left behind by the surgeon (whether by design because he or she 'couldn't get it all' or accident because they don't recognize the disease in all manifestations) will continue to thrive and cause pain and symptoms. It does not matter if the ovaries are removed or if HRT is withheld; Endo produces its own estrogen-synthesizing enzyme known as aromatase. Thus, it enables it's own vicious life cycle and sustains the disease process. You would be better off getting all disease truly excised from all locations at a specialty center like the CEC (www.centerforendo.com).

      Due in part to the efforts of foundations like the ERC, research is ongoing in some places as to the causes of Endometriosis and potential cures for the disease. Our organization will continue to push for more widespread research into the many facets of the disease, and ultimately, a cure.

      For more information:

      http://www.endocenter.org/

      Endo Self Test:

      Not sure if you have Endometriosis? While pelvic surgery is the only current way to definitively diagnose it, symptoms can lead you and your doctor to suspect the disease. Review the following and consider if any of these common symptoms apply to you. Review your answers with your gynecologist for further discussion.

      Do you experience so much pain during or around your period that you find yourself unable to work, attend school or social functions, or go about your normal routine? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have any relatives diagnosed with Endometriosis? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you find yourself with painful abdominal bloating, swelling or tenderness at any time in your cycle? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have a history of painful ovarian Endometriomas ("chocolate cysts")? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have a history of miscarriage, infertility or ectopic pregnancy? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you experience gastrointestinal symptoms during your cycle, such as nausea or vomiting and/or painful abdominal cramping accompanied by diarrhea and/or constipation? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have a history of fatigue and/or a lowered immunity (i.e., "sick and tired" all the time)? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have a history of allergies, which tend to worsen around your periods? _____YES / _____ NO

      If sexually active, do you experience pain during sexual activity? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you suffer from autoimmune diseases or other conditions (i.e., thyroid disease, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, fibromyalgia, multiple sclerosis, chronic migraines)? _____YES / _____ NO

      Have you ever undergone pelvic surgery like a laparoscopy, in which Endometriosis was suspected but not definitively diagnosed?
      _____YES / _____ NO

      If you have answered "yes" to one or more of these questions, you may have Endometriosis. Talk to your doctor about getting an accurate diagnosis and effective treatment today. Dull aching and cramping can occur during menstruation in many women and teens, due to uterine contractions and the release of various hormones including those known as prostaglandins. However, period pain that becomes so debilitating it renders you unable to go about your normal routine is not ordinary or typical! Pain is your body's way of signaling that something is WRONG. If you are suffering from pelvic pain at any point in your cycle, an Endometriosis diagnosis should be considered.

      Know the Facts:

      - Endometriosis can affect women and teens of all ages, even those as young as 10 or as old as 85!
      - Hysterectomy, menopause and pregnancy are NOT cures for Endometriosis; in fact, there is no definitive cure!
      - Delayed childbearing is NOT what causes Endometriosis; in fact, no one really knows for sure what causes the disease, but research points to multi-factorial origins like heredity, immunology and exposure to environmental toxicants!
      - Endometriosis can only be accurately diagnosed via surgery; diagnostic tests like MRIs and ultrasounds are not definitive!
      - GnRH therapies like Lupron should never be administered in those patients younger than 18 yrs. of age or before a surgical diagnosis!
      - You CAN live well in spite of Endometriosis. WE ARE HERE TO HELP!" ~ www.endocenter.org

  18. QUESTION:
    Can you get severe fatigue or breathlessness during the onset of the menopause?
    I had a hysterectomy in December. I still have my ovaries,but lately, my hair seems drier and thinner. I also have this overwhelming tiredness during the day, and breathlessness.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi!

      I hope you'll check with your health care provider about these symptoms. While they may be related to a surgically induced menopause, they may also be a symptom of another condition or conditions. As women enter menopause, they may begin to experience several symptoms typically associated with the changes that are taking place in their bodies. These symptoms include:

      Hot flashes. This is a feeling of warmth in the face, neck or chest that ranges from mild to severe. According to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), about 85 percent of women approaching or going through menopause have hot flashes.

      Night sweats (evening versions of “hot flashes”) and difficulty sleeping. Lack of sleep can contribute to women feeling tired, stressed or tense.

      Changes in vaginal tissue, including thinning, dryness, itchiness or burning. In some cases, sex may become painful (dyspareunia) due to decreased vaginal secretions.

      Thinning of bones. Known as osteoporosis, this condition can lead to a reduction of bone mass that reaches 20 percent in some women. As a result, menopausal and postmenopausal women are susceptible to fractures of the hip, spine, wrist and other bones. In some cases, osteoporosis can lead to loss of height.

      Abnormal vaginal bleeding or “spotting.” This is a common sign of menopause. However, women who have not had a period for 12 consecutive months should see a physician if they experience spotting, as this can sometimes be a sign of other conditions, such as:

      Cancer

      Side effects of using birth control pills or hormone replacement therapy

      Hormonal imbalance

      Noncancerous growths in the lining of the uterus, such as fibroids

      Mood changes. These changes can include mood swings, depression and irritability. Some researchers believe these emotions are a result of changes in the brain caused by a decrease in estrogen. Others think menopausal symptoms such as sleep problems, hot flashes and fatigue cause the feelings. Still others maintain that a combination of these factors is probably responsible.

      Urinary problems. These may include leaking, burning or pain when urinating (dysuria) or urgency. Leakages may also occur during sneezing, coughing or laughing. An increase in urinary tract infections (UTIs) is also associated with menopause as a result of a thinning of the urethra that happens at this time.

      Other symptoms may occur, also. You can read more about them at this medically-reviewed site - an excellent one!

      http://obgyn.health.ivillage.com/menopausehrt/menopause.cfm

      Feel better : )

  19. QUESTION:
    How old do you have to be for the morning after pill?
    I need to know how much, where, and how old i have to be to get the morning after pill. Im only 16 years old is that old enough. I checked the website for plan b and it said i have 47 hours left to take the pill. What exactly does the pill do?

    • ANSWER:
      No. You would have to be 17.

      It's extremely harmful for you. As for how it works, it tries to prevent ovulation, but IF you ovulate and conceive before taking it, it will make you have a "false period" so that the new child cannot implant. The child obviously dies. Conception occurs in one of the Fallopian tubes and then the child travels from there to the womb during the next 6-12 days. So, if s/he gets to the womb after all that time and cannot implant in the mother's womb because of Plan B, s/he dies and that is a very early abortion. In fact, any hormonal birth control does the very same thing. Here is a short video that explains easily: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jiCU46_lWeE Plan B's first "goal" may not be to abort the child, but it absolutely does cause an abortion--by preventing implantation--if conception has occurred before taking it.

      Please do yourself a favor and look at this site with information about the serious harm that can be done to YOUR body too: http://www.morningafterpill.org/is-emergency-contraception-saf.html

      It's a very powerful drug equal to 50 regular birth control pills, but regular pills alone are so bad for your body.You actually increase your risk of breast cancer by 3-4 times if you use birth control, especially over time. This study explains: http://www.abortionbreastcancer.com/press_releases/100106/index.htm

      When your body is bombarded by hormones it cannot handle/properly excrete, this leads to a build-up in your body (especially your uterus and breasts), which leads to growths like fibroids and cancer.

      Did you know that?

      I really encourage you not to get this pill or any pill that interferes with your body. You are so young; respect yourself. I know you must be scared because you are obviously in a situation that frightens you, but it's not going to make it better if you use this dangerous drug because it will mess up your cycle and only increase your worry about being pregnant, and then you will keep on using it again and again because you will think it's a sort of "magic" pill. You can't just run from the consequences of your actions, hurting yourself in the process; you've got to accept them. That's true responsibility.

      The logical conclusion from all of this is that you should not be having sex at all, because you are just not ready for the consequences. I think you probably know that in your heart. Pills like this make you think that babies are an interference in sex or an "accident," when the reality is that sex is there to make them.

      You've been fed so many lies by society about your body/sexuality/fertility that you must not know what to truly think, but the truth is simple: respect your body, respect your sexuality, respect your fertility. Your ability to conceive is a great, beautiful gift. Any interference with that causes so many problems in your whole body. If you are not ready for babies, which you clearly aren't, then you have to respect the creative power of sex by not getting involved in it yet. It's good to wait; it's worth it. You can start all over again. Remove this stress from your life and just be 16 years old; sex can wait and it will always be there once you've found the man who loves you enough to marry you before asking for your body.

      That's another very important part of sex: total self-giving and receiving all of another person. If you use birth control, you can't experience this kind of love, and you don't give everything--you withhold. Fear and control do not belong in a healthy relationship, but when you're having sex before the commitment of marriage, you are going to fall into that pattern of fear and control like you already are.

      You can change that. It will be a hard decision, but it can be made. Instead of getting a harmful drug and then returning to the same lifestyle, do something brave and decide, instead, to make a change, today, in your life. Think of your future; think of your future spouse, your future kids. Keep them in mind as your goal. Do you want to continue with school? That is a good goal, too. Focus on these things instead of sex right now, because your duty in life at this age is to discover who you are, and you can't do that with sex blinding you and keeping you from focusing on the truly important areas of your life at 16. Sex is wonderful and beautiful and good, but only within marriage because only then can you truly give of yourself, be truly free, and accept the gift of life wholeheartedly. Please think about this. This is a great site for teens http://www.chastity.com/node/21 and I encourage you to look.

      SHOULD you end up pregnant, there is free help for moms in need. Someone will help you financially and emotionally every step of the way so you and your child can have a good start together:

      http://www.birthright.org/htmpages/locate.htm
      http://www.standupgirl.com/index.php?option=com_weblinks&view=category&id=72&Itemid=23

  20. QUESTION:
    Can stress cause a woman to have unusual vaginal bleeding?
    A friend of mine told me that she suddenly stood up and felt a "gush." She said she bled for two hours straight. Then nothing. She has been unusually stressed out lately, not getting enough sleep, has had some soreness in her shoulder due to her muscles being all tensed up (for about a month now). Her doctors do not think that this is something to worry about; they thought maybe she was having an unusually strong period. But she got her regular period 4 days later.

    • ANSWER:
      Abnormal vaginal bleeding
      What is abnormal vaginal bleeding?

      The usual cause of vaginal bleeding is menstruation (the monthly period). However, any vaginal bleeding that is not normal menstrual bleeding or mid- cycle spotting (which often occurs during the first few months of taking the oral contraceptive pill) may be abnormal and must be investigated. This is because it may be a sign of a problem within the vagina, uterus (womb) or ovaries. This includes irregular or excessively heavy menstrual bleeding, and any vaginal bleeding in a woman who has passed the menopause.

      In teenage girls, the first few periods can be irregular and of varying degrees of heaviness, and this is not abnormal. Around the time of the menopause, menstrual bleeding often becomes irregular, and again this is not abnormal.

      HRT (hormone replacement therapy) may also cause harmless bleeding in postmenopausal women who have stopped having periods.

      What causes abnormal vaginal bleeding and who is at risk? Abnormal vaginal bleeding may occur between the normal menstrual bleeds (intermenstrual bleeding) or it may take the form of unusually heavy menstrual bleeding (menorrhagia). In postmenopausal women, it may develop after a number of years without any vaginal bleeding. It can be caused by a number of things, including:

      hormone imbalances,
      injury to the vagina or vulva,
      sexual abuse,
      infection in the uterus,
      polyps and fibroids (benign growths) in the uterus,
      cancer of the cervix,
      cancer of the uterus,
      some cancers of the ovaries,
      complications of an early (possibly
      unknown) pregnancy, for example,
      ectopic pregnancy or threatened miscarriage.
      Hormonal imbalances are by far the most common cause, and the problem usually occurs during the reproductive years.

  21. QUESTION:
    what does it mean for the endometrium to be heterogeneous?
    I had a pelvic ultrasound yesterday, and the results said "the endometrium is heterogeneous however a discrete mass is not present"

    What does this mean?

    • ANSWER:
      Heterogenous uterus' is a description used to describe the appearance of the uterus after an ultrasound exam is done. All that this means is that the ultrasound appearance of the uterus is not totally uniform. The two most common causes of heterogenous uterus are uterine fibroids, which are benign muscular growths in the uterine wall, and adenomyosis, which is a proliferation of the normal uterine glands into the muscular wall of the uterus. These conditions are very common, affecting up to maybe 50% of women by middle age. They generally cause no symptoms but they can cause abdominal pain and heavy bleeding and cramping with menstruation. Mild to moderate cases of either fibroids or adenomyosis probably do not have any pronounced effect on the ability of a women to have a baby. As always the diagnosis and the management of your girlfriend's particular condition is best done by the doctor who is following her condition already. Setting up an office visit to discuss an concerns with her OB / GYN doctor is advised.

  22. QUESTION:
    How long can I expect my period to be delayed after HSG?
    I had an HSG on April 8th. I am now 17 days late for my period. I took a cheap pregnancy test it was neg. I did an hcg and it was negative. According to ovulation kit I did ovulate at the correct time. When can I expect my period?

    • ANSWER:
      After the test
      After the test, some of the dye will leak out of the vagina. You also may have some vaginal bleeding for several days after the test. Call your doctor immediately if you have:

      Heavy vaginal bleeding (soak more than one tampon or pad in one hour).
      A fever.
      Severe belly pain.
      Vaginal bleeding that lasts for more than 3 to 4 days.
      Results
      A hysterosalpingogram (HSG) is an X-ray test that looks at the inside of the uterus and fallopian tubes and the area around them.

      Hysterosalpingogram Normal:
      The shape of the uterus and fallopian tubes are normal. The fallopian tubes are not scarred or damaged. The dye flows freely from the uterus, through the fallopian tubes, and spills normally into the belly.

      No objects (such as an intrauterine device, or IUD), tumors, or growths are seen in the uterus.

      Abnormal:
      Fallopian tubes may be scarred, malformed, or blocked so that the dye does not flow through the tubes and spill into the belly. Possible causes of blocked fallopian tubes include pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) or endometriosis.

      The dye may leak through the wall of the uterus, showing a tear or hole in the uterus.

      An abnormal uterus may show tissue (called a septum) that divides the uterus.

      Growths, such as polyps or fibroids, may be present.

      What Affects the Test
      Reasons you may not be able to have the test or why the results may not be helpful include:

      If your fallopian tube has a spasm. This may make a normal fallopian tube look blocked.
      If the doctor cannot put a catheter in the uterus.
      This test is not done on women who are having their period, are pregnant, or have a pelvic infection.

  23. QUESTION:
    What could post coital bleeding be caused by?
    I have had postcoital bleeding a few times in the last month, I am currently trying to concieve and am worried about this. A pap smear revealed no abnormal cells on my cervix, the only thing the doctor said was that my cervix looked inflamed and bled after the smear. I dont have an appointment with the gyno until November so was wondering if any of you out there had anything like this and what did it turn out to be?

    • ANSWER:
      # Cervical dysplasia: Cervical dysplasia is precancerous changes of the epithelial cells that line the cervix. Risk increases with multiple sexual partners, sex before age 18, childbirth before age 16, or a past history of STDs. Treatment is usually cryosurgery or conisation.

      # Chlamydia: A bacterial infection that is usually transmitted through sexual activity or contact with semen, vaginal fluid, or blood.

      # Gonorrhea: A usually sexually transmitted disease caused by a bacteria.# Several pharmaceutical treatments are available.

      # Vaginitis or Cervicitis: Inflammation or swelling and infection of the vagina or cervix. Treatment depends on the cause.

      # Cervical polyps: Cervical polyps are smooth, red or purple, finger-like growths that grow out of the mucuos layer of the cervix or the cervical canal. Cervical polyps are extremely fragile, extending out of the cervix, and easily and painlessly removed.

      # Trichomoniasis: A usually sexually transmitted disease caused by protozoan. Can also be passed to newborns during vaginal birth by infected mothers. Although rare, transmission is also possible in tap water, hot tubs, urine, on toilet seats, and in swimming pools. May cause vaginitis.

      # Vaginal Yeast Infection: An overgrowth of the normal fungi that inhabits the vaginal area. Common symptoms include itching, burning, and an odorless, white, cheese-like discharge.

      # Endometritis or adenomyosis: Endometritis is defined by Dorland's Medical Dictionary, 27th Edition as an inflammation of the endometrium (the innermost layer of the uterus). Both conditions are associated with endometriosis. Adenomysis is when endometrial tissue attaches itself to the uterus, or another organ such as the ovaries, and grows outside of the uterus.

      # Uterine polyps: Uterine polyps occur when the endometrium overgrows causing these protrusions into the uterus. It is extremely rare for these growths to grow in a way that is either benign or malignant. Women with uterine polyps frequently experience bleeding between periods (metrorrhagia), other symptoms includes vaginal bleeding after sex, spotting, menorrhagia, bleeding after menopause, and breakthrough bleeding during hormone therapy. Hysteroscopic-guided curettage is the prefered treatment, since the normal D&C is basically an unguided procedure that may miss many of the uterine polyps.

      # Fibroid tumors: Uterine fibroid tumors are usually benign tumors. They are solid masses made of fibrous tissue. Fibroid tumors are rarely malignant. Symptoms of fibroid tumors vary among women, with some women never experiencing any symptoms at all. Women who can wait until menopause will see their fibroids shrink and disappear once their bodies stop producing estrogen. It's important that women with fibroids make sure they never take estrogen, in any form including birth control pills, since estrogen increases fibroid growth. Several treatments are currently available for uterine fibroid tumors from myomectomy and uterine artery embolization to the traditional hysterectomy.

  24. QUESTION:
    What could be the cause of my period being so heavy?
    Well last month, my period was 4-5 days late. Then this month it's back on schedule, but it's a lot heavier than usual. Normally I can wear a regular tampon for 4 hours before it's full, today I had to change it every 1.5-2 hours. What could be the cause of this? And should I be worried? (by the way, I am sexually active.)

    • ANSWER:
      Hi... there are numerous reasons but as it's only happened once I really wouldn't worry about it. The following info I found could probably frighten the life out of you ! and I don't imagine any of it applies to you.

      Hope your ok.

      Some examples of abnormal bleeding include:

      CausesA change in hormone levels is a common cause of abnormal menstrual bleeding. This is called dysfunctional uterine bleeding.

      Other causes of abnormal menstrual bleeding include:

      •Endometrial hyperplasia (thickening/build-up of the lining of the uterus)
      •Cancer of the uterus
      •Uterine fibroids, uterine polyps (small noncancerous growths in the lining of the uterus), adenomyosis
      •Medical conditions such as thyroid and pituitary disorders, diabetes, cirrhosis of the liver, and systemic lupus erythematosus
      •Pregnancy complications -- such as miscarriage or ectopic pregnancy (when a fertilized egg implants somewhere other than the uterus)
      •Changes in birth control pills or estrogens that you take
      •Use of certain drugs such as steroids or blood thinners (for example, warfarin or Coumadin)
      •Use of an intrauterine device (IUD) for birth control
      •Recent trauma, surgery, or other uterine procedure
      •Infection in the uterus (pelvic inflammatory disease)
      •Bleeding disorders such as Von Willebrand disease
      •Polycystic ovary syndrome
      •Stress, change in diet or exercise routine, recent weight loss or weight gain, travel, or illness

  25. QUESTION:
    Transvaginal Ultrasound : Can I Please have a detailed description of the Procedure?
    I have to get a pelvic ultrasound, but I also have the option of a transvaginal ultrasound. I know the basics, they insert something in the vagina and take pictures, but I'd like to know details from start to finish. Does it hurt? Do they go past the cervix? How far do they go? Is it really better than a pelvic ultrasound?
    Also is it more or less painful than a catheter?

    • ANSWER:
      You will lie down on a table with your knees bent and feet in holders called stirrups. The health care provider will place a probe, called a transducer, into the vagina. The probe is covered with a condom and a gel. The probe sends out sound waves, which reflect off body structures. A computer receives these waves and uses them to create a picture. The doctor can immediately see the picture on a nearby TV monitor.

      The health care provider will move the probe within the area to see the pelvic organs. This test can be used during pregnancy.

      In some cases, a special transvaginal ultrasound method called saline infusion sonography (SIS), also called sonohysterography or hysterosonography, may be needed to more clearly view the uterus.

      This test requires saline (sterile salt water) to be placed into the uterus before the ultrasound. The saline helps outline any abnormal masses, so the doctor can get a better idea of their size.

      SIS is not done on pregnant women.

      How to Prepare for the Test Return to top

      You will be asked to undress, usually from the waist down. A transvaginal ultrasound is done with your bladder empty.

      How the Test Will Feel Return to top

      The test is usually painless, although some women may have mild discomfort from the pressure of the probe. Only a small part of the probe is placed into the vagina.

      Why the Test is Performed Return to top

      Transvaginal ultrasound can help diagnose the cause of certain types of infertility, pelvic pain, abnormal bleeding, and menstrual problems. It can show the lining of the uterus (endometrium). The test may reveal:

      Ovarian cysts
      Ovarian tumors
      Pelvic infection
      Uterine fibroids
      Transvaginal ultrasound is also used during pregnancy to monitor the growth of the fetus, listen to the unborn baby's heart beat, and to check for ectopic pregnancy and other potential problems.

      Normal Results Return to top

      The pelvic structures or fetus are normal.

      What Abnormal Results Mean Return to top

      An abnormal result may be due to many conditions. Some problems that may be seen include:

      Cancers of the uterus, ovaries, vagina, and other pelvic structures
      Non-cancerous growths of the uterus and ovaries (such as cysts or fibroids)
      Twisting of the ovaries
      Infection, including pelvic inflammatory disease
      Birth defects
      Some problems that may be found specifically in pregnant women include:

      Ectopic pregnancy
      More than one fetus (twins, triplets, etc.)
      Miscarriage
      Placenta previa
      Placental abruption
      Tumors of pregnancy including gestational trophoblastic disease
      Risks Return to top

      There are no known harmful effects of transvaginal ultrasound on humans.

      Unlike traditional x-rays, there is no radiation exposure with this test.

  26. QUESTION:
    What should I do about my overextended period?
    I'm 16 and have an irregular period. I've been on this one for roughly 2 months. what can I do about this and what could it mean?

    • ANSWER:
      A change in hormone levels is a common cause of abnormal menstrual bleeding. This is called dysfunctional uterine bleeding.

      Other causes of abnormal menstrual bleeding include:

      * Endometrial hyperplasia (thickening/build-up of the lining of the uterus)
      * Cancer of the uterus
      * Uterine fibroids, uterine polyps (small noncancerous growths in the lining of the uterus), adenomyosis
      * Medical conditions such as thyroid and pituitary disorders, diabetes, cirrhosis of the liver, and systemic lupus erythematosus
      * Pregnancy complications -- such as miscarriage or ectopic pregnancy (when a fertilized egg implants somewhere other than the uterus)
      * Changes in birth control pills or estrogens that you take
      * Use of certain drugs such as steroids or blood thinners (for example, warfarin or Coumadin)
      * Use of an intrauterine device (IUD) for birth control
      * Recent trauma, surgery, or other uterine procedure
      * Infection in the uterus (pelvic inflammatory disease)
      * Bleeding disorders such as Von Willebrand disease
      * Polycystic ovary syndrome
      * Stress, change in diet or exercise routine, recent weight loss or weight gain, travel, or illness

  27. QUESTION:
    How do you manage for preventing Vaginal Bleeding or spotting during pregnancy at different stages?

    • ANSWER:
      Cervical dysplasia:Cervical dysplasia is precancerous changes of the epithelial cells that line the cervix. Risk increases with multiple sexual partners, sex before age 18, childbirth before age 16, or a past history of STDs. Treatment is usually cryosurgery or conisation.

      Chlamydia: A bacterial infection that is usually transmitted through sexual activity or contact with semen, vaginal fluid, or blood.

      Gonorrhea: A usually sexually transmitted disease caused by a bacteria. Several pharmaceutical treatments are available.

      Vaginitis or Cervicitis: Inflammation or swelling and infection of the vagina or cervix. Treatment depends on the cause.

      Cervical polyps: Cervical polyps are smooth, red or purple, finger-like growths that grow out of the mucus layer of the cervix or the cervical canal. Cervical polyps are extremely fragile, extending out of the cervix, and easily and painlessly removed.

      Trichomoniasis: A usually sexually transmitted disease caused by protozoan. Can also be passed to newborns during vaginal birth by infected mothers. Although rare, transmission is also possible in tap water, hot tubs, urine, on toilet seats, and in swimming pools. May cause vaginitis.

      Vaginal yeast infection: An overgrowth of the normal fungi that inhabits the vaginal area. Common symptoms include itching, burning, and an odorless, white, cheese-like discharge.

      Endometritis or adenomyosis: Endometritis is defined by Dorland's Medical Dictionary, 27th Edition as an inflammation of the endometrium (the innermost layer of the uterus). Both conditions are associated with endometriosis. Adenomysis is when endometrial tissue attaches itself to the uterus, or another organ such as the ovaries, and grows outside of the uterus.

      Uterine polyps: Uterine polyps occur when the endometrium overgrows causing these protrusions into the uterus. It is extremely rare for these growths to grow in a way that is either benign or malignant. Women with uterine polyps frequently experience bleeding between periods (metrorrhagia), other symptoms includes vaginal bleeding after sex, spotting, menorrhagia, bleeding after menopause, and breakthrough bleeding during hormone therapy. Hysteroscopic-guided curettage is the preferred treatment, since the normal D&C is basically an unguided procedure that may miss many of the uterine polyps.

      Fibroid tumors: Uterine fibroid tumors are usually benign tumors. They are solid masses made of fibrous tissue. Fibroid tumors are rarely malignant. Symptoms of fibroid tumors vary among women, with some women never experiencing any symptoms at all. Women who can wait until menopause will see their fibroids shrink and disappear once their bodies stop producing estrogen. It's important that women with fibroids make sure they never take estrogen, in any form including birth control pills, since estrogen increases fibroid growth. Several treatments are currently available for uterine fibroid tumors from myomectomy and uterine artery embolization to the traditional hysterectomy.

      Diagnosing vaginal bleeding after sex is usually a matter of exclusion. Anytime you experience post-coital bleeding or vaginal bleeding after sex see your physician.
      New posts to the Women's Health forums:

  28. QUESTION:
    Is it bad to get little blood clots while on your period?
    I'm not currently on my period but have always wondered this... When my flow is heavy, I get little clots on the tissue when I wip. And sometimes larger ones. I also get really bad cramps every other period and some I just feel really tired. Is this bad?

    • ANSWER:
      It seems completely normal. You will have issues for the first 3 years of your cycle as your body goes through changes.

      It's normal for a girl's period to be heavier on some days than others. But signs of menorrhagia (excessively heavy or long periods) can include soaking through at least one sanitary napkin (pad) an hour for several hours in a row or periods that last longer than 7 days. Girls with menorrhagia sometimes stay home from school or social functions because they're worried they won't be able to control the bleeding in public.

      The most frequent cause of menorrhagia is an imbalance between the levels of estrogen and progesterone in the body, which allows the endometrium (the lining of the uterus) to keep building up. When the endometrium is finally shed during menstruation, the resulting bleeding is particularly heavy.

      Because many adolescents have slight hormone imbalances during puberty, menorrhagia isn't uncommon in teens. But in some cases, heavy menstrual bleeding can be caused by problems such as:

      Fibroids (benign growths) or polyps in the uterus
      Thyroid conditions
      Clotting disorders
      Inflammation or infection in the vagina or cervix

      http://kidshealth.org/parent/growth/grow…

  29. QUESTION:
    What to do with a really heavy period?
    I have heavy and kind of irregular periods and really don't know what to do? (Im only 15) I don't ever get cramps or pains from periods. But they are really heavy and during my 90 minute classes at school they completely soak through a pad and sometimes my pants. I haven't talked to my mom yet because she gets really uncomfortable and hates to talk about things like that. Also my family is kind of weird and will only go to the doctor if its a real emergency. So I really don't know if its normal or what I should do? Please help! Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Heavy periods are defined by a flow that requires the highest absorbency tampon or pad that must be changed sooner than recommended—usually within an hour.The reasons women have heavy periods include:
      •The natural flow is just heavy
      •Use of the birth control method called an IUD (intra-uterine device)
      •"Hormonal imbalance" (too little or no progesterone)
      •Fibroids or polyps (growths that sometimes occur in the uterus)
      •Thyroid problems (the thyroid is a gland in the neck that helps control many body functions)
      •Endometriosis—a condition in which cells from the lining of the uterus travel and grow in other parts of the body
      •Cigarette smoking
      •Childbirth (Many women have heavy flow during the first year or so after childbirth.)
      Some of these conditions don't need to be treated. Others may require treatment.When to see a doctor about heavy periodsIf you have a normally heavy period, there is usually no need for concern. However, you should see a doctor if:
      •You feel tired all the time.
      •Very heavy periods may cause anemia, which is a deficiency of the red blood cells that carry oxygen around the body. If you feel physically drained, ask a doctor to check for anemia.
      •You experience "flooding" (leaking through a super absorbency pad or tampon within one hour). If your periods get heavy and change in consistency, you should see a doctor. If no medical reasons are found for heavy flow, the doctor may prescribe oral contraceptives, or use cyclical progesterone to regulate the periods.

  30. QUESTION:
    What are fibroids and what happens when you have them when pregnant?
    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroids are just a growth of muscle from the uterus wall. They are very, very common, and most women don't even know that they have them. They can vary greatly in size from less than 1cm to 30+cms. They can be found growing from the outside of the uterus, inside the lining of the uterus, or into the uterine cavity. Some grow on stalks and some are flush against the muscle of the uterus. There is no cure for fibroids. In some cases, they have to be removed through surgery (if there are many of them and if they are interfering with the woman's life), and sometimes they can be shrunk by taking birth control pills. In most cases, they shrink during menopause, when they are starved of hormones. In most cases, doctors prefer to leave them well alone, and they are mostly harmless and even if they are removed, they can grow back.

      Generally speaking, fibroids won't have an impact on pregnancy. They won't cause problems, unless they are positioned badly, eg: right under the placenta, near the cervix or near a fallopian tube, cause ectopic pregnancy. Sometimes the extra blood flow to the uterus and the extra hormones from pregnancy can cause them to grow, sometimes just a bit, and sometimes rapidly. If they are growing rapidly, your doctor might suggest keeping a close eye on them (through ultrasounds) to make sure they don't interfere with your pregnancy, or steal resources from the baby. If the fibroid is positioned badly, it may require the baby being induced early, or call for a scheduled C-Section. Sometimes a fibroid can grow too fast during pregnancy and eventually "die". While this is completely safe for the baby, it will cause quite a bit of pain for the mother, and might require a hospital stay while it continues to die.

      As you can see, there are a lot of "maybes" and "sometimes" with fibroids. Each woman's case is unique, and you will need to consult with your doctor to make sure that all is well and to figure out what your options are. I have a fibroid that is 10cms big (currently 30 w pregnant) and while it was a concern at the beginning of my pregnancy due to how fast it was growing, now I have been given the all clear by my doctors that it is harmless. I have been for a LOT of ultrasounds, though, over the course of this pregnancy, and I still have two more scheduled before I give birth to make sure everything is still fine.

      Hope that helps! Good luck!

  31. QUESTION:
    if you have a fibior tumor in the womb can you loose it in a discharge with blood can you explain it to me?
    I want to know if it is possible?

    • ANSWER:
      No. A fibroid is a growth on your uterus. They can be of any size and they are made up of the same muscle tissue as the uterus. They are benign tumors. Some do cause pain and bleeding depending on their location, but the fibroid itself does not get expelled. For example, if there is a fibroid in the cervical region or growing into the endometrium, then there could be some bleeding. Some can grow to extreme sizes and need to be surgically removed in a process called a myomectomy. Hope this answer helps!

  32. QUESTION:
    What are other cases of having a missed or a late period.?
    Insted of insisting that you are pregnant when you miss a period, is there any other occasions that may happen in result of missing your period or having it late?

    • ANSWER:
      Hello, I found an article on the internet in regards to irregular periods and their reasons for being late, early, heavy, abnormally long and heavy bleeding. I hope this helps you to answer a few of your questions. Take care.

      Hormonal Imbalance One of the prime reasons for periods to go irregular is hormonal imbalance. In a female's body, in order to produce a period, the body creates hormones such as estrogen and progesterone. Various parts of the body need to send signals to each other in order to trigger menstruation. However, due to hormonal imbalance, many a time, these signals are missed or skipped, thus, resulting in irregular periods.

      Sudden Weight Gain or Loss Have you gained or lost a lot of weight lately? If yes, you've got an answer. When your body works at a constant pace, the hormones learn to process in similar manner. However, the moment you start doing rigorous workout, or eat a lot, your body takes a while to adjust to it. Hence, hormones become imbalanced, and lead to irregularity in periods. However, this is not a tense situation as it happens with every woman who has lost or gained weight quickly.

      Stress Workload? Job issues? Relationship turmoil? Mental dissatisfaction? Reduce your stress, female, for it's affecting the regularity of your periods. Yes, stress contributes to the most common reasons for a late period. With increasing stress, you are affecting the hormonal balance of your body, and hence, not only do your periods become irregular, but they also result in excessive weight gain, and anxiety.

      Polycystic Ovarian Disease So, you aren't pregnant, but you're still worried. Well, if your pregnancy test result came out to be negative, get a check up done, for chances, even though very less, are that you are suffering from Polycystic Ovarian Disease which is caused due to irregular ovulation as a result of hormonal imbalance. With proper treatment, your gynecologist will help you get your periods back to regular. However,

      Medications
      The Mayo Clinic advises that certain medications and result in excess bleeding including anti-coagulants that prevent blood clots and anti-inflammatory medicines. Not only can these medications result in heavy bleeding but they can also prolong your bleeding. If you are improperly taking hormone medication, this can also result in menorrhagia

      Anovulation, Fibroids
      When a woman fails to ovulate, this is called Anovulation. You can have a menstrual period but not ovulate. When this happens, the hormones may become unbalanced, resulting in excess bleeding.

      Cervical polyps are small, fragile growths that begin in either the mucosal surface of the cervix, or the endocervical canal and protrude through the opening of the cervix.

      Endometrial polyps are typically non-cancerous, growths that protrude from the lining of the uterus.

      Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is an infection of one or more organs that affects the uterus, fallopian tubes, and cervix. PID is, most often, a sexually transmitted disease; however, it sometimes occurs following childbirth, abortion, or other gynecological procedures.

      Cervical cancer is a type of cancer that occurs when cells in the cervix become abnormal, multiply out of control, and damage healthy parts of the body. The human papillomavirus, or HPV, is the cause of over ninety percent of all cervical cancers.

      Endometrial cancer occurs when abnormal cells in the uterus or the endometrium (the lining of the uterus) multiply out of control and damage to the uterus and other organs. While the cause of endometrial cancer is unknown, it is known that women diagnosed with this type of cancer tend are usually over fifty.

      IUDs or intrauterine devices used for contraception are a potential cause of heavy menstrual bleeding or menorrhagia. Women who experience prolonged or heavy periods while using the IUD should have the device removed and choose an alternate method of birth control.

      Bleeding disorders occur when it is hard for a person to stop bleeding. While there are several types of bleeding disorders, the most common type in women is von Willebrand Disease or VWD.

      Source(s):
      http://www.buzzle.com/articles/reasons-f…
      http://womenshealth.about.com/od/abnorma…

  33. QUESTION:
    What does it mean when bleed during smear?
    Hiya
    I'm really worried as have been having irregular bursts of heavy bleeding and was referred for smear. During the smear i bled, I would rather the nurse not told me as the thought made it hurt more, she said this could be an indication of something. Can anyone please help me if have any idea what it could be.
    Thanks x

    • ANSWER:
      If the cervix itself bleeds during a smear, it usually indicates an infection of some sort. The cervix has a very rich blood supply, which is why it's so pink. Infection causes inflammation, and causes cells to be easily damaged and bleed.

      If the bleeding is from inside the uterus, and not the cervix, it may also indicate infection, or a growth such as uterine fibroids.

      The smear is just the easiest and quickest way to diagnose or rule out an infection. If the results are negative, you may be referred for an ultrasound scan, so the inside of the uterus can be viewed.

  34. QUESTION:
    What is the best home remedy for dysmenorrhea. I have PMS and often bloated and have loss of bowel movement.?
    It is commonly associated with severe abdominal pain and cramps and often relieved when i induce vomiting. There are times when i have loss of consciousness. Health experts, i hope you can enlighten me by an advice and best home remedy.

    • ANSWER:
      Dysmenorrhoea
      Period pains, or dysmenorrhoea, affect 40-70% of women of reproductive age.
      For about one in 10 women the discomfort and pain is bad enough to interfere with their daily lives.
      A certain amount of discomfort around the time of ovulation and menstruation is normal and it has been proposed that it is related to the movements of the womb and the hormones and chemicals that circulate around the body at that time of the month.
      However, sometimes dysmenorrhoea is a sign of an underlying disease.
      The pain typically occurs in the lower abdomen and/or pelvis and can radiate to the back and along the thighs, lasting somewhere between eight and 72 hours.
      It can occur before or during menstruation or both. Headaches, diarrhoea, nausea and vomiting may accompany it.
      When there is no underlying cause, simple analgesia with a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug such as ibuprofen might be all that is needed.
      Some women find that going on the combined oral contraceptive pill lessens the discomfort.
      Others have reported being helped by acupuncture, TENS therapy (a painless way of stimulating the nerves using pulsed energy) or a hot water bottle applied locally to the area of discomfort.
      If there is an underlying disease causing the dysmenorrhoea then this should be treated.
      Often there will be other symptoms too, such as heavy bleeding or pain or bleeding after intercourse.
      The most common diseases associated with dysmenorrhoea are endometriosis and fibroids.
      Endometriosis is a condition where the cells that make up the lining of the womb are also found in places other than the womb.
      With each menstruation, this tissue outside of the womb responds to the same hormones that control periods and therefore builds up and breaks down and bleeds in the same way as the womb lining.
      This can lead to inflammation and pain. Endometriosis can be treated with hormones or surgery to shrink or remove the problematic tissue.
      Fibroids are non-cancerous or benign growths in the uterus.
      A fifth of women develop them in their lifetime. They can be very small or as big as a melon.
      Some cause no problems while others cause significant pain and heavy periods.
      Treatment options include hormonal therapy and surgery.
      Other less common causes of dysmenorrhoea are previous pelvic surgery and a pelvic infection.
      Premenstrual syndrome (PMS)
      Many women experience physical and mood changes around the time of their period, but for some it can be a particularly difficult time.
      There are more than 150 symptoms associated with premenstrual syndrome (PMS), but the common ones include low mood and irritability, breast tenderness and bloating.
      Typically PMS symptoms appear before in the days before period and cease once menstruation begins.
      It is not known what causes PMS but hormonal changes are thought to be involved. PMS severity often increases around hormonal surges, such as puberty and pregnancy.
      Women aged 30-45 often experience the most severe PMS.
      Treatments are available to ease the symptoms. These include hormonal contraceptives and more potent hormonal drugs.
      Some may prefer to try non-hormonal alternatives such as vitamin B6 and evening primrose oil.

  35. QUESTION:
    I had the Novasure procedure several years ago, why am I bleeding after sex?
    I haven't been sexually active for long time. I recently started having sex again, however, I sometimes start bleeding after sex. Today it is a little bit heavier, but it's usually quite light. Is this because the lining was burned out by the Novasure and it is thin? Is it from just not having sex? I know that I can become pregnant, but I am 47, very overweight, and had the Novasure. Do you think I can still get pregnant? Has anyone became pregnant after Novasure?

    • ANSWER:
      OMG girls are always bleeding, anyways to answer your question these are the top 10 reasons for vaginal bleeding
      # Cervical dysplasia:Cervical dysplasia is precancerous changes of the epithelial cells that line the cervix. Risk increases with multiple sexual partners, sex before age 18, childbirth before age 16, or a past history of STDs. Treatment is usually cryosurgery or conisation.

      # Chlamydia: A bacterial infection that is usually transmitted through sexual activity or contact with semen, vaginal fluid, or blood.

      # Gonorrhea: A usually sexually transmitted disease caused by a bacteria. Several pharmaceutical treatments are available.

      # Vaginitis or Cervicitis: Inflammation or swelling and infection of the vagina or cervix. Treatment depends on the cause.

      # Cervical polyps: Cervical polyps are smooth, red or purple, finger-like growths that grow out of the mucus layer of the cervix or the cervical canal. Cervical polyps are extremely fragile, extending out of the cervix, and easily and painlessly removed.

      # Trichomoniasis: A usually sexually transmitted disease caused by protozoan. Can also be passed to newborns during vaginal birth by infected mothers. Although rare, transmission is also possible in tap water, hot tubs, urine, on toilet seats, and in swimming pools. May cause vaginitis.

      # Vaginal yeast infection: An overgrowth of the normal fungi that inhabits the vaginal area. Common symptoms include itching, burning, and an odorless, white, cheese-like discharge.

      # Endometritis or adenomyosis: Endometritis is defined by Dorland's Medical Dictionary, 27th Edition as an inflammation of the endometrium (the innermost layer of the uterus). Both conditions are associated with endometriosis. Adenomysis is when endometrial tissue attaches itself to the uterus, or another organ such as the ovaries, and grows outside of the uterus.

      # Uterine polyps: Uterine polyps occur when the endometrium overgrows causing these protrusions into the uterus. It is extremely rare for these growths to grow in a way that is either benign or malignant. Women with uterine polyps frequently experience bleeding between periods (metrorrhagia), other symptoms includes vaginal bleeding after sex, spotting, menorrhagia, bleeding after menopause, and breakthrough bleeding during hormone therapy. Hysteroscopic-guided curettage is the preferred treatment, since the normal D&C is basically an unguided procedure that may miss many of the uterine polyps.

      # Fibroid tumors: Uterine fibroid tumors are usually benign tumors. They are solid masses made of fibrous tissue. Fibroid tumors are rarely malignant. Symptoms of fibroid tumors vary among women, with some women never experiencing any symptoms at all. Women who can wait until menopause will see their fibroids shrink and disappear once their bodies stop producing estrogen. It's important that women with fibroids make sure they never take estrogen, in any form including birth control pills, since estrogen increases fibroid growth. Several treatments are currently available for uterine fibroid tumors from myomectomy and uterine artery embolization to the traditional hysterectomy.

      http://www.novasure.com/irregular-period/novasure-procedure.cfm

  36. QUESTION:
    Why does my period start so heavy?
    Im 14 years old and started my period about 1 year ago. i get heavy periods that last about 7 or 8 days. i started my period yesterday afternoon and this afternoon i had 2 wear 2 maxi long pads coz im scared i'll leak and my period was so heavy. by the last few days it normally gets a tiny bit lighter but its horrible!!!! and i dont use tampos yet. why is this happening?

    • ANSWER:
      Hello, here is an article I found on a great teen web site that explains teen periods and the reasons for them to be irregular. I hope this information helps to answer a few of your questions. Take care.

      It can take 2 to 3 years from a girl's first period for her body to develop a regular cycle. During that time, the body is essentially adjusting to the influx of hormones unleashed by puberty. And what's "regular" varies from person to person. The typical cycle of an adult female is 28 days, although some are as short as 21 days and others are as long as 35.

      Changing hormone levels might make a girl's period last a short time during one month (just a few days) and a long time the next (up to a week). She may skip months, get two periods almost right after each other, or alternate between heavy and light bleeding from one month to another.

      It's normal for a girl's period to be heavier on some days than others. But signs of menorrhagia (excessively heavy or long periods) can include soaking through at least one sanitary napkin (pad) an hour for several hours in a row or periods that last longer than 7 days. Girls with menorrhagia sometimes stay home from school or social functions because they're worried they won't be able to control the bleeding in public.

      The most frequent cause of menorrhagia is an imbalance between the levels of estrogen and progesterone in the body, which allows the endometrium (the lining of the uterus) to keep building up. When the endometrium is finally shed during menstruation, the resulting bleeding is particularly heavy.

      Because many adolescents have slight hormone imbalances during puberty, menorrhagia isn't uncommon in teens. But in some cases, heavy menstrual bleeding can be caused by problems such as:

      Fibroids (benign growths) or polyps in the uterus
      Thyroid conditions
      Clotting disorders
      Inflammation or infection in the vagina or cervix

      http://kidshealth.org/parent/growth/growing/menstrual_problems.html#

  37. QUESTION:
    Why is it irrigular and will it stop being irrigular soon?
    I had my period for about 1 year and a half. It came in the middle of feburay and then 6 weeks later, but this week is when im supposed to get it and it hasn't come. I don't want it to come in the middle of may because i have this trip i gotta go on. also before febuary it came like a month before and before that it came like 2 months before, why is it irregular?

    • ANSWER:
      Hello, here is an article I found on a great teen web site that explains teen periods and the reasons for them to be irregular. I hope this information helps to answer a few of your questions. Take care.

      It can take 2 to 3 years from a girl's first period for her body to develop a regular cycle. During that time, the body is essentially adjusting to the influx of hormones unleashed by puberty. And what's "regular" varies from person to person. The typical cycle of an adult female is 28 days, although some are as short as 21 days and others are as long as 35.

      Changing hormone levels might make a girl's period last a short time during one month (just a few days) and a long time the next (up to a week). She may skip months, get two periods almost right after each other, or alternate between heavy and light bleeding from one month to another.

      It's normal for a girl's period to be heavier on some days than others. But signs of menorrhagia (excessively heavy or long periods) can include soaking through at least one sanitary napkin (pad) an hour for several hours in a row or periods that last longer than 7 days. Girls with menorrhagia sometimes stay home from school or social functions because they're worried they won't be able to control the bleeding in public.

      The most frequent cause of menorrhagia is an imbalance between the levels of estrogen and progesterone in the body, which allows the endometrium (the lining of the uterus) to keep building up. When the endometrium is finally shed during menstruation, the resulting bleeding is particularly heavy.

      Because many adolescents have slight hormone imbalances during puberty, menorrhagia isn't uncommon in teens. But in some cases, heavy menstrual bleeding can be caused by problems such as:

      Fibroids (benign growths) or polyps in the uterus
      Thyroid conditions
      Clotting disorders
      Inflammation or infection in the vagina or cervix

      http://kidshealth.org/parent/growth/grow…

  38. QUESTION:
    What would cause an enlarged uterus?
    I went to my gynecologist today and she said my uterus feels enlarged. What could this mean? She scheduled an ultrasound for next week to see what is causing this and my irregular periods.

    I'm 25 and not pregnant. What could cause an enlarged uterus?

    • ANSWER:
      The most common cause of an enlarged uterus is fibroids. These are benign growths either in the uterus or on the outer wall of the uterus. Fibroids can cause irregular bleeding.

      You can do a search on fibroids or myomata or leiomyomata...these are all different terms for the same thing.

  39. QUESTION:
    I had just finished my period a week ago and all of a sudden i start bleeding,again?
    I had my period a week and a half ago after i had my period yes i did have sex so yesturday i went to restroom and a lil bit blood it was light and so today i woke up to,use the restroom and i wiped my self and it was blood what could of happen?

    • ANSWER:
      Hello, here is an article I found on a great teen web site that explains teen periods and the reasons for them to be irregular. I hope this information helps to answer a few of your questions. Take care.

      It can take 2 to 3 years from a girl's first period for her body to develop a regular cycle. During that time, the body is essentially adjusting to the influx of hormones unleashed by puberty. And what's "regular" varies from person to person. The typical cycle of an adult female is 28 days, although some are as short as 21 days and others are as long as 35.

      Changing hormone levels might make a girl's period last a short time during one month (just a few days) and a long time the next (up to a week). She may skip months, get two periods almost right after each other, or alternate between heavy and light bleeding from one month to another.

      It's normal for a girl's period to be heavier on some days than others. But signs of menorrhagia (excessively heavy or long periods) can include soaking through at least one sanitary napkin (pad) an hour for several hours in a row or periods that last longer than 7 days. Girls with menorrhagia sometimes stay home from school or social functions because they're worried they won't be able to control the bleeding in public.

      The most frequent cause of menorrhagia is an imbalance between the levels of estrogen and progesterone in the body, which allows the endometrium (the lining of the uterus) to keep building up. When the endometrium is finally shed during menstruation, the resulting bleeding is particularly heavy.

      Because many adolescents have slight hormone imbalances during puberty, menorrhagia isn't uncommon in teens. But in some cases, heavy menstrual bleeding can be caused by problems such as:

      Fibroids (benign growths) or polyps in the uterus
      Thyroid conditions
      Clotting disorders
      Inflammation or infection in the vagina or cervix

      http://kidshealth.org/parent/growth/grow…

  40. QUESTION:
    Left Ovary cannot be seen in an ultra sound?
    Why could that be?
    A number of fibroids exist in my mothers uterus and possibly a pulp.
    One of the fibroids exist in the submocosal location? Im not enitrely sure what this means but I believe its growth is causing the heavy menstrual bleeding of my mother and it does need to be operated on, cant anyone help me?

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroids are NOT cancer. I've had many fibroids resulting from a disease called endometriosis,. If your mother has massive fibroids, they can and will cause a lot of pain. They don't belong there. This is what happens. I hope her Dr is going to do something about it. At first, I refused because I was only 35. That didn't work. My endometriosis got so bad, I passed out from hemorrhage. Then I woke up in the hospital with a complete hysterectomy because the Dr told my husband he should sign the release form since I was unable. My husband did because he thought I was going to die. No, I knew differently. I only wish the Dr hadn't gone so drastically. Oh well, So don't worry, fibroids are never cancer, it's only thick excessive tissue growth. And yes, it hurts. I hope your mom feels better. Make sure she gets another opinion, That is so very important.

  41. QUESTION:
    Should I be seeing a doctor for my periods?
    I started my period when I was young, (around 12), and they have always been heavy. I always try to change regularly, which amounts to every 30 minutes to an hour because I go so heavy. Just now it was so bad that it had went through my shorts and was dripping down my leg. I tell my parents I think I need to see a doctor, because I don't think I should be going this heavy. I'm only 16!

    • ANSWER:
      Hello Brea,

      Experiencing a heavy flow during your period once in a while can be considered normal. However, if this continues on a regular basis, then it could be a matter of concern. If the flow during your period has been heavy for quite some time now, do not take it lightly. Your body may be trying to tell you something. This Buzzle article will help you identify this gynecological problem better and find some possible solutions for it.

      Why it Happens

      •Hormones: Generally, a woman nearing menopause or a young girl may experience heavy bleeding at least once within the first year of getting her period. This is a normal situation resulting from hormonal changes, but should be monitored closely because if either loses too much blood, it may lead to other complications.
      •Uterine Fibroids: Some women may develop uterine fibroids as a result of the excessive or quick production of estrogen in the body. It is important to note that a fibroid tumor is benign and non cancerous. However, it can lead to bleeding more than usual which causes much discomfort. Since it is caused due to estrogen, the tumor develops quickly during menstruation and pregnancy when estrogen is produced more.
      •Lochia: It is natural to experience excess bleeding after pregnancy. This bleeding after a normal delivery or a c-section is termed as Lochia. It is the body's way of discharging any excess fluids like mucus or placental tissue that remains inside you before childbirth. It begins almost immediately after delivery and lasts for about 6 weeks.
      •Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID): PID is caused due to an infection in the uterine lining, the ovaries or the fallopian tubes. The causes of PID can be unprotected sex, surgical procedures like abortion or cesarean delivery, etc. This is a very serious problem and many sexually active teens are falling prey to PID without realizing its dangers.
      •Polyps: Uterine polyps are small in growths on the lining of the uterus. Polyps are generally caused by hormonal changes in a woman's body. Women in their late 20s to mid 40s have a greater tendency of experiencing polyps in the uterus, which is also a cause of heavy blood flow during one's period.
      •Medications: Some women may experience heavy flow while on birth control pills or medication for some other ailment. Other medications for inflammations may also cause heavy and continuous flow for quite some time. Hence, women must take care of what medications they're taking and take them only if prescribed.

      Most Common Symptoms Experienced

      The amount of blood flow experienced even during a heavy period varies from woman to woman. So, it is necessary to know what exactly are the symptoms of heavy flow so that you can identify if you indeed are bleeding in excess.

      •Generally, a discharge of more than 80 ml of blood from the body during a single period (that is the 5 day period) is considered heavy.
      •Another symptom is when you experience a period that lasts more than the usual duration of a period. For instance, a normal period lasts for 4 to 5 days. If you are bleeding for a continuous period of more than 10 days, then it is advisable to consult a doctor.
      •If you feel the need to keep changing your tampon or your sanitary napkin almost an hourly rate, then it is a sign that you're bleeding more than normal. Also, make sure that you change your protection at least twice a day to prevent any possible infection.
      •Some women also happen to discharge blood clots along with blood during their period.
      •Are your clothes getting stained more often during your period lately? It could be after a night's sleep or after a long day of sitting in one position. Sometimes, you may not realize it, but this too could be a sign
      •Heavy bleeding, in some cases, is also accompanied by severe abdominal cramps. In such a situation, you may also begin to feel dizzy and weak. This happens due to the excess blood loss from your body.

      If you experience all or even a combination of a couple of these symptoms, make sure you visit a medical professional who can diagnose you with the appropriate condition and provide expert advice.

  42. QUESTION:
    how can uncontrollable uterine bleed lead to death in pregnancy?
    what gets affected?
    how does it happen?
    can it be prevented?

    • ANSWER:
      Many different things can cause abnormal uterine bleeding. Pregnancy is a common cause. Polyps or fibroids (small and large growths) in the uterus can also cause bleeding. Rarely, a thyroid problem, infection of the cervix or cancer of the uterus can cause abnormal uterine bleeding. 


      In most women, abnormal uterine bleeding is caused by a hormone imbalance. When hormones are the problem, doctors call the problem dysfunctional uterine bleeding, or DUB. Abnormal bleeding caused by hormone imbalance is more common in teenagers or in women who are approaching menopause.

      These are just a few of the problems that can cause abnormal uterine bleeding. These problems can occur at any age, but the likely cause of abnormal uterine bleeding usually depends on your age.

      Women in their teens, 20s and 30s

      A common cause of abnormal bleeding in young women and teenagers is pregnancy. Many women have abnormal bleeding in the first few months of a normal pregnancy. Some birth control pills or the intrauterine device can also cause abnormal bleeding.

      Some young women who have abnormal uterine bleeding do not release an egg from their ovaries (called ovulation) during their menstrual cycle. This is common for teenagers who have just started getting their periods. This causes a hormone imbalance where the estrogen in your body makes the lining of your uterus (called the endometrium) grow until it gets too thick. When your body gets rid of this lining during your period, the bleeding will be very heavy. A hormone imbalance may also cause your body not to know when to shed the lining. This can cause irregular bleeding (“spotting”) between your periods.The tests your doctor orders may depend on your age. If you could be pregnant, your doctor may order a pregnancy test. If your bleeding is heavy, in addition to other tests, your doctor may want to check your blood count to make sure you don't have anemia (low iron) from the blood loss.

      An ultrasound exam of your pelvic area shows both the uterus and the ovaries. It may also show the cause of your bleeding.

      Your doctor may want to do an endometrial biopsy. This is a test of the uterine lining. It's done by putting a thin plastic tube (called a catheter) into your uterus. A tiny piece of the uterine lining is taken out and sent to a lab for testing. The test will show if you have cancer or a change in the cells. A biopsy can be done in the doctor's office and causes only mild pain.

      Another test is a hysteroscopy. A thin tube with a tiny camera in it is put into your uterus. The camera lets your doctor see the inside of your uterus. If anything abnormal shows up, your doctor can get a biopsy.A D&C, or dilatation and curettage, is a procedure in which the opening of your cervix is stretched just enough so a surgical tool can be put into your uterus. The tool is used to scrape away the lining of your uterus. The removed lining is checked in a lab for abnormal tissue. A D&C is done under general anesthesia (while you're in a sleep-like state).

      If you're having heavy bleeding, a D&C may be done both to find out the problem and to treat the bleeding. The D&C itself often makes heavy bleeding stop. Your doctor will decide if this procedure is necessary.

      Hysterectomy. This type of surgery removes the uterus. If you have a hysterectomy, you won’t have any more periods and you won’t be able to get pregnant. Hysterectomy is major surgery that requires general anesthesia and a hospital stay. It may require a long recovery period. Talk to your doctor about the risks and benefits of hysterectomy.

      Endometrial ablation is a surgical procedure that destroys the lining of the uterus. Unlike a hysterectomy, it does not remove the uterus. Endometrial ablation may stop all menstrual bleeding in some women. However, some women still have light menstrual bleeding or spotting after endometrial ablation. A few women have regular menstrual periods after the procedure. Women who have endometrial ablation still need to use some form of birth control even though, in most cases, pregnancy is not likely after the procedure.

      Your doctor can do endometrial ablation in several different ways. Newer endometrial ablation techniques do not require general anesthesia or a hospital stay. The recovery time after this procedure is shorter than recovery time after a hysterectomy.

      Good luck !!

  43. QUESTION:
    What causes fibroids in the female reproductive organs?

    • ANSWER:
      Also called: Uterine leiomyomata

      Uterine fibroids are the most common non-cancerous tumors in women of childbearing age. Fibroids are made of muscle cells and other tissues that grow in and around the wall of the uterus, or womb. The cause of fibroids is unknown. Risk factors include being African-American or being overweight.

      Many women with uterine fibroids have no symptoms. If you have symptoms, they may include

      Heavy or painful periods or bleeding between periods
      Feeling "full" in the lower abdomen
      Urinating often
      Pain during sex
      Lower back pain
      Reproductive problems, such as infertility, multiple miscarriages or early labor
      Most women with fibroids can get pregnant naturally. For those who cannot, infertility treatments may help. Treatment for uterine fibroids includes medicines that can slow or stop their growth, or surgery. If you have no symptoms, you may not even need treatment.

  44. QUESTION:
    Im 36 weeks pregnant. I have a fibroid in my uterus that's taking up alot of my babys space?
    It hurts so bad when she moves around, I guess because she is so cramped. i'm thinking of talking to the doctor about inducing me next week at 37 weeks simply because of how much space the fibroid is taking up. As any other mothers out there ever had this problem during pregnancy?

    • ANSWER:
      Cherry,

      How big is the fibroid? Have you had an ultrasound done lately to measure it? Obviously it is going to grow when you are pregnant because of the hormones in your body, however unless it is causing the baby problems most likely the doctor wont induce you just because it hurts and ill tell you why. The doctor wants to be sure that your baby's lungs are developed, and grow inside you as much as they can before they will consider induction, unless there is a danger to you or to your baby. In the last 4 weeks of pregnancy is when the baby gains most of his/her weight, they gain about .5 to 1 pound a week. And trust me you do not want your baby on a breathing tube. I have had to scan babies that are premature and they have a breathing tube, you don't want to do that. Im sure your doctor is aware of your fibroid when you got pregnant, and he/she should be having you do routine ultrasounds to see how big the fibroid has gotten, if they aren't you need to tell them too, because yes, depending on where the fibroid is exactly it can cause growth restriction to your baby. Now of course if the doctor decides it is in the best interest to deliver you early they can give you a steroid shot to help develop the lungs of the baby.

  45. QUESTION:
    How does physical activity impact the menstrual cycle and cramps?
    in details pls. thanks

    • ANSWER:
      WELL I HAVE FOUND THAT THE MORE PHYSICALLY ACTIVE I HAVE BEEN THE LESS MY CONTRACTIONS HURT. I MEAN THAT THERE IS NO REASON IT WILL EVER BE PAIN FREE BUT IT WILL BE LESSONED!

      AND I WAS TOLD BY MY DOCTORS TO TAKE ONE ACETAMINOPHEN EVERY DAY BEFORE YOUR PERIOD STARTS AND ALSO EVERYDAY DRINK SOME MILK. IT SOMEHOW HELPS!!

      HERE IS SOME STUFF I FOUND ON THE INTERNET!

      Practice relaxation techniques like meditation or yoga

      Menstrual Cramps - Topic Overview
      Most women have painful menstrual cramps (dysmenorrhea) from time to time. Menstrual cramps are one of the most common reasons for women to seek medical attention. The pain from menstrual cramps can range from mild to severe and can involve the lower abdomen, back, or thighs. You may also have headaches, nausea, dizziness or fainting, or diarrhea or constipation with your cramps.

      During the menstrual cycle, the lining of the uterus produces a hormone called prostaglandin. This hormone causes the uterus to contract, often painfully. Women with severe cramps may produce higher-than-normal amounts of prostaglandin, or they may be more sensitive to its effects.

      Cramping is common during the teen years, when a woman first starts having periods. Primary dysmenorrhea is a term used to describe painful menstrual cramping with no recognized physical cause. It is seen most commonly in women between the ages of 20 and 24. It usually goes away after 1 to 2 years, when hormonal balance occurs.

      Secondary dysmenorrhea is a term used to describe painful menstrual cramping caused by a physical problem other than menstruation. Physical problems that can cause this type of cramping include:

      A condition in which cells that look and act like the cells of the lining of the uterus (endometrium) are found in other parts of the abdominal cavity (endometriosis) or grow into the muscular tissue of the uterine wall (adenomyosis). Pain usually occurs 1 to 2 days before menstrual bleeding begins and continues through the period.
      Growths that are not cancerous (benign growths) in the pelvis, such as ovarian cysts, cervical or uterine polyps, or fibroids.
      Pelvic infections. Your risk for developing an infection is higher after menstrual bleeding has begun because the opening to the uterus (cervical canal) widens during menstruation. However, pelvic infections, especially those caused by sexually transmitted diseases, can occur at any time.
      Using an intrauterine device (IUD). An IUD may cause increased cramping during your period for the first few months of use. If menstrual cramping persists or gets worse, you may need to consider having the IUD removed and choosing another birth control method.
      Problems with pregnancy.
      Structural problems that were present at birth (congenital), such as narrowing of the lower part of the uterus that opens into the vagina (cervix).
      Menstrual-type cramps may occur after a medical procedure, such as cautery, cryotherapy, conization, radiation, endometrial biopsy, or IUD insertion.

      Other menstrual symptoms, such as weight gain, headache, and tension, that occur before your period begins, can be caused by premenstrual syndrome (PMS). For more information, see the topic Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS).

      Review the Check Your Symptoms section to determine if and when you need to see your health professional.

  46. QUESTION:
    What are all the causes for the Uterine fibroids in women?

    • ANSWER:
      What causes uterine fibroids?

      The cause of uterine fibroids is not known. Fibroids begin when cells overgrow in the muscular wall of the uterus.

      Once a fibroid starts, its growth seems to be linked to the hormone estrogen. The hormone progesterone may also promote fibroid growth. This is why uterine fibroids are not a problem during low-hormone times of a woman's life, when her menstrual cycle is not active. After menstrual periods stop completely (known as menopause, usually around age 50), uterine fibroids shrink and symptoms go away.

      As you age, you are more likely to have uterine fibroids, especially from your 30s and 40s through menopause. Most women have uterine fibroids by the time they reach age 50. Many do not have symptoms.

  47. QUESTION:
    What will these tests tell my doctor?
    Me and my DF been trying to conceive over a year. My menstrual cycles are pretty regular. My average cycle is 28 days, longest cycle is 31 days, and shortest cycle is 25 days.

    My doctor is sending me for a sonogram and blood tests on day 3 and 21 of my cycle. What will these tests tell my doctor?

    • ANSWER:
      Blood tests that check hormone levels are usually done on day 3 of the cycle. Hormones that are checked for include FSH, LH, and prolactin. FSH or follicle-stimulating hormone is responsible for stimulating ovaries to release eggs. high levels of FSH indicate there is a problem with the ovaries, because there is no response to the hormone by the ovary; and as a result, the body continues to produce more hormone. Low levels indicate a problem with the pituitary gland. A surge in luteinizing hormone (LH) occurs directly before ovulation. LH along with FSH help in producing a mature egg for fertilisation. Increased levels will indicate a problem with the ovaries, similar to FSH. Prolactin is the hormone that is responsible for production of breast milk. When prolactin levels are high, it causes inhibition or suppression of ovulation by suppressing secretion of FSH and LH.

      The scan will check for the position, size, and shape of the fallopian tubes, ovaries, and uterus. It can also check for any abnormal growths like fibroids or cysts, blockages or other problems.
      The scans are done at days 3 and 21 to see if ovaries, tubes, womb and lining are how they should be in respect to the stage of your cycle.

      Baby dust xxxxxxxx Good luck TTCxxxxx

  48. QUESTION:
    How can I help my wife ?
    My wife is having her period and when she goes to the bathroom she gets stomach cramps and she sits in there crying because they hurt so bad. What can I do to help her ?

    • ANSWER:
      She can use motrin and moist heat on her tummy and lower back for cramps like this; however sometimes women will have fibroid growths (tumors) in their uterus which can cause quite a lot of pain. She needs to see her gynecologist if she hasn't already.
      I hope she gets the help she deserves. I know how miserable she is.

  49. QUESTION:
    I took the depo shot and now something weird happened while on my period?
    I got the shot in April and I just got my first period since then... but a big clump of tissue or something came out while I was on my period.. it wasn't like a typical clot it didn't break up.. it almost looked like a sac or something.. freaked out and a little scared.. what was it?

    • ANSWER:
      Causes of Blood Clots

      Hormonal Changes
      Hormones called estrogen and progesterone, are responsible for the production and shedding of the uterine lining. If this balance is disturbed, blood clots can be formed. The main reasons of hormonal changes and hormonal imbalance in young women are given below:

      Enlarged Uterus
      The uterus enlarges during pregnancy so that it becomes easy to accommodate the child. After pregnancy, the uterus shrinks back to the normal size. However, it may not happen in some cases. At such times, blood gets collected and forms a clot before it is released from the body, and that is when you see blood clots during menstrual cycle.

      Endometriosis
      Endometriosis is another reason that can cause hormonal changes. This is a medical condition which occurs due to the wrong growth of a tissue. This tissue is supposed to form on the lining of the uterus, but if it grows inside or any other place, it results in heavy bleeding and blood clots. Endometriosis should be treated by a physician only.

      Side Effects
      If you are undergoing some medical treatment, specially if the prescribed medicines are steroids, than you can experience blood clots during your period. Steroids also cause weight gain, which is another reason for these clots.

      These were the hormonal changes that are responsible for blood clot during period. Besides these, there are some other reasons which are given further.

      Fibroids
      Fibroids are tumors which are non-cancerous and grow in the womb. A woman having uterine fibroids can experience blood clots during menstruation. Heavy flow is also seen along with blood clots. Premenstrual syndrome can also be one of the reasons.

      Miscarriage
      Women who have had a miscarriage in the past, may pass blood clots or gray clumps of tissues from the vagina. The women with a history of miscarriage should immediately consult a doctor if they notice these symptoms, during the next pregnancy.

      Heavy Periods
      A heavy flow can also be one of the reasons for blood clots during periods. A woman's body has high anti-clotting ability, but during heavy periods, this ability is used up, and this results in clots.

      Quarter-sized or small blood clots are no reason to worry about. But if they are bigger than that, consult your doctor immediately.

  50. QUESTION:
    i havent had my first period yet and i had sex and afterwards i started bleeding?
    is this my first period or is this from sex?
    im 15 by the way, i know thats still young but im just a late bloomer i guess.

    • ANSWER:
      This is definately from sex and not your first period.
      But just to let you know further causes : :
      ******************************************************************
      You've just finished making love, and you're in that pleasant dream-like state when you discover that you are bleeding. Nothing can bring you back to reality faster than vaginal bleeding after sex. Post-coital bleeding can occur for a number of reasons, and is nothing to take lightly. Here's a look at the top 10 causes of vaginal bleeding after sex:

      1.Cervical dysplasia:
      Cervical dysplasia is precancerous changes of the epithelial cells that line the cervix. Risk increases with multiple sexual partners, sex before age 18, childbirth before age 16, or a past history of STDs. Treatment is usually cryosurgery or conisation.

      2.Chlamydia:
      A bacterial infection that is usually transmitted through sexual activity or contact with semen, vaginal fluid, or blood.

      3.Gonorrhea:
      A usually sexually transmitted disease caused by a bacteria. Several pharmaceutical treatments are available.

      4.Vaginitis or Cervicitis: Inflammation or swelling and infection of the vagina or cervix. Treatment depends on the cause.

      5.Cervical polyps:
      Cervical polyps are smooth, red or purple, finger-like growths that grow out of the mucus layer of the cervix or the cervical canal. Cervical polyps are extremely fragile, extending out of the cervix, and easily and painlessly removed.

      6.Trichomoniasis:
      A usually sexually transmitted disease caused by protozoan. Can also be passed to newborns during vaginal birth by infected mothers. Although rare, transmission is also possible in tap water, hot tubs, urine, on toilet seats, and in swimming pools. May cause vaginitis.

      7.Vaginal yeast infection:
      An overgrowth of the normal fungi that inhabits the vaginal area. Common symptoms include itching, burning, and an odorless, white, cheese-like discharge.

      8.Endometritis or adenomyosis:
      Endometritis is defined by Dorland's Medical Dictionary, 27th Edition as an inflammation of the endometrium (the innermost layer of the uterus). Both conditions are associated with endometriosis. Adenomysis is when endometrial tissue attaches itself to the uterus, or another organ such as the ovaries, and grows outside of the uterus.

      9.Uterine polyps:
      Uterine polyps occur when the endometrium overgrows causing these protrusions into the uterus. It is extremely rare for these growths to grow in a way that is either benign or malignant. Women with uterine polyps frequently experience bleeding between periods (metrorrhagia), other symptoms includes vaginal bleeding after sex, spotting, menorrhagia, bleeding after menopause, and breakthrough bleeding during hormone therapy. Hysteroscopic-guided curettage is the preferred treatment, since the normal D&C is basically an unguided procedure that may miss many of the uterine polyps.

      10.Fibroid tumors:
      Uterine fibroid tumors are usually benign tumors. They are solid masses made of fibrous tissue. Fibroid tumors are rarely malignant. Symptoms of fibroid tumors vary among women, with some women never experiencing any symptoms at all. Women who can wait until menopause will see their fibroids shrink and disappear once their bodies stop producing estrogen. It's important that women with fibroids make sure they never take estrogen, in any form including birth control pills, since estrogen increases fibroid growth. Several treatments are currently available for uterine fibroid tumors from myomectomy and uterine artery embolization to the traditional hysterectomy.

      Diagnosing vaginal bleeding after sex is usually a matter of exclusion. Anytime you experience post-coital bleeding or vaginal bleeding after sex see your physician.

causes fibroid growth uterus

Can Birth Control Cause Fibroids To Grow

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Can Yaz cause fibroids to grow?
    Can Yaz (or other oral contraceptive) cause fibroids to grow. This past year I started taking Yaz and my fibroids have doubled in size. I am 30 years old and have no children. I have also been diagnosed with PCOS. If I stop taking birth control my periods stop all together and come on randomly every few months in a manner that is so painful that I sometimes have to go to the ER.

    • ANSWER:
      I took Hormones, and had 4 surgeries because of them.I have stopped taking them. I know hormones are a little different than oral Contraceptive, but I do believe that they do cause fibroids to grow.

  2. QUESTION:
    how to reduce bleeding for heavy periods?
    my mom refuses to get me birth control, and i have to change pads every fourty five minutes to a hour, and every night i bleed through, and my periods last for two weeks.

    • ANSWER:
      Even though she doesn't want you using birth control you need to see a gynecologist to find out why you're bleeding that heavy. That's insane to not be allowed to see a doctor if she won't let you because you could have something like endometriosis or an imbalance of hormones causing you to bleed like that. How can you get through the day like that? I bled through super tampons in 20 minutes and even birth control did not help me. Mine also lasted up to two weeks and I ended up with a total hysterectomy/keeping both ovaries at the age of 29. I was diagnosed with endometriosis at the age of 19 because my mom never took me to a doctor and assumed I was having growing pains. Had I not gone in when I did I may not have had kids to this day. Endometriosis can cause infertility. Adenomyosis (endometriosis inside the uterine muscle) was suspected before my hysterectomy. Please see a doctor. If she won't take you ask your dad to take you so he can sign the papers if you're under 18. It doesn't matter which parent takes you because the doctor won't likely have them stay in the exam room anyway when the time comes. Plus the doctor needs to be able to get the patient doctor relationship going and if a parent is there the patient is not likely to tell the truth about everything. If you're under 18 you will need a parent or legal guardian to at least sign the paper allowing the doctor to see you. You must be seen though and the treatment does not have to be birth control pills and they may not even help. You may need surgery to diagnose something else but you won't know until you are seen.

      When one is not able to go an hour without changing it's called menorrhagia and you need to be seen to find out why. It could be fibroids, polyps, hormone irregularities, endometriosis (more common in young women and teens), or other things I did not mention. Oh and make sure that you tell the doctor that you go through pads every 45 minutes and not just say you have heavy bleeding. Anyone can say they have heavy bleeding and doctors may think that women are just saying that because it looks like a lot of blood but if you say how little time you have to go through something then he/she will take you more seriously. You can't possibly continue going on like this without finding out why you are having the heavy bleeding. Polyps and fibroids can be removed and endometriosis can be lasered out. If it's hormonal problems maybe the doc will recommend the pill but you don't even know what's causing it yet so rather than jump to conclusions thinking that the pill will help why not try to find out why first and then see what the doc says.

  3. QUESTION:
    What could post coital bleeding be caused by?
    I have had postcoital bleeding a few times in the last month, I am currently trying to concieve and am worried about this. A pap smear revealed no abnormal cells on my cervix, the only thing the doctor said was that my cervix looked inflamed and bled after the smear. I dont have an appointment with the gyno until November so was wondering if any of you out there had anything like this and what did it turn out to be?

    • ANSWER:
      # Cervical dysplasia: Cervical dysplasia is precancerous changes of the epithelial cells that line the cervix. Risk increases with multiple sexual partners, sex before age 18, childbirth before age 16, or a past history of STDs. Treatment is usually cryosurgery or conisation.

      # Chlamydia: A bacterial infection that is usually transmitted through sexual activity or contact with semen, vaginal fluid, or blood.

      # Gonorrhea: A usually sexually transmitted disease caused by a bacteria.# Several pharmaceutical treatments are available.

      # Vaginitis or Cervicitis: Inflammation or swelling and infection of the vagina or cervix. Treatment depends on the cause.

      # Cervical polyps: Cervical polyps are smooth, red or purple, finger-like growths that grow out of the mucuos layer of the cervix or the cervical canal. Cervical polyps are extremely fragile, extending out of the cervix, and easily and painlessly removed.

      # Trichomoniasis: A usually sexually transmitted disease caused by protozoan. Can also be passed to newborns during vaginal birth by infected mothers. Although rare, transmission is also possible in tap water, hot tubs, urine, on toilet seats, and in swimming pools. May cause vaginitis.

      # Vaginal Yeast Infection: An overgrowth of the normal fungi that inhabits the vaginal area. Common symptoms include itching, burning, and an odorless, white, cheese-like discharge.

      # Endometritis or adenomyosis: Endometritis is defined by Dorland's Medical Dictionary, 27th Edition as an inflammation of the endometrium (the innermost layer of the uterus). Both conditions are associated with endometriosis. Adenomysis is when endometrial tissue attaches itself to the uterus, or another organ such as the ovaries, and grows outside of the uterus.

      # Uterine polyps: Uterine polyps occur when the endometrium overgrows causing these protrusions into the uterus. It is extremely rare for these growths to grow in a way that is either benign or malignant. Women with uterine polyps frequently experience bleeding between periods (metrorrhagia), other symptoms includes vaginal bleeding after sex, spotting, menorrhagia, bleeding after menopause, and breakthrough bleeding during hormone therapy. Hysteroscopic-guided curettage is the prefered treatment, since the normal D&C is basically an unguided procedure that may miss many of the uterine polyps.

      # Fibroid tumors: Uterine fibroid tumors are usually benign tumors. They are solid masses made of fibrous tissue. Fibroid tumors are rarely malignant. Symptoms of fibroid tumors vary among women, with some women never experiencing any symptoms at all. Women who can wait until menopause will see their fibroids shrink and disappear once their bodies stop producing estrogen. It's important that women with fibroids make sure they never take estrogen, in any form including birth control pills, since estrogen increases fibroid growth. Several treatments are currently available for uterine fibroid tumors from myomectomy and uterine artery embolization to the traditional hysterectomy.

  4. QUESTION:
    What are fibroids and what happens when you have them when pregnant?
    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroids are just a growth of muscle from the uterus wall. They are very, very common, and most women don't even know that they have them. They can vary greatly in size from less than 1cm to 30+cms. They can be found growing from the outside of the uterus, inside the lining of the uterus, or into the uterine cavity. Some grow on stalks and some are flush against the muscle of the uterus. There is no cure for fibroids. In some cases, they have to be removed through surgery (if there are many of them and if they are interfering with the woman's life), and sometimes they can be shrunk by taking birth control pills. In most cases, they shrink during menopause, when they are starved of hormones. In most cases, doctors prefer to leave them well alone, and they are mostly harmless and even if they are removed, they can grow back.

      Generally speaking, fibroids won't have an impact on pregnancy. They won't cause problems, unless they are positioned badly, eg: right under the placenta, near the cervix or near a fallopian tube, cause ectopic pregnancy. Sometimes the extra blood flow to the uterus and the extra hormones from pregnancy can cause them to grow, sometimes just a bit, and sometimes rapidly. If they are growing rapidly, your doctor might suggest keeping a close eye on them (through ultrasounds) to make sure they don't interfere with your pregnancy, or steal resources from the baby. If the fibroid is positioned badly, it may require the baby being induced early, or call for a scheduled C-Section. Sometimes a fibroid can grow too fast during pregnancy and eventually "die". While this is completely safe for the baby, it will cause quite a bit of pain for the mother, and might require a hospital stay while it continues to die.

      As you can see, there are a lot of "maybes" and "sometimes" with fibroids. Each woman's case is unique, and you will need to consult with your doctor to make sure that all is well and to figure out what your options are. I have a fibroid that is 10cms big (currently 30 w pregnant) and while it was a concern at the beginning of my pregnancy due to how fast it was growing, now I have been given the all clear by my doctors that it is harmless. I have been for a LOT of ultrasounds, though, over the course of this pregnancy, and I still have two more scheduled before I give birth to make sure everything is still fine.

      Hope that helps! Good luck!

  5. QUESTION:
    How do you manage for preventing Vaginal Bleeding or spotting during pregnancy at different stages?

    • ANSWER:
      Cervical dysplasia:Cervical dysplasia is precancerous changes of the epithelial cells that line the cervix. Risk increases with multiple sexual partners, sex before age 18, childbirth before age 16, or a past history of STDs. Treatment is usually cryosurgery or conisation.

      Chlamydia: A bacterial infection that is usually transmitted through sexual activity or contact with semen, vaginal fluid, or blood.

      Gonorrhea: A usually sexually transmitted disease caused by a bacteria. Several pharmaceutical treatments are available.

      Vaginitis or Cervicitis: Inflammation or swelling and infection of the vagina or cervix. Treatment depends on the cause.

      Cervical polyps: Cervical polyps are smooth, red or purple, finger-like growths that grow out of the mucus layer of the cervix or the cervical canal. Cervical polyps are extremely fragile, extending out of the cervix, and easily and painlessly removed.

      Trichomoniasis: A usually sexually transmitted disease caused by protozoan. Can also be passed to newborns during vaginal birth by infected mothers. Although rare, transmission is also possible in tap water, hot tubs, urine, on toilet seats, and in swimming pools. May cause vaginitis.

      Vaginal yeast infection: An overgrowth of the normal fungi that inhabits the vaginal area. Common symptoms include itching, burning, and an odorless, white, cheese-like discharge.

      Endometritis or adenomyosis: Endometritis is defined by Dorland's Medical Dictionary, 27th Edition as an inflammation of the endometrium (the innermost layer of the uterus). Both conditions are associated with endometriosis. Adenomysis is when endometrial tissue attaches itself to the uterus, or another organ such as the ovaries, and grows outside of the uterus.

      Uterine polyps: Uterine polyps occur when the endometrium overgrows causing these protrusions into the uterus. It is extremely rare for these growths to grow in a way that is either benign or malignant. Women with uterine polyps frequently experience bleeding between periods (metrorrhagia), other symptoms includes vaginal bleeding after sex, spotting, menorrhagia, bleeding after menopause, and breakthrough bleeding during hormone therapy. Hysteroscopic-guided curettage is the preferred treatment, since the normal D&C is basically an unguided procedure that may miss many of the uterine polyps.

      Fibroid tumors: Uterine fibroid tumors are usually benign tumors. They are solid masses made of fibrous tissue. Fibroid tumors are rarely malignant. Symptoms of fibroid tumors vary among women, with some women never experiencing any symptoms at all. Women who can wait until menopause will see their fibroids shrink and disappear once their bodies stop producing estrogen. It's important that women with fibroids make sure they never take estrogen, in any form including birth control pills, since estrogen increases fibroid growth. Several treatments are currently available for uterine fibroid tumors from myomectomy and uterine artery embolization to the traditional hysterectomy.

      Diagnosing vaginal bleeding after sex is usually a matter of exclusion. Anytime you experience post-coital bleeding or vaginal bleeding after sex see your physician.
      New posts to the Women's Health forums:

  6. QUESTION:
    I had the Novasure procedure several years ago, why am I bleeding after sex?
    I haven't been sexually active for long time. I recently started having sex again, however, I sometimes start bleeding after sex. Today it is a little bit heavier, but it's usually quite light. Is this because the lining was burned out by the Novasure and it is thin? Is it from just not having sex? I know that I can become pregnant, but I am 47, very overweight, and had the Novasure. Do you think I can still get pregnant? Has anyone became pregnant after Novasure?

    • ANSWER:
      OMG girls are always bleeding, anyways to answer your question these are the top 10 reasons for vaginal bleeding
      # Cervical dysplasia:Cervical dysplasia is precancerous changes of the epithelial cells that line the cervix. Risk increases with multiple sexual partners, sex before age 18, childbirth before age 16, or a past history of STDs. Treatment is usually cryosurgery or conisation.

      # Chlamydia: A bacterial infection that is usually transmitted through sexual activity or contact with semen, vaginal fluid, or blood.

      # Gonorrhea: A usually sexually transmitted disease caused by a bacteria. Several pharmaceutical treatments are available.

      # Vaginitis or Cervicitis: Inflammation or swelling and infection of the vagina or cervix. Treatment depends on the cause.

      # Cervical polyps: Cervical polyps are smooth, red or purple, finger-like growths that grow out of the mucus layer of the cervix or the cervical canal. Cervical polyps are extremely fragile, extending out of the cervix, and easily and painlessly removed.

      # Trichomoniasis: A usually sexually transmitted disease caused by protozoan. Can also be passed to newborns during vaginal birth by infected mothers. Although rare, transmission is also possible in tap water, hot tubs, urine, on toilet seats, and in swimming pools. May cause vaginitis.

      # Vaginal yeast infection: An overgrowth of the normal fungi that inhabits the vaginal area. Common symptoms include itching, burning, and an odorless, white, cheese-like discharge.

      # Endometritis or adenomyosis: Endometritis is defined by Dorland's Medical Dictionary, 27th Edition as an inflammation of the endometrium (the innermost layer of the uterus). Both conditions are associated with endometriosis. Adenomysis is when endometrial tissue attaches itself to the uterus, or another organ such as the ovaries, and grows outside of the uterus.

      # Uterine polyps: Uterine polyps occur when the endometrium overgrows causing these protrusions into the uterus. It is extremely rare for these growths to grow in a way that is either benign or malignant. Women with uterine polyps frequently experience bleeding between periods (metrorrhagia), other symptoms includes vaginal bleeding after sex, spotting, menorrhagia, bleeding after menopause, and breakthrough bleeding during hormone therapy. Hysteroscopic-guided curettage is the preferred treatment, since the normal D&C is basically an unguided procedure that may miss many of the uterine polyps.

      # Fibroid tumors: Uterine fibroid tumors are usually benign tumors. They are solid masses made of fibrous tissue. Fibroid tumors are rarely malignant. Symptoms of fibroid tumors vary among women, with some women never experiencing any symptoms at all. Women who can wait until menopause will see their fibroids shrink and disappear once their bodies stop producing estrogen. It's important that women with fibroids make sure they never take estrogen, in any form including birth control pills, since estrogen increases fibroid growth. Several treatments are currently available for uterine fibroid tumors from myomectomy and uterine artery embolization to the traditional hysterectomy.

      http://www.novasure.com/irregular-period/novasure-procedure.cfm

  7. QUESTION:
    Do ovarian cysts usually need to be surgically removed?
    I was told today after getting MRI results that I need to see an oncologist. I always thought that most ovarian cysts and fibroids are not cancer. I have no symptoms, no pain, no bleeding.
    Do you think I'll have to have that godd-awful test called a 'Hysterosonography?'
    the report mentioned that I should go for a transvaginal sonogram for more information.

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease or cancer related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman's childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain - constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that you discuss all the details such as the type of cyst, size of cyst etc with your doctor/gyno and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 10 years and have had to have surgery 2 times to the cysts removed (it wasn't anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  8. QUESTION:
    Fibroid in your twenties and pregnancy?
    I know that having fibroids can cause complications with pregnancy, however if you have a small fibroid and you want to have children and you are in your twenties, but will prefer to wait a few years to do so. However you are not sure if the small fibroid will grow in those years.
    Would you consider having the children now the fibroid is small so that you can guarantee that you can have children before complications of the fibroid steps in later.
    Can taking birth control increased the chance of the fibroid growing bigger faster?

    • ANSWER:
      I have a small fibroid and am currently pregnant. A small fibroid should not cause problems with pregnancy. However, if you are planning to wait a couple of years, there is always the chance it can grow. Removing a fibroid really only usually requires a laparoscopy. Women are also often more fertile after one. So, if you wanted to wait and felt your fibroid had gotten larger, you could always opt for the laparoscopy before getting pregnant.

  9. QUESTION:
    When getting a Pap Smear, What exactly does the OB/GYN look for on your first exam?
    I'm sexually active & I know that I should be going to get a check up soon at the Gyno. Do you know what they look for? & will it hurt the first time?

    • ANSWER:
      They are looking at several things... they will have you take off everything below the waste, and give you a gown to wear... then you sit on the exam table and the GYN will have you rest your feet in the stirrups and then using lubrication the GYN will insert a speculum... its a tool that opens up the vagina... dont worry...you may feel some pressure but it wont hurt.

      1. Anatomy : looking at all the organs and making sure that everything is normal because you may want to have children later on in life; also at this time they look for anything abnormal such as bumps, lumps, ect which could be from infections, or from STDs. Mostly though they are mostly concerned with the size of your Ovaries, to make sure they are healthy and not growing fibroids. And they look to make sure the lining of the vagina/cervix/and opening to the uterus is healthy... some women can have disorders such as endometriosis, fibroids, cancer, or PMS due to problems with the anatomy.

      2. Discharge: they are looking at the discharge, which should be clear to white like egg whites.... anything that is another color or has a smell could be an infection which they would want to treat with medication.

      3. STD: if you are at risk for STDs or you request them to test for STDs they will take a sample of the discharge and analyze it under a microscope to look for bacteria. If you want to get checked for HIV and Syphillis, they will have to take a blood sample.

      4. Pap Smear : needs to be done annually, they simply use a sterile cotton swab to get a sample of the cells inside your cervix and they will analyze it under a microscope to look for changes to the cells... as you know women can get Cervical cancer from an STD called HPV... so its important to get the Pap Smear done every year. People often have HPV and never know because it doesnt cause many symptoms. Guys can be carriers of the virus and spread it to a woman, even if only having sex one time. By having a pap smear every year, they will monitor your cells for any slight changes which could be the possibility of a cancer growing... they can then kill the cancer before it becomes worse.

      5. Birth Control: you may be interested in going on some kind of birth control and they must do an exam to help decide which one is best for you... there are hundreds of different pills as well as other things like the shot, diaphragm, foams, ect... they need to make sure you are healthy to decide which one to put you on.

      Good Luck! and Wonderful of you for taking care of your health!

  10. QUESTION:
    Is Endometriosis the same as Uterine fibroids?
    Any and all information on either subject (if they are not the same thing) would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.
    What causes the scaring in endometriosis?

    • ANSWER:
      Here's the deal with endo: you have these little cells in your body called endometrial cells. they're supposed to live in the wall of your uterus. Hormones in your body send signals to these little cells to fill up with blood. If you don't get pregnant that month, hormones send signals to those cells to detach from the wall and start to move downward. Then they release that blood and your period starts. After your period is over, more hormones tell those little cells it's time to go home. Sometimes those cells don't listen and wind up attaching themselves to places they shouldn't be. Lots of people get them on their ovaries, their bowel, etc. There are even documented cases of these little cells in the throat area. Talk about getting lost!
      Well, those little cells, although they're not where they're supposed to be, still receive those signals from the hormones telling them to fill up with blood. Since they're not where they belong, lots of times that means they're pressing up against an organ as they fill with blood - and that hurts like crazy. Then again when they get the signal to release the blood, they do it, and THAT hurts even more. It's sort of like you're bleeding internally. Somehow instead of getting the signal to move around like the other cells do, they stick themselves to their new home. Idk how or why, it just happens.
      The only way to get rid of it is through surgery. Most doctors remove it by burning the cells off, just because they're in a delicate region of your body. However, this menthod isn't quite effective because the burning doesn't always get the entire cell. Little microscopic pieces can be left behind, and they grow back - sometimes in the very next month. If your doctor CUTS out the cells, studies have shown the cells don't come back. However, sometimes it's not possible to cut out all of the cells depending on where they are. It's also not possible to see all of the endometriosis in your body - much of it is microscopic, but that doesn't mean it isn't there & it also doesn't mean it isn't painful.
      Birth control regulates your periods and many times helps with the pain. The biggest benefit is lighter periods because most people with endo tend to have heavy periods. Less flow means less pain. There is a drug called Meclomen, it's an NSAID like Aleve or Advil but it actually helps people with endo by making your periods super light - I barely had one while taking it. You just start taking the pill at the first sign of pain and continue through your period and it does wonders. It's also not habit forming unlike a lot of the narcotics most women with endo have to take.
      I've had endo for probably 10 years now, but it took nearly 5 years to diagnose it because many doctors don't really believe endometriosis really exists - don't ask me why. Since then, I've had surgery twice, and will continue to need regular surgeries to deal with the pain. I keep in close contact with my doctor, letting him know everything I htink might be helpful because endo can cause problems getting pregnant and I want to avoid that as much as possible. Unfortunately, other than that, the only thing doctors can offer us is birth control. Well, they could try Lupron depot, but that basically puts you in a state of menopause for a year or two, but has been shown to cause remission of endo for as long as 5 years. I've opted against that route, because the shots are nearly 0 and need to be taken every 3 months, plus there are chances for unwanted side effects - and I'm not so sure I want that risk either.
      This is pretty much what I know about endo, although I can't really tell you much more about fibroids other than to say they're not the same as endo. I hope this helps!

  11. QUESTION:
    how can uncontrollable uterine bleed lead to death in pregnancy?
    what gets affected?
    how does it happen?
    can it be prevented?

    • ANSWER:
      Many different things can cause abnormal uterine bleeding. Pregnancy is a common cause. Polyps or fibroids (small and large growths) in the uterus can also cause bleeding. Rarely, a thyroid problem, infection of the cervix or cancer of the uterus can cause abnormal uterine bleeding. 


      In most women, abnormal uterine bleeding is caused by a hormone imbalance. When hormones are the problem, doctors call the problem dysfunctional uterine bleeding, or DUB. Abnormal bleeding caused by hormone imbalance is more common in teenagers or in women who are approaching menopause.

      These are just a few of the problems that can cause abnormal uterine bleeding. These problems can occur at any age, but the likely cause of abnormal uterine bleeding usually depends on your age.

      Women in their teens, 20s and 30s

      A common cause of abnormal bleeding in young women and teenagers is pregnancy. Many women have abnormal bleeding in the first few months of a normal pregnancy. Some birth control pills or the intrauterine device can also cause abnormal bleeding.

      Some young women who have abnormal uterine bleeding do not release an egg from their ovaries (called ovulation) during their menstrual cycle. This is common for teenagers who have just started getting their periods. This causes a hormone imbalance where the estrogen in your body makes the lining of your uterus (called the endometrium) grow until it gets too thick. When your body gets rid of this lining during your period, the bleeding will be very heavy. A hormone imbalance may also cause your body not to know when to shed the lining. This can cause irregular bleeding (“spotting”) between your periods.The tests your doctor orders may depend on your age. If you could be pregnant, your doctor may order a pregnancy test. If your bleeding is heavy, in addition to other tests, your doctor may want to check your blood count to make sure you don't have anemia (low iron) from the blood loss.

      An ultrasound exam of your pelvic area shows both the uterus and the ovaries. It may also show the cause of your bleeding.

      Your doctor may want to do an endometrial biopsy. This is a test of the uterine lining. It's done by putting a thin plastic tube (called a catheter) into your uterus. A tiny piece of the uterine lining is taken out and sent to a lab for testing. The test will show if you have cancer or a change in the cells. A biopsy can be done in the doctor's office and causes only mild pain.

      Another test is a hysteroscopy. A thin tube with a tiny camera in it is put into your uterus. The camera lets your doctor see the inside of your uterus. If anything abnormal shows up, your doctor can get a biopsy.A D&C, or dilatation and curettage, is a procedure in which the opening of your cervix is stretched just enough so a surgical tool can be put into your uterus. The tool is used to scrape away the lining of your uterus. The removed lining is checked in a lab for abnormal tissue. A D&C is done under general anesthesia (while you're in a sleep-like state).

      If you're having heavy bleeding, a D&C may be done both to find out the problem and to treat the bleeding. The D&C itself often makes heavy bleeding stop. Your doctor will decide if this procedure is necessary.

      Hysterectomy. This type of surgery removes the uterus. If you have a hysterectomy, you won’t have any more periods and you won’t be able to get pregnant. Hysterectomy is major surgery that requires general anesthesia and a hospital stay. It may require a long recovery period. Talk to your doctor about the risks and benefits of hysterectomy.

      Endometrial ablation is a surgical procedure that destroys the lining of the uterus. Unlike a hysterectomy, it does not remove the uterus. Endometrial ablation may stop all menstrual bleeding in some women. However, some women still have light menstrual bleeding or spotting after endometrial ablation. A few women have regular menstrual periods after the procedure. Women who have endometrial ablation still need to use some form of birth control even though, in most cases, pregnancy is not likely after the procedure.

      Your doctor can do endometrial ablation in several different ways. Newer endometrial ablation techniques do not require general anesthesia or a hospital stay. The recovery time after this procedure is shorter than recovery time after a hysterectomy.

      Good luck !!

  12. QUESTION:
    How does physical activity impact the menstrual cycle and cramps?
    in details pls. thanks

    • ANSWER:
      WELL I HAVE FOUND THAT THE MORE PHYSICALLY ACTIVE I HAVE BEEN THE LESS MY CONTRACTIONS HURT. I MEAN THAT THERE IS NO REASON IT WILL EVER BE PAIN FREE BUT IT WILL BE LESSONED!

      AND I WAS TOLD BY MY DOCTORS TO TAKE ONE ACETAMINOPHEN EVERY DAY BEFORE YOUR PERIOD STARTS AND ALSO EVERYDAY DRINK SOME MILK. IT SOMEHOW HELPS!!

      HERE IS SOME STUFF I FOUND ON THE INTERNET!

      Practice relaxation techniques like meditation or yoga

      Menstrual Cramps - Topic Overview
      Most women have painful menstrual cramps (dysmenorrhea) from time to time. Menstrual cramps are one of the most common reasons for women to seek medical attention. The pain from menstrual cramps can range from mild to severe and can involve the lower abdomen, back, or thighs. You may also have headaches, nausea, dizziness or fainting, or diarrhea or constipation with your cramps.

      During the menstrual cycle, the lining of the uterus produces a hormone called prostaglandin. This hormone causes the uterus to contract, often painfully. Women with severe cramps may produce higher-than-normal amounts of prostaglandin, or they may be more sensitive to its effects.

      Cramping is common during the teen years, when a woman first starts having periods. Primary dysmenorrhea is a term used to describe painful menstrual cramping with no recognized physical cause. It is seen most commonly in women between the ages of 20 and 24. It usually goes away after 1 to 2 years, when hormonal balance occurs.

      Secondary dysmenorrhea is a term used to describe painful menstrual cramping caused by a physical problem other than menstruation. Physical problems that can cause this type of cramping include:

      A condition in which cells that look and act like the cells of the lining of the uterus (endometrium) are found in other parts of the abdominal cavity (endometriosis) or grow into the muscular tissue of the uterine wall (adenomyosis). Pain usually occurs 1 to 2 days before menstrual bleeding begins and continues through the period.
      Growths that are not cancerous (benign growths) in the pelvis, such as ovarian cysts, cervical or uterine polyps, or fibroids.
      Pelvic infections. Your risk for developing an infection is higher after menstrual bleeding has begun because the opening to the uterus (cervical canal) widens during menstruation. However, pelvic infections, especially those caused by sexually transmitted diseases, can occur at any time.
      Using an intrauterine device (IUD). An IUD may cause increased cramping during your period for the first few months of use. If menstrual cramping persists or gets worse, you may need to consider having the IUD removed and choosing another birth control method.
      Problems with pregnancy.
      Structural problems that were present at birth (congenital), such as narrowing of the lower part of the uterus that opens into the vagina (cervix).
      Menstrual-type cramps may occur after a medical procedure, such as cautery, cryotherapy, conization, radiation, endometrial biopsy, or IUD insertion.

      Other menstrual symptoms, such as weight gain, headache, and tension, that occur before your period begins, can be caused by premenstrual syndrome (PMS). For more information, see the topic Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS).

      Review the Check Your Symptoms section to determine if and when you need to see your health professional.

  13. QUESTION:
    i havent had my first period yet and i had sex and afterwards i started bleeding?
    is this my first period or is this from sex?
    im 15 by the way, i know thats still young but im just a late bloomer i guess.

    • ANSWER:
      This is definately from sex and not your first period.
      But just to let you know further causes : :
      ******************************************************************
      You've just finished making love, and you're in that pleasant dream-like state when you discover that you are bleeding. Nothing can bring you back to reality faster than vaginal bleeding after sex. Post-coital bleeding can occur for a number of reasons, and is nothing to take lightly. Here's a look at the top 10 causes of vaginal bleeding after sex:

      1.Cervical dysplasia:
      Cervical dysplasia is precancerous changes of the epithelial cells that line the cervix. Risk increases with multiple sexual partners, sex before age 18, childbirth before age 16, or a past history of STDs. Treatment is usually cryosurgery or conisation.

      2.Chlamydia:
      A bacterial infection that is usually transmitted through sexual activity or contact with semen, vaginal fluid, or blood.

      3.Gonorrhea:
      A usually sexually transmitted disease caused by a bacteria. Several pharmaceutical treatments are available.

      4.Vaginitis or Cervicitis: Inflammation or swelling and infection of the vagina or cervix. Treatment depends on the cause.

      5.Cervical polyps:
      Cervical polyps are smooth, red or purple, finger-like growths that grow out of the mucus layer of the cervix or the cervical canal. Cervical polyps are extremely fragile, extending out of the cervix, and easily and painlessly removed.

      6.Trichomoniasis:
      A usually sexually transmitted disease caused by protozoan. Can also be passed to newborns during vaginal birth by infected mothers. Although rare, transmission is also possible in tap water, hot tubs, urine, on toilet seats, and in swimming pools. May cause vaginitis.

      7.Vaginal yeast infection:
      An overgrowth of the normal fungi that inhabits the vaginal area. Common symptoms include itching, burning, and an odorless, white, cheese-like discharge.

      8.Endometritis or adenomyosis:
      Endometritis is defined by Dorland's Medical Dictionary, 27th Edition as an inflammation of the endometrium (the innermost layer of the uterus). Both conditions are associated with endometriosis. Adenomysis is when endometrial tissue attaches itself to the uterus, or another organ such as the ovaries, and grows outside of the uterus.

      9.Uterine polyps:
      Uterine polyps occur when the endometrium overgrows causing these protrusions into the uterus. It is extremely rare for these growths to grow in a way that is either benign or malignant. Women with uterine polyps frequently experience bleeding between periods (metrorrhagia), other symptoms includes vaginal bleeding after sex, spotting, menorrhagia, bleeding after menopause, and breakthrough bleeding during hormone therapy. Hysteroscopic-guided curettage is the preferred treatment, since the normal D&C is basically an unguided procedure that may miss many of the uterine polyps.

      10.Fibroid tumors:
      Uterine fibroid tumors are usually benign tumors. They are solid masses made of fibrous tissue. Fibroid tumors are rarely malignant. Symptoms of fibroid tumors vary among women, with some women never experiencing any symptoms at all. Women who can wait until menopause will see their fibroids shrink and disappear once their bodies stop producing estrogen. It's important that women with fibroids make sure they never take estrogen, in any form including birth control pills, since estrogen increases fibroid growth. Several treatments are currently available for uterine fibroid tumors from myomectomy and uterine artery embolization to the traditional hysterectomy.

      Diagnosing vaginal bleeding after sex is usually a matter of exclusion. Anytime you experience post-coital bleeding or vaginal bleeding after sex see your physician.

  14. QUESTION:
    Why do I bleed when I have sex?
    My boyfriend and I have been intimate for about 8 months and everytime we do it, I bleed.

    • ANSWER:
      Here’s a look at the top 10 causes of vaginal bleeding after sex, I hope this information helps you to answer a few of your questions. Take care.

      Cervical dysplasia: Cervical dysplasia is precancerous changes of the epithelial cells that line the cervix. Risk increases with multiple sexual partners, sex before age 18, childbirth before age 16, or a past history of STDs. Treatment is usually cryosurgery or conisation.

      Chlamydia: A bacterial infection that is usually transmitted through sexual activity or contact with semen, vaginal fluid, or blood.

      Gonorrhea: A usually sexually transmitted disease caused by a bacteria. Several pharmaceutical treatments are available.

      Vaginitis or Cervicitis: Inflammation or swelling and infection of the vagina or cervix. Treatment depends on the cause.

      Cervical polyps: Cervical polyps are smooth, red or purple, finger-like growths that grow out of the mucus layer of the cervix or the cervical canal. Cervical polyps are extremely fragile, extending out of the cervix, and easily and painlessly removed.

      Trichomoniasis: A usually sexually transmitted disease caused by protozoan. Can also be passed to newborns during vaginal birth by infected mothers. Although rare, transmission is also possible in tap water, hot tubs, urine, on toilet seats, and in swimming pools. May cause vaginitis.

      Vaginal Yeast Infection: An overgrowth of the normal fungi that inhabits the vaginal area. Common symptoms include itching, burning, and an odorless, white, cheese-like discharge.

      Endometritis or adenomyosis: Endometritis is defined by Dorland’s Medical Dictionary, 27th Edition as an inflammation of the endometrium (the innermost layer of the uterus). Both conditions are associated with endometriosis. Adenomysis is when endometrial tissue attaches itself to the uterus, or another organ such as the ovaries, and grows outside of the uterus.

      Uterine polyps: Uterine polyps occur when the endometrium overgrows causing these protrusions into the uterus. It is extremely rare for these growths to grow in a way that is either benign or malignant. Women with uterine polyps frequently experience bleeding between periods (metrorrhagia), other symptoms includes vaginal bleeding after sex, spotting, menorrhagia, bleeding after menopause, and breakthrough bleeding during hormone therapy. Hysteroscopic-guided curettage is the preferred treatment, since the normal D&C is basically an unguided procedure that may miss many of the uterine polyps.

      Fibroid tumors: Uterine fibroid tumors are usually benign tumors. They are solid masses made of fibrous tissue. Fibroid tumors are rarely malignant. Symptoms of fibroid tumors vary among women, with some women never experiencing any symptoms at all. Women who can wait until menopause will see their fibroids shrink and disappear once their bodies stop producing estrogen. It’s important that women with fibroids make sure they never take estrogen, in any form including birth control pills, since estrogen increases fibroid growth. Several treatments are currently available for uterine fibroid tumors from myomectomy and uterine artery embolization to the traditional hysterectomy.

      The article reprinted from http://digghealth.com/reasons-bleeding-s…
      Source(s):
      http://digghealth.com/reasons-bleeding-s…

  15. QUESTION:
    can someone tell me about subserosal fibroids? and the treatment to have them removed?
    I was told that i have 2 subserosal fiborids and they hurt i want them removed but i want to know really can i still have children after the trement?

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroids, also known as leiomyomas or just plain myomas, are benign, smooth muscle tumors that usually grow in the uterus (womb). They are the most common pelvic tumors in females. They can range in size anywhere from a few millimeters (the size of a sesame seed) to several centimeters (about an inch). Fibroids can occur in different locations in and on the uterus but very rarely on organs outside of the uterus.

      Subserosal fibroids are located under the outer “skin” of the uterus (serosa) and do not grow into the muscular wall of the uterus (myometrium).

      What are the Available Treatment Options?

      Medication
      Medical management of fibroids is fairly limited and often used only to reduce symptoms until surgery is necessary. Currently two medical agents are used for the management of fibroids:

      * Depo-Provera, an intramuscular injection of long-acting progesterone (a commonly used birth control agent) has been used for the management of fibroids that cause heavy vaginal bleeding. Used over time, Depo-Provera stops menstruation (amenorrhea). This reduces the vaginal bleeding, but there are troublesome side-effects associated with this process including: weight gain, hair thinning, and irregular vaginal spotting. This medication is of little or no use in treating symptoms of fibroids other than those related to vaginal bleeding.

      * Depo-Lupron (Lupron) has also been used in the medical management of fibroids. It is given by injection. Lupron essentially creates a “medical menopause” by decreasing the amount of estrogen circulating in the bloodstream and causing the fibroids to shrink. Like Depo-Provera, Lupron also causes amenorrhea. When used for a short time (from 3 to 6 months), Lupron has proven beneficial in reducing fibroid size making them surgically more manageable. It also helps to reverse the anemia (low red blood cell count) caused by increased vaginal bleeding. However, Lupron cannot be used for more than 6 months, as over-usage leads to bone loss (osteoporosis) and significant increases in triglyceride (a fat molecule) and cholesterol levels.

      Surgery
      Surgery is needed when your symptoms cannot be managed using medication. The surgical procedures that are used are described below. The one that is right for you depends on multiple factors including your age, the symptoms and types of fibroids you have, and your desire for future child bearing.

      * Abdominal Myomectomy involves the removal of fibroids (pedunculated, subserosal or intramural) from the uterine surface or wall through an incision made in the abdomen. This procedure is indicated if you have symptomatic fibroids and plan to have children in the future. The risks of an abdominal myomectomy include significant blood loss, post-operative infection, accumulation of scar tissue (with possible detrimental effects on fertility), possible need for cesarean section with subsequent pregnancies, and possible growth of new fibroids.

      * Hysteroscopy and Submucus Resection is performed through the vagina for the treatment of symptomatic submucosal fibroids. The cervix is dilated and a small camera (hysteroscope) is passed through the cervix into the endometrial cavity. This camera allows the physician to see a submucosal fibroid directly. A small wire with a weak electrical current is then used to shave the fibroid from the endometrial cavity. The risks of this procedure include infection, uterine perforation, and possible growth of new fibroids with recurrence of symptoms.

      * Laparoscopic Removal of Fibroids and Myolysis involve placing a small telescope (laparoscope) through the naval to visualize subserosal and pedunculated fibroids. A laser or electrical wire is then used to remove or dissolve the fibroid. There are very few indications for this procedure. If your fibroids are small enough to be treated this way, then you should discuss with your physician whether your fibroids actually need to be treated at all.

      * Hysterectomy is the removal of the uterus with or without the removal of the cervix. Hysterectomy is the only definitive treatment for fibroids and can be used for all types. It can be performed in several ways. An abdominal hysterectomy involves removing the uterus through a surgical incision in the abdomen, while a vaginal hysterectomy is done by making an incision in the vagina. In a laparoscopic-assisted vaginal hysterectomy, a laparoscope, inserted through the navel, is used to aid in the removal of the uterus through the vagina. A hysterectomy is indicated if you have symptomatic fibroids that cannot be managed by other means and you are done with child bearing. The type of hysterectomy that should be done depends upon the size and location of your fibroids. The complications of a hysterectomy include bleeding and infection.

      Uterine artery embolization
      An alternative to medical management or surgical treatment of fibroids is uterine artery embolization. Embolizations are performed by cardiovascular interventional radiologists. Your gynecologist should be able to refer you to one. In this specialized test, a small tube (catheter) is placed into the blood vessels going to your uterus. These vessels are then blocked so that the blood flow to the fibroids is greatly decreased. This blocking causes the fibroids to shrink, improving your symptoms. This procedure is indicated if you have symptomatic fibroids and would like to preserve fertility. The complications of this procedure are rare but include internal swelling from ruptured blood vessels (hematomas) and infection.

      Uterine fibroids can sometimes interfere with a healthy pregnancy. During pregnancy, uterine fibroids tend to grow to large sizes as they are triggered by your body�s increase in hormones. This can compromise the shape of your uterus and limit the amount of space that your baby has to grow. As a result, miscarriage or fetal malpresentations may occur. Uterine fibroids can also increase the chance of:

      * postpartum hemorrhaging
      * obstructed labor
      * stalled labor
      * cesarean section

  16. QUESTION:
    Hoe do you get pelvic inflammatory disease?
    My wife had abdominal pain and it was diagnosed as pid. The description of it is like an std but we have been married 8 years and know infidelity is not an issue. So if it is just some random infection do I still need to be treated and why? And how does an infection get there? All the doctor did was push on her abdomen and overy area.

    • ANSWER:
      Your wife needs to get a second opinion. If her doctor just felt her abdomen & ovaries....this is not a conclusive diagnosis. She could have an Ovarian Cyst, Fibroid, or Endometriosis or number of other possibilities.

      Pelvic inflammatory disease can today be diagnosed through a new procedure called, falloposcopy. Falloposcopy is a visual examination of the inside of the fallopian tubes; it's a simple procedure performed on an out- patient basis.

      Other tests for proper diagnosis include:
      .a WBC
      an ESR (sed rate)
      a wet prep or wet mount microscopic examination
      a serum HCG (pregnancy test)
      an endocervical culture for gonorrhea, chlamydia, or other organisms
      a laparoscopy (may be needed)
      pelvic ultrasound or CT scan (may be needed)

      After proper testing is completed & if PID is conclusively diagnosed, then there are many possible causes.

      The majority of pelvic inflammatory disease cases are caused by the same bacteria that lead to sexually transmitted diseases (such as chlamydia, gonorrhea, mycoplasma, staph, strep). By the way, you can also be a silent carrier of any of these STD's.

      Although the cause of PID most commonly spreads through sex, bacteria may also enter the body after gynecological procedures such as the insertion of an intrauterine device (IUD), childbirth, miscarriage, therapeutic or elective abortion, and endometrial biopsy.

      Risk factors:
      Past history of any sexually transmitted disease
      Practice of douching
      Insertion of an IUD
      Birth control pills are thought in some cases to lead to cervical ectropion, a condition that allows easier access to tissue where bacteria may grow. However, birth control pills may protect against PID by stimulating the body to produce a thicker cervical mucous, which makes it harder for semen to carry bacteria to the uterus.
      ____________________

  17. QUESTION:
    who knows the causes of dysmenorrhea?
    I often feel cramps in my abdomen during the period and I always have a very healthy diet, how that happens, who knows the real reason for my problem?

    • ANSWER:
      There are two types of dysmenorrhea:

      Primary dysmenorrhea is menstrual pain that's not a symptom of an underlying gynecologic disorder but is related to the normal process of menstruation. Primary dysmenorrhea is the most common type of dysmenorrhea, affecting more than 50% of women, and quite severe in about 15%. Primary dysmenorrhea is more likely to affect girls during adolescence. Fortunately for many women, the problem eases as they mature, particularly after a pregnancy. Although it may be painful and sometimes debilitating for brief periods of time, it is not harmful.

      Secondary dysmenorrhea is menstrual pain that is generally related to some kind of gynecologic disorder. Most of these disorders can be easily treated with medications or surgery. Secondary dysmenorrheal is more likely to affect women during adulthood.
      Primary dysmenorrhea is thought to be caused by excessive levels of prostaglandins, hormones that make your uterus contract during menstruation and childbirth. Its pain probably results from contractions of your uterus that occur when the blood supply to its lining (endometrium) is reduced.

      Usually, the pain will happen only during menstrual cycles in which an egg is released. The pain may progressively become worse as endometrial tissue shed during a menstrual period passes through the cervix, particularly when the cervical canal is narrow.

      Other factors that may make the pain of primary dysmenorrhea even worse include a uterus that tilts backward (retroverted uterus) instead of forward, lack of exercise, and psychological or social stress.

      Secondary dysmenorrhea may be caused by a number of conditions, including:

      fibroids - benign tumours that develop within the uterine wall or are attached to it
      adenomyosis - the tissue that lines the uterus (called the endometrium) begins to grow within its muscular walls
      a sexually transmitted infection (STI)
      endometriosis - fragments of the endometrial lining that are found on other pelvic organs
      pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), which is primarily an infection of the fallopian tubes, but can also affect the ovaries, uterus, and cervix
      an ovarian cyst or tumour
      the use of an intrauterine device (IUD), a birth control method
      External medicine cures internal diseases. This is the magic of black plaster.Ancient Dysmenorrheal Plaster can cure dysmenorrheal just because of the external application to lower abdomen and back of the waist. The principle is through applying the plaster to skin, the medicines permeate the lesion part, have effects on pathogenic factors and cure dysmenorrheal. For any details, please visit:http://www.nobleherb.com/goods-12.html

  18. QUESTION:
    What's gonna happen now after being told that I have 2 fibroids and 1 ovarian cyst?
    Whats gonna happen now? I'm very worried, the doctor says that first we're gonna be watching the cyst then we'll handle the fibroids.
    I gotta go in 2 weeks to see if after my period the cyst goes away, he says it's filled with fluid. I don't want a Hysterectomy cause I want to have kids, Have you or a loveone been through these 2 things and what happened?

    • ANSWER:
      fibroids are nothing to worry about, they can usually freeze them and pluck them right off (my mom gets them)

      as for the cyst, depending on how big and whatnot, they might just be able to drain it (using a needle) or might just cut it out. either way, it wont be a hysterectomy

      *****
      A cyst is a fluid-filled sac, and can be located anywhere in the body. On the ovary, different types of cysts can form. The most common type of ovarian cyst is called a functional cyst, which often forms during the normal menstrual cycle. Each month, a woman's ovaries grow tiny cysts that hold the eggs. When an egg is mature, the sac breaks open to release the egg, so it can travel through the fallopian tube for fertilization. Then the sac dissolves. In one type of functional cyst, called a follicular cyst, the sac doesn't break open to release the egg and may continue to grow. This type of cyst usually disappears within one to three months. A corpus luteum cyst, another type of functional cyst, forms if the sac doesn’t dissolve. Instead, the sac seals off after the egg is released. Fluid then builds up inside of it. This type of cyst usually goes away on its own after a few weeks. However, it can grow to almost four inches and may bleed or twist the ovary and cause pain. Clomid or Serophene, which are drugs used to induce ovulation, can raise the risk of getting this type of cyst. These cysts are almost never associated with cancer.

      There are also other types of cysts:

      Endometriomas. These cysts develop in women who have endometriosis, when tissue from the lining of the uterus grows outside of the uterus. The tissue may attach to the ovary and form a growth. These cysts can be painful during sexual intercourse and during menstruation.
      Cystadenomas. These cysts develop from cells on the outer surface of the ovary. They are often filled with a watery fluid or thick, sticky gel. They can become large and cause pain.
      Dermoid cysts. The cells in the ovary are able to make hair, teeth, and other growing tissues that become part of a forming ovarian cyst. These cysts can become large and cause pain.
      Polycystic ovaries. The eggs mature within the follicles, or sacs, but the sac doesn't break open to release the egg. The cycle repeats, follicles continue to grow inside the ovary, and cysts form
      How are cysts treated?
      Watchful waiting. The patient waits and gets re-examined in one to three months to see if the cyst has changed in size. This is a common treatment option for women who are in their childbearing years, have no symptoms, and have a fluid-filled cyst. It also might be an option for postmenopausal women.

      Surgery. If the cyst doesn’t go away after several menstrual periods, has gotten larger, looks unusual on the ultrasound, causes pain, or you’re postmenopausal, the doctor may want to remove it. There are two main surgical procedures:

      Laparoscopy—if the cyst is small and looks benign on the ultrasound, your doctor may perform a laparoscopy. This procedure is done under general anesthesia. A very small incision is made above or below the navel, and a small instrument that acts like a telescope is inserted into the abdomen. If the cyst is small and looks benign, it can be removed.
      Laparotomy—if the cyst is large and looks suspicious, the doctor may perform a procedure called a laparotomy. This procedure involves making bigger incisions in the stomach to remove the cyst. While you are under general anesthesia, the doctor is able to have the cyst tested to find out if the tissue is cancerous. If it is cancerous, the doctor may need to remove the ovary and other tissues that may be affected, like the uterus or lymph nodes.
      Birth control pills. If you frequently develop cysts, your doctor may prescribe birth control pills to prevent you from ovulating. This will lower the chances of forming new cysts.
      ***

      if you DO need surgery, dont worry, it would only be one overy, you still have another one and you would still be able to have kids

  19. QUESTION:
    How to ease period cramps?
    I've really bad cramps every month, is this normal? Because my friends, my mom and my sis don't seem to have my kind of cramps and they don't have cramps every month. They can stand and walk. But in my case, I find it extremely painful to get out of bed. Am I sick?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi,
      During menstrual periods, your uterus contracts to help expel its lining. Hormone-like substances (prostaglandins) involved in pain and inflammation trigger the uterine muscle contractions. Higher levels of prostaglandins are associated with more severe menstrual cramps.

      Many experts believe that severe contractions constrict the blood vessels feeding the uterus. The resulting pain can be compared to the angina that occurs when blocked coronary arteries starve portions of the heart of food and oxygen.

      Menstrual cramps also may be caused by:

      Endometriosis. In this painful condition, the tissue that lines your uterus becomes implanted outside your uterus, most commonly on your fallopian tubes, ovaries or the tissue lining your pelvis.

      Uterine fibroids. These noncancerous growths in the wall of the uterus rarely may be the cause of pain.
      Adenomyosis. In this condition, the tissue that lines your uterus begins to grow into the muscular walls of the uterus.

      Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). This infection of the female reproductive organs is usually caused by sexually transmitted bacteria.

      Cervical stenosis. In some women, the opening of the cervix may be so small that it impedes menstrual flow, causing a painful increase of pressure within the uterus.

      Menstrual cramps are a treatable condition. Your doctor may recommend:

      NSAIDs. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may be helpful in relieving the pain of menstrual cramps. Your doctor may initially suggest taking over-the-counter NSAIDs, such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others) or naproxen (Aleve), at regular doses starting the day before you expect your period to begin. Prescription NSAIDs, such as mefenamic acid (Ponstel), are also available.Hormonal birth control. Oral birth control pills contain hormones that prevent ovulation and reduce the severity of menstrual cramps. These hormones can also be delivered in several other forms: an injection, a patch you wear on your skin, an implant placed under the skin of your arm or a flexible ring that you insert into your vagina.

  20. QUESTION:
    Is their anyone who has ever had fribroid tumors?
    removed from their uterues if so did they come back and was recovery time long and where did they make the incisicion site on you cause i'm debating on whether to have them removed or have a partial hysterectomy and i'm only 26 with two kids but i had my tubes tied five years ago thanx!

    • ANSWER:
      Yes. It is good to deal with them while they are still small in size. If you are considering more kids, minimally invasive procedures may be worth trying, even if the Fibroids do return after a few years. However many of us LOVE never having to worry about pregnancy (PMS or monthly cycles) ever again.

      I had a fast-growing and large one, so I had limited choices, and insisted on a supra-cervical hysterectomy about 6 years ago. That means I kept my Ovaries and Cervix...to allow my body to return to (and maintain) a normal state on it's own, w/o any medicine. Several less invasive and effective procedures may be available to you.

      I healed fast, and am VERY happy to be relieved of Birth Control and Periods. I'm doing great at age 51 - with Hormone tests (and a body style) that says I'm still like in my 30's. I am not considered post-menopausal, even tho I have no Uterus or monthly hormone shifts. It's great! (a small side benefit is that I counted how much money I've saved in Birth Control and feminine products, and the procedure saves thousands of dollars can go to other things, like paying down a mortgage principal)

      If you are done having kids, a Uterine Embolization procedure might be for you, which cuts off blood flow and causes shrinkage of the tumors. Seeing a Naturopath with a specialty in women's health may be good - as Complimentary and Alternative therapies (like specialized Castor Oil pack) may help. But if tumors grow, you may be left facing a more radical surgery than necessary, so make it a priority to get all possible information on treatment alternatives. Google searches can help. Best wishes to you.

  21. QUESTION:
    i have a friend she collapse on the floor from her period and has really painful cramps and the ambulance came
    it happened just now. how can women preventing this from not happening anymore.her mom was screaming like i was scared as hell.it was a nightmare when i ran downstairs.
    how can females stop this from happening?

    a little help would be just great.

    • ANSWER:
      The condition of very painful periods is called, dysmenorreah. There are two ways this condition can cause extreme pain. One, the uterus releases a substance called prostaglandins. These produce pain. Two, the uterus produces clots that dialate, or open up, the cervix when they come out. The pain can be like childbirth. I suffered many years from extremely painful periods. I finally had the lining of my uterus lazered out and that stopped the heavy flow and painful periods for many years. It came back somewhat because eventually the uterine lining can regenerate itself but they never again were extreme like they had been. Then I went through menopause, relieving me of them forever! Anyway, if your friend still wants children and is young, she may not want to get her uterus lazered out, it prevents pregnancy. So, if there is nothing else structurally wrong with her, her best course of action would be to go on the pill.
      Birth control pills can be used for heavy painful periods, not just for preventing pregnancy. These pills can greatly reduce or even stop ovulation, sometimes up to six months at a time. She can talk to her Doctor about which one would work best for her. If it's not an ovulation or homone problem, they can do some tests to see if there is something else going on. It's possible she has endometriosis, a painful condition in which the uterine tissue can grow outside into other internal organs nearby like the fallopian tubes or the ovaries. Or she could have a fibroid tumor or cyst within the uterus, those can be painful. Or she could have an ovarian cyst on her ovaries that contributes to her pain when she menstruates. Whatever the cause, the proper tests can determine what's wrong. I hope she gets it resolved, good luck to her!

  22. QUESTION:
    What is Fybroid Tumors on the uterus?
    Why have an hysterectomy?

    • ANSWER:
      What are fibroids?
      Fibroid tumors are usually benign (non-cancerous) tumors found, most often, in the uterus of women in their 30's and 40's, although they occasionally develop on other organs which contain smooth muscle cells.
      Fibroid tumors are solid tumors which are made of fibrous tissue, hence the name 'fibroid' tumor. Most often fibroids occur as multiple tumor masses which are slow-growing and often cause no symptoms.

      The size of fibroids varies immensely among women and some are so small that a microscope is required to see them. However some women experience a single large fibroid tumor the size of a grapefruit or a fibroid which is so large it encompasses the entire abdominal area. Such large tumors can weigh as much as 50 pounds; the largest, reported, fibroid ever recorded weighed in at 140 pounds.

      No one is sure why fibroid tumors develop, but some facts are quite clear-- they do not develop before the body begins producing estrogen during the onset of menstruation-- estrogen, such as in birth control pills and taken for menopausal symptoms, does cause fibroid tumors to grow and fibroid tumors will grow very quickly during pregnancy when the body is producing extra estrogen-- they often shrink and disappear after menopause when the body stops producing estrogen--a woman will almost never develop fibroid tumors after menopause.

      The estrogen connection appears to be quite clear, although there are still some who doubt the role estrogen plays in the development of fibroid tumors because women with fibroids often have blood levels which reveal normal amounts of estrogen.

      Types of Fibroid Tumors
      Submucous Fibroids

      These fibroids occur just below the lining of the uterus and can cause menstrual problems, including pain as they grow and move around the pelvic area.

      Intramural Fibroids

      A round fibroid most often within the uterine wall which can cause enlargement of the uterus as they grow.

      Subserous Fibroids

      This fibroid grows on the outer wall of the uterus and usually causes no symptoms until it grows large enough to interfere with other organs.

      Pedunculated Fibroids

      These fibroids develop when a subserous fibroid grows a peduncle (stalk), as they grow larger they may become twisted and cause severe pain.

      Interligamentous Fibroid

      A fibroid which grows sideways between the ligaments which support the uterus in the abdominal region. This type of fibroid is especially difficult to remove without the possibility of interfering with the blood supply or other organs.

      Parasitic Fibroid

      The rarest form of fibroid tumor occurs when a fibroid attaches itself to another organ.

      Diagnosis of Fibroid Tumors
      Diagnosis of fibroids is generally made by your physician during your annual gynecological exam when your physician feels a mass, they often are found when your physician is looking for something else or may never be discovered if you do not experience symptoms. However larger fibroids may make examination of your ovaries impossible if they grow near your ovaries.

      An ultrasound scan is often ordered when such masses are felt by your physician to determine the cause of the mass, however some fibroids appear on sonograms as ovarian tumors and surgery is the only way an accurate diagnosis can be made.

      Although most fibroids cause no symptoms, the estimated 25 percent of women who do have symptoms may have abnormal bleeding, pain during menstruation, and as the fibroid tumors grow larger, women will often experience a swollen abdomen.

      Larger fibroids may cause frequent urination or an inability to control your bladder, either the ability to control the urge or in severe cases, a women may find that she is unable to urinate at all. If a fibroid extends towards a woman's back it may push on the bowels, causing constipation and a backache.

  23. QUESTION:
    Birth control for women over 40. Need very reliable but safe! Is there such a thing?
    I'm 44 and trying to figure out the best form of birth control. I'm concerned about using any with hormones at my age. I'm a non-smoker, pretty healthy, normal weight, have had 1 child and am in a monogamous relationship.

    I definitely don't want to risk pregnancy. My son is grown, in college and I don't plan to have more children.

    I'd like to get any info from women who've used the low estrogen pills, and any and all info on use of other forms of bc!
    Any bad experiences, side effects, failures?

    I've read so many statistics that go back and forth on the safety of taking the pill/hormones, especially for women over 35-40. A cancer can take so long to manifest itself, how can you really know?

    I am using the Today sponge. I thought it was a pretty effective method, so it says on the box. In reading online medical sources, it has a 15-40 % failure rate out of 100!

    I know a tubaligation is an option, but the thought of making it so final is a mental thing..no more babies.

    • ANSWER:
      Talk to your GYN doctor about a new procedure being done.You're not planning on having more children so you need to make a permanent decision fast.I have fibroids for staying with the pill too long I was like you about having a tubal done.My doctor told me that hormones cause fibroids.I will be having a procedure that is simpler than a hysterectomy with a lot less healing time.It's called a UFC,Uterine Fibroid Embolization.It's less invasive,and the procedure for permanent birth control has less recovery time than a tubal.They insert two small coils to keep the egg from becoming fertilized.Talk to your doctor and ask about the procedure he can explain to you in detail.It's called Tubal Occlusion Procedure(non-surgical sterilization)Good Luck.

  24. QUESTION:
    Good medicine to take for period cramps?
    I mean like stuff I can find in the counter; Advil, Tylenol, etc. What do you think works best? Or what else do you use?? Thanks:)

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroids are benign tumors within or along the uterine wall," says Dr Brill. They can be as small as an apple seed or as large as a grapefruit, and several can occur at once. They typically crop up in your 30s and 40s; 40 percent of women have one by their mid-30s. African-American women have a higher risk.

      Though fibroids can cause pain, they generally trigger a feeling of moderate pressure in the pelvis at any given time. And the closer they are to the lining of the uterus, the heavier your flow-it may last longer than seven days and/or you may have to change your tampon every hour or two, says Dr Minkin.

      The good news is that unless the pelvic pressure is really major or having a heavy flow is a hassle, there's no need to treat them. But if the pain and blood flow are bad, your gyno can shrink them via medication or, in rare cases, recommend surgery to remove the growths.

      Symptom-"I get insane pelvic pain throughout the month-even during sexual intercourse."
      Possible culprit-Endometriosis

      You should go to a doctor as soon as these symptoms start. It's hard to diagnose partly because so many women think it's just severe menstrual cramps, so they don't even see their gyno for tests. Endometriosis typically brings on a really killer pain in the lower abdomen-and sometimes in the back and thighs as well-that often can't be alleviated by OTC meds.

      This pain can pop up any time of the month. A heavy flow can also be a sign, as can be painful sex. "It'll feel like you have cramps during intercourse because your guy's penis rubs the tissue growing outside of the uterus," says Dr. Minkin.

      Any of this sound familiar to you? Then make an appointment with your gyno as soon as possible. If she diagnoses you with endometriosis, birth-control pills or other hormones can slow the growth of the renegade tissue. In extremely severe cases, surgery may be needed to reduce the amount of tissue that's built up outside the uterus.

  25. QUESTION:
    Pains in pelvic area during intercourse - 3 months postpartum?
    I had my baby three months ago. My husband and I resumed sexual activity at about 8 weeks postpartum and things had been fine, but just recently I have been getting pains in what feels like my uterus during intercourse. What could this be? I have recently stopped breastfeeding. Could it have something to do with my changing hormones? My menstrual cycle has not yet returned. Anyone else have this happen to them?

    • ANSWER:
      If Sex Hurts
      Some common reasons that lovemaking might be uncomfortable for moms By Arricca Sansone

      It's hard enough for parents to find time for sex, so it's disappointing when it's painful. Some common reasons that lovemaking might be uncomfortable for moms, from Laura Berman, Ph.D., coauthor of The Passion Prescription: Ten Weeks to Your Best Sex — Ever!

      Tearing and scarring
      Even if you're past the six-week postdelivery, no-sex period, episiotomy scars may still not have healed completely.

      What to do: Be honest with your doctor about how much pain you're having. It can take as long as a year for the tender tissues around the perineum (the area cut during an episiotomy) to heal entirely after childbirth. Scar tissue can also cause pain during sex but can be treated by topical medications, therapy, or exercises.

      Dryness
      Estrogen levels, which help keep you lubricated during sex, often drop when you're breastfeeding and may not return to normal until six months after you stop. Oral contraceptives can have a similar effect.

      What to do: Use an over-the-counter lubricant. If you're on the Pill, talk to your doctor about changing to another brand or method of birth control.

      Irritation
      An infection can cause an itchy or sandpapery feeling during urination or sex, vaginal redness, or a cottage cheese–like discharge.

      What to do: See your doctor right away: It could be a yeast infection. If so, he'll prescribe a topical cream or pill or suggest an over-the-counter treatment. Or it could be bacterial vaginosis, which is usually treated with antibiotics.

      Pelvic pain
      Deep pelvic or lower-back pain during sex could be due to fibroids (noncancerous uterine growths), an ovarian cyst, or endometriosis (uterine tissue growing outside the uterus).

      What to do: See your doctor. Once he diagnoses the problem, he'll suggest treatment. For example,the Pill can slow down endometriosis, and uterine artery embolization (a minimally invasive procedure) treats fibroids. Or he may simply advise physical therapy and/or exercises.

  26. QUESTION:
    Ladies!Please tell Can Heavy Periods control your life Or can you control them?

    • ANSWER:
      A common, treatable problem
      If you have heavy periods, you're not alone. Heavy periods or menorraghia (pronounced men-or-ah-jah) affects 1 in 5 women of reproductive age, causing excessive menstruation that regularly interferes with daily activities.
      You may be hesitant to discuss your symptoms with a doctor. What you may not realize, however, is that treatment can bring relief.
      Next: What are Heavy Periods?

      Causes of Heavy Periods
      Several medical conditions may cause or contribute to heavy periods. It's also possible to experience heavy periods with no known cause.

      Hormonal imbalance: An imbalance of the female hormones estrogen and progesterone. Hormonal imbalance can also be signs of early menopause (also known as perimenopause), which can lead to irregular or heavy periods.

      Fibroids: Benign (noncancerous) growths in the smooth muscle tissue of the walls of the uterus, or womb. They can be as small as a pea or grow larger than a grapefruit. Pressure from fibroids may build with each menstrual cycle and cause heavy periods. Learn more about fibroids.

      Medication: Some drugs, such as anticoagulants (drugs that prevent the clotting of blood) or anti-inflammatory medications, can cause heavy or prolonged periods.

      Infection or Disease: Heavy periods can also be a sign of more serious conditions like certain types of cancer or infections in the uterus.

      Treatments for Heavy Periods
      Medical experts often treat heavy periods with less invasive methods first, such as birth control pills or global endometrial ablation (GEA), and reserve hysterectomy for specific circumstances.

      Birth control pillsBirth control pills can help reduce menstrual flow by up to 60%, but it may not be the best option for all women.

      For some women, birth control pills are simply ineffective in reducing heavy periods. For others, the potential side effects of weight gain, mood swings and breast tenderness may be too undesirable.

      Global endometrial ablation (GEA)If birth control pills have not been a successful treatment for you, GEA may offer an effective, nonhormonal option.

      During an endometrial ablation procedure, your doctor inserts a catheter into the uterus (womb) to treat the endometrium, the lining of the uterus. Over the next week or so after treatment, the uterine lining sheds, much like it would during menstruation, resulting in lighter periods.

      Ablation treatments may be performed in a doctor’s office or in a hospital. Learn more about GEA.

      HysterectomyIf birth control pills or endometrial ablation have not been effective or are not advised for you, your doctor may recommend a hysterectomy. In fact, about 30-35% of hysterectomies are performed annually to treat heavy periods.

      Before you commit to having a hysterectomy, however, you should know that it is a major surgery. Explore your hysterectomy options, To learn about less invasive treatments with shorter recovery times.

      You don’t have to live with heavy periods, and you do have options. Find a doctor who can help.

  27. QUESTION:
    Is it normal to bleed after sex alot of the time even though I have been having sex for over three years?

    • ANSWER:
      I just had this happen for the first time a week or so ago- here's what I found online

      You've just finished making love, and you're in that pleasant dream-like state when you go to the bathroom and discover that you are bleeding. Nothing can bring you back to reality faster than vaginal bleeding after sex. Post-coital bleeding can occur for a number of reasons, and is nothing to take lightly. Here's a look at the top 10 causes of vaginal bleeding after sex:

      1. Cervical dysplasia: Cervical dysplasia is precancerous changes of the epithelial cells that line the cervix. Risk increases with multiple sexual partners, sex before age 18, childbirth before age 16, or a past history of STDs. Treatment is usually cryosurgery or conisation.

      2. Chlamydia: A bacterial infection that is usually transmitted through sexual activity or contact with semen, vaginal fluid, or blood.

      3. Gonorrhea: A usually sexually transmitted disease caused by a bacteria. Several pharmaceutical treatments are available.

      4. Vaginitis or Cervicitis: Inflammation or swelling and infection of the vagina or cervix. Treatment depends on the cause.

      5. Cervical polyps: Cervical polyps are smooth, red or purple, finger-like growths that grow out of the mucuos layer of the cervix or the cervical canal. Cervical polyps are extremely fragile, extending out of the cervix, and easily and painlessly removed.

      6. Trichomoniasis: A usually sexually transmitted disease caused by protozoan. Can also be passed to newborns during vaginal birth by infected mothers. Although rare, transmission is also possible in tap water, hot tubs, urine, on toilet seats, and in swimming pools. May cause vaginitis.

      7. Vaginal Yeast Infection: An overgrowth of the normal fungi that inhabits the vaginal area. Common symptoms include itching, burning, and an odorless, white, cheese-like discharge.

      8. Endometritis or adenomyosis: Endometritis is defined by Dorland's Medical Dictionary, 27th Edition as an inflammation of the endometrium (the innermost layer of the uterus). Both conditions are associated with endometriosis. Adenomysis is when endometrial tissue attaches itself to the uterus, or another organ such as the ovaries, and grows outside of the uterus.

      9. Uterine polyps: Uterine polyps occur when the endometrium overgrows causing these protrusions into the uterus. It is extremely rare for these growths to grow in a way that is either benign or malignant. Women with uterine polyps frequently experience bleeding between periods (metrorrhagia), other symptoms includes vaginal bleeding after sex, spotting, menorrhagia, bleeding after menopause, and breakthrough bleeding during hormone therapy. Hysteroscopic-guided curettage is the prefered treatment, since the normal D&C is basically an unguided procedure that may miss many of the uterine polyps.

      10. Fibroid tumors: Uterine fibroid tumors are usually benign tumors. They are solid masses made of fibrous tissue. Fibroid tumors are rarely malignant. Symptoms of fibroid tumors vary among women, with some women never experiencing any symptoms at all. Women who can wait until menopause will see their fibroids shrink and disappear once their bodies stop producing estrogen. It's important that women with fibroids make sure they never take estrogen, in any form including birth control pills, since estrogen increases fibroid growth. Several treatments are currently available for uterine fibroid tumors from myomectomy and uterine artery embolization to the traditional hysterectomy.

      Diagnosing vaginal bleeding after sex is usually a matter of exclusion. Anytime you experience post-coital bleeding or vaginal bleeding after sex call your doctor immediately!

  28. QUESTION:
    My left boob hurts but im not pregnant?
    Ok my left boob is getting a little bigger then my right one...its tender and sometimes itches...im 2o years old do not have kids...am on the birth control patch...and for sure am not pregnant and havnt had sex for over 2 months... Please help if you have any idea of what it is and how the hell can I even out these two?

    • ANSWER:
      My first question would be have you ever taken any anabolic steroids to pump up muscle? Sometimes steroid injections can cause this type of problem, but usually only in the injection site.

      Second, it is normal for every woman's breasts to be a little different in size. It's part of the normal growth process and nothing to worry about. But, if this growth is something you've actually watched happen (as in, they used to be about the same size and now you see this one growing larger) you should get to your OB/gyn immediately. Fluctuating hormone levels can sometimes cause this (especially with the itching), but the tenderness and swelling should be checked out by a medical professional as soon as possible. You could possibly have fibroid tumors which are benign (thank goodness) but can cause a great deal of pain and tenderness. Until you see your doctor, try to cut back on caffeine and chocolate (as these can flare up fibroids and make them hurt worse).

      Good luck, and I pray that it is nothing serious. Too many women these days wait too long to see their doctors, when a 1 hour office visit can usually alleviate alot of pain, suffering, and worry. Please see your OB/GYN at first appointment. :)

  29. QUESTION:
    Long lasting menstrual cycle, what is happening?
    As of last year, my period has been lasting more than the usual one week ,up to two in most cases. Last year two, I did not get it the whole month of September, then did so in October, but it wasnt the usual flow, and more like spotting, or pinkish clear, when I wipe. I have no pains in my abdomen or anything. I have gone to the doctor, and am scheduled for the gynecologist this coming week. I was previously on birth control pills,about a year or so ago, it regulated my period, however, I stopped. Could that also be a cause? Thanks.
    Okay, so my period stopped for two/three days, and it has started up again. It is not heavy, but light. That color when you whipe after urinating, and it sometimes comes out dark. Now, that I am due for a pap smear, I cannot do it because of this. Would it be best if I ask to be put on the pill to regulate my period? I'm getting scared now ..

    • ANSWER:
      At age 18, I had this same problem you are describing. I was not taking the pill but rather the Depo Prevera shot. It is a birth control shot you get once every three months. So, I mean, these same symptoms happened to me. I would suggest talking to your Dr. while at your appointment. And ask your gyn if it could also be fibroids. They grow on your uterus and they are like tumors...causes severe cramping, irregular cycles and this could be a possibility.

  30. QUESTION:
    I heard that if you have bad menstrual cramps you may have cervical cancer?

    • ANSWER:
      Physical problems that can cause bad cramping include:

      -A condition in which cells that look and act like the cells of the lining of the uterus (endometrium) are found in other parts of the abdominal cavity (endometriosis) or grow into the muscular tissue of the uterine wall (adenomyosis). Pain usually occurs 1 to 2 days before menstrual bleeding begins and continues through the period.
      -Growths that are not cancerous (benign growths) in the pelvis, such as ovarian cysts, cervical or uterine polyps, or fibroids.
      -Pelvic infections. Your risk for developing an infection is higher after menstrual bleeding has begun because the opening to the uterus (cervical canal) widens during menstruation. However, pelvic infections, especially those caused by sexually transmitted diseases, can occur at any time.
      -Using an intrauterine device (IUD). An IUD may cause increased cramping during your period for the first few months of use. If menstrual cramping persists or gets worse, you may need to consider having the IUD removed and choosing another birth control method.
      -Problems with pregnancy.
      -Structural problems that were present at birth (congenital), such as narrowing of the lower part of the uterus that opens into the vagina (cervix).

      Women with precancerous lesions in their cervix usually have no symptoms. A woman usually does not have any symptoms until the cells turn into cancer and invade the deepest parts of the cervix or other pelvic organs. That is why it is important that you have a regular Pap test. This test checks for cells that are cancer or precancer.

      In the early stages of cervical cancer, you may have few symptoms. They may not be alarming to you, but it is a good idea to have them checked by a doctor. These are some of the early symptoms.

      -Vaginal discharge. Cervical cancer can cause more vaginal discharge than usual. This discharge is often bloody or foul smelling.
      -Abnormal vaginal bleeding. If you have cervical cancer, you may have bleeding between your periods or after sexual intercourse. Blood flow during your period may be heavier and last longer than usual.
      -Odor. You may notice a strange or unpleasant odor from vaginal discharge.
      -Pain. You may have pain during sex or pain in the pelvic area unrelated to sex or other activities.

      If you have a more advanced cancer that has spread, you may have these symptoms. These signs usually mean that the cancer has spread to the tissue around the cervix.

      -Pain in the pelvic area
      -Heavy bleeding from the vagina
      -A single swollen leg

  31. QUESTION:
    Long period lasting over 2 weeks?
    I'm 20 and have been having my menstrul cycle since I was in grade school. I've never had an unusally long period until recently. Last month my period lasted only a few days instead of my normal 6-7 and this month Im going on to 17 days now. Im not on birth control nor have I ever been but I am sexually active. I'd go to a doctor but I dont have medical insrance anyone have any ideas what it could be?

    • ANSWER:
      The following are examples of possible menstrual problems. While most menstrual abnormalities are not cause for concern, they can sometimes signal other medical problems. Therefore, all persistent menstrual abnormalities should be evaluated by a physician. Many problems can be effectively treated with hormonal therapies or other options.

      Dysmenorrhea (severe cramps and pain): Uterine contractions are normal during the menstrual period. However, for some women, these contractions cause severe lower abdominal cramps that can begin several hours or days before the onset of menstruation. Dysmenorrhea is divided into two categories: primary and secondary. Primary dysmenorrhea is characterized by intense menstrual cramps that usually begin within the first three years of menstruation. Primary dysmenorrhea is caused by normal uterine contractions. More than 50% of all women suffer from primary dysmenorrhea. Many women find that nonprescription drugs such as aspirin, ibuprofen, and naproxen sodium relieve these cramps. Secondary dysmenorrhea is the onset of severe cramps that occur from other medical conditions, such as non-cancerous uterine tumors (fibroids) or endometriosis (a condition in which the uterine tissue lining grows outside of the uterus).

      Menorrhagia (heavy menstrual periods): Most women who need to change tampons or pads frequently or experience long periods (more than six days) do not have dangerously heavy periods (menorrhagia). In many cases, these women may simply have thicker uterine linings that cause them to bleed longer. However, heavy bleeding can be a sign of other conditions, such as non-cancerous uterine tumors (fibroids), pelvic inflammatory disease, abnormal blood clotting, or other problems. Women who experience heavy periods should report the problem to their physicians for further investigation. Heavy bleeding that is independent of other conditions can often be treated with oral contraceptives or other hormonal therapy.

      Metrorrhagia (bleeding between periods): Vaginal bleeding that occurs between periods (metorrhagia) may sometimes be called breakthrough bleeding or "spotting." There are several causes of metorrhagia, including oral contraceptives (usually only within the first one to three months of use), a dislodged intrauterine device (IUD), infection, inflammation of the uterus, polyps on the cervix, or an early miscarriage. Bleeding between periods is also common in young women when they just begin menstruating or near the time of ovulation (approximately 14 days before menstruation) in young adult women.

      Oligomenorrhea (irregular or abnormally light menstrual periods): Oligomenorrhea is defined as having fewer than eleven menstrual periods a year. This is common in young women who just begin menstruating and women who are approaching menopause. Other causes of oligomenorrhea including pregnancy, thyroid disease, an acute illness, the use of oral contraceptives, stress, emotional problems, etc. Persistent, unexplained irregular periods should be evaluated by a physician.

      Primary amenorrhea (failure to begin menstruating): The most common cause of primary amenorrhea is late puberty, which is usually genetically inherited and is not a cause for concern. However, if menstruation has not begun by age 16, clinical investigation is usually warranted. Occasionally, primary amenorrhea may be caused by hormonal problems or abnormalities of the pituitary gland, thyroid or adrenal glands, or the ovaries. Sometimes, hormonal therapy can help treat primary amenorrhea. In rare cases, failure to begin menstruating signals a missing part of the reproductive tract (such as the ovaries, uterus, or chromosomal abnormality).

      Secondary amenorrhea (absence of menstruation): The secondary form of amenorrhea occurs after a regular menstrual cycle has already been established. The absence of menstruation for four months or longer is considered to be amenorrhea. Secondary amenorrhea has several causes including pregnancy, breast-feeding, discontinued use of oral contraceptives, too little body fat, drastic dieting or eating disorders (such as anorexia), intense exercise, stress, chronic diseases (such as thyroid disorders), or the use of tranquilizers or antidepressants. In many cases, menstruation returns on its own and there is little cause for concern unless the woman wants to become pregnant. However, women who do not menstruate for four months or longer should be evaluated by a physician to determine whether lifestyle changes or medications (such as oral contraceptives or other hormonal therapy) are necessary.

  32. QUESTION:
    Is it necessary that myome to be removed or just have to be there when it not disturbed you.?
    Is there a possibility that it grows bigger then whats the risk.

    • ANSWER:
      I'm going to go out on a limb and assume "myome" means "uterine fibroid" in another language. If it doesn't bother you (pain/bleeding ?), there is no reason to do anything about it. Yes, it can grow bigger. Fibroids often regress on their own after menopause. They are stimulated by estrogen, so when you stop producing estrogen, they go away.

      Besides surgical removal (myomectomy--remove just the fibroid; hysterectomy--remove the entire uterus), there are other things doctors can do. If the fibroids are causing abnormal bleeding, birth control pills can often relieve the symptoms. They won't get rid of the fibroids however (though they might shrink a little). Once you stop the pill, the fibroids will start bleeding again. A newer method to get rid of them is uterine artery embolization. An interventional radiologist feeds a catheter through your arteries until he reaches the fibroid. Then he injects some things that clog up the artery that is feeding the fibroid. Without a good blood supply, the fibroid should regress.

      Ask your doctor for more details....

  33. QUESTION:
    what is going on bleeding after sex?
    After havin sex I have notice when i go use the bathroom I would pee bleed. But I just had my period like a week ago. this has never happend to me befor help. cause we are trying to have a baby. and everytime we have sex and after waitin to get up. Im always leckin everything out it seems like

    • ANSWER:
      You've just finished making love, and you're in that pleasant dream-like state when you go to the bathroom and discover that you are bleeding. Nothing can bring you back to reality faster than vaginal bleeding after sex. Post-coital bleeding can occur for a number of reasons, and is nothing to take lightly. Here's a look at the top 10 causes of vaginal bleeding after sex:

      1. Cervical dysplasia:Cervical dysplasia is precancerous changes of the epithelial cells that line the cervix. Risk increases with multiple sexual partners, sex before age 18, childbirth before age 16, or a past history of STDs. Treatment is usually cryosurgery or conisation.

      2. Chlamydia: A bacterial infection that is usually transmitted through sexual activity or contact with semen, vaginal fluid, or blood.

      3. Gonorrhea: A usually sexually transmitted disease caused by a bacteria. Several pharmaceutical treatments are available.

      4. Vaginitis or Cervicitis: Inflammation or swelling and infection of the vagina or cervix. Treatment depends on the cause.

      5. Cervical polyps: Cervical polyps are smooth, red or purple, finger-like growths that grow out of the mucus layer of the cervix or the cervical canal. Cervical polyps are extremely fragile, extending out of the cervix, and easily and painlessly removed.

      6. Trichomoniasis: A usually sexually transmitted disease caused by protozoan. Can also be passed to newborns during vaginal birth by infected mothers. Although rare, transmission is also possible in tap water, hot tubs, urine, on toilet seats, and in swimming pools. May cause vaginitis.

      7. Vaginal yeast infection: An overgrowth of the normal fungi that inhabits the vaginal area. Common symptoms include itching, burning, and an odorless, white, cheese-like discharge.

      8. Endometritis or adenomyosis: Endometritis is defined by Dorland's Medical Dictionary, 27th Edition as an inflammation of the endometrium (the innermost layer of the uterus). Both conditions are associated with endometriosis. Adenomysis is when endometrial tissue attaches itself to the uterus, or another organ such as the ovaries, and grows outside of the uterus.

      9. Uterine polyps: Uterine polyps occur when the endometrium overgrows causing these protrusions into the uterus. It is extremely rare for these growths to grow in a way that is either benign or malignant. Women with uterine polyps frequently experience bleeding between periods (metrorrhagia), other symptoms includes vaginal bleeding after sex, spotting, menorrhagia, bleeding after menopause, and breakthrough bleeding during hormone therapy. Hysteroscopic-guided curettage is the preferred treatment, since the normal D&C is basically an unguided procedure that may miss many of the uterine polyps.

      10. Fibroid tumors: Uterine fibroid tumors are usually benign tumors. They are solid masses made of fibrous tissue. Fibroid tumors are rarely malignant. Symptoms of fibroid tumors vary among women, with some women never experiencing any symptoms at all. Women who can wait until menopause will see their fibroids shrink and disappear once their bodies stop producing estrogen. It's important that women with fibroids make sure they never take estrogen, in any form including birth control pills, since estrogen increases fibroid growth. Several treatments are currently available for uterine fibroid tumors from myomectomy and uterine artery embolization to the traditional hysterectomy.

      Diagnosing vaginal bleeding after sex is usually a matter of exclusion. Anytime you experience post-coital bleeding or vaginal bleeding after sex see your physician.

  34. QUESTION:
    Is it normal when a girl is not on her period but when she has sex she bleed and she is not a virgin?

    • ANSWER:
      Top 10 causes of vaginal bleeding after sex:

      Chlamydia: A bacterial infection that is usually transmitted through sexual activity or contact with semen, vaginal fluid, or blood.

      Gonorrhea: A usually sexually transmitted disease caused by a bacteria.

      Cervical dysplasia: Cervical dysplasia is precancerous changes of the epithelial cells that line the cervix. Risk increases with multiple sexual partners, sex before age 18, childbirth before age 16, or a past history of STDs. Treatment is usually cryosurgery or conisation.

      Vaginitis or Cervicitis: Inflammation or swelling and infection of the vagina or cervix. Treatment depends on the cause.

      Cervical polyps: Cervical polyps are smooth, red or purple, finger-like growths that grow out of the mucuos layer of the cervix or the cervical canal. Cervical polyps are extremely fragile, extending out of the cervix, and easily and painlessly removed.

      Trichomoniasis: A usually sexually transmitted disease caused by protozoan. Can also be passed to newborns during vaginal birth by infected mothers. Although rare, transmission is also possible in tap water, hot tubs, urine, on toilet seats, and in swimming pools. May cause vaginitis.

      Vaginal Yeast Infection: An overgrowth of the normal fungi that inhabits the vaginal area. Common symptoms include itching, burning, and an odorless, white, cheese-like discharge.

      Endometritis or adenomyosis: Endometritis is defined by Dorland's Medical Dictionary, 27th Edition as an inflammation of the endometrium (the innermost layer of the uterus). Both conditions are associated with endometriosis. Adenomysis is when endometrial tissue attaches itself to the uterus, or another organ such as the ovaries, and grows outside of the uterus.

      Uterine polyps: Uterine polyps occur when the endometrium overgrows causing these protrusions into the uterus. It is extremely rare for these growths to grow in a way that is either benign or malignant. Women with uterine polyps frequently experience bleeding between periods (metrorrhagia), other symptoms includes vaginal bleeding after sex, spotting, menorrhagia, bleeding after menopause, and breakthrough bleeding during hormone therapy. Hysteroscopic-guided curettage is the prefered treatment, since the normal D&C is basically an unguided procedure that may miss many of the uterine polyps.

      Fibroid tumors: Uterine fibroid tumors are usually benign tumors. They are solid masses made of fibrous tissue. Fibroid tumors are rarely malignant. Symptoms of fibroid tumors vary among women, with some women never experiencing any symptoms at all. Women who can wait until menopause will see their fibroids shrink and disappear once their bodies stop producing estrogen. It's important that women with fibroids make sure they never take estrogen, in any form including birth control pills, since estrogen increases fibroid growth. Several treatments are currently available for uterine fibroid tumors from myomectomy and uterine artery embolization to the traditional hysterectomy.

      Diagnosing vaginal bleeding after sex is usually a matter of exclusion. Anytime you experience post-coital bleeding or vaginal bleeding after sex call your doctor immediately!

  35. QUESTION:
    Should I start having kids now?
    Hi, I'm 26. I was recently diagnosed with a 5cm cyst on my left ovary. Fibroids, endometrial hyperplasia (shown on MRI and sonogram), and possible endometriosis (yea the whole 9 yards). I'll get the cyst remove in 2 weeks and a D & C. I dont have any kids. I really need some advised if I should start having kids now ( of course after the surgery ) or wait. Please help!!!

    • ANSWER:
      I'm 26..happily married and just now having our first...I'm 25weeks pregnant with our daughter.

      First- I have severe endometriosis...I was treated by being on birth control...and I'm surprised you're just now being diagnosed at 26. I began showing symptoms at 13. (Severe cramps, heavy periods)

      All of what you have stated is easily treated...and I suggest trying a BCP to decrease the growing off the uterine lining that causes the scar tissue associated with endometriosis, endometrial hyperplasia...and the fibroids...most of the time it helps with cyst formation also.

      Having children is a personal decision...I agree would the above, Ask yourself, would you be having children if you were well? Are you ready?

  36. QUESTION:
    My ultrasound showed a 8.4 * 8.0 cm fibroid in the posterior wall of my uterus is this a big fibroid?
    My uterus is enlarged the size of 11.2 * 8.1cm, my ovaries are normal and also my kidneys could having this fibroid stop me from becoming pregnant PLEASE HELPPPPPPPPPPP PLEASEEEEEEEE could I have some response ASAP PLEASEEEEEEEEE thank you

    • ANSWER:
      Help for Women With Fibroids
      c. 2002 Susun S. Weed

      Wise Woman herbal and home remedies are simple, safe ways to help yourself when you have a diagnosis of uterine fibroids.

      Uterine fibroids are solid muscle tissue growths in the uterus. They are also called fibroid tumors, myomas, or leiomyomas. Fibroids occur so frequently (in up to half of all women over forty) that they could be considered a normal irregularity. The occasional fibroid can become enormous (medical literature reports one that was 100 pounds!), but the majority (80%) remain as small as a walnut.

      Fibroids are the number one reason American women have hysterectomies.

      The causes of uterine fibroids are unknown, but estrogens, especially estradiol, promote their growth. After menopause fibroids disappear. But because estrogen levels can rise during the early menopausal years, previously asymptomatic fibroids may grow in the years just before the cessation of menses, resulting in symptoms such as feeling of heaviness in the belly, low back pain, pain with vaginal penetration, urinary frequency or incontinence, bowel difficulties, or severe menstrual pain and flooding.

      Women of color are three to nine times more likely to have fibroids than white women, and theirs will grow more quickly.

      Fibroid tumors are not cancer, not malignant. Tumor means a swelling or a growth, not a malignancy, not cancer. Less than 0.1% of all uterine fibroids are malignant.

      Small fibroids often disappear spontaneously. Larger fibroids are more difficult to resolve, but not impossible to control with natural measures.

      • The “root chakra” (lowermost energy center in the body, which includes the uterus) said to store unexpressed anger. It is believed that any unwanted growths in these organs can be countered by allowing the anger to safely discharge.

      • One woman’s fibroids (and menstrual cramps) disappeared within three months of beginning a vigorous exercise program. Exercise helps insure regular ovulation, and irregular ovulation seems to worsen fibroids.

      • Consuming three or more servings of whole grains or beans daily not only reduces the size of fibroids but offers protection from breast and endometrial cancers as well.

      • Red clover flowers (Trifolium pratense), are one of my favorite infusions, but use during the menopausal years may increase difficulty with fibroids.

      • Strengthening the liver with herbs such as dandelion, milk thistle seed, or yellow dock root helps it metabolize estrogen out of the body, thus reducing fibroids.

      • Vitex or chasteberry tincture, 25-30 drops two to four times daily, often shrinks small fibroids within two months. But results come from long-term use — up to two years.

      • Ask someone to burn moxa over the area of the fibroid while you envision the heat releasing the treasures in your uterus. What is locked up in this fibroid? What can you give birth to?

      • Acupuncture treatments can shrink fibroids.

      • Poke root (Phytolacca americana), used internally as a tincture (1-10 drops per day; start small) and externally as a belly rub oil, has gained a reputation as a profound helper in relieving pain and distresses from fibroids. CAUTION: Poke is considered poisonous; it is not often found for sale. This is one remedy you may have to make yourself to try.

      • Warm castor oil packs on the belly, or ginger compresses (soak a towel in hot ginger water) relieve pain and help shrink the fibroids.

      • The use of progesterone to treat women with uterine fibroids is hotly debated. One side holds that fibroids are created by lack of progesterone. The other side makes, to my mind, the better case: that progesterone increases fibroids. Evidence? Fibroids increase in size during pregnancy, when progesterone production is high, and atrophy after menopause, when progesterone levels decrease. Whichever side is right, eating more whole grains and beans usually changes estrogen/progesterone ratio for the better and shrinks fibroids.

      • Reduce fibroids by reducing your exposure to estrogen: avoid birth control pills, ERT/HRT, estrogen-mimicing residues from herbicides and pesticides used on food crops (eat organically- raised products). Tampons that are bleached with chlorine may mimic the bad effects of estrogen, too.

      • Lupron (leuprolide acetate), a drug which induces “artificial menopause”by shutting down the body's production of estradiol causes a significant decrease in fibroid size within 8-12 weeks. Fibroids do regrow to about 90 percent of their original size when the drug is withdrawn however.

      • Major advances have been made in surgical treatments for women with fibroids. There are many options now besides hysterectomy (removal of the uterus), including hysteroscopic resection, uterine embolization, myomectomy, and suprecervical hysterectomy. Since these are fairly new procedures, take the time to find a surgeon who is skilled in the procedure.

      • Hysterectomy can be a life-saving procedure, but by the age of sixty, more than one-third of American women will have given up their wombs to the surgeons. The presence of non- symptomatic fibroids is never sufficient reason, to my mind, for a hysterectomy. Of my students and apprentices who have had hysterectomies because of fibroids, those who “did their homework” — that is, helped themselves before and after their surgery with all the tools at their disposal — seemed to fare much better than those who did not.

      • With very few exceptions, no woman is healthier without her ovaries. So, even if you elect a hysterectomy, keep your ovaries.

      These Wise Woman ways, and lots more, are in my book New Menopausal Years the Wise Woman Way, available from www.ashtreepublishing.com. They are arranged in order of risk: the safest first, the most dangerous last. If you have a uterine fibroid and it is a problem, begin with the mildest remedies first. Set a time limit for your use of any remedy, but, except in an emergency, don't go on to stronger remedies until you are sure the safer ones aren't effective for you. As with any advice, you are the best judge of what works for you.

  37. QUESTION:
    Please tell me more about fibroids?
    I had an ultrasound scan today. I was referred for the scan because I've been trying to conceive and nothing has happened in a year and a half of trying.

    It turns out I have 3 fibroids in my womb. The woman who did the scan said that 2 were "fairly big". She also said it was the reason I've always had very heavy, painful periods.

    Does anyone else have fibroids? I'd like to hear other people's experiences, and find out more information (e.g. useful websites etc.).

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroid tumors are usually benign (non-cancerous) tumors found, most often, in the uterus of women in their 30's and 40's, although they occasionally develop on other organs which contain smooth muscle cells.

      Fibroid tumors are solid tumors which are made of fibrous tissue, hence the name 'fibroid' tumor. Most often fibroids occur as multiple tumor masses which are slow-growing and often cause no symptoms.

      The size of fibroids varies immensely among women and some are so small that a microscope is required to see them. However some women experience a single large fibroid tumor the size of a grapefruit or a fibroid which is so large it encompasses the entire abdominal area. Such large tumors can weigh as much as 50 pounds; the largest, reported, fibroid ever recorded weighed in at 140 pounds.

      No one is sure why fibroid tumors develop, but some facts are quite clear-- they do not develop before the body begins producing estrogen during the onset of menstruation-- estrogen, such as in birth control pills and taken for menopausal symptoms, does cause fibroid tumors to grow and fibroid tumors will grow very quickly during pregnancy when the body is producing extra estrogen-- they often shrink and disappear after menopause when the body stops producing estrogen--a woman will almost never develop fibroid tumors after menopause.

      The estrogen connection appears to be quite clear, although there are still some who doubt the role estrogen plays in the development of fibroid tumors because women with fibroids often have blood levels which reveal normal amounts of estrogen.
      Types of Fibroid Tumors

      Submucous Fibroids

      These fibroids occur just below the lining of the uterus and can cause menstrual problems, including pain as they grow and move around the pelvic area.

      Intramural Fibroids

      A round fibroid most often within the uterine wall which can cause enlargement of the uterus as they grow.

      Subserous Fibroids

      This fibroid grows on the outer wall of the uterus and usually causes no symptoms until it grows large enough to interfere with other organs.

      Pedunculated Fibroids

      These fibroids develop when a subserous fibroid grows a peduncle (stalk), as they grow larger they may become twisted and cause severe pain.

      Interligamentous Fibroid

      A fibroid which grows sideways between the ligaments which support the uterus in the abdominal region. This type of fibroid is especially difficult to remove without the possibility of interfering with the blood supply or other organs.

      Parasitic Fibroid

      The rarest form of fibroid tumor occurs when a fibroid attaches itself to another organ.
      Diagnosis of Fibroid Tumors

      Diagnosis of fibroids is generally made by your physician during your annual gynecological exam when your physician feels a mass, they often are found when your physician is looking for something else or may never be discovered if you do not experience symptoms. However larger fibroids may make examination of your ovaries impossible if they grow near your ovaries.

      An ultrasound scan is often ordered when such masses are felt by your physician to determine the cause of the mass, however some fibroids appear on sonograms as ovarian tumors and surgery is the only way an accurate diagnosis can be made.

      Although most fibroids cause no symptoms, the estimated 25 percent of women who do have symptoms may have abnormal bleeding, pain during menstruation, and as the fibroid tumors grow larger, women will often experience a swollen abdomen.

      Larger fibroids may cause frequent urination or an inability to control your bladder, either the ability to control the urge or in severe cases, a women may find that she is unable to urinate at all. If a fibroid extends towards a woman's back it may push on the bowels, causing constipation and a backache. Treatment of Fibroids

      If your fibroid tumors are severe enough that they cause certain symptoms, surgery is often, the required treatment. Symptoms which justify surgery include: extremely heavy bleeding during your menstrual cycle, which causes anemia that does not respond to treatment; pain, which has become intolerable to the woman or discomfort caused by the pressure of the fibroids on another organ; or when the location of the tumors is likely to cause further problems.

      Surgery for fibroid tumors includes, myomectomy and hysterectomy. Myomectomy is the surgical removal of each individual tumor without damage to the uterus, preserving a woman's ability to conceive. However, fibroids will often grow back and although it is possible to have a myomectomy repeated, multiple myomectomies can cause other problems such as the walls of the uterus sticking together due to scarring.

      Women should also consider uterine artery embalization. Uterine artery embalization leaves the uterus intact in a non-surgical procedure.
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      Polyvinyl particles are placed into the uterine artery at a point just before the nexis of vessels spread out into the uterine tissue. The particles flow into the vessels and clog them. This prevents the fibroids from receiving the constant blood supply they require and causes the fibroids shrink overtime. However, almost immediately the symptoms of heavy bleeding and pelvic pain are significantly reduced.

      The sad fact is that because fibroids do grow back, most women will eventually have to face a hysterectomy. Removing the uterus is the only permanent way to effectively relieve most women of fibroids.

      Hysterectomy is, most often, the procedure of choice for fibroid tumors when a women with severe symptoms, has completed her family and her uterus has grown to the size of a uterus at twelve weeks of pregnancy; a women has excessively large fibroid tumors; severe abnormal bleeding occurs; or when the fibroids are causing problems with other organs such as the bladder and bowels.

      Science is starting to evaluate other options for treating fibroids, including the use of Lupron which may be beneficial for those who want to become pregnant or for women approaching menopause when fibroids often shrink naturally. Lupron shrinks fibroids in most women with continued use, but one drawback is that the fibroids will quickly grow back once treatment is stopped.

      If you have fibroid tumors, investigate your options before deciding what treatment you want to try. There are many alternatives to hysterectomy currently available, and science is creating more options for women everyday.

  38. QUESTION:
    Bleeding during sex all of the sudden?
    i'm not a virgin, but with my current partner, the first, second, and most recent (third) time we've had sex, i've bled.
    the first time it was really bad too.

    but if i had sex before him, why is this happening?
    :/ help!

    • ANSWER:
      Most likely you have an STD. But here are the top ten reasons. You need to see a doctor. SOON

      Top 10 Causes of Vaginal Bleeding After Sex

      Cervical dysplasia: Cervical dysplasia is precancerous changes of the epithelial cells that line the cervix. Risk increases with multiple sexual partners, sex before age 18, childbirth before age 16, or a past history of STDs. Treatment is usually cryosurgery or conisation.

      Chlamydia: A bacterial infection that is usually transmitted through sexual activity or contact with semen, vaginal fluid, or blood.

      Gonorrhea: A usually sexually transmitted disease caused by a bacteria. Several pharmaceutical treatments are available.

      Vaginitis or Cervicitis: Inflammation or swelling and infection of the vagina or cervix. Treatment depends on the cause.

      Cervical polyps: Cervical polyps are smooth, red or purple, finger-like growths that grow out of the mucus layer of the cervix or the cervical canal. Cervical polyps are extremely fragile, extending out of the cervix, and easily and painlessly removed.

      Trichomoniasis: A usually sexually transmitted disease caused by protozoan. Can also be passed to newborns during vaginal birth by infected mothers. Although rare, transmission is also possible in tap water, hot tubs, urine, on toilet seats, and in swimming pools. May cause vaginitis.

      Vaginal Yeast Infection: An overgrowth of the normal fungi that inhabits the vaginal area. Common symptoms include itching, burning, and an odorless, white, cheese-like discharge.

      Endometritis or adenomyosis: Endometritis is defined by Dorland's Medical Dictionary, 27th Edition as an inflammation of the endometrium (the innermost layer of the uterus). Both conditions are associated with endometriosis. Adenomysis is when endometrial tissue attaches itself to the uterus, or another organ such as the ovaries, and grows outside of the uterus.

      Uterine polyps: Uterine polyps occur when the endometrium overgrows causing these protrusions into the uterus. It is extremely rare for these growths to grow in a way that is either benign or malignant. Women with uterine polyps frequently experience bleeding between periods (metrorrhagia), other symptoms includes vaginal bleeding after sex, spotting, menorrhagia, bleeding after menopause, and breakthrough bleeding during hormone therapy. Hysteroscopic-guided curettage is the preferred treatment, since the normal D&C is basically an unguided procedure that may miss many of the uterine polyps.

      Fibroid tumors: Uterine fibroid tumors are usually benign tumors. They are solid masses made of fibrous tissue. Fibroid tumors are rarely malignant. Symptoms of fibroid tumors vary among women, with some women never experiencing any symptoms at all. Women who can wait until menopause will see their fibroids shrink and disappear once their bodies stop producing estrogen. It's important that women with fibroids make sure they never take estrogen, in any form including birth control pills, since estrogen increases fibroid growth. Several treatments are currently available for uterine fibroid tumors from myomectomy and uterine artery embolization to the traditional hysterectomy.

  39. QUESTION:
    Can you die from Fibroids? and also can you die from the surgery?

    • ANSWER:
      Uterine fibroids are the most common non-cancerous tumors in women of childbearing age. Fibroids are made of muscle cells and other tissues that grow in and around the wall of the uterus, or womb. The cause of fibroids is unknown. Risk factors include being African-American or being overweight.

      Theres Always A Chance Of Death With Surgery But Its Usually Very Low.

      How Are Uterine Fibroids Treated?
      More and more, doctors are beginning to realize that uterine fibroids may not require any intervention or, at most, limited treatment. For a woman with uterine fibroids that are not causing symptoms, the best therapy may be watchful waiting. Some women never exhibit any symptoms nor have any problems associated with fibroids, in which case no treatment is necessary.

      If a woman is experiencing anemia caused by heavy, prolonged menstrual bleeding, moderate to severe pain, infertility or urinary tract or bowel problems, she will require therapy. Treatment options include:

      Medications. For women who experience occasional pelvic pain or discomfort, a mild, over-the counter anti-inflammatory or pain-killing drug such as Aleve or Motrin, often will be effective. More bothersome cases may require stronger drugs available by prescription.
      Some fibroids are treated with hormones that reduce the amounts of the hormone estrogen. Doctors believe that fibroids grow best when there are high levels of the female hormone estrogen.
      Birth control pills can be used to treat the bleeding symptoms of uterine fibroids because they decrease the production of female hormones and prevent ovulation. Birth control pills (oral contraceptives) do not reduce the size of uterine fibroids and may in fact increase their size. For more on oral contraceptives, see the article on the Pill.
      Surgery. Fortunately, a woman now has a number of surgical and less invasive options for treatment of uterine fibroids that can control symptoms, preserve the uterus, and preserve fertility. In the past, a woman with growing uterine fibroids was only considered a candidate for hysterectomy (the surgical removal of the uterus). Performing hysterectomy in a woman of reproductive age means that she will no longer be able to have children. Hysterectomy also may have other effects, both physical and psychological. Today, many women and their doctors are considering other treatment options, based on symptoms and not the idea that uterine fibroids will continue to grow until it becomes necessary to perform a hysterectomy.
      If a fibroid is particularly troublesome, the surgeon often can remove only the tumor, leaving the uterus intact. This procedure is called myomectomy. This is done when a woman wants to be able to have children.
      There are a number of techniques that can be used to perform a myomectomy:
      Laparoscopic myomectomy involves the use a thin, telescope-like instrument attached to a small video camera called a laparoscope inserted through a tiny incision at the belly button. The surgeon uses specialized surgical instruments inserted through this incision and two or three additional small incisions in the abdomen to remove the fibroids.
      Hysteroscopic myomectomy is a procedure where some fibroids are removed through the vagina using a surgical instrument called a hysteroscope - a thin, telescope-like instrument inserted through the cervix and into the uterus.
      Laparotomy involves an abdominal incison to remove all fibroids, no matter what size or location of the tumors.
      Fibroid embolization. This treatment works by decreasing the blood supply to the fibroids, causing them to shrink. It is a minimally invasive procedure performed by an interventional radiologist. Patients are typically able to return home the same day of the procedure.
      MRI-guided ultrasound. This is the newest technique available to remove fibroids. The treatment uses MRI images to plan and guide focused ultrasound waves that destroy fibroid tissue.

  40. QUESTION:
    Fibroid tumor and conception?
    About 8 months ago i was told by the doctor i have a fibroid tumor,i really would like to have a child in a few years and wonder has anyone ever been a similar situation and had a successful pregnancy most of all is it possible to get pregnant?

    • ANSWER:
      It really depends. Most fibroids are harmless and will not affect conception. However, it really depends on where they are situated in the uterus. If they are blocking a fallopian tube or the cervix, they could hinder conception. If they are very large, they could prevent an embryo from implanting or cause early miscarriages. If you do become pregnant, again, they are generally harmless, unless they are situated poorly. If they are over the cervix, they might result in a c-section, or if they are positioned under the placenta, they might rob the growing fetus of blood and nutrients. Pregnancy hormones and the increased blood flow during pregnancy can also cause fibroids to grow rapidly. One of the dangers of fibroids in pregnancy is that they might "die", and that can cause a lot of pain for the mother, but no harm to the baby.

      For me, I knew I had four or five fibroids before I became pregnant. They didn't affect my ability to conceive, but once I became pregnant, they began to grow rapidly. One grew to the size of a tennis ball, but it was perfectly harmless. One was about an inch long, and under the placenta, and I had to have a lot of ultrasounds throughout my pregnancy to keep an eye on that one. In the end, it came to nothing, and my baby was born healthy. My sister also has fibroids (they can run in families), and she didn't even have to get any ultrasounds done to monitor hers.

      On the whole, I suggest you talk to your doctor and get more facts about your particular case. On the whole, though, I wouldn't worry about it too much. In some cases, going on birth control can help shrink fibroids. In some dramatic cases, surgery might be recommended.

      Good luck!

  41. QUESTION:
    Causes for cramps (besides the obvious)?
    I don't get my period anymore since I'm on birth control, and I took a pregnancy test at the doctor's office and it came out a strong negative. But, I've been having some wicked cramps. Especially my lower right abdominal area. It's not a UTI/infection/STD or my appendex, and my doctor is honestly stumped. I would really like to know what it us because the pain is just horrible. Any guesses?

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroids can cause extreme discomfort.

      Uterine fibroids are noncancerous (benign) tumors that develop in the womb (uterus), a female reproductive organ.

      Causes, incidence, and risk factors

      Uterine fibroids are common. As many as 1 in 5 women may have fibroids during their childbearing years (the time after starting menstruation for the first time and before menopause). Half of all women have fibroids by age 50.

      Fibroids are rare in women under age 20. They are more common in African-Americans than Caucasians.

      The cause of uterine fibroids is unknown. However, their growth has been linked to the hormone estrogen. As long as a woman with fibroids is menstruating, a fibroid will probably continue to grow, usually slowly.

      Fibroids can be so tiny that you need a microscope to see them. However, they can grow very large. They may fill the entire uterus, and may weigh several pounds. Although it is possible for just one fibroid to develop, usually there are more than one.

      Fibroids are often described by their location in the uterus:

      Myometrial -- in the muscle wall of the uterus

      Submucosal -- just under the surface of the uterine lining

      Subserosal -- just under the outside covering of the uterus

      Pendunculated -- occurring on a long stalk on the outside of the uterus or inside the cavity of the uterus

      Symptoms

      More common symptoms of uterine fibroids are:

      Bleeding between periods

      Heavy menstrual bleeding (menorrhagia), sometimes with the passage of blood clots

      Menstrual periods that may last longer than normal

      Need to urinate more often

      Pelvic cramping or pain with periods

      Sensation of fullness or pressure in lower abdomen

      Pain during intercourse

      Note: There are often no symptoms. Your health care provider may find them during a physical exam or other test. Fibroids often shrink and cause no symptoms in women who have gone through menopause.

      Signs and tests

      The health care provider will perform a pelvic exam. This may show that you have a change in the shape of your womb (uterus).

      It can be difficult to diagnose fibroids, especially if you are extremely overweight.

      An ultrasound may be done to confirm the diagnosis of fibroids. Sometimes, a pelvic MRI is done.

      An endometrial biopsy (biopsy of the uterine lining) or laparoscopy may be needed to rule out cancer.

      Treatment

      Treatment depends on several things, including:

      Your age

      General health

      Severity of symptoms

      Type of fibroids

      Whether you are pregnant

      If you want children in the future

      Some women may just need pelvic exams or ultrasounds every once in a while to monitor the fibroid's growth.

      Treatment for the symptoms of fibroids may include:

      Birth control pills (oral contraceptives) to help control heavy periods

      Intrauterine devices (IUDs) that release the hormone progestin to help reduce heavy bleeding and pain

      Iron supplements to prevent or treat anemia due to heavy periods

      Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen or naprosyn for cramps or pain

      Short-term hormonal therapy injections to help shrink the fibroids

      Surgery and procedures used to treat fibroids include:

      Hysteroscopic resection of fibroids: Women who have fibroids growing inside the uterine cavity may need this outpatient procedure to remove the fibroid tumors.

      Uterine artery embolization: This procedure stops the blood supply to the fibroid, causing it to die and shrink. Women who may want to become pregnant in the future should discuss this procedure with their health care provider.

      Myomectomy: This surgery removes the fibroids. It is often the chosen treatment for women who want to have children, because it usually can preserve fertility. More fibroids can develop after a myomectomy.

      Hysterectomy: This invasive surgery may be an option if medicines do not work and other surgeries and procedures are not an option.

  42. QUESTION:
    I don't know where to put this question but I want to ask is bleeding during deep penetration normal?
    If not...why do I bleed even after three years of marriage?

    • ANSWER:
      It could be for several reasons. Either you are just prone to bleeding because you're sensitive or you could have a medical condition causing this. I have it frequently because I have endometriosis. You should check with a doctor to make sure there isn't a medical condition causing it for you.

      Here's a look at the top 10 causes of vaginal bleeding after sex:

      Cervical dysplasia: Cervical dysplasia is precancerous changes of the epithelial cells that line the cervix. Risk increases with multiple sexual partners, sex before age 18, childbirth before age 16, or a past history of STDs. Treatment is usually cryosurgery or conisation.

      Chlamydia: A bacterial infection that is usually transmitted through sexual activity or contact with semen, vaginal fluid, or blood.

      Gonorrhea: A usually sexually transmitted disease caused by a bacteria.

      Several pharmaceutical treatments are available.

      Vaginitis or Cervicitis: Inflammation or swelling and infection of the vagina or cervix. Treatment depends on the cause.

      Cervical polyps: Cervical polyps are smooth, red or purple, finger-like growths that grow out of the mucuos layer of the cervix or the cervical canal. Cervical polyps are extremely fragile, extending out of the cervix, and easily and painlessly removed.

      Trichomoniasis: A usually sexually transmitted disease caused by protozoan. Can also be passed to newborns during vaginal birth by infected mothers. Although rare, transmission is also possible in tap water, hot tubs, urine, on toilet seats, and in swimming pools. May cause vaginitis.

      Vaginal Yeast Infection: An overgrowth of the normal fungi that inhabits the vaginal area. Common symptoms include itching, burning, and an odorless, white, cheese-like discharge.

      Endometritis or adenomyosis: Endometritis is defined by Dorland's Medical Dictionary, 27th Edition as an inflammation of the endometrium (the innermost layer of the uterus). Both conditions are associated with endometriosis. Adenomysis is when endometrial tissue attaches itself to the uterus, or another organ such as the ovaries, and grows outside of the uterus.

      Uterine polyps: Uterine polyps occur when the endometrium overgrows causing these protrusions into the uterus. It is extremely rare for these growths to grow in a way that is either benign or malignant. Women with uterine polyps frequently experience bleeding between periods (metrorrhagia), other symptoms includes vaginal bleeding after sex, spotting, menorrhagia, bleeding after menopause, and breakthrough bleeding during hormone therapy. Hysteroscopic-guided curettage is the prefered treatment, since the normal D&C is basically an unguided procedure that may miss many of the uterine polyps.

      Fibroid tumors: Uterine fibroid tumors are usually benign tumors. They are solid masses made of fibrous tissue. Fibroid tumors are rarely malignant. Symptoms of fibroid tumors vary among women, with some women never experiencing any symptoms at all. Women who can wait until menopause will see their fibroids shrink and disappear once their bodies stop producing estrogen. It's important that women with fibroids make sure they never take estrogen, in any form including birth control pills, since estrogen increases fibroid growth. Several treatments are currently available for uterine fibroid tumors from myomectomy and uterine artery embolization to the traditional hysterectomy.

      Diagnosing vaginal bleeding after sex is usually a matter of exclusion. Anytime you experience post-coital bleeding or vaginal bleeding after sex call your doctor immediately!

  43. QUESTION:
    what is fibroid and why does it occur in black women?
    fibroids in the uterus

    • ANSWER:
      It does not have black women as exclusive hosts; can happen to any woman.

      What are fibroids?
      Fibroid tumors are usually benign (non-cancerous) tumors found, most often, in the uterus of women in their 30's and 40's, although they occasionally develop on other organs which contain smooth muscle cells.

      Fibroid tumors are solid tumors which are made of fibrous tissue, hence the name 'fibroid' tumor. Most often fibroids occur as multiple tumor masses which are slow-growing and often cause no symptoms.

      The size of fibroids varies immensely among women and some are so small that a microscope is required to see them. However some women experience a single large fibroid tumor the size of a grapefruit or a fibroid which is so large it encompasses the entire abdominal area.

      Such largetumors can weigh as much as 50 pounds; the largest, reported, fibroid ever recorded weighed in at 140 pounds.

      No one is sure why fibroid tumors develop, but some facts are quite clear-- they do not develop before the body begins producing estrogen during the onset of menstruation-- estrogen, such as in birth control pills and taken for menopausal symptoms, does cause fibroid tumors to grow and fibroid tumors will grow very quickly during pregnancy when the body is producing extra estrogen-- they often shrink and disappear after menopause when the body stops producing estrogen--a woman will almost never develop fibroid tumors after menopause.

      The estrogen connection appears to be quite clear, although there are still some who doubt the role estrogen plays in the development of fibroid tumors because women with fibroids often have blood levels which reveal normal amounts of estrogen.

      For more info go to source:)

  44. QUESTION:
    what could make a woman have her menstration for more than ninteen days?

    • ANSWER:
      I had the same problem. I was diagnosed with three medical conditions. My periods were lasting almost a full month every month. I would start and then stop for 3 days then start again. Heavy bleeding like that is called menorrhagia. here are some things that could be causing it:Why do some women have heavy and long menstrual flows? The causes of prolonged and heavy bleeding are given below. In younger women heavy periods are most often due to a temporary hormone imbalance, which eventually corrects itself. In the years close to the menopause, (45 years of age onwards) heavy periods are usually a sign of hormone imbalance. However, the possibility of heavy periods being caused by an underlying disease increases with age. The following conditions are associated with heavy periods: fibroids. endometriosis. pelvic inflammatory disease. polyps of the lining of the womb. the commonest cause is a condition called dysfunctional uterine bleeding (DUB). This refers to heavy bleeding with no apparent explanation.

      I was diagnosed with endometriosis at the age of 21 when I had a tubal ligation done because that is when the doctor discovered it. He said from as bad as mine was, I had it for awhile. All endometriosis is, is when the lining of the uterus grows places other than your uterus such as:ovaries, the area behind the womb and in front of the rectum and it can even grow on surgical scars and the navel but those are less common. I was diagnosed with heavy periods or menorrhagia at 22 years of age because my periods were lasting so long and I was also diagnosed with painful periods which is called dysmenorrhoea-I was diagnosed with that due to the endometriosis. You can talk to your doctor about birth control to regulate the periods, hormone pills to try and stop it or something called a thermal ablation but with that you wont ever be able to have kids because it burns the uterine lining off. You may want to set up an appointment ASAP! NEW YORKER IS VERY WRONG. YOU CAN HAVE A PERIOD FOR MORE THAN TWO WEEKS-THAT IS A SIGN OF TWO OF THE MEDICAL PROBLEMS I WAS DIAGNOSED WITH.

  45. QUESTION:
    ever since i've had sex i bleed everytime i get fingered?
    the last time i had sex was a few months ago. and ever since then ever time i get fingered i bleed a little bit. why is this? and how do i make it stop? i wasn't a virgin last time a had sex and my cherry has been popped for almost a year. and after i get fingered it hurts a little the next day and the bleeding continues a little bit too. the guy never sees it on his fingers its not like dark blood its just red brown tinted... helppp

    • ANSWER:
      Cervical dysplasia:Cervical dysplasia is precancerous changes of the epithelial cells that line the cervix. Risk increases with multiple sexual partners, sex before age 18, childbirth before age 16, or a past history of STDs. Treatment is usually cryosurgery or conisation.

      Chlamydia: A bacterial infection that is usually transmitted through sexual activity or contact with semen, vaginal fluid, or blood.

      Gonorrhea: A usually sexually transmitted disease caused by a bacteria. Several pharmaceutical treatments are available.

      Vaginitis or Cervicitis: Inflammation or swelling and infection of the vagina or cervix. TreVaginitis or Cervicitis: Inflammation or swelling and infection of the vagina or cervix. Treatment depends on the cause.

      Cervical polyps: Cervical polyps are smooth, red or purple, finger-like growths that grow out of the mucus layer of the cervix or the cervical canal. Cervical polyps are extremely fragile, extending out of the cervix, and easily and painlessly removed.

      Trichomoniasis: A usually sexually transmitted disease caused by protozoan. Can also be passed to newborns during vaginal birth by infected mothers. Although rare, transmission is also possible in tap water, hot tubs, urine, on toilet seats, and in swimming pools. May cause vaginitis.

      Vaginal yeast infection: An overgrowth of the normal fungi that inhabits the vaginal area. Common symptoms include itching, burning, and an odorless, white, cheese-like discharge.

      Endometritis or adenomyosis: Endometritis is defined by Dorland's Medical Dictionary, 27th Edition as an inflammation of the endometrium (the innermost layer of the uterus). Both conditions are associated with endometriosis. Adenomysis is when endometrial tissue attaches itself to the uterus, or another organ such as the ovaries, and grows outside of the uterus.

      Uterine polyps: Uterine polyps occur when the endometrium overgrows causing these protrusions into the uterus. It is extremely rare for these growths to grow in a way that is either benign or malignant. Women with uterine polyps frequently experience bleeding between periods (metrorrhagia), other symptoms includes vaginal bleeding after sex, spotting, menorrhagia, bleeding after menopause, and breakthrough bleeding during hormone therapy. Hysteroscopic-guided curettage is the preferred treatment, since the normal D&C is basically an unguided procedure that may miss many of the uterine polyps.

      Fibroid tumors: Uterine fibroid tumors are usually benign tumors. They are solid masses made of fibrous tissue. Fibroid tumors are ravary among women, with some women never experiencing any symptoms at all. Women who can wait until menopause will see their fibroids shrink and disappear once their bodies stop producing estrogen. It's important that women with fibroids make sure they never take estrogen, in any form including birth control pills, since estrogen increases fibroid growth. Several treatments are currently available for uterine fibroid tumors from myomectomy and uterine artery embolization to the traditional hysterectomy.

  46. QUESTION:
    whats a miscarriage? how does it happen? and why?
    how does a miscarriage feels? how do u know is a miscarriage ?
    im asking this because u got my period but before that i thought i was pregnant i had the symptoms and i Just told my self it was PMS... but before i got my period i got cramps not nad cramps but i did... so now my blood is Dark brown and like really red.. i don't think is a miscarriage but i don't how a miscarriage is? any help i know is confusing but im scared.. im having painful cramps:(

    • ANSWER:
      Miscarriage is the spontaneous end of a pregnancy @ a stage where the embryo or fetus is incapable of surviving, generally defined in humans @ prior to 24 wks. of gestation. Miscarriages can occur 4 many reasons including genetic, uterine or hormonal abnormalities, reproductive tract infections, tissue rejection, pregnancies involving more than 1 fetus & uncontrolled diabetes. Women w/ controlled diabetes rn't @ higher risk of miscarriage. Because diabetes may develop during pregnancy (gestational diabetes), an important part of prenatal care is 2 monitor 4 signs of the disease. Poly-cystic ovary syndrome is a risk factor 4 miscarriage, w/ 30-50% of pregnancies in women w/ PCOS being miscarried in the 1st trimester. High blood pressure during pregnancy, known as preeclampsia, is sometimes caused by an inappropriate immune reaction 2 the developing fetus, & is assoc. w/ the risk of miscarriage. Similarly, women w/ a history of recurrent miscarriages r @ risk of developing preeclampsia. Severe cases of hypothyroidism increase the risk of miscarriage. The effect of milder cases of hypothyroidism on miscarriage rates hasn't been established. Here r some examples of what can increase the risk of a miscarriage: the presence of certain immune conditions such as autoimmune diseases, certain illnesses such as rubella, chlamydia & others, tobacco (cigarette) smokers, an increase in miscarriage is also assoc. w/ the father being a cigarette smoker, cocaine use, physical trauma, exposure 2 environmental toxins, the use of an IUD during the time of conception, antidepressants such as paroxetine & venlafaxine & being over the age of 20. The age of the mother is a major risk factor. Miscarriage rates grow @ an ever-increasing rate after age 20. The most common symptom of a miscarriage is bleeding. Of women who seek clinical treatment 4 bleeding during pregnancy, about 1/2 will go on 2 have a miscarriage. Miscarriage may also b detected during an ultrasound exam, or through serial human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) testing. Women pregnant from ART methods, & women w/ a history of miscarriage, may b monitored closely & so detect a miscarriage sooner than women w/out such monitoring. Something else that might explain the bleeding is uterine fibroids. Uterine fibroids r large masses made up of tissue cells from ur uterus, they're a type of non-cancerous tumor, can grow in & around ur uterus, distorting the shape & size of this organ, range in size, from just a few cms in length 2 up 2 15 cms+ & often grow in clusters, so if u have 1 uterine fibroid, it's likely that u may also have more. Fibroids r actually quite common - between 50%-80% of all women have at least 1. Between 10-30% of pregnant women have fibroids. Uterine fibroids r usually discovered during ur yrly. pelvic exam. U r probably wondering y ur fibroids started growing in the 1st place, if u have them. Some women may simply have a genetic predisposition 2 growing fibroids. Fibroids may also b the result of hormones. Reproductive hormones like estrogen & progesterone can stimulate cell growth, causing fibroids 2 form. After pregnancy & during menopause most fibroids begin 2 shrink, due 2 a lack of hormones. Though fibroids tend 2 grow in size during pregnancy, it's unlikely that they'll cause u ne symptoms. Some pregnant women do experience minor symptoms, particularly pelvic pain & light spotting. This is especially common if u experience fibroid torsion, when a fibroid growing on a stalk begins 2 twist. However, most pregnant women won't even know that the fibroids r there. Most pregnant women who have fibroids won't experience ne complications w/ their pregnancy either. However, fibroids during pregnancy do increase ur risk of miscarriage or preterm labor slightly. Occasionally, complications can arise if ur fibroids become very large. Complications can include postpartum hemorrhaging, obstructed labor (if the fibroid grows in2 the birth canal), fetal malpresentations (sometimes fibroids grow in2 the uterus, forcing ur baby in2 an unusual position), stalled labor & cesarean section.

  47. QUESTION:
    can fibroids in the uterus cause the lining in the uterus to be thick????
    My mom has been in menoause for quite some time now, and she has had no pain or bleeding. I'm just curious to know. She also had to get a biopsy done to.

    • ANSWER:
      you can get this and other info at www.webmd.com

      Sexual Health: Your Guide to Uterine Fibroids
      Uterine fibroids are benign tumors that are made up of the muscle and connective tissue from the wall of the uterus (womb). Fibroids may grow as a single nodule or in clusters and may range in size from 1 mm to more than 20 cm (8 inches) in diameter. They may grow within the wall of the uterus or they may project into the interior cavity or toward the outer surface of the uterus. In rare cases, they may grow on stems projecting from the surface of the uterus.

      What Causes Uterine Fibroids?
      The causes of fibroids are not known. Most fibroids occur in women of reproductive age, and according to some estimates, they are diagnosed in black women 2-3 times more frequently than in white women. They seldom are seen in young women who have not begun to menstruate, and they usually stabilize or go away in women after menopause.

      According to the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), at least 25% of women suffer from uterine fibroids.

      Are Fibroids Cancer?
      No. Fibroids are not associated with cancer. They are benign tumors that almost never develop into cancer.

      Who Is at Risk for Uterine Fibroids?
      No risk factors have been found for uterine fibroids other than being a female of reproductive age. However, some studies suggest obese women are at increased risk of having fibroids. (A person is considered obese if he or she is more than 20% over his or her ideal body weight.)

      What Are the Symptoms of Uterine Fibroids?
      Most fibroids do not cause any symptoms and do not require treatment other than regular observation by a doctor. Fibroids may be discovered during routine gynecologic examinations or during prenatal care. Some women who have uterine fibroids may experience the following symptoms:

      Excessive or painful bleeding during menstruation.
      Bleeding between periods.
      A feeling of fullness in the lower abdomen.
      Frequent urination resulting from a fibroid that compresses the bladder.
      Pain during sexual intercourse
      Low back pain.
      How Are Uterine Fibroids Treated?
      More and more, doctors are beginning to realize that uterine fibroids may not require any intervention or, at most, limited treatment. For a woman with uterine fibroids that are not causing symptoms, the best therapy may be watchful waiting. Some women never exhibit any symptoms nor have any problems associated with fibroids, in which case no treatment is necessary.

      If a woman is experiencing anemia caused by heavy, prolonged menstrual bleeding, moderate to severe pain, infertility or urinary tract or bowel problems, she will require therapy. Treatment options include:

      Medications. For women who experience occasional pelvic pain or discomfort, a mild, over-the counter anti-inflammatory or pain-killing drug such as Aleve or Motrin, often will be effective. More bothersome cases may require stronger drugs available by prescription.
      Some fibroids are treated with hormones that reduce the amounts of the hormone estrogen. Doctors believe that fibroids grow best when there are high levels of the female hormone estrogen.
      Birth control pills can be used to treat the bleeding symptoms of uterine fibroids because they decrease the production of female hormones and prevent ovulation. Birth control pills (oral contraceptives) do not reduce the size of uterine fibroids and may in fact increase their size. For more on oral contraceptives, see the article on the Pill.
      Surgery. Fortunately, a woman now has a number of surgical and less invasive options for treatment of uterine fibroids that can control symptoms, preserve the uterus, and preserve fertility. In the past, a woman with growing uterine fibroids was only considered a candidate for hysterectomy (the surgical removal of the uterus). Performing hysterectomy in a woman of reproductive age means that she will no longer be able to have children. Hysterectomy also may have other effects, both physical and psychological. Today, many women and their doctors are considering other treatment options, based on symptoms and not the idea that uterine fibroids will continue to grow until it becomes necessary to perform a hysterectomy.
      If a fibroid is particularly troublesome, the surgeon often can remove only the tumor, leaving the uterus intact. This procedure is called myomectomy. This is done when a woman wants to be able to have children.
      There are a number of techniques that can be used to perform a myomectomy:
      Laparoscopic myomectomy involves the use a thin, telescope-like instrument attached to a small video camera called a laparoscope inserted through a tiny incision at the belly button. The surgeon uses specialized surgical instruments inserted through this incision and two or three additional small incisions in the abdomen to remove the fibroids.
      Hysteroscopic myomectomy is a procedure where some fibroids are removed through the vagina using a surgical instrument called a hysteroscope - a thin, telescope-like instrument inserted through the cervix and into the uterus.
      Laparotomy involves an abdominal incison to remove all fibroids, no matter what size or location of the tumors.
      Fibroid embolization. This treatment works by decreasing the blood supply to the fibroids, causing them to shrink. It is a minimally invasive procedure performed by an interventional radiologist. Patients are typically able to return home the same day of the procedure.
      MRI-guided ultrasound. This is the newest technique available to remove fibroids. The treatment uses MRI images to plan and guide focused ultrasound waves that destroy fibroid tissue.

  48. QUESTION:
    Pregnancy Symptoms Are Subsiding?
    I'm 9 weeks pregnant when I went to see my doctor he said that I had a small fibroid but not to worry about it. But now my breast that once grew in size because of the pregnancy are reducing in size. Also my symptoms are subsiding. I don't think I've had a miscarriage because I've not had any pain or bleeding. What should I do?

    • ANSWER:
      You probably had an estrogen surge and your hormones are leveling off or your body is getting use to the extra.... I had to take Yaz last year after a miscarriage to suppress my ovarian function to reduce risk of miscarriage in next pregnancy (I have pcos). It is supposed to be a low estrogen birth control. My boobs got HUGE with the medication. I was very emotional too. But, after about a week, things subsided, my breasts eventually went back to their normal size (about 2 mos. in to a 6 mos. run of the medication) and all was well. My emotions stopped after about a week. My body had gotten use to the extra estrogen etc. that the medication was supplying.

      I would assume similar is occuring in your situation. Especially since you dont have pain or bleeding. Im sure as baby developes and more hormones come on further along in pregnancy you will experience these things again.

      The fibroid might also have caused your hormones to go out of whack for a few. Good luck!

  49. QUESTION:
    I've had my period for over 7 days now, and had my 'normal' period just 2 1/2 weeks ago!?
    I was stupid and didn't mark down when I had my period last month, but I am positive that I am bleeding early. I usually have the huge signs, bloating, cramps, gain weight, but didn't this time. Now I have been bleeding for over a week! My periods usually only last 3 days at the most! I haven't started any kind of birth control, and I am not on any birth control pills. I don't take any medication (aspirin, cramp relief,etc.) unless I am close to death. Could this be menopause?

    I am 37 yrs old.

    Periods have been normal since age 16.

    Periods last 3 days, 4 max with just mild spotting on 4th day.

    No birth control pills for 2 years, but had no problems when using them.

    I feel great, but have had little sleep. I haven't been tired. Maybe just some added stress, but I have had a lot of stress before and it never changed my period.

    I don't want to see a doctor while on my period, but I don't have insurance or the money anyway.

    • ANSWER:
      I am going thru the same thing and I am in my 30's
      Go to your OBGYN - you probably have a tumor growth - DONT' WORRY this is normal for women in their 30's. It could be polyps or fibroids or something else which needs a minor surgery.

      If you let it grow you will have more breakthru bleeding and painful ones too. IT can also cause you to not be able to have kids. There is a procedure called DNC which will help remove it. I am getting this procedure done soon. But you know what, it could be any number of things but nothign to be worried about. See the Doctor though.

      This happens to most women, but the rate of this happening the highest is in African women.

      Hope this helps.

  50. QUESTION:
    I had sex for the first time in 1 year, is it normal to bleed just a little?

    • ANSWER:
      You've just finished making love, and you're in that pleasant dream-like state when you go to the bathroom and discover that you are bleeding. Nothing can bring you back to reality faster than vaginal bleeding after sex. Post-coital bleeding can occur for a number of reasons, and is nothing to take lightly. Here's a look at the top 10 causes of vaginal bleeding after sex:

      1.Cervical dysplasia:Cervical dysplasia is precancerous changes of the epithelial cells that line the cervix. Risk increases with multiple sexual partners, sex before age 18, childbirth before age 16, or a past history of STDs. Treatment is usually cryosurgery or conisation.

      2.Chlamydia: A bacterial infection that is usually transmitted through sexual activity or contact with semen, vaginal fluid, or blood.

      3.Gonorrhea: A usually sexually transmitted disease caused by a bacteria. Several pharmaceutical treatments are available.

      4.Vaginitis or Cervicitis: Inflammation or swelling and infection of the vagina or cervix. Treatment depends on the cause.

      5.Cervical polyps: Cervical polyps are smooth, red or purple, finger-like growths that grow out of the mucus layer of the cervix or the cervical canal. Cervical polyps are extremely fragile, extending out of the cervix, and easily and painlessly removed.

      6.Trichomoniasis: A usually sexually transmitted disease caused by protozoan. Can also be passed to newborns during vaginal birth by infected mothers. Although rare, transmission is also possible in tap water, hot tubs, urine, on toilet seats, and in swimming pools. May cause vaginitis.

      7.Vaginal yeast infection: An overgrowth of the normal fungi that inhabits the vaginal area. Common symptoms include itching, burning, and an odorless, white, cheese-like discharge.

      8.Endometritis or adenomyosis: Endometritis is defined by Dorland's Medical Dictionary, 27th Edition as an inflammation of the endometrium (the innermost layer of the uterus). Both conditions are associated with endometriosis. Adenomysis is when endometrial tissue attaches itself to the uterus, or another organ such as the ovaries, and grows outside of the uterus.

      9.Uterine polyps: Uterine polyps occur when the endometrium overgrows causing these protrusions into the uterus. It is extremely rare for these growths to grow in a way that is either benign or malignant. Women with uterine polyps frequently experience bleeding between periods (metrorrhagia), other symptoms includes vaginal bleeding after sex, spotting, menorrhagia, bleeding after menopause, and breakthrough bleeding during hormone therapy. Hysteroscopic-guided curettage is the preferred treatment, since the normal D&C is basically an unguided procedure that may miss many of the uterine polyps.

      10.Fibroid tumors: Uterine fibroid tumors are usually benign tumors. They are solid masses made of fibrous tissue. Fibroid tumors are rarely malignant. Symptoms of fibroid tumors vary among women, with some women never experiencing any symptoms at all. Women who can wait until menopause will see their fibroids shrink and disappear once their bodies stop producing estrogen. It's important that women with fibroids make sure they never take estrogen, in any form including birth control pills, since estrogen increases fibroid growth. Several treatments are currently available for uterine fibroid tumors from myomectomy and uterine artery embolization to the traditional hysterectomy.

      Diagnosing vaginal bleeding after sex is usually a matter of exclusion. Anytime you experience post-coital bleeding or vaginal bleeding after sex see your physician.

can birth control cause fibroids to grow