Do Uterine Polyps Cause Back Pain

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Can periods cause head and neck pain?
    I have been having a really bad headache for a few days and a lot of neck pain. I also have been feeling dizzy. My period is very heavy so could this be all because of that?

    • ANSWER:
      I used to have very heavy periods that caused pain and fatigue all over my body. After exhausting all other options (pain killers,exercises,hormone treatment,etc) I finally agreed to a hysterectomy. I already have 3 grown children so that wasn't an issue. The dizziness and headaches could be caused by anemia. It is very common with heavy periods. You should pay a visit to your doctor. Heavy periods, especially if not normal, could be a symptom to another serious condition like uterine polyps or endometriosis. Good luck!

  2. QUESTION:
    What to do with a really heavy period?
    I have heavy and kind of irregular periods and really don't know what to do? (Im only 15) I don't ever get cramps or pains from periods. But they are really heavy and during my 90 minute classes at school they completely soak through a pad and sometimes my pants. I haven't talked to my mom yet because she gets really uncomfortable and hates to talk about things like that. Also my family is kind of weird and will only go to the doctor if its a real emergency. So I really don't know if its normal or what I should do? Please help! Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Heavy periods are defined by a flow that requires the highest absorbency tampon or pad that must be changed sooner than recommended—usually within an hour.The reasons women have heavy periods include:
      •The natural flow is just heavy
      •Use of the birth control method called an IUD (intra-uterine device)
      •"Hormonal imbalance" (too little or no progesterone)
      •Fibroids or polyps (growths that sometimes occur in the uterus)
      •Thyroid problems (the thyroid is a gland in the neck that helps control many body functions)
      •Endometriosis—a condition in which cells from the lining of the uterus travel and grow in other parts of the body
      •Cigarette smoking
      •Childbirth (Many women have heavy flow during the first year or so after childbirth.)
      Some of these conditions don't need to be treated. Others may require treatment.When to see a doctor about heavy periodsIf you have a normally heavy period, there is usually no need for concern. However, you should see a doctor if:
      •You feel tired all the time.
      •Very heavy periods may cause anemia, which is a deficiency of the red blood cells that carry oxygen around the body. If you feel physically drained, ask a doctor to check for anemia.
      •You experience "flooding" (leaking through a super absorbency pad or tampon within one hour). If your periods get heavy and change in consistency, you should see a doctor. If no medical reasons are found for heavy flow, the doctor may prescribe oral contraceptives, or use cyclical progesterone to regulate the periods.

  3. QUESTION:
    What are other causes for vaginal bleeding after intercourse other than STDs or tearing of the vaginal walls?
    As a 30 year old female, I can honestly say I probably don't engage in sexual activities as much as the normal person my age, so I have had a hard time determining if the bleeding I am having is related to intercourse. This has gone on for years, so I doubt it is STD related because I have been tested through the years. More recently I have have noticed that the bleeding definately appears the day after intercourse and it fools me into thinking I am getting my period.

    It is not the bleeding you get when you have tissue tearing. It definately is more like spotting and lasts a day or so. I even feel like I have cramps.

    For years I had pain during intercourse but the doctor never really saw cause for alarm and because I was never really that sexually experienced, (probably cuz it hurt.) I was never sure what was normal or not.

    No I notice I don't have as much pain, but the bleeding thing is more an issue.

    I believe I have hormone imbalances. Could this be related?

    • ANSWER:
      I am going through the same thing. I am married though and have sex often. I just started the bleeding and pain during sex. I have been to the Dr. (whom I TRUST!!! ) 2 times this week. We did a sonogram to see if I have a fibroid or a polyp on my cervix or uterus. There was nothing on the sonogram. I am going to end up needing to have a uterine biopsy if this continues.

      You need to have a pap smear, sono of the ovaries and uterus to check for fibroids and polyps. After that you might want to be tested for endometriosis.

      It could be any of the things I listed above or just a hormone imbalance. BUT.... Those are also symptoms of cervical or uterine cancer. Best to get it all checked out!!

      Good luck and Im so sorry that sex has been painful for you for so long!! That is a bummer!!

      GOD BLESS and GOOD LUCK!!

  4. QUESTION:
    What test are needed before you start a IUI or IVF treatment?
    My husband got an order to get a second sperm count (first was from his urologist, who then refered us to an infertility clinic). I was order an Estradiol/ FSH blood test, and HSG test and I got an ultrasound done Friday. What else is needed before the treatments. What happens if everything comes out normal. The only thing I know is not normal is my partner's count is only 18 million. Any advice?

    • ANSWER:
      At this point, your day 3 fsh, estradiol and lh and progesterone tests can tell them alot, but if it is normal the next step they may suggest after an HSG (hysterosalpinogram) is a saline sonogram.
      The HSG is a test in which they will insert a speculum in your vagina to open your cervix so that they can insert a catheter with a dye in it that they will squirt into your tubes to highlight them on a computer screen. They will also xray the uterus as well to see if there are any fibroids. If the tubes are blocked it can prevent the sperm from meeting the egg and if you have any polyps or fibroids in your uterus the egg may not be able to attach to the uterine wall and it can cause complications during pregnancy.
      The HSG test takes about 15-20 minutes and can be very uncomfortable depending on your tolerance for pain. My fertility specialist actually prescribed an antibiotic to take the day before the test, the day of and the day after to prevent infection. They also instructed me to take 2-3 Advil or Motrin about an hr or so before the procedure to help minimize the pain and cramping. The cramping tends to last all day (for me anyway)
      The saline sonogram is like an HSG but much less painful and usually when the Dr wants to take a second look at the uterus after the HSG. They use a catheter to open the cervix and they insert a saline dye via a catheter to highlight the uterus while doing a trans-vaginal ultrasound.
      Dr's may even wish for your husband to take a multivitamin or increase his zinc and caffeine intake. Caffeine is not recommended for women trying to conceive or who are pregnant but it has actually shown to help men improve their counts and swimming. The fertility specialist may not recommend herbal supplements for you but you can definitely inquire whether or not your hubby can take them. If they allow, you should look into a product called fertility blend for men. Go onto their site and print out the label and ingredient list and show it to your specialist who will let you know if the supplement is recommend for someone with your husbands sperm count.
      Both the HSg and saline sonograms will be performed around day 10 of your cycle.
      If they do give you Clomid, I have taken it twice.. with two different Dr's and in two different ways.. and honestly days 3-7 showed better results.
      Before I went to the specialist, my regular Dr gave me Clomid on days 5-9 at 50mgs.. I ovulated 1 follicle too late in my cycle. You need at least 10 days or more between ovulation and your next period to sustain a pregnancy. I took it for 2 months then stopped and made a deal with my husband that if within 2 more months of trying without Clomid we are seeing a specialist. And we did.
      The specialist gave me Clomid at 100mg on days 3-7 and I ovulated by day 11 of a 28 day cycle.. I had IUI on days 11 and 12 of my cycle and I was pregnant that month.
      Good luck with all the tests.. email me if you want to talk about it or get more info.
      Baby dust!!

  5. QUESTION:
    Anyone ever had a uterine polyp removed?
    Just wondering about the procedure and how does it or will it affect conception?

    • ANSWER:
      I had 2 uterine polys removed in December 2006. Prior to them being removed I was in agony every single month with my period, passing out with pain, clotting and old brown blood coming out during ovulation. I had them removed and have been fantastic since, periods a dream. I was told it was not posible for me to conceive with mine but that was due to their position and causing obstruction. I had them taken out under general anaesthetic and had bleeding for about 7 days after with no complications at all. Best thing I ever did and now I am free to get pregnant, consultant told me to wait a month and go make babies after that. Good luck to you

  6. QUESTION:
    What does it mean if your period lasts for 2 weeks?
    I've had this happen to me maybe a few times. I got my period around 3-4 years ago. I am 15 right now. A period to last 2 weeks sounds a bit excessive... and my flow can be pretty heavy sometimes also. Does anybody know any reasons to why this happens?

    • ANSWER:
      There are lots of causes for heavy long periods. I'd say see your doctor to find out if you have something like endometriosis or fibroids. Periods normally last for 3-7 days so unless you've been diagnosed with hypermenorrhagia (heavy bleeding) I'd see your doctor preferrably a gynecologist. Periods can also be more irregular and you may have heavy bleeding but since you've had them already I say get it checked out. An ultrasound may be done to determine if you have fibroids. Also if the doctor suspects endometriosis you may need to get a second opinion from another doctor before agreeing to the diagnostic laporoscopy (a surgical procedure). I was diagnosed at 19 but had symptoms from age 13 and up. My mom said they were just growing pains. By the time I was 19 the doctor told me that it was not normal to have pain or cramps when I wasn't having a period. He also did diagnose me with endometriosis, put me on the pill, and after switching to a better doctor I was told I shouldn't wait more than 2 years from the diagnosis of endometriosis to have kids. I know you're young now but being put on the pill may prevent the endometriosis from spreading and it can lighten up your periods a lot. It gave me those 2 years of help I needed to finally have my kids. After my second and third kid I had more bleeding and pain requiring narcotics to give me relief. I couldn't be away from a bathroom more than 20 minutes at a time because I'd go through a super plus tampon and a pad in that time. Hypermenorrhagia is when a woman goes through more than one pad or tampon in an hour. I finally had a hysterectomy when my last child was about 2 years old. I was just sick of the 10 day to two week heavy periods I had.

      Edited with info..

      "HYPERMENORRHEA

      M—Malformations include bicornate uterus, congenital ovarian cysts, endometriosis, ectopic pregnancies, and retained placenta.
      I—Inflammation recalls cervicitis, endometritis, and pelvic inflammatory disease.
      N—Neoplasms include fibroids, carcinoma, and polyps of the cervix and endometrium. One should also not forget choriocarcinoma, hydatidiform moles, and hormone-producing tumors of the ovary.
      T—Trauma includes perforation of the uterus, excessive intercourse during the menses, and introduction of foreign bodies into the uterus.
      S—Systemic diseases include anemia and the coagulation disorders such as hemophilia, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, and scurvy. Also in this category are lupus erythematosus and endocrine disorders, especially hypothyroidism and dysfunctional uterine bleeding from disproportion in the output of estrogen and progesterone by the ovary.
      Approach to the DiagnosisThe diagnosis includes a thorough pelvic examination, CBC, coagulation studies, thyroid function tests, and perhaps other endocrine tests. Ultrasonography is ordered next. If all these are normal, a trial of estrogen or progesterone supplementation or a dilatation and curettage (D & C) may be indicated. Culdoscopy, peritoneoscopy, and a hysterosalpingogram may be necessary before performing an exploratory laparotomy and, if necessary, a hysterectomy. A gynecologist or endocrinologist will be helpful in solving the diagnostic dilemma in many cases."

      http://www.womentowomen.com/menstruation/menorrhagia.aspx

      Not everyone needs a hysterectomy for heavy bleeding but if one has tried everything else it's sometimes the last resort like it was for me.

  7. QUESTION:
    I have pain in my lower left side by the ovary is. I had surgery about 1 yr ago to remove polyps. What is it?
    The pain is like dull achy but comes and goes. can anyone clarify this for me.

    • ANSWER:
      Abdominal/pelvic pain that is similar to that of period cramping may indicate a problem in a reproductive organ (like the pain around your ovaries or uterus).

      This includes conditions such as endometriosis (when tissue from the uterus is displaced to somewhere else like the pelvic wall or ovaries), uterine fibroids (thick bands of muscular and fibrous tissue in the uterus), ovarian cysts, ovarian cancer (rare), or pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) infection of the reproductive organs, usually from a sexually transmitted disease.

      If you have pain in your ovary area, you might have an ovarian cyst. I have experienced that same type of pain whenever I have had an ovarian cyst. I was also diagnosed with endometriosis last year which caused me severe pelvic pain and intense and painful period cramping.

      Based on your symptoms and what you wrote, I would recommend that you should see your doctor/gynaecologist, just to rule out any serious causes.

      Good luck :)

  8. QUESTION:
    Why did i miss my period for three months ?
    My last period was in July, it is now October. I have not got a period since July and im worried. I took two pregnancy tests in September they were both negative. I did have unprotected sex in August and September. Can anyone help me figure out why i missed three periods. Thanks everyone and please no smart answers .

    • ANSWER:
      Hello Kaye, The doctor can give you a one time pill that will jump start your period and then hopefully it will continue to be normal.

      RANDOM REASONS FOR IRREGULAR PERIODS:

      Significant weight gain or weight loss is one of the reasons for irregular periods. Even though low body weight is the most common cause of irregular periods, obesity also causes various irregularities in your menstrual cycle.

      If you are a victim of severe emotional stress, then you can possibly experience irregular or missed periods. This is due to the reason that stress will have very serious impact on your reproductive health. So, if you are aware you experience severe emotional stress, you may suffer from irregular periods.

      Various eating disorders such as anorexia or bulimia nervosa can also have influence on your regular menstrual cycle. So, if you have any kind of eating disorder, you can certainly experience irregular periods.

      Excessive exercising or body straining activities can also lead to irregular menstrual cycle. This is the reason why most of athletes encounter missed periods.

      Many new mothers do not resume their regular periods until they have completed their breast feeding. So, they can possibly have irregular menstrual cycle.

      Alcohol consumption can also disturb your hormonal metabolism. As a result, you’ll certainly end up with irregular or missed periods.

      Certain uterine abnormalities such as cervical polyps, uterine fibroids and endometriosis also cause irregular periods, too.

      Certain STDs also show irregular periods as a symptom.

      One of the common causes is stress. It is one of the main culprits for this problem. If you have been worried, over worked or angry before your period, chances are that you will experience an irregular menstrual cycle.

      Girls who have just begun menstruation, experience irregular menstruation for up to one year or more. Missed periods after menarche are nothing to worry about, it's part of the normal body process.

      Pregnancy can be another reason for a missed period. So if you missed a period after sexual intercourse, its best to first rule out pregnancy. To prevent unplanned pregnancy, it is wise to use contraceptives. There can be changes in the menstrual cycle after pregnancy.

      These are quite a few reasons that may cause you to experience irregular periods. So, if you are really concerned about your missed periods, make sure you consult any experienced gynecologist and find out the root cause of it.

      And remember to always consider healthy liquid intake such as beverages, natural fruit juices, and herbal teas. These can also help to cleanse and regulate or relieve lower abdominal pains. Always see a professional if there are serious complications.

      Womenshealthzone
      buzzle

  9. QUESTION:
    why is my period is brown mucky colour after 4 days instead of the usual period colour?
    i could understand this for a day or so something to do with old blood ect but now im coming off my period and not had a normal looking one in colour . is this anything to worry about.

    • ANSWER:
      Vaginal discharge is a part of the menstrual cycle and its appearance and meaning may vary as per the stage and time of its occurrence. A lot of women experience brown discharge after their period. Of course, the reason for the same may vary from person to person. As a matter of fact, a brown discharge after the menstrual cycle is not always a cause for concern or a warning sign for any critical condition. There are chances that a perfectly healthy woman may also experience a brown discharge before, during, and after a period. Let's get to know what the causes of such an occurrence are.

      Causes of a Brown Discharge After a Period

      More often than not, a delayed period can lead to brown, dark red and/or dark brown discharge during and after a period. Most of the time, brown discharge after a period is often related to the endometrial tissues (lining of the uterus which gives way to menstrual bleeding). Remnants of the older endometrial tissues may appear brown when discharged from the body, which we can also say is the cleaning process of the uterus, because blood that is old will look brown, so tissue with old blood too will look the same.

      In a slightly more serious case, the brown discharge may be altered blood, meaning it has appeared as a symptom of some kind of damage to any internal part of the reproductive system, which may require a thorough examination. It could also be due to some kind of erosion, polyps and/or injury to the surface or the mouth of the uterus.

      There are chances that a woman might notice a brown discharge after 3 to 4 weeks of the menstrual cycle. This discharge may signify implantation bleeding; on the other hand, it is also an early sign of pregnancy.

      Other causes that can lead to a brown discharge are serious medical conditions, that include:
      •Repeated yeast infection
      •Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)
      •Bacterial vaginosis
      •Cervical cancer
      •Sexually transmitted diseases (STD) (e.g. chlamydia, vaginal warts, gonorrhea, etc.)

      Several phases of the menstrual cycle like perimenopause and menopause may also cause a brown discharge after the menstrual cycle.

      How to Treat the Condition

      Getting to the root cause of the problem by just observing the brown discharge is slightly difficult. However, watching out for the duration or the amount of time the vaginal discharge lasts can be of some help. As mentioned earlier, if the brown discharge is noticed as a result of a delayed period, it will stop within the duration of the menstrual cycle. If the problem continues, it is best to see a gynecologist and get to the root of the problem. If the cause is serious, then the discharge may be accompanied by several other symptoms such as itching, vaginal dryness, pain during intercourse, skin rash, frequent urination, loss of appetite, uterine bleeding, burning sensation inside the vagina, and mood swings and depression.

      The aforementioned symptoms should not be overlooked and one must immediately consult a doctor to discuss the issue freely and get it resolved at the earliest. The treatment for brown discharge after a period will be in accordance with the cause of the same. Your gynecologist might provide simple medication or small dietary and lifestyle changes to tackle the problem. In serious conditions, supplements, surgery, chemotherapy, pap smear tests, and other medical tests may be necessary.

      Remember that most of the time, it is not a very dangerous situation. However, if it prolongs, it is better to go and see a gynecologist and get the problem evaluated. Early detection of the problem is the best way to prevent it.

  10. QUESTION:
    What would cause light blood in between period?
    i have regular periods every month
    i had regular ovulation pains around a week ago,
    and had sex (As my partner and i are trying for children)
    yesterday i noticed i had very light blood when i wiped, now today i had it again but also im getting pains like im about to start a period, but i know im not because im not due nor have my usual period symptoms like sore breast, so i guess to ease my mind i was wondering what could the causes be and why?
    Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      There could be any number of reasons. This is actually much more common than you might think. Most irregular periods are benign - nothing to worry about. Missed periods, too frequent periods, spotting, light periods, or bouts of heavy clotting and bleeding are usually caused by an underlying hormonal imbalance that is easily treated.

      A wide variety of factors can be responsible for irregular periods, among them:

      Significant weight gain or loss
      Over-exercise
      Poor nutrition (or a diet too high in carbohydrates)
      Smoking
      Drug use
      Caffeine
      Excessive alcohol use (interfering with how the liver metabolizes estrogen and progesterone)
      Eating disorders
      Increased stress
      Polycystic ovarian syndrome/estrogen dominance
      Uterine abnormalities (fibroids/cysts/polyps/endometriosis)
      Hormonal imbalance related to perimenopause
      Medications
      Chemotherapy
      Recent childbirth, miscarriage, or D&C
      Breastfeeding

      Check here for more information.

      http://www.womentowomen.com/menstruation/irregularperiods.aspx

  11. QUESTION:
    What can a ob/gyn in do to help me with my horrible cramps and heavy bleeding.Is there a surgical procedure?
    I've already tried to take birth control and can't .

    • ANSWER:
      Depends on the cause of you heavy bleeding, aka menorrahgia. You could have endometriosis or another disease that causes pain and heavy bleeding. You can have cysts and lesions caused by endometriosis removed by laparoscopic surgery.

      If you do not want (more) children in the future, there are several procedures to "thin" the lining of the uterus. It's not surgery but it is a procedure only a qualified doctor can perform. The thinner living will either bleed less or not at all.

      Drug therapy for menorrhagia may include:
      Iron supplements. If the condition is accompanied by anemia, your doctor may recommend that you take iron supplements regularly. If your iron levels are low but you're not yet anemic, you may be started on iron supplements rather than waiting until you become anemic.
      Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). NSAIDs, such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others) or naproxen (Aleve), help reduce menstrual blood loss. NSAIDs have the added benefit of relieving painful menstrual cramps (dysmenorrhea).
      Oral contraceptives. Aside from providing effective birth control, oral contraceptives can help regulate menstrual cycles and reduce episodes of excessive or prolonged menstrual bleeding.
      Oral progesterone. When taken for 10 or more days of each menstrual cycle, the hormone progesterone can help correct hormonal imbalance and reduce menorrhagia.
      The hormonal IUD (Mirena). This type of intrauterine device releases a type of progestin called levonorgestrel, which makes the uterine lining thin and decreases menstrual blood flow and cramping.

      If you have menorrhagia from taking hormone medication, you and your doctor may be able to treat the condition by changing or stopping your medication.

      You may need surgical treatment for menorrhagia if drug therapy is unsuccessful. Treatment options include:
      Dilation and curettage (D&C). In this procedure, your doctor opens (dilates) your cervix and then scrapes or suctions tissue from the lining of your uterus to reduce menstrual bleeding. Although this procedure is common and often treats menorrhagia successfully, you may need additional D&C procedures if menorrhagia recurs.
      Operative hysteroscopy. This procedure uses a tiny tube with a light (hysteroscope) to view your uterine cavity and can aid in the surgical removal of a polyp that may be causing excessive menstrual bleeding.
      Endometrial ablation. Using a variety of techniques, your doctor permanently destroys the entire lining of your uterus (endometrium). After endometrial ablation, most women have little or no menstrual flow. Endometrial ablation reduces your ability to become pregnant.
      Endometrial resection. This surgical procedure uses an electrosurgical wire loop to remove the lining of the uterus. Both endometrial ablation and endometrial resection benefit women who have very heavy menstrual bleeding. Like endometrial ablation, this procedure reduces your ability to become pregnant.
      Hysterectomy. Surgical removal of the uterus and cervix is a permanent procedure that causes sterility and cessation of menstrual periods. Hysterectomy is performed during anesthesia and requires hospitalization. Additional removal of the ovaries (bilateral oophorectomy) may cause premature menopause.

      Except for hysterectomy, these surgical procedures are usually done on an outpatient basis. Although you may need a general anesthetic, it's likely that you can go home later on the same day.

      When menorrhagia is a sign of another condition, such as thyroid disease, treating that condition usually results in lighter periods.

  12. QUESTION:
    When I have sex with my boyfriend It hurts when he goes deep?

    Its kinda up by the cervix?

    • ANSWER:
      A number of conditions can cause painful intercourse.
      It could be a matter of size if your boy friends penis is hitting your cervix that could cause pain.

      Such "deep thrust" pain could also be a symptom of uterine polyps or fibroids or other condition.
      Therefore, women experiencing painful intercourse on a regular basis should seek the care of a gynaecologist or other women's health care provider with experience in painful intercourse.

      With a little detective work between you and your gynaecologist the cause of your pain should be found and treatment provided that will lead to a more enjoyable sex life.

  13. QUESTION:
    What does it mean when a girl doesnt have her period for 4 months?
    My bestfriend hasnt got her period for four months and she took three pregnancy test and they all came out negative but shes very worried because she thinks something is wrong with her. Can anyone help ?

    • ANSWER:
      RANDOM REASONS FOR IRREGULAR PERIODS:

      Significant weight gain or weight loss is one of the reasons for irregular periods. Even though low body weight is the most common cause of irregular periods, obesity also causes various irregularities in your menstrual cycle.

      If you are a victim of severe emotional stress, then you can possibly experience irregular or missed periods. This is due to the reason that stress will have very serious impact on your reproductive health. So, if you are aware you experience severe emotional stress, you may suffer from irregular periods.

      Various eating disorders such as anorexia or bulimia nervosa can also have influence on your regular menstrual cycle. So, if you have any kind of eating disorder, you can certainly experience irregular periods.

      Excessive exercising or body straining activities can also lead to irregular menstrual cycle. This is the reason why most of athletes encounter missed periods.

      Many new mothers do not resume their regular periods until they have completed their breast feeding. So, they can possibly have irregular menstrual cycle.

      Alcohol consumption can also disturb your hormonal metabolism. As a result, you’ll certainly end up with irregular or missed periods.

      Certain uterine abnormalities such as cervical polyps, uterine fibroids and endometriosis also cause irregular periods, too.

      Certain STDs also show irregular periods as a symptom.

      One of the common causes is stress. It is one of the main culprits for this problem. If you have been worried, over worked or angry before your period, chances are that you will experience an irregular menstrual cycle.

      Girls who have just begun menstruation, experience irregular menstruation for up to one year or more. Missed periods after menarche are nothing to worry about, it's part of the normal body process.

      Pregnancy can be another reason for a missed period. So if you missed a period after sexual intercourse, its best to first rule out pregnancy. To prevent unplanned pregnancy, it is wise to use contraceptives. There can be changes in the menstrual cycle after pregnancy.

      These are quite a few reasons that may cause you to experience irregular periods. So, if you are really concerned about your missed periods, make sure you consult any experienced gynecologist and find out the root cause of it.

      And remember to always consider healthy liquid intake such as beverages, natural fruit juices, and herbal teas. These can also help to cleanse and regulate or relieve lower abdominal pains. Always see a professional if there are serious complications.

      Womenshealthzone
      buzzle

  14. QUESTION:
    Can you get pregnant if you skip a period?
    I haven't had a period in 2 months. Can I still get pregnant before my next period of I have one?

    • ANSWER:
      Hello Stacie,

      RANDOM REASONS FOR IRREGULAR PERIODS:

      Significant weight gain or weight loss is one of the reasons for irregular periods. Even though low body weight is the most common cause of irregular periods, obesity also causes various irregularities in your menstrual cycle.

      If you are a victim of severe emotional stress, then you can possibly experience irregular or missed periods. This is due to the reason that stress will have very serious impact on your reproductive health. So, if you are aware you experience severe emotional stress, you may suffer from irregular periods.

      Various eating disorders such as anorexia or bulimia nervosa can also have influence on your regular menstrual cycle. So, if you have any kind of eating disorder, you can certainly experience irregular periods.

      Excessive exercising or body straining activities can also lead to irregular menstrual cycle. This is the reason why most of athletes encounter missed periods.

      Many new mothers do not resume their regular periods until they have completed their breast feeding. So, they can possibly have irregular menstrual cycle.

      Alcohol consumption can also disturb your hormonal metabolism. As a result, you’ll certainly end up with irregular or missed periods.

      Certain uterine abnormalities such as cervical polyps, uterine fibroids and endometriosis also cause irregular periods, too.

      Certain STDs also show irregular periods as a symptom.

      One of the common causes is stress. It is one of the main culprits for this problem. If you have been worried, over worked or angry before your period, chances are that you will experience an irregular menstrual cycle.

      Girls who have just begun menstruation, experience irregular menstruation for up to one year or more. Missed periods after menarche are nothing to worry about, it's part of the normal body process.

      Pregnancy can be another reason for a missed period. So if you missed a period after sexual intercourse, its best to first rule out pregnancy. To prevent unplanned pregnancy, it is wise to use contraceptives. There can be changes in the menstrual cycle after pregnancy.

      These are quite a few reasons that may cause you to experience irregular periods. So, if you are really concerned about your missed periods, make sure you consult any experienced gynecologist and find out the root cause of it.

      And remember to always consider healthy liquid intake such as beverages, natural fruit juices, and herbal teas. These can also help to cleanse and regulate or relieve lower abdominal pains. Always see a professional if there are serious complications.

      Womenshealthzone
      buzzle

  15. QUESTION:
    What are the side effects of using cortisone nasal sprays for a long time?
    they tell me it has less side effects than oral or cortisone injections, but what if i use the nasal sprays for over than 10 yrs????

    • ANSWER:
      General Side Effects
      According to the Mayo Clinic, all steroid nasal sprays can cause side effects. Irritation, itching, burning or dryness inside the nose or throat may commonly occur. Headaches, sneezing, runny nose, upset stomach or nosebleeds are also possible. According to RX List, other symptoms reported in more than three percent of clinical trial participants include nausea, vomiting, lightheadedness, tearing eyes, nasal stuffiness, cough, aftertaste, asthma symptoms, throat inflammation, viral or upper respiratory tract infection and dysmenorrhea (severe uterine pain during menstruation).
      Serious Side Effects.
      All steroid nasal sprays can suppress the functioning of the immune system, increasing the likelihood of developing other infections, according to RX List. Those exposed to chicken pox or measles while using these medications should notify their doctor. Intranasal corticosteroids may also have serious adverse effects on the eyes, including dryness and irritation, blurred vision, cataracts, glaucoma, increased intraocular pressure and conjunctivitis, according to RX List. Rarely, ulcers or nasal polyps have been reported by those taking mometasone furoate monohydrate and beclomethasone dipropionate monohydrate.
      Allergic reactions have also been reported, including symptoms such as unexplained rash, hives, itching, swelling, angioedema (swelling under the skin) and anaphylaxis (a life-threatening allergic reaction affecting the whole body). If you experience any of these symptoms, seek emergency medical care.
      Some research suggests that prolonged or excessive use of certain intranasal steroids can interfere with the functioning of the adrenal glands. The adrenal glands produce important hormones (cortisol) that are vital to regulating the body's stress response, sexual function, metabolism, balance of salt and water and blood glucose levels. According to RX List, certain steroid nasal sprays such as budesonide, flunisolide and fluticasone furoate carry some risk of causing adrenal suppression and slowed growth or hypercorticism (increased production of cortisol), which can cause Cushing's disease-like symptoms such as weight gain in the upper back, abdomen, face and neck.
      Hope answered your question in depth.
      Link is given below.

  16. QUESTION:
    how can uncontrollable uterine bleed lead to death in pregnancy?
    what gets affected?
    how does it happen?
    can it be prevented?

    • ANSWER:
      Many different things can cause abnormal uterine bleeding. Pregnancy is a common cause. Polyps or fibroids (small and large growths) in the uterus can also cause bleeding. Rarely, a thyroid problem, infection of the cervix or cancer of the uterus can cause abnormal uterine bleeding. 


      In most women, abnormal uterine bleeding is caused by a hormone imbalance. When hormones are the problem, doctors call the problem dysfunctional uterine bleeding, or DUB. Abnormal bleeding caused by hormone imbalance is more common in teenagers or in women who are approaching menopause.

      These are just a few of the problems that can cause abnormal uterine bleeding. These problems can occur at any age, but the likely cause of abnormal uterine bleeding usually depends on your age.

      Women in their teens, 20s and 30s

      A common cause of abnormal bleeding in young women and teenagers is pregnancy. Many women have abnormal bleeding in the first few months of a normal pregnancy. Some birth control pills or the intrauterine device can also cause abnormal bleeding.

      Some young women who have abnormal uterine bleeding do not release an egg from their ovaries (called ovulation) during their menstrual cycle. This is common for teenagers who have just started getting their periods. This causes a hormone imbalance where the estrogen in your body makes the lining of your uterus (called the endometrium) grow until it gets too thick. When your body gets rid of this lining during your period, the bleeding will be very heavy. A hormone imbalance may also cause your body not to know when to shed the lining. This can cause irregular bleeding (“spotting”) between your periods.The tests your doctor orders may depend on your age. If you could be pregnant, your doctor may order a pregnancy test. If your bleeding is heavy, in addition to other tests, your doctor may want to check your blood count to make sure you don't have anemia (low iron) from the blood loss.

      An ultrasound exam of your pelvic area shows both the uterus and the ovaries. It may also show the cause of your bleeding.

      Your doctor may want to do an endometrial biopsy. This is a test of the uterine lining. It's done by putting a thin plastic tube (called a catheter) into your uterus. A tiny piece of the uterine lining is taken out and sent to a lab for testing. The test will show if you have cancer or a change in the cells. A biopsy can be done in the doctor's office and causes only mild pain.

      Another test is a hysteroscopy. A thin tube with a tiny camera in it is put into your uterus. The camera lets your doctor see the inside of your uterus. If anything abnormal shows up, your doctor can get a biopsy.A D&C, or dilatation and curettage, is a procedure in which the opening of your cervix is stretched just enough so a surgical tool can be put into your uterus. The tool is used to scrape away the lining of your uterus. The removed lining is checked in a lab for abnormal tissue. A D&C is done under general anesthesia (while you're in a sleep-like state).

      If you're having heavy bleeding, a D&C may be done both to find out the problem and to treat the bleeding. The D&C itself often makes heavy bleeding stop. Your doctor will decide if this procedure is necessary.

      Hysterectomy. This type of surgery removes the uterus. If you have a hysterectomy, you won’t have any more periods and you won’t be able to get pregnant. Hysterectomy is major surgery that requires general anesthesia and a hospital stay. It may require a long recovery period. Talk to your doctor about the risks and benefits of hysterectomy.

      Endometrial ablation is a surgical procedure that destroys the lining of the uterus. Unlike a hysterectomy, it does not remove the uterus. Endometrial ablation may stop all menstrual bleeding in some women. However, some women still have light menstrual bleeding or spotting after endometrial ablation. A few women have regular menstrual periods after the procedure. Women who have endometrial ablation still need to use some form of birth control even though, in most cases, pregnancy is not likely after the procedure.

      Your doctor can do endometrial ablation in several different ways. Newer endometrial ablation techniques do not require general anesthesia or a hospital stay. The recovery time after this procedure is shorter than recovery time after a hysterectomy.

      Good luck !!

  17. QUESTION:
    Do I need to remove an endometrial polyp?
    My OBGYN says he has to do a D&C but what will happen if I dont do it. I mean if it is just longer periods I can learn to live with that. I heard the D&C is very painful and the polyn can grow back anyway.

    • ANSWER:
      Here's the thing: there is almost never a single polyp, and the problems they can cause are more than just longer periods. Longer, more painful periods, bleeding between periods, miscarriages, and even infertility. Most polyps are benign, but some are precursors to uterine cancer.

      Most OBGYN's will do a D&C under general anesthesia or conscious sedation, which means you won't be conscious enough to feel the procedure. Afterward, you may have some cramping, but nothing worse than you would have during your period, and they are easily dulled with advil or motrin. You'll probably skip your next period, as your uterus will need time to replace the lining. It's not completely painless, but the pain is minimal, and a better option than playing fast and loose with your reproductive health.

      There is a possibility the polyps will come back eventually, and you'd need treatment again some year down the road...but again, it's better to deal with it than to not. Don't be afraid. I promise that it is nothing you can't handle.

  18. QUESTION:
    What is the possability im pregnent?
    I was 9 days late when i had sex. We used a condom but im not on birth control. Now im 18 days late. Im also a swimmer but havent been to swim much. And the other 2 months i was in swim when i swam more i got my period normal.

    • ANSWER:
      Hello Lovey,

      RANDOM REASONS FOR IRREGULAR PERIODS:

      Significant weight gain or weight loss is one of the reasons for irregular periods. Even though low body weight is the most common cause of irregular periods, obesity also causes various irregularities in your menstrual cycle.

      If you are a victim of severe emotional stress, then you can possibly experience irregular or missed periods. This is due to the reason that stress will have very serious impact on your reproductive health. So, if you are aware you experience severe emotional stress, you may suffer from irregular periods.

      Various eating disorders such as anorexia or bulimia nervosa can also have influence on your regular menstrual cycle. So, if you have any kind of eating disorder, you can certainly experience irregular periods.

      Excessive exercising or body straining activities can also lead to irregular menstrual cycle. This is the reason why most of athletes encounter missed periods.

      Alcohol consumption can also disturb your hormonal metabolism. As a result, you’ll certainly end up with irregular or missed periods.

      Certain uterine abnormalities such as cervical polyps, uterine fibroids and endometriosis also cause irregular periods, too.

      Certain STDs also show irregular periods as a symptom.

      One of the common causes is stress. It is one of the main culprits for this problem. If you have been worried, over worked or angry before your period, chances are that you will experience an irregular menstrual cycle.

      Girls who have just begun menstruation, experience irregular menstruation for up to one year or more. Missed periods after menarche are nothing to worry about, it's part of the normal body process.

      Pregnancy can be another reason for a missed period. So if you missed a period after sexual intercourse, its best to first rule out pregnancy. To prevent unplanned pregnancy, it is wise to use contraceptives. There can be changes in the menstrual cycle after pregnancy.

      These are quite a few reasons that may cause you to experience irregular periods. So, if you are really concerned about your missed periods, make sure you consult any experienced gynecologist and find out the root cause of it.

      And remember to always consider healthy liquid intake such as beverages, natural fruit juices, and herbal teas. These can also help to cleanse and regulate or relieve lower abdominal pains. Always see a professional if there are serious complications.

      Womenshealthzone
      buzzle

  19. QUESTION:
    How does physical activity impact the menstrual cycle and cramps?
    in details pls. thanks

    • ANSWER:
      WELL I HAVE FOUND THAT THE MORE PHYSICALLY ACTIVE I HAVE BEEN THE LESS MY CONTRACTIONS HURT. I MEAN THAT THERE IS NO REASON IT WILL EVER BE PAIN FREE BUT IT WILL BE LESSONED!

      AND I WAS TOLD BY MY DOCTORS TO TAKE ONE ACETAMINOPHEN EVERY DAY BEFORE YOUR PERIOD STARTS AND ALSO EVERYDAY DRINK SOME MILK. IT SOMEHOW HELPS!!

      HERE IS SOME STUFF I FOUND ON THE INTERNET!

      Practice relaxation techniques like meditation or yoga

      Menstrual Cramps - Topic Overview
      Most women have painful menstrual cramps (dysmenorrhea) from time to time. Menstrual cramps are one of the most common reasons for women to seek medical attention. The pain from menstrual cramps can range from mild to severe and can involve the lower abdomen, back, or thighs. You may also have headaches, nausea, dizziness or fainting, or diarrhea or constipation with your cramps.

      During the menstrual cycle, the lining of the uterus produces a hormone called prostaglandin. This hormone causes the uterus to contract, often painfully. Women with severe cramps may produce higher-than-normal amounts of prostaglandin, or they may be more sensitive to its effects.

      Cramping is common during the teen years, when a woman first starts having periods. Primary dysmenorrhea is a term used to describe painful menstrual cramping with no recognized physical cause. It is seen most commonly in women between the ages of 20 and 24. It usually goes away after 1 to 2 years, when hormonal balance occurs.

      Secondary dysmenorrhea is a term used to describe painful menstrual cramping caused by a physical problem other than menstruation. Physical problems that can cause this type of cramping include:

      A condition in which cells that look and act like the cells of the lining of the uterus (endometrium) are found in other parts of the abdominal cavity (endometriosis) or grow into the muscular tissue of the uterine wall (adenomyosis). Pain usually occurs 1 to 2 days before menstrual bleeding begins and continues through the period.
      Growths that are not cancerous (benign growths) in the pelvis, such as ovarian cysts, cervical or uterine polyps, or fibroids.
      Pelvic infections. Your risk for developing an infection is higher after menstrual bleeding has begun because the opening to the uterus (cervical canal) widens during menstruation. However, pelvic infections, especially those caused by sexually transmitted diseases, can occur at any time.
      Using an intrauterine device (IUD). An IUD may cause increased cramping during your period for the first few months of use. If menstrual cramping persists or gets worse, you may need to consider having the IUD removed and choosing another birth control method.
      Problems with pregnancy.
      Structural problems that were present at birth (congenital), such as narrowing of the lower part of the uterus that opens into the vagina (cervix).
      Menstrual-type cramps may occur after a medical procedure, such as cautery, cryotherapy, conization, radiation, endometrial biopsy, or IUD insertion.

      Other menstrual symptoms, such as weight gain, headache, and tension, that occur before your period begins, can be caused by premenstrual syndrome (PMS). For more information, see the topic Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS).

      Review the Check Your Symptoms section to determine if and when you need to see your health professional.

  20. QUESTION:
    Heavy bleeding and heavy pain during my period with black clots?
    Is it normal or what should i do?
    Pls advise

    • ANSWER:
      Hormonal changes. Your body relies on a delicate balance of the hormones progesterone and estrogen. These hormones regulate the production and shedding of the uterine lining. When this balance is disturbed, it can lead to the development of an excessively thick uterine lining. This thickness can contribute to more bleeding than usual. It can also cause clots in the menstrual blood when the lining is shed.
      There r so many reasons for this as Endometriosis, fibroid, polyps etc
      to find out correct reason u should visit a local specialist in ur town.

  21. QUESTION:
    Why do I have Irregular Periods?
    I am a woman in her 40's who has always had regular periods. For the last two months after my periods end I notice that two days later there is bleeding. It is usually minimal with occasional dark blood that lasts about 2 to 3 days. I am actually quite healthy and have no other symptoms or no pain. The only thing that has changed is that I am older and have lost about 9 pounds in the last three months slowly. Can anyone shed light on this as to why this is happening.

    • ANSWER:
      Hello there, Here are some facts I had found in regards to irregular periods. I hope this helps!
      RANDOM REASONS FOR IRREGULAR PERIODS:

      Significant weight gain or weight loss is one of the reasons for irregular periods. Even though low body weight is the most common cause of irregular periods, obesity also causes various irregularities in your menstrual cycle.

      If you are a victim of severe emotional stress, then you can possibly experience irregular or missed periods. This is due to the reason that stress will have very serious impact on your reproductive health. So, if you are aware you experience severe emotional stress, you may suffer from irregular periods.

      Various eating disorders such as anorexia or bulimia nervosa can also have influence on your regular menstrual cycle. So, if you have any kind of eating disorder, you can certainly experience irregular periods.

      Excessive exercising or body straining activities can also lead to irregular menstrual cycle. This is the reason why most of athletes encounter missed periods.

      Alcohol consumption can also disturb your hormonal metabolism. As a result, you’ll certainly end up with irregular or missed periods.

      Certain uterine abnormalities such as cervical polyps, uterine fibroids and endometriosis also cause irregular periods, too.

      Certain STDs also show irregular periods as a symptom.

      One of the common causes is stress. It is one of the main culprits for this problem. If you have been worried, over worked or angry before your period, chances are that you will experience an irregular menstrual cycle.

      ALSO READ ABOUT PERIMENOPAUSE ON LINE

      Womenshealthzone
      buzzle

  22. QUESTION:
    how to reduce bleeding for heavy periods?
    my mom refuses to get me birth control, and i have to change pads every fourty five minutes to a hour, and every night i bleed through, and my periods last for two weeks.

    • ANSWER:
      Even though she doesn't want you using birth control you need to see a gynecologist to find out why you're bleeding that heavy. That's insane to not be allowed to see a doctor if she won't let you because you could have something like endometriosis or an imbalance of hormones causing you to bleed like that. How can you get through the day like that? I bled through super tampons in 20 minutes and even birth control did not help me. Mine also lasted up to two weeks and I ended up with a total hysterectomy/keeping both ovaries at the age of 29. I was diagnosed with endometriosis at the age of 19 because my mom never took me to a doctor and assumed I was having growing pains. Had I not gone in when I did I may not have had kids to this day. Endometriosis can cause infertility. Adenomyosis (endometriosis inside the uterine muscle) was suspected before my hysterectomy. Please see a doctor. If she won't take you ask your dad to take you so he can sign the papers if you're under 18. It doesn't matter which parent takes you because the doctor won't likely have them stay in the exam room anyway when the time comes. Plus the doctor needs to be able to get the patient doctor relationship going and if a parent is there the patient is not likely to tell the truth about everything. If you're under 18 you will need a parent or legal guardian to at least sign the paper allowing the doctor to see you. You must be seen though and the treatment does not have to be birth control pills and they may not even help. You may need surgery to diagnose something else but you won't know until you are seen.

      When one is not able to go an hour without changing it's called menorrhagia and you need to be seen to find out why. It could be fibroids, polyps, hormone irregularities, endometriosis (more common in young women and teens), or other things I did not mention. Oh and make sure that you tell the doctor that you go through pads every 45 minutes and not just say you have heavy bleeding. Anyone can say they have heavy bleeding and doctors may think that women are just saying that because it looks like a lot of blood but if you say how little time you have to go through something then he/she will take you more seriously. You can't possibly continue going on like this without finding out why you are having the heavy bleeding. Polyps and fibroids can be removed and endometriosis can be lasered out. If it's hormonal problems maybe the doc will recommend the pill but you don't even know what's causing it yet so rather than jump to conclusions thinking that the pill will help why not try to find out why first and then see what the doc says.

  23. QUESTION:
    Why have my periods gotten shorter and lighter?
    Im 18 years old and ive had periods every 28 days since i was 13, they lasted about 4 days and were very heavy. But ive noticed since august/july up until now ive been coming on every 2 weeks and they are an awful lot lighter than before. I have lost and gained a few pounds on and off since and during ramazan and i have been under some stress but thesw factors have never affected my periods before and ive had it worse before.

    • ANSWER:
      RANDOM REASONS FOR IRREGULAR PERIODS:

      Significant weight gain or weight loss is one of the reasons for irregular periods. Even though low body weight is the most common cause of irregular periods, obesity also causes various irregularities in your menstrual cycle.

      If you are a victim of severe emotional stress, then you can possibly experience irregular or missed periods. This is due to the reason that stress will have very serious impact on your reproductive health. So, if you are aware you experience severe emotional stress, you may suffer from irregular periods.

      Various eating disorders such as anorexia or bulimia nervosa can also have influence on your regular menstrual cycle. So, if you have any kind of eating disorder, you can certainly experience irregular periods.

      Excessive exercising or body straining activities can also lead to irregular menstrual cycle. This is the reason why most of athletes encounter missed periods.

      Many new mothers do not resume their regular periods until they have completed their breast feeding. So, they can possibly have irregular menstrual cycle.

      Alcohol consumption can also disturb your hormonal metabolism. As a result, you’ll certainly end up with irregular or missed periods.

      Certain uterine abnormalities such as cervical polyps, uterine fibroids and endometriosis also cause irregular periods, too.

      Certain STDs also show irregular periods as a symptom.

      One of the common causes is stress. It is one of the main culprits for this problem. If you have been worried, over worked or angry before your period, chances are that you will experience an irregular menstrual cycle.

      Girls who have just begun menstruation, experience irregular menstruation for up to one year or more. Missed periods after menarche are nothing to worry about, it's part of the normal body process.

      Pregnancy can be another reason for a missed period. So if you missed a period after sexual intercourse, its best to first rule out pregnancy. To prevent unplanned pregnancy, it is wise to use contraceptives. There can be changes in the menstrual cycle after pregnancy.

      These are quite a few reasons that may cause you to experience irregular periods. So, if you are really concerned about your missed periods, make sure you consult any experienced gynecologist and find out the root cause of it.

      And remember to always consider healthy liquid intake such as beverages, natural fruit juices, and herbal teas. These can also help to cleanse and regulate or relieve lower abdominal pains. Always see a professional if there are serious complications.

      Womenshealthzone
      buzzle

  24. QUESTION:
    Why have my periods gotten shorter and lighter?
    Im 18 years old and ive had periods every 28 days since i was 13, they lasted about 4 days and were very heavy. But ive noticed since august/july up until now ive been coming on every 2 weeks and they are an awful lot lighter than before. I have lost and gained a few pounds on and off since and during ramazan and i have been under some stress but thesw factors have never affected my periods before and ive had it worse before.

    • ANSWER:
      RANDOM REASONS FOR IRREGULAR PERIODS:

      Significant weight gain or weight loss is one of the reasons for irregular periods. Even though low body weight is the most common cause of irregular periods, obesity also causes various irregularities in your menstrual cycle.

      If you are a victim of severe emotional stress, then you can possibly experience irregular or missed periods. This is due to the reason that stress will have very serious impact on your reproductive health. So, if you are aware you experience severe emotional stress, you may suffer from irregular periods.

      Various eating disorders such as anorexia or bulimia nervosa can also have influence on your regular menstrual cycle. So, if you have any kind of eating disorder, you can certainly experience irregular periods.

      Excessive exercising or body straining activities can also lead to irregular menstrual cycle. This is the reason why most of athletes encounter missed periods.

      Many new mothers do not resume their regular periods until they have completed their breast feeding. So, they can possibly have irregular menstrual cycle.

      Alcohol consumption can also disturb your hormonal metabolism. As a result, you’ll certainly end up with irregular or missed periods.

      Certain uterine abnormalities such as cervical polyps, uterine fibroids and endometriosis also cause irregular periods, too.

      Certain STDs also show irregular periods as a symptom.

      One of the common causes is stress. It is one of the main culprits for this problem. If you have been worried, over worked or angry before your period, chances are that you will experience an irregular menstrual cycle.

      Girls who have just begun menstruation, experience irregular menstruation for up to one year or more. Missed periods after menarche are nothing to worry about, it's part of the normal body process.

      Pregnancy can be another reason for a missed period. So if you missed a period after sexual intercourse, its best to first rule out pregnancy. To prevent unplanned pregnancy, it is wise to use contraceptives. There can be changes in the menstrual cycle after pregnancy.

      These are quite a few reasons that may cause you to experience irregular periods. So, if you are really concerned about your missed periods, make sure you consult any experienced gynecologist and find out the root cause of it.

      And remember to always consider healthy liquid intake such as beverages, natural fruit juices, and herbal teas. These can also help to cleanse and regulate or relieve lower abdominal pains. Always see a professional if there are serious complications.

      Womenshealthzone
      buzzle

  25. QUESTION:
    my sister has excessive bleeding like having a period for over a month now. she has lost a lot of weight?
    and says she has little to no energy from this. does anyone know what she has. she is taking iron supplements but now is really scared because her weakness has increased and she still is bleeding.

    • ANSWER:
      MENORRHAGIA Causes
      In some cases, the cause of heavy menstrual bleeding is unknown, but a number of conditions may cause menorrhagia. Common causes include:

      Hormonal imbalance. In a normal menstrual cycle, a balance between the hormones estrogen and progesterone regulates the buildup of the lining of the uterus (endometrium), which is shed during menstruation. If a hormonal imbalance occurs, the endometrium develops in excess and eventually sheds by way of heavy menstrual bleeding. Hormonal imbalance occurs most often in adolescent girls and in women approaching menopause. If menorrhagia is caused by a specific hormonal imbalance, such as thyroid disease, the heavy menstrual flow often can be controlled with hormone medications. However, improper use of hormone medications can also be a direct cause of menorrhagia.
      Uterine fibroids. These noncancerous (benign) tumors of the uterus appear during your childbearing years. Uterine fibroids may cause heavier than normal or prolonged menstrual bleeding.
      Polyps. Small, benign growths on the lining of the uterine wall (uterine polyps) may cause heavy or prolonged menstrual bleeding. Polyps of the uterus most commonly occur in women of reproductive age as the result of high hormone levels.
      Dysfunction of the ovaries. Lack of ovulation (anovulation) may cause hormonal imbalance and result in menorrhagia.
      Adenomyosis. This condition occurs when glands from the endometrium become embedded in the uterine muscle, often causing heavy bleeding and pain. Adenomyosis is most likely to develop if you're a middle-aged woman who has had many children.
      Intrauterine device (IUD). Menorrhagia is a well-known side effect of using a nonhormonal intrauterine device for birth control. When an IUD is the cause of excessive menstrual bleeding, you'll often need to remove it.
      Pregnancy complications. A single, heavy, late period may be due to a miscarriage. If bleeding occurs at the usual time of menstruation, however, miscarriage is unlikely to be the cause. An ectopic pregnancy — implantation of a fertilized egg within the fallopian tube instead of the uterus — also may cause menorrhagia.
      Cancer. Rarely, uterine cancer, ovarian cancer and cervical cancer can cause excessive menstrual bleeding.
      Medications. Certain drugs, including anti-inflammatory medications and anticoagulants (to prevent blood clots), can contribute to heavy or prolonged menstrual bleeding.
      Other medical conditions. A number of other medical conditions, including pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), thyroid problems, endometriosis, and liver or kidney disease, may cause menorrhagia.

      Complications
      Excessive or prolonged menstrual bleeding can lead to other medical conditions, including:

      Iron deficiency anemia. In this common type of anemia, your blood is low on hemoglobin, a substance that enables red blood cells to carry oxygen to tissues. Low hemoglobin may be the result of insufficient iron. Menorrhagia may deplete iron levels enough to increase the risk of iron deficiency anemia. Symptoms include pallor, weakness and fatigue.

      Although diet plays a role in iron deficiency anemia, the problem is complicated by heavy menstrual periods. Most cases of anemia are mild, but even mild anemia can cause weakness and fatigue. Moderate to severe anemia can also cause shortness of breath, rapid heart rate, lightheadedness and headaches.

      Severe pain. Heavy menstrual bleeding often is accompanied by menstrual cramps (dysmenorrhea). Sometimes the cramps associated with menorrhagia are severe enough to require prescription medication or a surgical procedure.

  26. QUESTION:
    How do you get rid of menstrual cramps?

    • ANSWER:
      Original Article:http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/menstrual-cramps/DS00506
      Menstrual cramps (dysmenorrhea)
      Introduction

      Even if you're not familiar with the term "dysmenorrhea," if you're a woman, chances are you've experienced it at some time in your life. Dysmenorrhea is simply the medical term for menstrual cramps, that dull or throbbing pain in the lower abdomen many women experience just before and during their menstrual periods. For some women, the discomfort is merely annoying. For others, it can be severe enough to interfere with everyday activities for a few days every month.

      Dysmenorrhea can be primary or secondary. Primary dysmenorrhea involves no physical abnormality and usually begins within three years after you begin menstruating. Secondary dysmenorrhea involves an underlying physical cause, such as endometriosis or uterine fibroids.

      If you have primary dysmenorrhea, there are some measures you can take to ease the discomfort. You can also take comfort in knowing that cramps tend to decrease in intensity as you get older and often disappear after pregnancy. For secondary dysmenorrhea, managing your cramps involves treating the underlying cause.
      Signs and symptoms

      Most women experience menstrual cramps at some time in their lives. Cramps become problematic when they're severe enough to keep you from going about your day-to-day routine.

      If you have primary dysmenorrhea, cramps most likely began within three years after you started menstruating. They may persist through your 20s or until you deliver a child and, for unknown reasons, they're likely to decrease in intensity or go away entirely. With secondary dysmenorrhea, cramps may start or return later in life, but can begin anytime after you begin menstruating.

      Signs and symptoms of dysmenorrhea, whether primary or secondary, may include:

      * Dull or throbbing pain in your lower abdomen
      * Pain that radiates to your lower back and thighs

      Less common signs and symptoms include:

      * Nausea and vomiting
      * Loose stools
      * Sweating
      * Dizziness

      Causes
      CLICK TO ENLARGE
      Illustration showing normal ovulation Normal ovulation

      To create a nourishing environment for a fertilized egg, the female sex hormone estrogen causes your uterine lining (endometrium) to thicken every month. Soon after, a follicle — a tiny sac in your ovary that contains a single egg (ovum) — ruptures and releases its egg (ovulation). If the egg becomes fertilized by contact with a sperm on its way to your uterus, the egg implants in the lining of the uterus. However, most often the unfertilized egg passes through your uterus and out of your body. Shortly thereafter, your uterus releases the lining, and your menstrual flow begins.

      To help expel its lining, your uterus contracts. Prostaglandins, hormone-like substances involved in pain and inflammation, trigger the uterine muscle contractions. No one knows for sure, but many experts believe that prostaglandins cause menstrual cramps (primary dysmenorrhea).

      A number of conditions can cause secondary dysmenorrhea. They include:

      * Endometriosis. In this painful condition, the type of tissue that lines your uterus becomes implanted outside your uterus, most commonly on your fallopian tubes, ovaries or the tissue lining your pelvis.
      * Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). This infection of the female reproductive organs is usually caused by sexually transmitted bacteria.
      * Use of an intrauterine device (IUD). These small, plastic, T-shaped birth control devices are inserted into your uterus. They may cause increased cramping, particularly during the first few months after insertion.
      * Uterine fibroids and uterine polyps. These noncancerous tumors and growths protrude from the lining of your uterus.

      Risk factors

      You're more likely to have severe menstrual cramps if you have one or both of the following:

      * Early onset of puberty (age 11 or younger)
      * A family history of painful periods

      When to seek medical advice

      If you've started menstruating within the past few years and are experiencing cramps, chances are your menstrual pain is primary dysmenorrhea and not a cause for concern. However, if cramping disrupts your life for several days a month or if you're older and just started experiencing severe menstrual cramps, see your doctor. If you have secondary dysmenorrhea, pinpointing the underlying cause is the first step to successful treatment.
      Screening and diagnosis

      Your doctor will review your medical history and perform a physical examination, including a pelvic exam. During the pelvic exam, your doctor will check for any abnormalities in your reproductive organs and look for indications of infection.

      To rule out other causes of your symptoms or to identify the cause of secondary dysmenorrhea, your doctor may request diagnostic tests, such as:

      * Imaging tests. Noninvasive tests that enable your doctor to look for abnormalities inside your pelvic cavity include ultrasound, computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).
      * Laparoscopy. This surgical procedure involves your doctor viewing your pelvic cavity by making tiny incisions in your abdomen and inserting a fiber-optic tube with a small camera lens.
      * Hysteroscopy. In this procedure, your doctor inserts an instrument through your vagina and your cervical canal to examine your cervical canal and the inside of your uterus.

      Complications

      The complications of secondary dysmenorrhea depend on the underlying cause. For instance, pelvic inflammatory disease can scar your fallopian tubes and compromise reproductive health. The scarring can lead to an ectopic pregnancy, in which the fertilized egg stays in the fallopian tube rather than traveling through the tube to implant in your uterus, or it implants somewhere else outside your uterus. Endometriosis, another possible cause of secondary dysmenorrhea, can lead to impaired fertility.
      Treatment

      For secondary dysmenorrhea, you'll need treatment for the underlying cause. Depending on the cause, treatment could include antibiotics to treat infection or surgery to remove fibroids or polyps.

      You may be able to reduce your discomfort from dysmenorrhea by using an over-the-counter nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), such as aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others) or naproxen (Aleve). Self-care strategies also may help relieve discomfort. For severe cramping, your doctor might recommend low-dose oral contraceptives to prevent ovulation, which may reduce the production of prostaglandins and therefore the severity of your cramps.
      Self-care

      You can try a number of self-care strategies to reduce the discomfort of primary dysmenorrhea. Once the pain begins, soaking in a hot bath or using a heating pad on your abdomen may ease your cramps. You can also make some lifestyle changes to improve your overall health and possibly decrease the severity of your cramps. Try these tips:

      * Exercise regularly. Exercise results in an increased release of endorphins, your body's natural painkillers.
      * Get adequate rest. Your body may be less vulnerable to pain when you're well rested.

      Complementary and alternative medicine

      Some women find relief through massage, yoga or meditation, all stress-relieving activities that may help to lessen pain and aren't likely to harm you. Some women find acupuncture helpful for pain relief. The National Institutes of Health issued a consensus statement in 1998 stating that acupuncture may help relieve certain types of pain, including menstrual cramps.

  27. QUESTION:
    My period this month is really abnormal?
    So I'm 17, I've had my period since I was around 12, all of them being normal. But this one is really strange; I'll begin with my general info. I'm a virgin, I take care of myself, etc. But. But I have a really sharp pain in one spot from this one- no where else. I had the bleeding for about an hour then it stopped but not completely. All it is now is this brown stuff and grey stuff which is not normal at all. What is this?

    • ANSWER:
      This is actually much more common than you might think. Most irregular periods are benign - nothing to worry about. Missed periods, too frequent periods, spotting, light periods, or bouts of heavy clotting and bleeding are usually caused by an underlying hormonal imbalance that is easily treated.

      A wide variety of factors can be responsible for irregular periods, among them:

      Significant weight gain or loss
      Over-exercise
      Poor nutrition (or a diet too high in carbohydrates)
      Smoking
      Drug use
      Caffeine
      Excessive alcohol use (interfering with how the liver metabolizes estrogen and progesterone)
      Eating disorders
      Increased stress
      Polycystic ovarian syndrome/estrogen dominance
      Uterine abnormalities (fibroids/cysts/polyps/endometriosis)
      Hormonal imbalance related to perimenopause
      Medications

      Check here for more information.

      http://www.womentowomen.com/menstruation/irregularperiods.aspx

  28. QUESTION:
    is my period heavy enough for me to see a doctor?
    My period usually lasts about 7-9 days. It is very heavy in the beginning and i go through one Super size tampon in 1 hour or 1 1/2 for about 2 days and then it starts to get lighter until it stops. A regular size would last me about 45 minutes during the 1-3 days. But it is very regular and comes once a month. Should I go see a doctor about this and what could be causing it?
    and i am 20 and got my first period when i was 12/13.

    • ANSWER:
      Yes not only is going through something within an hour considered heavy but the fact that you go beyond 7 days would concern me. I'd get seen for sure. I had bled 10 days to two weeks and previously was diagnosed with endometrioss at the age of 19. Pain would be a symptom of a problem. I ended up with a hysterectomy at 29 due to the bleeding and pain but there are other options out there and it's best to find out what's going on or what's causing the heavy bleeding.

      Here's some information
      http://www.healthsystem.virginia.edu/uvahealth/adult_gyneonc/menor.cfm
      "In general, bleeding is considered excessive when a woman soaks through enough sanitary products (sanitary napkins or tampons) to require changing every hour. In addition, bleeding is considered prolonged when a woman experiences a menstrual period that lasts longer than seven days in duration."

      "What causes menorrhagia?
      There are several possible causes of menorrhagia, including the following:

      hormonal (particularly estrogen and progesterone) imbalance (especially seen in adolescents who are experiencing their menstrual period for the first time and in women approaching menopause)
      pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)
      uterine fibroids
      abnormal pregnancy (i.e., miscarriage, ectopic)
      infection, tumors, or polyps in the pelvic cavity
      certain birth control devices (i.e., intrauterine devices, or IUDs)
      bleeding or platelet disorders
      high levels of prostaglandins (chemical substances which help to control the muscle contractions of the uterus)
      high levels of endothelins (chemical substances which help the blood vessels in the body dilate)
      liver, kidney, or thyroid disease

      The following are the most common (other) symptoms of menorrhagia. However, each individual may experience symptoms differently. Symptoms may include:

      spotting or bleeding between menstrual periods
      spotting or bleeding during pregnancy
      The symptoms of menorrhagia may resemble other menstrual conditions or medical problems. Always consult your physician for a diagnosis."

      "Treatment for menorrhagia may include:

      iron supplementation (if the condition is coupled with anemia, a blood disorder caused by a deficiency of red blood cells or hemoglobin)
      prostaglandin inhibitors such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs), such as aspirin or ibuprofen (to help reduce cramping and the amount of blood expelled)
      oral contraceptives (ovulation inhibitors)
      progesterone (hormone treatment)
      endometrial ablation - a procedure to destroy the lining of the uterus (endometrium).
      endometrial resection - a procedure to remove the lining of the uterus (endometrium).
      hysterectomy - surgical removal of the uterus."

  29. QUESTION:
    What does it mean if its hurts& you bleed(down there) during sex?

    for some reason for the past couple months when me and my bf have sexual intercourse i'll bleed...like alot sometimes...and it feels really sore on the outside of the vagina...what does this mean and how do i stop it from happening..and dont say not to have sex cz i already know tht solution...and im not ever on my period when we do....
    and no im not a virgin..& gets wet like wet wet..then after a lil time passes by and its getting great is when this bad stuff happens

    • ANSWER:
      Bleeding during or after sex is not considered normal and therefore should be evaluated at all times. The only time bleeding during or after sex is considered normal in some cases is if you are having sexual intercourse for the first time.

      Some causes of vaginal bleeding after sex, such as vaginal dryness after menopause or in some cases by the use of certain types of birth control pills are not serious and may be easily treated.

      However, in some cases, vaginal bleeding after sex can be a sign of a serious underlying problem, including:

      * Inflammation of the cervix (cervicitis).
      * Sexually transmitted diseases, such as chlamydia or gonorrhea.
      * Cervical polyps.
      * Cervical ectropion, a condition in which the cervical tissue is more susceptible to abrasion.
      * Endometriosis or ovarian cysts.
      * Pelvic inflammatory disease.
      * Uterine fibroids.
      * Cancer of the cervix, uterus or vagina.

      If you’re experiencing pain during or after sex there may be several factors that are contributing to the pain you feel. For women there are a number of physical conditions that may make sex hurt, including:

      * Pelvic Inflammatory Disease
      * Endometriosis
      * Ovarian cysts
      * Interstitial cystitis
      * Vaginismus
      * Vulvodynia
      * Some sexually transmitted diseases
      * Urinary infections
      * Yeast infections
      * Vaginal dryness
      * Physical injury and chronic pain

      If you continue to experience bleeding and pain during or after sex, I would recommend that you consult with your doctor/gynaecologist to see what they think could be causing this.

      Good luck :)

  30. QUESTION:
    period is a little bit late and bloated belly?
    I had unprotected sex in 4 months ago, my period was all fine for 3 months until now. My period is a week late and my belly is bloated for 1 week. Is there something wrong with me? i never have this period so late.

    is it possible to be pregnant if you have period for 3 months until it stop? I looked it up and that what it says.

    • ANSWER:
      RANDOM REASONS FOR IRREGULAR PERIODS:

      Significant weight gain or weight loss is one of the reasons for irregular periods. Even though low body weight is the most common cause of irregular periods, obesity also causes various irregularities in your menstrual cycle.

      If you are a victim of severe emotional stress, then you can possibly experience irregular or missed periods. This is due to the reason that stress will have very serious impact on your reproductive health. So, if you are aware you experience severe emotional stress, you may suffer from irregular periods.

      Various eating disorders such as anorexia or bulimia nervosa can also have influence on your regular menstrual cycle. So, if you have any kind of eating disorder, you can certainly experience irregular periods.

      Excessive exercising or body straining activities can also lead to irregular menstrual cycle. This is the reason why most of athletes encounter missed periods.

      Many new mothers do not resume their regular periods until they have completed their breast feeding. So, they can possibly have irregular menstrual cycle.

      Alcohol consumption can also disturb your hormonal metabolism. As a result, you’ll certainly end up with irregular or missed periods.

      Certain uterine abnormalities such as cervical polyps, uterine fibroids and endometriosis also cause irregular periods, too.

      Certain STDs also show irregular periods as a symptom.

      One of the common causes is stress. It is one of the main culprits for this problem. If you have been worried, over worked or angry before your period, chances are that you will experience an irregular menstrual cycle.

      Girls who have just begun menstruation, experience irregular menstruation for up to one year or more. Missed periods after menarche are nothing to worry about, it's part of the normal body process.

      Pregnancy can be another reason for a missed period. So if you missed a period after sexual intercourse, its best to first rule out pregnancy. To prevent unplanned pregnancy, it is wise to use contraceptives. There can be changes in the menstrual cycle after pregnancy.

      These are quite a few reasons that may cause you to experience irregular periods. So, if you are really concerned about your missed periods, make sure you consult any experienced gynecologist and find out the root cause of it.

      And remember to always consider healthy liquid intake such as beverages, natural fruit juices, and herbal teas. These can also help to cleanse and regulate or relieve lower abdominal pains. Always see a professional if there are serious complications.

      Womenshealthzone
      buzzle

  31. QUESTION:
    i have not had my period this month and after intercourse everytime i have the urge to unrinate?
    But nothing really comes out but just a little. bit. It kind of hurts but it kinda of tickles a little. COuld i be pregnant or is it something else. I am scared that i might be pregnant because i have two other children and did not want another one. I have an apt tomorrow at 11 for a pg test but im scared. Please any ideas or suggestions about this.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Victoria,

      As you probably already know, many common things can make your period irregular. I do think you also have a Urinary Tract Infection, along with whatever reason your period is late.

      You should get your urine checked before it gets out of control and can hurt your kidneys as well.

      RANDOM REASONS FOR IRREGULAR PERIODS:

      Significant weight gain or weight loss is one of the reasons for irregular periods. Even though low body weight is the most common cause of irregular periods, obesity also causes various irregularities in your menstrual cycle.

      If you are a victim of severe emotional stress, then you can possibly experience irregular or missed periods. This is due to the reason that stress will have very serious impact on your reproductive health. So, if you are aware you experience severe emotional stress, you may suffer from irregular periods.

      Various eating disorders such as anorexia or bulimia nervosa can also have influence on your regular menstrual cycle. So, if you have any kind of eating disorder, you can certainly experience irregular periods.

      Excessive exercising or body straining activities can also lead to irregular menstrual cycle. This is the reason why most of athletes encounter missed periods.

      Many new mothers do not resume their regular periods until they have completed their breast feeding. So, they can possibly have irregular menstrual cycle.

      Alcohol consumption can also disturb your hormonal metabolism. As a result, you’ll certainly end up with irregular or missed periods.

      Certain uterine abnormalities such as cervical polyps, uterine fibroids and endometriosis also cause irregular periods, too.

      Certain STDs also show irregular periods as a symptom.

      One of the common causes is stress. It is one of the main culprits for this problem. If you have been worried, over worked or angry before your period, chances are that you will experience an irregular menstrual cycle.

      Girls who have just begun menstruation, experience irregular menstruation for up to one year or more. Missed periods after menarche are nothing to worry about, it's part of the normal body process.

      Pregnancy can be another reason for a missed period. So if you missed a period after sexual intercourse, its best to first rule out pregnancy. To prevent unplanned pregnancy, it is wise to use contraceptives. There can be changes in the menstrual cycle after pregnancy.

      These are quite a few reasons that may cause you to experience irregular periods. So, if you are really concerned about your missed periods, make sure you consult any experienced gynecologist and find out the root cause of it.

      And remember to always consider healthy liquid intake such as beverages, natural fruit juices, and herbal teas. These can also help to cleanse and regulate or relieve lower abdominal pains. Always see a professional if there are serious complications.

      Womenshealthzone
      buzzle

  32. QUESTION:
    Brown discharge two days after menstruation on going for 7 days now?
    My girl and i had sex on the last day of her menstruation, two to three days after a brown discharge appeared (EXACTLY BROWN, NOT REDDISH OR PINKISH). She's had it seven days now. It's usually less than a teaspoon. She took a pregnancy test and the results were negative. What could it be? Could it be implantation bleeding or hormonal imbalance or infection? Could there still be a possibility of pregnancy?

    • ANSWER:
      Causes of a Brown Discharge After a Period

      More often than not, a delayed period can lead to brown, dark red and/or dark brown discharge during and after a period. Most of the time, brown discharge after a period is often related to the endometrial tissues (lining of the uterus which gives way to menstrual bleeding). Remnants of the older endometrial tissues may appear brown when discharged from the body, which we can also say is the cleaning process of the uterus, because blood that is old will look brown, so tissue with old blood too will look the same.

      In a slightly more serious case, the brown discharge may be altered blood, meaning it has appeared as a symptom of some kind of damage to any internal part of the reproductive system, which may require a thorough examination. It could also be due to some kind of erosion, polyps and/or injury to the surface or the mouth of the uterus.

      There are chances that a woman might notice a brown discharge after 3 to 4 weeks of the menstrual cycle. This discharge may signify implantation bleeding; on the other hand, it is also an early sign of pregnancy.

      Other causes that can lead to a brown discharge are serious medical conditions, that include:
      •Repeated yeast infection
      •Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)
      •Bacterial vaginosis
      •Cervical cancer
      •Sexually transmitted diseases (STD) (e.g. chlamydia, vaginal warts, gonorrhea, etc.)
      Several phases of the menstrual cycle like perimenopause and menopause may also cause a brown discharge after the menstrual cycle.

      How to Treat the Condition

      Getting to the root cause of the problem by just observing the brown discharge is slightly difficult. However, watching out for the duration or the amount of time the vaginal discharge lasts can be of some help. As mentioned earlier, if the brown discharge is noticed as a result of a delayed period, it will stop within the duration of the menstrual cycle. If the problem continues, it is best to see a gynecologist and get to the root of the problem. If the cause is serious, then the discharge may be accompanied by several other symptoms such as itching, vaginal dryness, pain during intercourse, skin rash, frequent urination, loss of appetite, uterine bleeding, burning sensation inside the vagina, and mood swings and depression.

      The aforementioned symptoms should not be overlooked and one must immediately consult a doctor to discuss the issue freely and get it resolved at the earliest. The treatment for brown discharge after a period will be in accordance with the cause of the same. Your gynecologist might provide simple medication or small dietary and lifestyle changes to tackle the problem. In serious conditions, supplements, surgery, chemotherapy, pap smear tests, and other medical tests may be necessary.

      Remember that most of the time, it is not a very dangerous situation. However, if it prolongs, it is better to go and see a gynecologist and get the problem evaluated. Early detection of the problem is the best way to prevent it.

  33. QUESTION:
    How big is uteres at 14 weeks preg. and is it below the naval?
    also, wanted to double check that is does stay put, and does not shift around and is in center of tummy area?
    just trying to figure out what is baby movin and what is gas... by finding making sure that the uterus is exactly where I think it is. I feel movement to the side...

    • ANSWER:
      The uterus, sometimes called the womb, is a muscular organ located at the very top of the vagina. The cervix, which is really the bottom part of the uterus, connects the vagina and the uterus. During pregnancy the baby grows within the lining of the uterus. The uterus grows from it's normal size of a pear to the size of a watermelon during pregnancy. When labor starts, contractions within the uterine muscle fibers help the cervix dilate and the baby deliver. When not pregnant, the uterus goes through a monthly menstrual cycle that depends on hormones coming from the ovaries. These hormones mostly affect the lining of the uterus. The lining swells during the first few weeks of the cycle, then slowly dies off during the last few weeks. This causes the lining to "slough off" which creates menstrual flow. Since this lining is sensitive to hormones, any abnormality of these hormones can cause irregular bleeding. Furthermore, common, non-cancerous, tumors called fibroids can grow within the muscular layer of the uterus and cause symptoms like pain, pressure, heavy and irregular bleeding, and constipation. For a more thorough discussion of fibroids, please click here. Other conditions, like endometrial polyps (tiny growths within the lining of the uterus), pre-cancer, and even uterine cancer can cause heavy and abnromal bleeding.

  34. QUESTION:
    Am I pregnant, or is my period late from stress?
    I had sex for the first time a week ago. He had a condom, but before he put it on he was inside me without it. I have been on birth control for 2 years now, and I was wondering what my chances were of getting pregnant from pre-ejaculation while on birth control. I have had an extremely stressful month and the thought of being pregnant has me even more stressed. Tonight I took my 4th white pill of the last week of this pack. Usually I have started by now. Am I pregnant, or is my period late because of all my stress?

    • ANSWER:
      Hello There,

      Your period can be late for several common reasons and most are no reason to worry.

      RANDOM REASONS FOR IRREGULAR PERIODS:

      Significant weight gain or weight loss is one of the reasons for irregular periods. Even though low body weight is the most common cause of irregular periods, obesity also causes various irregularities in your menstrual cycle.

      If you are a victim of severe emotional stress, then you can possibly experience irregular or missed periods. This is due to the reason that stress will have very serious impact on your reproductive health. So, if you are aware you experience severe emotional stress, you may suffer from irregular periods.

      Various eating disorders such as anorexia or bulimia nervosa can also have influence on your regular menstrual cycle. So, if you have any kind of eating disorder, you can certainly experience irregular periods.

      Excessive exercising or body straining activities can also lead to irregular menstrual cycle. This is the reason why most of athletes encounter missed periods.

      Many new mothers do not resume their regular periods until they have completed their breast feeding. So, they can possibly have irregular menstrual cycle.

      Alcohol consumption can also disturb your hormonal metabolism. As a result, you’ll certainly end up with irregular or missed periods.

      Certain uterine abnormalities such as cervical polyps, uterine fibroids and endometriosis also cause irregular periods, too.

      Certain STDs also show irregular periods as a symptom.

      One of the common causes is stress. It is one of the main culprits for this problem. If you have been worried, over worked or angry before your period, chances are that you will experience an irregular menstrual cycle.

      Girls who have just begun menstruation, experience irregular menstruation for up to one year or more. Missed periods after menarche are nothing to worry about, it's part of the normal body process.

      Pregnancy can be another reason for a missed period. So if you missed a period after sexual intercourse, its best to first rule out pregnancy. To prevent unplanned pregnancy, it is wise to use contraceptives. There can be changes in the menstrual cycle after pregnancy.

      These are quite a few reasons that may cause you to experience irregular periods. So, if you are really concerned about your missed periods, make sure you consult any experienced gynecologist and find out the root cause of it.

      And remember to always consider healthy liquid intake such as beverages, natural fruit juices, and herbal teas. These can also help to cleanse and regulate or relieve lower abdominal pains. Always see a professional if there are serious complications.

      Womenshealthzone
      buzzle

  35. QUESTION:
    Period was two days late it finally came but it came wierd two days after i had unprotected sex?
    Could I still be pregnant?? N can I get pregnant two days after my period which is 23 day cycle now..??
    I am only 20 I appreciate the links but they r not helping I need answers that can I can really read not sites.. Thank u

    • ANSWER:
      RANDOM REASONS FOR IRREGULAR PERIODS:

      Significant weight gain or weight loss is one of the reasons for irregular periods. Even though low body weight is the most common cause of irregular periods, obesity also causes various irregularities in your menstrual cycle.

      If you are a victim of severe emotional stress, then you can possibly experience irregular or missed periods. This is due to the reason that stress will have very serious impact on your reproductive health. So, if you are aware you experience severe emotional stress, you may suffer from irregular periods.

      Various eating disorders such as anorexia or bulimia nervosa can also have influence on your regular menstrual cycle. So, if you have any kind of eating disorder, you can certainly experience irregular periods.

      Excessive exercising or body straining activities can also lead to irregular menstrual cycle. This is the reason why most of athletes encounter missed periods.

      Many new mothers do not resume their regular periods until they have completed their breast feeding. So, they can possibly have irregular menstrual cycle.

      Alcohol consumption can also disturb your hormonal metabolism. As a result, you’ll certainly end up with irregular or missed periods.

      Certain uterine abnormalities such as cervical polyps, uterine fibroids and endometriosis also cause irregular periods, too.

      Certain STDs also show irregular periods as a symptom.

      One of the common causes is stress. It is one of the main culprits for this problem. If you have been worried, over worked or angry before your period, chances are that you will experience an irregular menstrual cycle.

      Girls who have just begun menstruation, experience irregular menstruation for up to one year or more. Missed periods after menarche are nothing to worry about, it's part of the normal body process.

      Pregnancy can be another reason for a missed period. So if you missed a period after sexual intercourse, its best to first rule out pregnancy. To prevent unplanned pregnancy, it is wise to use contraceptives. There can be changes in the menstrual cycle after pregnancy.

      These are quite a few reasons that may cause you to experience irregular periods. So, if you are really concerned about your missed periods, make sure you consult any experienced gynecologist and find out the root cause of it.

      And remember to always consider healthy liquid intake such as beverages, natural fruit juices, and herbal teas. These can also help to cleanse and regulate or relieve lower abdominal pains. Always see a professional if there are serious complications.

      Womenshealthzone
      buzzle

  36. QUESTION:
    What does it mean if your period lasts longer than 2 weeks whn normally it's just 3 days?
    I thought I was about off my period and me andy boyfriend had sex and it started all over again like a whole new cycle this is going into the third week I've been on my period now

    • ANSWER:
      There are lots of causes for heavy long periods. I'd say see your doctor to find out if you have something like endometriosis or fibroids. Periods normally last for 3-7 days so unless you've been diagnosed with hypermenorrhagia (heavy bleeding) I'd see your doctor preferrably a gynecologist. Periods can also be more irregular and you may have heavy bleeding but since you've had them already I say get it checked out. An ultrasound may be done to determine if you have fibroids. Also if the doctor suspects endometriosis you may need to get a second opinion from another doctor before agreeing to the diagnostic laporoscopy (a surgical procedure). I was diagnosed at 19 but had symptoms from age 13 and up. My mom said they were just growing pains. By the time I was 19 the doctor told me that it was not normal to have pain or cramps when I wasn't having a period. He also did diagnose me with endometriosis, put me on the pill, and after switching to a better doctor I was told I shouldn't wait more than 2 years from the diagnosis of endometriosis to have kids. I know you're young now but being put on the pill may prevent the endometriosis from spreading and it can lighten up your periods a lot. It gave me those 2 years of help I needed to finally have my kids. After my second and third kid I had more bleeding and pain requiring narcotics to give me relief. I couldn't be away from a bathroom more than 20 minutes at a time because I'd go through a super plus tampon and a pad in that time. Hypermenorrhagia is when a woman goes through more than one pad or tampon in an hour. I finally had a hysterectomy when my last child was about 2 years old. I was just sick of the 10 day to two week heavy periods I had.

      Edited with info..

      "HYPERMENORRHEA

      M—Malformations include bicornate uterus, congenital ovarian cysts, endometriosis, ectopic pregnancies, and retained placenta.
      I—Inflammation recalls cervicitis, endometritis, and pelvic inflammatory disease.
      N—Neoplasms include fibroids, carcinoma, and polyps of the cervix and endometrium. One should also not forget choriocarcinoma, hydatidiform moles, and hormone-producing tumors of the ovary.
      T—Trauma includes perforation of the uterus, excessive intercourse during the menses, and introduction of foreign bodies into the uterus.
      S—Systemic diseases include anemia and the coagulation disorders such as hemophilia, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, and scurvy. Also in this category are lupus erythematosus and endocrine disorders, especially hypothyroidism and dysfunctional uterine bleeding from disproportion in the output of estrogen and progesterone by the ovary.
      Approach to the DiagnosisThe diagnosis includes a thorough pelvic examination, CBC, coagulation studies, thyroid function tests, and perhaps other endocrine tests. Ultrasonography is ordered next. If all these are normal, a trial of estrogen or progesterone supplementation or a dilatation and curettage (D & C) may be indicated. Culdoscopy, peritoneoscopy, and a hysterosalpingogram may be necessary before performing an exploratory laparotomy and, if necessary, a hysterectomy. A gynecologist or endocrinologist will be helpful in solving the diagnostic dilemma in many cases."

      http://www.womentowomen.com/menstruation…

      Not everyone needs a hysterectomy for heavy bleeding but if one has tried everything else it's sometimes the last resort like it was for me.

  37. QUESTION:
    My periods is delayed n im only having the symptoms of goin to have period.what do i do?
    i had alot of physical activities and had viral fever and now my period are delayed...was due on 24Sep

    • ANSWER:
      RANDOM REASONS FOR IRREGULAR PERIODS:

      Significant weight gain or weight loss is one of the reasons for irregular periods. Even though low body weight is the most common cause of irregular periods, obesity also causes various irregularities in your menstrual cycle.

      If you are a victim of severe emotional stress, then you can possibly experience irregular or missed periods. This is due to the reason that stress will have very serious impact on your reproductive health. So, if you are aware you experience severe emotional stress, you may suffer from irregular periods.

      Various eating disorders such as anorexia or bulimia nervosa can also have influence on your regular menstrual cycle. So, if you have any kind of eating disorder, you can certainly experience irregular periods.

      Excessive exercising or body straining activities can also lead to irregular menstrual cycle. This is the reason why most of athletes encounter missed periods.

      Many new mothers do not resume their regular periods until they have completed their breast feeding. So, they can possibly have irregular menstrual cycle.

      Alcohol consumption can also disturb your hormonal metabolism. As a result, you’ll certainly end up with irregular or missed periods.

      Certain uterine abnormalities such as cervical polyps, uterine fibroids and endometriosis also cause irregular periods, too.

      Certain STDs also show irregular periods as a symptom.

      One of the common causes is stress. It is one of the main culprits for this problem. If you have been worried, over worked or angry before your period, chances are that you will experience an irregular menstrual cycle.

      Girls who have just begun menstruation, experience irregular menstruation for up to one year or more. Missed periods after menarche are nothing to worry about, it's part of the normal body process.

      Pregnancy can be another reason for a missed period. So if you missed a period after sexual intercourse, its best to first rule out pregnancy. To prevent unplanned pregnancy, it is wise to use contraceptives. There can be changes in the menstrual cycle after pregnancy.

      These are quite a few reasons that may cause you to experience irregular periods. So, if you are really concerned about your missed periods, make sure you consult any experienced gynecologist and find out the root cause of it.

      And remember to always consider healthy liquid intake such as beverages, natural fruit juices, and herbal teas. These can also help to cleanse and regulate or relieve lower abdominal pains. Always see a professional if there are serious complications.

      Womenshealthzone
      buzzle

  38. QUESTION:
    What are the symptoms of taking to much estrogen?

    • ANSWER:
      Too much estrogen:

      1.Causes endometrium to proliferate

      2.Causes breast stimulation that can lead to breast cancer

      3.Increases body fat

      4.Increase endometrial cancer risk

      5.Increase gallbladder disease risk

      6.Restrains osteoclast function slightly

      7.Increases blood clot risk

      Too musch estrogen is the root cause of a myriad of illnesses. Conditions associated with this include fibrocystic breast disease, PMS, uterine fibroids, breast cancer, endometriosis, infertility problem, endometrial polyps, PCOS, auto-immune disorders, low blood sugar problems, and menstrual pain.

      For men, too much estrogen and too little testosterone is the increased risk of heart attack or stroke, urogenital disease and cardiovascular disease.

  39. QUESTION:
    Is it normal if I bleed everydayy from my vagina even thoe I bad my period alreadu?

    • ANSWER:
      According to St. John Health System, most women will experience light bleeding (spotting), irregular periods or breakthrough bleeding at least once during their lifetime. Irregular bleeding and spotting between menstrual periods can be caused by a variety of conditions, some relatively harmless while others are quite serious.

      WomentoWomen.com points out that most of the time, irregular periods are harmless. Some women regularly experience spotting between periods due to stress, hormone fluctuation, ovulation and use of an IUD (intrauterine device).

      Additional Causes
      It can also be caused by pregnancy complications; injury to the vagina (which can result from intercourse, infection or polyp) or hypothyroidism (under-active thyroid).

      Irregular vaginal bleeding can be caused by serious conditions such as miscarriage, uterine cancer, cervical cancer or cancer of the fallopian tubes.

      What To Do
      If you are experiencing irregular bleeding, first make sure that it is coming from your vagina and not from your urine or rectum. Insert a tampon to confirm that the bleeding is coming from your uterus, cervix or vagina.

      When to Call Your Doctor
      Contact your doctor immediately if you are experiencing irregular bleeding and you are post-menopausal, pregnant or if you have any additional symptoms (such as fever or pain).

      Diagnosis
      Your doctor will need to thoroughly examine you to rule out physical abnormalities. She will also likely order blood work to check your thyroid function and rule out anemia.

      Read more: Reasons for Irregular Spotting or Bleeding Between Periods | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/facts_5585441_reasons-spotting-bleeding-between-periods.html#ixzz1tA70pz1C

  40. QUESTION:
    Lower abdominal pain after intercourse?
    So after my girlfriend and I have intercourse, she appears to have extreme lower abdominal pain. It hurts to move in certain positions, and even lay still sometimes. During sex there seems to be little to no problems, any suggestions?

    • ANSWER:
      You haven't specified whether the pain is superficial, sharp, crampy...if she gets to the point where she climaxes without much pain and the pain intensifies as she climaxes and afterwards, there are chances it is triggered by uterine contractions; uterine contractions alone don't cause pain. could be a polyp in the uterus (endometrial polyp) which can easily be removed, or perhaps cysts, but she wouldn't know unless she goes see her doctor who'd probably be able to identify the problem with sonogram. Another very common cause of pain after intercourse us endometriosis (especially if she has painful periods and other symptoms) but that can diagnosis can only be confirmed laparoscopically (minimally invasive surgery with a camera/laparoscope). Good luck

  41. QUESTION:
    why havent i come on my period?
    right basically, my periods have always regular, 28 days apart, and 5 days long. but i haven't had a period since the beginning of july, and i keep getting really bad pains in my stomach..there is no way i can be pregnant, so i have no idea what is wrong! i need some advice in what i should do!

    • ANSWER:
      RANDOM REASONS FOR IRREGULAR PERIODS:

      Significant weight gain or weight loss is one of the reasons for irregular periods. Even though low body weight is the most common cause of irregular periods, obesity also causes various irregularities in your menstrual cycle.

      If you are a victim of severe emotional stress, then you can possibly experience irregular or missed periods. This is due to the reason that stress will have very serious impact on your reproductive health. So, if you are aware you experience severe emotional stress, you may suffer from irregular periods.

      Various eating disorders such as anorexia or bulimia nervosa can also have influence on your regular menstrual cycle. So, if you have any kind of eating disorder, you can certainly experience irregular periods.

      Excessive exercising or body straining activities can also lead to irregular menstrual cycle. This is the reason why most of athletes encounter missed periods.

      Many new mothers do not resume their regular periods until they have completed their breast feeding. So, they can possibly have irregular menstrual cycle.

      Alcohol consumption can also disturb your hormonal metabolism. As a result, you’ll certainly end up with irregular or missed periods.

      Certain uterine abnormalities such as cervical polyps, uterine fibroids and endometriosis also cause irregular periods, too.

      Certain STDs also show irregular periods as a symptom.

      One of the common causes is stress. It is one of the main culprits for this problem. If you have been worried, over worked or angry before your period, chances are that you will experience an irregular menstrual cycle.

      Girls who have just begun menstruation, experience irregular menstruation for up to one year or more. Missed periods after menarche are nothing to worry about, it's part of the normal body process.

      Pregnancy can be another reason for a missed period. So if you missed a period after sexual intercourse, its best to first rule out pregnancy. To prevent unplanned pregnancy, it is wise to use contraceptives. There can be changes in the menstrual cycle after pregnancy.

      These are quite a few reasons that may cause you to experience irregular periods. So, if you are really concerned about your missed periods, make sure you consult any experienced gynecologist and find out the root cause of it.

      And remember to always consider healthy liquid intake such as beverages, natural fruit juices, and herbal teas. These can also help to cleanse and regulate or relieve lower abdominal pains. Always see a professional if there are serious complications.

      Womenshealthzone
      buzzle

  42. QUESTION:
    Should I be worried that I am late?
    Last month, my period came on time but it lasted three weeks. There was a lot of pain, but it finally stopped. So, this month, I am a little over a week late. I feel so sick. I am suffering from nausea, overly tired, migranes and more. Could it just be delayed because of how long it lasted last month or should I worry soon?

    • ANSWER:
      Having irregular or missed periods can be caused by a number of things such as significant weight gain or loss (although low body weight is a common cause of missed or irregular periods, obesity also can cause menstrual problems), over-exercise, poor nutrition (or a diet too high in carbohydrates), smoking, certain medications, caffeine, excessive alcohol use (interfering with how the liver metabolizes estrogen and progesterone), eating disorders, increased stress, PCOS (Polycystic ovarian syndrome or estrogen dominance), uterine abnormalities such as fibroids, ovarian cysts, polyps, endometriosis and hormonal imbalances.

      I would recommend you consult with your doctor/gynaecologist for further evaluation to see what they think could be causing this if you have missed your period for more than two months.

      Good luck :)

  43. QUESTION:
    I havent had a period in almost two months,i know i should take a test but..?
    Im haveing the kinda normal cramp like pains,except they're like sharp pains, and im thinkin maybe im just late or something.When you get pregnant do you still have period pains?(the whole boob swelling,sharp pain stuff?)

    • ANSWER:
      Having irregular or missed periods can be caused by a number of things such as significant weight gain or loss (although low body weight is a common cause of missed or irregular periods, obesity also can cause menstrual problems), over-exercise, poor nutrition (or a diet too high in carbohydrates), smoking, certain medications, caffeine, excessive alcohol use (interfering with how the liver metabolizes estrogen and progesterone), eating disorders, increased stress, PCOS (Polycystic ovarian syndrome or estrogen dominance), uterine abnormalities such as fibroids, ovarian cysts, polyps, endometriosis and hormonal imbalances.

      I would recommend you consult with your doctor/gynaecologist for further evaluation to see what they think could be causing this if you have missed your period for more than two months.

      Good luck :)

  44. QUESTION:
    Is three periods in one month normal?
    As it says on the question... sorry if it's too much info.
    My periods are not regular.
    They are always heavy and clotty.
    I got them when i was 10 going on 11 i am now 19

    If you need anymore information just ask.

    Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      i think it may have something to do with stress, though it does warrant a visit to the doctor.

      The following information is to be taken a guide only, and NOT TO BE USED TO SELF DIAGNOSE.

      Excessively heavy menstrual bleeding, called menorrhagia, is menstrual bleeding of greater than 5 tablespoons per month. This condition occurs in about 10% of women. The most common pattern of menorrhagia is excessive bleeding that occurs in regular menstrual cycles and with normal ovulation.

      There are several important reasons that menorrhagia should be evaluated by a doctor. First, menorrhagia can cause a woman substantial emotional distress and physical symptoms, such as severe cramping . Second, the blood loss can be so severe that it causes a dangerously lowered blood count (anemia), which can lead to medical complications and symptoms such as dizziness and fainting. Third, there can be dangerous causes of menorrhagia that require more urgent treatment.

      Benign (noncancerous) causes of menorrhagia include:
      uterine fibroids (benign tumors of smooth muscle tissue),

      endometrial polyps (tiny benign growths that protrude into the womb),

      adenomyosis,

      intrauterine devices (IUD's),

      underactive thyroid function (hypothyroidism),

      an autoimmune disorder called systemic lupus erythematosus ,

      blood clotting disorders such as inherited bleeding disorders, and

      certain medications, especially those that interfere with blood clotting.

      Though not common, menorrhagia can be a sign of endometrial cancer. A potentially precancerous condition known as endometrial hyperplasia can also result in abnormal vaginal bleeding. This situation is more frequent in women who are over the age of 40.

      Although there are many causes of menorrhagia, in most women, the specific cause of menorrhagia is not found even after a full medical evaluation. These women are said to have dysfunctional uterine bleeding. Although no specific cause of the abnormal vaginal bleeding is found in women with dysfunctional uterine bleeding, there are treatments available to reduce the severity of the condition.

      Irregular vaginal bleeding; menstrual periods that are too frequent (polymenorrhea)

      Menstrual periods that are abnormally frequent (polymenorrhea) can be caused by certain sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) (such as chlamydia or gonorrhea) that cause inflammation in the uterus. This condition is called pelvic inflammatory disease. Endometriosis is a condition of unknown cause that can lead to pelvic pain and polymenorrhea. Sometimes, the cause of polymenorrhea is unclear, in which case the woman is said to have dysfunctional uterine bleeding.

      Menstrual periods at irregular intervals (metrorrhagia)

      Irregular menstrual periods (metrorrhagia) can be due to benign growths in the cervix, such as cervical polyps. The cause of these growths is usually not known. Metrorrhagia can also be caused by infections of the uterus (endometritis) and use of birth control pills (oral contraceptives). Sometimes after an evaluation, a woman's doctor might determine that her metrorrhagia does not have an identifiable cause and that further evaluation is not necessary at that time.

      Perimenopause is the time period approaching the menopausal transition. It is often characterized by irregular menstrual cycles, including menstrual periods at irregular intervals and variations in the amount of blood flow. Menstrual irregularities may precede the onset of true menopause (defined as the absence of periods for one year) by several years.

      Decreased amount or duration of menstrual flow (hypomenorrhea)

      An overactive thyroid function (hyperthyroidism) or certain kidney diseases can both cause hypomenorrhea. Oral contraceptive pills can also cause hypomenorrhea. It is important for women to know that lighter, shorter, or even absent menstrual periods as a result of taking oral contraceptive pills does not indicate that the contraceptive effect of the oral contraceptive pills is inadequate. In fact, many women appreciate this "side effect" of oral contraceptives.

      Bleeding between menstrual periods (intermenstrual bleeding)

      Women who are ovulating normally can experience light bleeding (sometimes referred to as "spotting") between menstrual periods. Hormonal birth control methods (oral contraceptive pills or patches) as well as IUD use for contraception may sometimes lead to light bleeding between periods. Psychological stress, certain medications such as anticoagulant drugs, and fluctuations in hormone levels may all be causes of light bleeding between periods. Other conditions that cause abnormal menstrual bleeding, or bleeding in women who are not ovulating regularly (see below) can also be the cause of intermenstrual bleeding.
      Thanks for Yahooing!
      Dr. Frog
      WOW 35 misspellings, thats got to be a record!! someone should update the Yahoo dictionary!

  45. QUESTION:
    2 days late on my period, brown discharge with some blood?
    Im 18 and I've had unprotected sex for several year with my partner ( same partner) The first day of my last period was September 1 . Last night before going to bed i got some brown discharge, when i woke up i had some blood but still had dark brown discharge. I been going to the bathroom every 5 minutes today. Could I be pregnant ? Or is it that im getting my period soon ? This is the first time i get brown discharge. Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Brown: May happen right after periods, and is just "cleaning out" your vagina. Old blood looks brown.

      Spotting Blood/Brown Discharge: This may occur when you are ovulating/mid-cycle. Sometimes early in pregnancy you may have spotting or a brownish discharge at the time your period would normally come. If you have spotting at the time of your normal period rather than your usual amount of flow, and you have had sex without using birth control, you should check a pregnancy test.

      RANDOM REASONS FOR IRREGULAR PERIODS:

      Significant weight gain or weight loss is one of the reasons for irregular periods. Even though low body weight is the most common cause of irregular periods, obesity also causes various irregularities in your menstrual cycle.

      If you are a victim of severe emotional stress, then you can possibly experience irregular or missed periods. This is due to the reason that stress will have very serious impact on your reproductive health. So, if you are aware you experience severe emotional stress, you may suffer from irregular periods.

      Various eating disorders such as anorexia or bulimia nervosa can also have influence on your regular menstrual cycle. So, if you have any kind of eating disorder, you can certainly experience irregular periods.

      Excessive exercising or body straining activities can also lead to irregular menstrual cycle. This is the reason why most of athletes encounter missed periods.

      Many new mothers do not resume their regular periods until they have completed their breast feeding. So, they can possibly have irregular menstrual cycle.

      Alcohol consumption can also disturb your hormonal metabolism. As a result, you’ll certainly end up with irregular or missed periods.

      Certain uterine abnormalities such as cervical polyps, uterine fibroids and endometriosis also cause irregular periods, too.

      Certain STDs also show irregular periods as a symptom.

      One of the common causes is stress. It is one of the main culprits for this problem. If you have been worried, over worked or angry before your period, chances are that you will experience an irregular menstrual cycle.

      Girls who have just begun menstruation, experience irregular menstruation for up to one year or more. Missed periods after menarche are nothing to worry about, it's part of the normal body process.

      Pregnancy can be another reason for a missed period. So if you missed a period after sexual intercourse, its best to first rule out pregnancy. To prevent unplanned pregnancy, it is wise to use contraceptives. There can be changes in the menstrual cycle after pregnancy.

      These are quite a few reasons that may cause you to experience irregular periods. So, if you are really concerned about your missed periods, make sure you consult any experienced gynecologist and find out the root cause of it.

      And remember to always consider healthy liquid intake such as beverages, natural fruit juices, and herbal teas. These can also help to cleanse and regulate or relieve lower abdominal pains. Always see a professional if there are serious complications.

      Womenshealthzone
      buzzle
      pamf.org

  46. QUESTION:
    Im 17 and i missed my period this month?
    its usually towards the end of the month but i didnt have it, i cant be pregnant because im still a virgin!
    i have been sick this month with the flu so i was wondering could that be a reason why i missed it?

    • ANSWER:
      RANDOM REASONS FOR IRREGULAR PERIODS:

      Significant weight gain or weight loss is one of the reasons for irregular periods. Even though low body weight is the most common cause of irregular periods, obesity also causes various irregularities in your menstrual cycle.

      If you are a victim of severe emotional stress, then you can possibly experience irregular or missed periods. This is due to the reason that stress will have very serious impact on your reproductive health. So, if you are aware you experience severe emotional stress, you may suffer from irregular periods.

      Various eating disorders such as anorexia or bulimia nervosa can also have influence on your regular menstrual cycle. So, if you have any kind of eating disorder, you can certainly experience irregular periods.

      Excessive exercising or body straining activities can also lead to irregular menstrual cycle. This is the reason why most of athletes encounter missed periods.

      Many new mothers do not resume their regular periods until they have completed their breast feeding. So, they can possibly have irregular menstrual cycle.

      Alcohol consumption can also disturb your hormonal metabolism. As a result, you’ll certainly end up with irregular or missed periods.

      Certain uterine abnormalities such as cervical polyps, uterine fibroids and endometriosis also cause irregular periods, too.

      Certain STDs also show irregular periods as a symptom.

      One of the common causes is stress. It is one of the main culprits for this problem. If you have been worried, over worked or angry before your period, chances are that you will experience an irregular menstrual cycle.

      Girls who have just begun menstruation, experience irregular menstruation for up to one year or more. Missed periods after menarche are nothing to worry about, it's part of the normal body process.

      Pregnancy can be another reason for a missed period. So if you missed a period after sexual intercourse, its best to first rule out pregnancy. To prevent unplanned pregnancy, it is wise to use contraceptives. There can be changes in the menstrual cycle after pregnancy.

      These are quite a few reasons that may cause you to experience irregular periods. So, if you are really concerned about your missed periods, make sure you consult any experienced gynecologist and find out the root cause of it.

      And remember to always consider healthy liquid intake such as beverages, natural fruit juices, and herbal teas. These can also help to cleanse and regulate or relieve lower abdominal pains. Always see a professional if there are serious complications.

      Womenshealthzone
      buzzle

  47. QUESTION:
    Why am I having stomach pain?
    When I woke up this morning I was feeling sick and I got diarrhea. After that I started feeling this weird kind of pain in my stomach. It feels like someone's stretching the muscles of my stomach vigorously. The pain was not constant. It comes and goes. When I came back home from college, I saw a stain of blood on my underpants. I know for sure that this is not period blood because I got my period 2 weeks ago. If anybody knows what this is please tell me. Oh and just to let you know, I haven't eaten anything today and I have never had sex before.

    • ANSWER:
      Hello Selena,

      Women may experience abdominal pain at various stages in the menstrual cycle; the pain can be caused by menstruation or completely independent of it. Many times this pain is short-lived and requires no treatment. However, if the pain is accompanied by bleeding, a medical problem may be the cause. Abdominal pain can be felt across the whole abdomen or on one side. The pain can be intermittent, sharp, cramp-like or dull and achy. Spotting is light bleeding that occurs outside of menstrual bleeding. Spotting can last from a few hours to several days and may be pink, brown or red in color.

      Common Causes
      Common causes of abdominal pain with spotting are early pregnancy, uterine fibroids and mittelschmerz. Uterine fibroids are noncancerous tumors composed of muscle cells and other tissue that grow in and around the uterine wall. Mittelschmerz is abdominal pain felt during the process of ovulation and can be accompanied by bloody discharge or light blood. Abdominal pain and spotting can also occur right before menstrual bleeding as part of a set of symptoms called premenstrual syndrome, or PMS.

      Menopausal Pain and Spotting
      As a woman approaches menopause, her levels of estrogen and progesterone, and her periods, become irregular. This can result in spotting. Once menopause begins 12 months after a woman's last menstrual period, irregular bleeding can have other causes. These include polyps, thinning of the endometrial tissue, severe endometriosis, uterine hyperplasia and endometrial cancer. Uterine hyperplasia is a condition in which the uterine lining thickens. Menopausal women most often develop this condition if they're taking estrogen supplements without progesterone. If left untreated, the cells in the uterus can become abnormal, leading to uterine cancer, the most common form of endometrial cancer. Bleeding is the most common sign of endometrial cancer in postmenopausal women.

      Endometriosis
      Abdominal cramping and bleeding can be symptoms of endometriosis. Endometriosis is a condition in which endometrial tissue--the lining of the uterus--grows on areas outside the uterine cavity, including the ovaries, colon, abdomen and bladder. Endometrial tissue sheds and bleeds during menstruation; endometrial growth stays in place but may bleed. The areas of endometriosis heal, scar, then are stimulated again during the next cycle. This ongoing process can lead to pelvic pain.

      Ectopic Pregnancy
      Ectopic pregnancy is when a fertilized egg implants outside the uterus, most often within a fallopian tube. The placenta and fetus begin to develop at that site, but an ectopic pregnancy can't continue normally. The first signs of an ectopic pregnancy include vaginal bleeding and lower abdominal pain. If these symptoms appear, a doctor should be consulted.

      Considerations
      A woman should not self-diagnose any instance of cramping and spotting at any point during her reproductive years. If a woman experiences cramping and spotting that has not been part of her normal menstrual cycle, she should note the frequency and type of pain and make an appointment to see a physician. Avoiding self-diagnosis is even more important for women who have entered menopause. Every instance of spotting after menopause is abnormal, even if the causes are benign. Medical attention is required.

      Warnings
      If bleeding is heavy enough to soak one pad per hour or contains large blood clots, the patient should seek medical attention immediately. A doctor should be contacted immediately if cramping is severe or is not relieved by pain medication.

  48. QUESTION:
    Why do I have such bad periods?
    I have week long periods and the first couple days of my periods are awful

    I'll faint, if I try and eat anything I'll puke it up, and i'll have the worst cramps ever

    Could being vegetarian and eating less then I use to have anything to do with it? I didn't use to have such bad periods when I weighed 120 but now that I am 105 it seems my periods are awful!

    • ANSWER:
      Painful periods (Dysmenorrhoea) is divided into 2 types depending on the cause of the pain:

      1 - Primary dysmenorrhoea (the commonest type) and
      2 - Secondary dysmenorrhoea.

      In primary dysmenorrhoea there is no underlying medical cause. During a period, chemicals called prostaglandins cause the uterus to contract. Women who have painful periods have larger amounts of prostaglandins causing painful contractions. Pain usually begins shortly before or at the beginning of a period and can last from a few hours to a few days. Primary dysmenorrhoea is commonest in young women and starts a few years after the first period.

      Secondary dysmenorrhea is usually secondary to, or results from, a specific disease or disorder. These disorders include:

      * Endometriosis:
      This occurs when the endometrial (lining of the womb) tissue becomes implanted outside the uterine cavity, usually in other areas of the pelvis. In one study of adolescents, endometriosis was the most common cause of menstrual pain that did not respond to over-the-counter painkillers. Endometriosis should be highly suspected in women with severe menstrual cramps who also have infertility. Laparoscopy, an invasive diagnostic procedure, is the only definitive method for diagnosing endometriosis.

      * Pelvic inflammatory disease:
      This is caused by a uterine infection that can spread to the fallopian tubes, ovaries, and other tissues in the pelvis. It may be sexually transmitted.

      Other causes of secondary dysmenorrhea include:

      * Cervical stenosis (narrowing of the opening to the uterus).
      * Uterine fibroids.
      * Uterine polyps.
      * Intrauterine devices (IUDs) can also cause menstrual cramping.

      In secondary dysmenorrhoea the pain may begin several days before the period and can last throughout the period.

      If painful periods are interfering with your daily activities and you miss work/school because of it, I would recommend that you consult with your doctor/gynaecologist for further evaluation as soon as possible.

      It may be helpful to keep a menstrual diary so that you can track when your periods occur, how long they last, how heavy they are, and when you get menstrual cramps.

      Good luck :)

  49. QUESTION:
    My peroid is playing tricks on me?
    It was the time for my period a few day ago, an my period is most of the time ON TIME maybe a day after of a day before...
    But this time it is a FEW days after like 3 or more an i feel like i am going to have my period each day after the expected norml period date, but it just wont come ? im confused.
    Its back an forth i feel like ill be having it today then the cramps will go away until the next day comes an then the samething follows?? please tell me options of why this is happening.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Rachelle,

      RANDOM REASONS FOR IRREGULAR PERIODS:

      Significant weight gain or weight loss is one of the reasons for irregular periods. Even though low body weight is the most common cause of irregular periods, obesity also causes various irregularities in your menstrual cycle.

      If you are a victim of severe emotional stress, then you can possibly experience irregular or missed periods. This is due to the reason that stress will have very serious impact on your reproductive health. So, if you are aware you experience severe emotional stress, you may suffer from irregular periods.

      Various eating disorders such as anorexia or bulimia nervosa can also have influence on your regular menstrual cycle. So, if you have any kind of eating disorder, you can certainly experience irregular periods.

      Excessive exercising or body straining activities can also lead to irregular menstrual cycle. This is the reason why most of athletes encounter missed periods.

      Many new mothers do not resume their regular periods until they have completed their breast feeding. So, they can possibly have irregular menstrual cycle.

      Alcohol consumption can also disturb your hormonal metabolism. As a result, you’ll certainly end up with irregular or missed periods.

      Certain uterine abnormalities such as cervical polyps, uterine fibroids and endometriosis also cause irregular periods, too.

      Certain STDs also show irregular periods as a symptom.

      One of the common causes is stress. It is one of the main culprits for this problem. If you have been worried, over worked or angry before your period, chances are that you will experience an irregular menstrual cycle.

      Girls who have just begun menstruation, experience irregular menstruation for up to one year or more. Missed periods after menarche are nothing to worry about, it's part of the normal body process.

      Pregnancy can be another reason for a missed period. So if you missed a period after sexual intercourse, its best to first rule out pregnancy. To prevent unplanned pregnancy, it is wise to use contraceptives. There can be changes in the menstrual cycle after pregnancy.

      These are quite a few reasons that may cause you to experience irregular periods. So, if you are really concerned about your missed periods, make sure you consult any experienced gynecologist and find out the root cause of it.

      And remember to always consider healthy liquid intake such as beverages, natural fruit juices, and herbal teas. These can also help to cleanse and regulate or relieve lower abdominal pains. Always see a professional if there are serious complications.

      Womenshealthzone
      buzzle

  50. QUESTION:
    my gf vagina was bleeding during sex shes not a virgin and her period is in 2 weeks there's no pain?
    she feels no pain, her period is in 2 weeks, there were chunks of tissue and blood but like i said theres no pain

    • ANSWER:
      Bleeding during or after sex is not considered normal and therefore should be evaluated at all times. The only time bleeding during or after sex is considered normal in some cases is if a girl/woman is having sexual intercourse for the first time and the first few times after having sex for the first time.

      Some causes of vaginal bleeding after sex, such as vaginal dryness after menopause or in some cases by the use of certain types of birth control pills are not serious and may be easily treated.

      However, in some cases, vaginal bleeding after sex can be a sign of a serious underlying problem, including:

      * Inflammation of the cervix (cervicitis).
      * Sexually transmitted diseases, such as chlamydia or gonorrhea.
      * Cervical polyps.
      * Cervical ectropion, a condition in which the cervical tissue is more susceptible to abrasion.
      * Endometriosis or ovarian cysts.
      * Pelvic inflammatory disease.
      * Uterine fibroids.
      * Cancer of the cervix, uterus or vagina.

      If your girlfriend continues to experience bleeding during or after sex, I would recommend that she consults with her doctor/gynaecologist to see what they think could be causing this.

      Good luck :)

do uterine polyps cause back pain

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