Do Uterine Fibroids Turn Into Cancer

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    I have uterine fibroid that is 6 times normal do I need a hysterectomy?
    what are the side effects? they say the uterine is to high to check for Cancer. but they want to do a hysterectomy.

    • ANSWER:
      You need to ask your gynaecologist this question. Fibroids can be harmless or may be pre-cancerous. Your doctor can tell you what options you have and the pros and cons of each.

      A hysterectomy is a fairly serious operation and the main dangers are - bleeding, infection,damage to surrounding organs (bladder, urerters, bowel) etc. On the whole it is a safe operation with no long standing effects (except infertility), but the above mentioned side effects should be kept in mind. However, if the fibroid has a chance of turning into cancer, the risks of the operation are minimal compared to the benefit of preventing the cancer. It all depends on the nature of the fibroid. The size is not important.

  2. QUESTION:
    i use to hear that woman not having sex at all til 30yrs or thereabout is not good to her health, is it true?
    that it can even make her to constantly fall sick and can even cause barreness when she eventually starts having sex. is it really true? i personally dont beleive is true.

    • ANSWER:
      Just like everything, there are pros and cons.

      If a woman becomes sexually active sooner, chances are she's used hormonal birth control for at least PART of her life. Using the pill (and recently the shot, ring, IUD and implant) prevents ovulation, so it cuts down on the incidences of ovarian and uterine cancers, as well as ovarian cysts and uterine fibroids.
      The pill DOES however increase the risk of breast cancer.

      Women who are not sexually active are less likely to be exposed to sexually transmitted diseases. Some (like chlamydia) can effect fertility, while others (HPV) can cause cervical cancer and genital warts, and some can outright kill (HIV and Syphilis).

      Fertility in women drops precipitously after women turn 33-35 years of age. So while fertility is not directly effected by not having sex, it IS effected by age, so that much is partially true.

      Women who do not participate in sexual activity do NOT get any more or any fewer illnesses than those who ARE sexually active.
      Consider the fact that there are nunneries chock full of aging virgins and most are as healthy as anyone else and many live to be well into their 70's, 80's and even older.

  3. QUESTION:
    Period Cramps!! How do i help reduce them or even stop them altogether?
    I started my period at a young age (9) which is a little strange but im 16 now and i have NEVER not had any strong pains despite having the implant put in to calm them (didnt work) and going on the pill also (didnt help). Is there anyway i can reduce these pains without any medication (I have them really bad right now and im at work so i dont have any access to any medication etc) ???

    • ANSWER:
      You have a condition called Dysmenorrhea or painful periods, your Doctor should have explained this to you, but not all Doctors have the time, if yours didn’t then I will.

      More than 50 per cent of women experience dysmenorrhea (menstrual pain) for one or two days during menstruation. Menstrual cramps occur most often in teens; however, women in their twenties and older also suffer from painful periods. Would it surprise you to know that the American College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (ACOG) says that about one in ten women experience menstrual pain so severely that they are unable to perform their normal routine for one to three days each month?

      Many times menstrual cramps are described as a dull ache or a feeling of pressure in the lower abdomen. While the pain and intensity varies from woman to woman, dysmenorrhea is sometimes severe enough to cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, and/or general aches and pains

      Menstrual cramps are caused by the normal contraction of the uterus. Like all muscles, the uterus contracts and relaxes. Most of the time women are unaware of these contractions. During menstruation uterine contractions are much stronger and it is these strong contractions that are most likely to be painful.

      Uterine contractions are caused by prostaglandins. Prostaglandins are a natural substance made by the body; uterine prostaglandins cause uterine contractions. Strong uterine contractions cause the blood supply to the uterus to temporarily shut down, depriving the uterine muscle of oxygen and setting up the cycle of menstrual contractions and pain.

      There are two types of dysmenorrhea.

      The most common type is called primary dysmenorrhea. Primary dysmenorrhea is caused by the normal production of prostaglandins as described above; it often occurs in women who have not had children and mostly disappears after a full-term pregnancy although this is not always so and in very rare (1in 1,000,000) cases a hysterectomy is the only option

      The second type of menstrual cramps is called secondary dysmenorrhea. Secondary dysmenorrhea may feel like primary dysmenorrhea, however it is caused by a disease in the uterus, fallopian tubes, or ovaries rather than the normal production of prostaglandins. This type of menstrual pain often lasts longer than primary dysmenorrhea and, in many cases, causes more severe pain. Women with secondary dysmenorrhea may experience pelvic pain at other times of the month or during sexual intercourse. Some of the most common causes of secondary dysmenorrhea include endometriosis, pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), uterine fibroid tumours’, and having an intrauterine device (IUD).

      The Doctor usually prescribes low doses of birth control pills (oral contraceptives) containing oestrogen and progestin in a regular or extended cycle. This type of approach can prevent ovulation (the monthly release of an egg) and reduce the production of prostaglandins which, in turn, reduces the severity of cramping and causes a light menstrual flow.

      Use of an IUD that releases small amounts of the progestin levonorgestrel directly into the uterine cavity, has been associated with a 50 present reduction in the prevalence of menstrual cramps. In contrast, IUDs that do not contain hormones, such as those containing copper, may worsen menstrual cramps.

      Are there surgical solutions?

      In the past, many women with menstrual cramps had an operation known as a D & C (dilation and curettage) to remove some of the lining of the uterus. This procedure is also sometimes used as a diagnostic measure to detect cancer or precancerous conditions of the uterine lining. Some women even resorted to the ultimate solution to menstrual problems by having a hysterectomy, surgery that removes the entire uterus.

      Today, when a woman has abnormally heavy and painful uterine bleeding, her doctor may recommend endometrial ablation, a procedure in which the lining of the uterus is burned away or vaporized using a heat-generating device.

      Other methods not involving your Doctor are: adequate rest and sleep, but also regular exercise (especially walking). Some women find that abdominal massage, yoga, or orgasmic sexual activity may bring relief. A heating pad applied to the abdominal area may relieve the pain and congestion and decrease symptoms.

      A number of non-prescription (over-the-counter) agents can help control the pain as well as actually prevent the menstrual cramps themselves. For mild cramps, aspirin or acetaminophen (Tylenol), or acetaminophen plus a diuretic (Diurex MPR, FEM-1, Midol, Pamprin, Premsyn, and others) may be sufficient. However, aspirin has limited effect in curbing the production of prostaglandin and is only useful for less painful cramps.

      In conclusion, now that you know about your condition you are now in an informed position to further discuss this with your Doctor, which is what you should do.

  4. QUESTION:
    Help! I have been diagnosed with uterine fibroids and hyperplasia. Is there any hope?

    I am 41, no kids, just got engaged and wanted to start my family. I just don't want to have a hysterectomy yet. But, I don't want to risk cancer either.

    • ANSWER:
      You have not given age and treatment so for taken.
      It is benign disease& curable.Just read.-
      It shouldn't be a surprise that many women with uterine fibroids at some point end up with hyperplasia if their fibroids and resulting symptoms are left untreated. Hormonal imbalances that incite fibroid growth seem to incite fast multiplication of cell growth of the endometrial lining as well. If hyperplasia and uterine fibroids are both part of your diagnosis and abnormal bleeding is a major symptom, treating the hyperplasia first with progesterone may well bring the bleeding under control; thus, allowing you to postpone treatment for your uterine fibroids until they become symptomatic enough on their own to warrant action.
      Hyperplasia is the result of hormonal imbalances (just like fibroids!) and women who are diagnosed with hyperplasia all lack appropriate progesterone levels. The first line of defense for hyperplasia is progesterone pills as this is an easy way to increase a woman's progesterone levels and prevent the hyperplasia from progressing. If this treatment along with a D&C doesn't work to stop hyperplasia from developing into endometrial cancer, it would then be appropriate to turn to hysterectomy.

  5. QUESTION:
    Can uterine fibroids turn into cancer?

    • ANSWER:
      No. Fibroids are over-growths of uterine muscle cells and/or fiberous tissue cells in and around the uterine muscle wall.

      You can read more here:
      http://www.medicalcenter.osu.edu/patientcare/healthcare_services/gynecological_health/uterine_fibroids/Pages/index.aspx
      and:
      http://www.medicalcenter.osu.edu/patientcare/healthcare_services/gynecological_health/uterine_cancer/Pages/index.aspx

  6. QUESTION:
    why would I have another period right after one?
    I have endometriosis, I know this. but, for the last six months or so, I have had consistenlty two periods a month. exactly two weeks in between. recently, I just finished my period and went in for an exam and the next day I started my period again. it started as a trickle and then became like a normal period after that. I have noticed in the past sometimes intercourse could also start my period. does this mean I have scar tissue in the vaginal region? or should I worry about cancer. My mother had uterine cancer. and I am a smoker. all the women I know who have had such irregular bleeding has had cancer. I have had my paps done regularly.

    • ANSWER:
      Dysfunctional uterine bleeding, specifically Metrorrhagia, can be caused by a number of reasons in both women with Endo and those who do not have the disease. Aside from Endo and adhesions, polyps, fibroids and infection, the most common reason for Metrorrhagia is hormonal imbalance. It can almost always be treated effectively based on the underlying cause, once the cause is diagnosed with certainty. You may need to undergo any of the following tests in order for your doc to have a better understanding of what the actual cause is:

      Endometrial biopsy: sample of tissue from the inside of the uterus. The tissue is then examined under a microscope.

      Ultrasound scan: Sound waves are used to get pictures of the uterus, ovaries, and pelvis. The ultrasound probe may be placed on your lower abdomen or into your vagina (AKA "transvaginal").

      Sonohysterogram: an ultrasound scan is done after fluid is injected through a tube into your uterus. This test allows your provider to look for problems with the lining of the uterus.

      Hysteroscopy: Your health care provider inserts a thin metal tube with a light and tiny camera through the vagina and cervix and into the uterus. This allows your provider to see the inside of the uterus.

      Hysterosalpingography: Dye is injected into the uterus and fallopian tubes through the cervix. X-rays are then taken. The dye outlines the shape and size of the uterus and tubes.

      Treatments aside from hormonal medication and laparoscopy to treat Endometriosis include a D&C, hysteroscopy (to remove a polyp, for example), and rarely, depending on the cause, a hysterectomy, which is removal of the uterus. In cases where cancer is found, it is treated accordingly (i.e., surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy).

      Good luck and hope all turns out well for you.

  7. QUESTION:
    1986 my mother was diagnosed w/fibroid tumors, (outside the uterus) are they cancerous/life threatening now?
    My mother has had a continuous problem with bleeding for the past 7 years and her abdomen is bloated also. Could she have them safely removed now or have they turned into cancer tumors? She's too scared to go to the doctor for fear they will tell her she's about to die (she real old fashioned). Thanx for any advice!!

    • ANSWER:
      I'd bet that your mother's fibroids are inside the uterus, not outside. Yes, sometimes they do grow outside, but those do not cause heavy bleeding.

      Fibroids are almost always benign--but they are a nuisance. Basically, they are growths within the muscle of the uterine wall, and/or under the lining. They cause heavy periods, a protruding abdomen (looks like pregnancy), and backaches, among other symptoms. But the real problem is if your mom's periods are so heavy that she's always anemic...out of breath, cold, and lightheaded.

      The most important thing to keep in mind is that many women over 40 have fibroids, although most don't cause any problems.
      Your mom could do nothing now and wait until menopause, when the reduction in hormones causes the tumors to shrink--but the inconvenience and worry that her current symptoms are causing should be reason enough to see the doctor just for a basic exam and a blood test to measure her iron levels.

      If the fibroids need to come out, then there are many surgical choices she can make, depending on how big her fibroids are. A skilled surgeon with experience can often remove only the tumors, leaving her uterus intact. If the tumors are large, your mother could have a simple hysterectomy and leave her ovaries intact. It's important that she find an OB-GYN surgeon with a track record of preserving organs as much as possible.

      There are also some newer methods that involve blocking the blood vessels that feed the fibroids so that they die off in time, but this is usually for women with only a few fibroids. And if heavy bleeding is the worst symptom, your mother might be a candidate for the procedure where a heated balloon-like device cauterizes the uterine lining to stop the bleeding without invasive surgery. This doesn't make the fibroids stop growing, but it does treat the anemia.

      Tell your mother not to worry, and have a check up to see what's going on. Remember--she is in control of any decision, and a second opinion is always a good idea.

      And do read up on the subject. There are many resources online. This condition is way more common than you think. And again--it is almost NEVER cancer.

  8. QUESTION:
    Is it normal to be spotting?
    I've always had irregular periods and recently I was spotting for a week and got no period, but why?
    It started as a dark brown then slowly turn a light, pale. I've never had sex so obviously being pregnant wouldn't be an answer. Any idea?

    I recently was pretty sick with the Flu though? :/ Body aches, chills, headaches, faintness, fever, no stomach pains, but tender breasts, sore throat. That was all.

    • ANSWER:
      Hello, Here are the reasons for spotting.

      What are the normal and abnormal reasons for spotting? Many women experience spotting at some point during their cycle, be in after the major bleeding period, in the middle or days before their period is due.

      There are times when it’s perfectly normal to spot, and there are times when spotting is an indication of something wrong, be it minor or major.

      First, let’s define “spotting”. Spotting is when a bit of blood is passed through the vagina. Normally it doesn’t reach the underwear, but rather is swiped with toilet paper after a bowel movement or urination. The blood can be pink-tinged mucus, rusty brown or bright red. Spotting can be a one-time occurrence, or it can last for several hours or even several days. Spotting does NOT define the first day of menstruation. The first day of menstruation should always be the first day of actual bleeding.

      “Normal” Spotting

      Normal spotting is what may occur at the very end of your bleeding days. A day or two of spotting after 3 to 5 days of bleeding is normal, and just the end of the bleeding period.

      Spotting that occurs in the middle of your cycle or spotting that occurs some ten to fourteen days prior to the start of the next cycle is normal too. This spotting may occur during ovulation. Seeing a spot of blood during ovulation is considered an excellent fertility sign. It is thought that mid-cycle spotting occurs for one of two reasons. First reason is possibly that when the egg bursts through the follicle, a little bleeding may occur. This blood will then make its way out and show up as spotting. Or, during ovulation, the level of estrogens rise, and this sometimes prompts the uterus to shed a bit of lining, which shows up in the form of spotting.

      Spotting that occurs about a week before the cycle is due – and only lasts for less than one day- is possibly considered implantation spotting. This happens as a result of the fertilized egg burrowing into the uterine lining. Or another reason for seeing implantation spotting may be due to a slight rise in estrogen and drop in progesterone before the corpus luteum takes over the production of progesterone. The corpus luteum takes over the production when the implanted fertilized egg signals the body that pregnancy has occurred and that the lining must be maintained. Keep in mind that spotting that continues for days is not implantation spotting.

      “Abnormal” Spotting

      Abnormal spotting shows up at times other than the above mentioned times. Abnormal spotting lasts for days. It’s abnormal to spot days before your menstrual cycle is due. The causes of abnormal spotting vary.

      One common cause of spotting several days before the menstrual cycle is due is low progesterone. It’s the hormone progesterone that helps to maintain the uterine lining for pregnancy and when progesterone level drops, the menstrual cycle occurs. In women who are deficient in progesterone, they will see spotting several days to a week before their cycle is due. This can also cause minor infertility and early miscarriage.

      Another reason spotting may occur could be uterine fibroids, which are fairly harmless, but need to be kept an eye on. Endometriosis, birth control pills are a few other reasons spotting may occur. The most harmful reasons for spotting are possible sexually transmitted diseases and some cancers.

      TAKE CARE! Mama Bear

      http://fertilityhealthinsurance.com/reas…

  9. QUESTION:
    I heard that if you have bad menstrual cramps you may have cervical cancer?

    • ANSWER:
      Physical problems that can cause bad cramping include:

      -A condition in which cells that look and act like the cells of the lining of the uterus (endometrium) are found in other parts of the abdominal cavity (endometriosis) or grow into the muscular tissue of the uterine wall (adenomyosis). Pain usually occurs 1 to 2 days before menstrual bleeding begins and continues through the period.
      -Growths that are not cancerous (benign growths) in the pelvis, such as ovarian cysts, cervical or uterine polyps, or fibroids.
      -Pelvic infections. Your risk for developing an infection is higher after menstrual bleeding has begun because the opening to the uterus (cervical canal) widens during menstruation. However, pelvic infections, especially those caused by sexually transmitted diseases, can occur at any time.
      -Using an intrauterine device (IUD). An IUD may cause increased cramping during your period for the first few months of use. If menstrual cramping persists or gets worse, you may need to consider having the IUD removed and choosing another birth control method.
      -Problems with pregnancy.
      -Structural problems that were present at birth (congenital), such as narrowing of the lower part of the uterus that opens into the vagina (cervix).

      Women with precancerous lesions in their cervix usually have no symptoms. A woman usually does not have any symptoms until the cells turn into cancer and invade the deepest parts of the cervix or other pelvic organs. That is why it is important that you have a regular Pap test. This test checks for cells that are cancer or precancer.

      In the early stages of cervical cancer, you may have few symptoms. They may not be alarming to you, but it is a good idea to have them checked by a doctor. These are some of the early symptoms.

      -Vaginal discharge. Cervical cancer can cause more vaginal discharge than usual. This discharge is often bloody or foul smelling.
      -Abnormal vaginal bleeding. If you have cervical cancer, you may have bleeding between your periods or after sexual intercourse. Blood flow during your period may be heavier and last longer than usual.
      -Odor. You may notice a strange or unpleasant odor from vaginal discharge.
      -Pain. You may have pain during sex or pain in the pelvic area unrelated to sex or other activities.

      If you have a more advanced cancer that has spread, you may have these symptoms. These signs usually mean that the cancer has spread to the tissue around the cervix.

      -Pain in the pelvic area
      -Heavy bleeding from the vagina
      -A single swollen leg

  10. QUESTION:
    Fibroids turn to cancer?
    do fibroids turn to cancer?
    Is it okay to leave Benigne fibroids in the uterus?

    • ANSWER:
      you should talk to your doctor about this more specifically :)

      however, no, they usually do not. in very rare cases, benign uterine fibroids can transform into a malignant cancer.

      whether or not you you leave uterine fibroids in depends on several factors. for women who are not having any problems with them (e.g. pain, bleeding), and who are not pregnant, then the fibroids can be left alone. however, if you are having problems with them, and/or they are large in size, your doctor may recommend that you have them taken out. as a side note, uterine fibroids may interfere with a woman's ability to get pregnant.

  11. QUESTION:
    Large partially pedunculated fibroid leiomyoma 10.2 x 8.6 x 9.7 of the anterior uterus... HELPPPPPPPPPPPP?
    In a way I can tell I’m blessed why? In 2008 I used to blame myself and others who caused a car accident that I was in. I lost so much after that accident not being able to have the very good health and physic I used to have. From 162 no I weight 210. I went to so many doctors after my accident because my neck and back was really in pain. I finally found a doctor who did thank lord give me hope that everything could go back to normal. Until the other day my chiropractors to finish my treatment cause my insurance almost with no balance, he told me that he will MRI my back. When they did they found and confirmed that I had a herniated disc L5-S1 that this accident had make worst because a previous chiropractor told me I had a disc problem before 3 days before the accident etc... But that MRI for my back shows a growing mass inside my pelvic. They send me for a pelvic ultrasound. Also the days of the MRI my tummy to the right side move so much that was crazy and I was extremely dizzy. Result came like that:

    Age: 26
    Sex: Female

    History: Pelvic pain with heavy menses.

    Finding: utilizing a full urinary bladder as an acoustic window, the pelvis was evaluated and the uterus is in a normal anteverted/anteflexed orientation measuring 8.4 x 9.8 x 8.0 cm. The uterus contains a very large anterior complex leiomyoma, which measures 10.2 x 8.6 x 9.7 cm. The right and left adnexa are normal. There is no free fluid within the cul-de-sac.

    Impression: There is a large soft tissue mass involving the anterior uterus almost certainly representing a large partially pedunculated leiomymoma, which measures 10.2 x 8.6x 9.7 cm. This is an otherwise normal study.

    I had so many symptoms related to this now I realized when I make search, I though it was normal to have these symptoms or I was like that but I was in silence sick.

    -I always had heavy period since a teen
    -around 2 to 3 days
    -only when lose weight in 2007 my period is around 5 to 6 days with no pain at all.
    -sometimes painful period who changed to be worst now, and right side got worst in last 3 years with clog blood peace going aout.
    -constipation on and off but now for my period this month my belly got so big and bloated and I was constipated now I started going again.
    -I always fell pain when I’m ovulating like I’m having my period on my right ovaries side and pain bit after period since 1 year ½ now.
    -My right side belly itch me so much when I eat sugar or bad food or fell like biting me inside to my skin.
    -when I crave too much sugar and eat really too much I have a gluant mucus think like mucus and clear going out my vagina with no smell, sometimes itch lightly. When I take the GSE grapseed oil it's ok.
    -under my skin all over my body something fell like stuff crawling.
    -end 2007/start 2008 after doing a master cleanse I start noticing theses itch on my right side belly. And I was for 2 months on and off yeast infection diagnosed was Candida vaginitis.
    -during the cleanse fell like one day my right ovary need to go out like something pulling out.
    - I never tried to cleanse my body ever since.

    Please God is giving an opportunity to heal myself. By showing me that I have been sick for years trough all this tragedy, I discover it. Please give me information about my condition anyone is welcome/ what food to eat and not/ what life to lead/ what supplement to takes/ what natural medicine is good/ what surgery is involved/ do this fibroids turn into cancer. HELPPPPPPP PLEASE.

    I will see a doctor this Tuesday and hope better news and hope he tells I will be able to have 1 baby.

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroids are clumps of uterine extra tissue overgrowths, some do not cause any discomfort and the ones that are larger and that will need to be surgically removed through an incision like a c-section to basically go into the uterus . If you are 26 years old, and want children, make sure that they leave your ovaries, tubes and uterus intact and NOT TO REMOVE THEM and only remove the fibroids. However, if your doctor suggests that something be removed so the fibroids don't come back and start growing again? Ask him what your options are. Don't be afraid to ask your doctor all the questions you have. Make a short list and take it with you to your appointment. Be ready with some questions.

      You will be OK. Have faith, and speak to someone at Social Security and start some benefits, you need to speak to a counselor, a dietician, and you need alot of support, emotional and medically. And try to have someone with you all the time, because you shouldn't be alone in this.

  12. QUESTION:
    5 years of menopause and period comes back?
    My mom's period stopped when she was 45 and she's had hot flashes and all that jazz every since because of menopause. Today her period came and she's hurting. She doesn't even wanna walk just lay down all day. A couple of days ago she has weird rashes/bruise looking things in her chest and her nipples hurt. What's going on? is this normal?!?!?!
    she just told me this happened two year ago. and since it came her boobs and nipples don't hurt

    • ANSWER:
      What Causes Postmenopausal Bleeding?

      Most women become menopausal between the age of 45 to 55 years, however, for some women, the onset of menopause may take place at an earlier age due to lifestyle-related issues. Since menopause refers to the cessation of menstruation, women often get alarmed if they experience bleeding after menopause. Given below are some of the factors that may be responsible for causing menstrual bleeding after menopause.

      Hormone Replacement Therapy: During the transitional period that precedes menopause and postmenopause, hormonal changes bring about a lot of distressing symptoms such as vaginal dryness, hot flashes, headaches, irregular heartbeat, excessive sweating, weight gain, reduced sex drive, fatigue and sleep disturbances. If the symptoms are unmanageable, hormone replacement therapy is recommended. Women opting for this treatment usually take synthetic hormones orally or transdermally. Hormone replacement therapy may alleviate some of the symptoms to some extent, but it may cause certain side effects, one of them being postmenopausal bleeding.

      Uterine Growth: Development of a benign growth in the uterus could also be responsible for causing postmenopausal bleeding. Development of fibroids or polyps on the walls of the uterus could be the reason why a woman may have a menstrual period even after approaching menopause. Polyps or the benign tumor-like growths that appear in the cervix or on the uterine walls may lend a distorted appearance to the uterus and cause bleeding. Fibroids, which are benign tumors filled with fibrous tissues, can also cause heavy bleeding. These growths must be removed as soon as possible.

      Cancerous Uterine Growth: Since menopausal bleeding could also be associated with malignant growth in the uterus or ovaries, gynecologists often conduct a pelvic examination and examine the cervix and the vagina. Pap smear, ultrasound and endometrial biopsy may also be conducted to examine the reproductive organs and ascertain the presence of a cancerous growth. These tests can help the doctors measure the thickness of uterine lining, which in turn, may help in the diagnosis of the initial stage of uterine cancer or endometrial hyperplasia. If left untreated, hyperplasia may progress into uterine cancer. Due to the serious nature of the disease, timely diagnosis and treatment is extremely essential for averting serious complications.

      Vaginal Atrophy: Vaginal atrophy is a condition that is associated with the thinning of vagina. This is caused due to the decrease in the production of estrogen by the ovaries. Due to the drying and thinning of the vaginal lining, the vagina becomes fragile and quite prone to injuries, which is why, postmenopausal women may experience spotting or bleeding after intercourse. This condition also makes women prone to vaginal infections. Use of vaginal creams, vaginal estrogen ring or tablets can help in treating this condition.

      Besides the following conditions, nutritional deficiencies may also bring about a hormonal imbalance and cause menstrual bleeding after menopause. Women who suffer drastic weight loss at this time, are also prone to experiencing vaginal bleeding after menopause. Symptoms that are experienced during this time usually stress women out, so, they need to stay relaxed and calm their frayed nerves. Since bleeding after menopause may be indicative of a serious disease, a proper medical checkup becomes extremely essential. Drug therapy, natural remedies and lifestyle-related changes may help in managing the symptoms. Growths within the uterus or the reproductive organs may need to be removed through surgery.

  13. QUESTION:
    Will polyps cause cancer if inside my uterus?

    • ANSWER:
      Endometrial Polyps

      As our ability to look inside the uterus improves, many women are told they have a common abnormality of the uterine lining, called endometrial polyps. An understanding of these common growths that develop inside the uterine cavity will help patients decide which course of treatment best suits them.

      The uterus is mostly composed of muscle. However, the inside lining of the uterus is made of “fluffy” endometrial tissue that grows and shrinks during the menstrual cycle. If a woman does not become pregnant, this lining sheds, causing a menstrual period. After a period, the lining grows rapidly under the influence of hormones like estrogen. Polyps are areas that grow a little too much. As they grow, they usually fan out but remain attached to a small stalk, kind of similar to a bush or a tree. The stalk is like the trunk of
      a tree, while the larger part of the polyp is like the branches (see photo below). They are usually about the size of a pencil eraser, although they can be even smaller. Rarely, polyps can grow to the size of an orange!

      Since most polyps are small, they probably do not often cause symptoms. However, when symptoms do occur, they usually include excessive bleeding during a menstrual period, or bleeding in between periods, or even spotting after intercourse. Some women report a few days of brown blood after a normal menstrual period. Polyps cause these symptoms because they dangle from their stalks and irritate the surrounding tissue, which causes the tissue to rub off, exposing tiny blood vessels. These blood vessels bleed, leading to spotting or vaginal bleeding. If the polyp interferes with the egg and sperm, it may make it hard to get pregnant. Nobody knows how common this is. It is also possible that they may lead to a slightly higher chance of miscarriage, but this is also unknown. Most gynecologists will remove polyps, as discussed below, if they are found in women with a history of miscarriage.

      If a woman goes to her doctor complaining of spotting between periods or after intercourse, or very heavy bleeding during a menstrual period, her doctor will usually think of polyps as one of the many possible causes. Diagnosing endometrial polyps involves looking inside the uterine cavity. A regular ultrasound (also called a sonogram) usually does not diagnose polyps, because the pressure inside the uterus flattens the polyps, making them very hard to see. A special ultrasound, called a sonohysterogram
      (water ultrasound), allows doctors to see inside the uterus after a few drops of sterile water is carefully infused into the uterus through the vagina. The water opens the uterine cavity, allowing the doctor to see if any polyps are hanging around. Another diagnostic test is a hysterosalpingogram (HSG), which uses dye under pressure to open the uterus and tubes. A quick x-ray is then taken to see if any polyps are in the uterus. Finally, gynecologists are becoming more skilled at using the hysteroscope to look inside the uterus. This is a small, lighted tube that goes into the vagina then the uterus, to look around inside the uterus. Hysteroscopy using small tubes can be performed in the office, but larger tubes (used to remove large polyps or fibroids) usually require anesthesia in the hospital.

      If a polyp is diagnosed one of the first questions is “could this be cancer?” Fortunately, polyps only rarely turn cancerous. The risk does increase, but only slightly, as a patient passes age 50. The next question is often “how do you remove the polyp?” The old-fashioned way was to perform a D & C (dilatation and curettage). This involves a gentle scraping of the uterine lining. Unfortunately, this may miss the polyp completely, since this procedure is done solely by feel. Imagine a polyp dangling by a little stalk. As the scraping instrument goes by, it will likely just push the polyp out of the way without grabbing it. Thankfully, we now have hysteroscopes, which allow us to look right at the polyp as we grasp it or cut it away from the uterine lining. This ensures that the polyp (or, in some cases, multiple polyps) is removed.

      After removal of a polyp, the patient can return to work in a few days. She may notice a little spotting for a few days. Only a small percent of polyps seem to come back, but it is possible that months or years after treatment a polyp might recur. If you are diagnosed with endometrial polyps, please discuss treatment options with your doctor, who is in the best position to help you decide whether or not removal (called polypectomy) is necessary.

      David Ashley Hill, M.D.
      Associate Director
      Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
      Florida Hospital Family Practice Residency
      Orlando, Florida

  14. QUESTION:
    please advice and input on this.. I fear I have cancer?
    I'm new here and not sure if i'm at that right place but i'm really hoping for some advice and input. Heres some history i'm 27yrs old and have 3 children, I just had a baby 5 months ago.. this is when all my problems began. 4 weeks after the birth of my son i went to my ob and recieved the depo(5-19-2010) shot cause i already had a tubal ligation scheduled (7-20-2010) and she said that was the best method of birth control before then considering i have NEVER been on birth control before, ok well after i had my son my stomach never really went down, anyways i had the tubal everything went great i recovered normally, my stomach was still descended though but i never brought it up thinking it was normal, well another month goes by and i still look 6 months pregnant and friends family everyone was telling me it wasnt normal and something was wrong.. of course i just let it go in one ear and out another... well a few weeks ago i ended up in the ER cause i just couldnt handle the pain anymore and was starting to really think ok maybe there is something (symptoms i have had for a couple months: heartburn, indegestion, pain/cramps in my stomach, heavy feeling in my stomach, lower back pain, and my pubic bone is sore) well the ER didnt do much, the gave me a ct scan which they said i had uterine fibroid so i make an appt with my ob.. well my ultrasound was yesterday and no fibroid, but i have a cyst on my left ovary and calcifications in my uterus.. also she said the left side of my uterus showed up white on the ultrasound so i was scheduled for a DX Hysteroscopy and D&C Oct 15th 2010, i'm scared to death i have no idea what any of this means and they would not go into detail about my uterus but could tell me about my cyst on my ovary which has me even more concerned she said well lets just do the surgery and i'll get your results in about 2-3 weeks and we'll go from there, can someone please tell me whats going on.. i have never had "female" problems this is all new to me and the lack of knowledge doesn't make this any easier.. I need input please I could barely sleep last night, the not knowing not even an idea of whats wrong with my uterus and all i can find on the internet is about cancer but wouldn't my ob of said something if she suspected it? I'm so worried please help :( btw i'm currently 5 months post partum and still look about 6-7 months pregnant, i'm asked EVERYWHERE i go when my baby's due so humiliating I also have not lost not 1 pound in 5 months and i'm very active.

    • ANSWER:
      There aren't any 'official' people to answer questions. I remember asking a friend when she was expecting, and you can imagine what she said. She had had much the same troubles as you, but hers turned out to be a fibroid the size of a large foetus. You need to go back to your health professional with a list of questions about possible cancer (I'm assuming this is what you are most frightened of) or other conditions, but all will become clear once you've had your op as they will take samples of everything they find to investigate further. Meanwhile, be kind to yourself. I know it's impossible not to worry, but try not to.

  15. QUESTION:
    Extreme menstrual cramping?
    I took literally three acetiphinomen an hour ago, each 500 mg, and nothing! I am in so much pain its ridiculus. In the past I have tried heating pads, herbal teas, hot water bottles, etc and nothing works.. I spend from the time I wake up in the morning until 8:00 at night in the fetal position crying. I even tried exercising and that was a nightmare. never again. I'm 19 and I dont believe in birth control. What can I do? Even if it sounds crazy or stupid.

    • ANSWER:
      You have a condition called Dysmenorrhea or painful periods, your Doctor should have explained this to you (I’m presuming you’ve seen your Doctor, if not why not???), but not all Doctors have the time, if yours didn’t then I will.

      More than 50 per cent of women experience dysmenorrhea (menstrual pain) for one or two days during menstruation. Menstrual cramps occur most often in teens; however, women in their twenties and older also suffer from painful periods. Would it surprise you to know that the American College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (ACOG) says that about one in ten women experience menstrual pain so severely that they are unable to perform their normal routine for one to three days each month?

      Many times menstrual cramps are described as a dull ache or a feeling of pressure in the lower abdomen. While the pain and intensity varies from woman to woman, dysmenorrhea is sometimes severe enough to cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, and/or general aches and pains

      Menstrual cramps are caused by the normal contraction of the uterus. Like all muscles, the uterus contracts and relaxes. Most of the time women are unaware of these contractions. During menstruation uterine contractions are much stronger and it is these strong contractions that are most likely to be painful.

      Uterine contractions are caused by prostaglandins. Prostaglandins are a natural substance made by the body; uterine prostaglandins cause uterine contractions. Strong uterine contractions cause the blood supply to the uterus to temporarily shut down, depriving the uterine muscle of oxygen and setting up the cycle of menstrual contractions and pain.

      There are two types of dysmenorrhea.

      The most common type is called primary dysmenorrhea. Primary dysmenorrhea is caused by the normal production of prostaglandins as described above; it often occurs in women who have not had children and mostly disappears after a full-term pregnancy although this is not always so and in very rare (1in 1,000,000) cases hysterectomy is the only option

      The second type of menstrual cramps is called secondary dysmenorrhea. Secondary dysmenorrhea may feel like primary dysmenorrhea, however it is caused by a disease in the uterus, fallopian tubes, or ovaries rather than the normal production of prostaglandins. This type of menstrual pain often lasts longer than primary dysmenorrhea and, in many cases, causes more severe pain. Women with secondary dysmenorrhea may experience pelvic pain at other times of the month or during sexual intercourse. Some of the most common causes of secondary dysmenorrhea include endometriosis, pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), uterine fibroid tumours’, and having an intrauterine device (IUD).

      The Doctor usually prescribes low doses of birth control pills (oral contraceptives) containing oestrogen and progestin in a regular or extended cycle. This type of approach can prevent ovulation (the monthly release of an egg) and reduce the production of prostaglandins which, in turn, reduces the severity of cramping and causes a light menstrual flow.

      Use of an IUD that releases small amounts of the progestinlevonorgestrel directly into the uterine cavity, has been associated with a 50 present reduction in the prevalence of menstrual cramps. In contrast, IUDs that do not contain hormones, such as those containing copper, may worsen menstrual cramps.

      Are there surgical solutions?

      In the past, many women with menstrual cramps had an operation known as a D & C (dilation and curettage) to remove some of the lining of the uterus. This procedure is also sometimes used as a diagnostic measure to detect cancer or precancerous conditions of the uterine lining. Some women even resorted to the ultimate solution to menstrual problems by having hysterectomy, surgery that removes the entire uterus.

      Today, when a woman has abnormally heavy and painful uterine bleeding, her doctor may recommend endometrial ablation, a procedure in which the lining of the uterus is burned away or vaporized using a heat-generating device.

      Other methods not involving your Doctor are: adequate rest and sleep, but also regular exercise (especially walking). Some women find that abdominal massage, yoga, or orgasmic sexual activity may bring relief. Heating pad applied to the abdominal area may relieve the pain and congestion and decrease symptoms.

      A number of non-prescription (over-the-counter) agents can help control the pain as well as actually prevent the menstrual cramps themselves. For mild cramps, aspirin or acetaminophen (Tylenol), or acetaminophen plus a diuretic (Diurex MPR, FEM-1, Midol, Pamprin, Premsyn, and others) may be sufficient. However, aspirin has limited effect in curbing the production of prostaglandin and is only useful for less painful cramps.

  16. QUESTION:
    Please help me get through this ='(?
    just a couple of hours ago...i thought that being 17 dpo and 3 days late that my chances of being pregnant we great...DH and i have been ttc for almost 2 years now...instead i have just learned that i have uterine fibroids(cancerous)...dr told us that 99 percent i wont be able to carry a child....i'm an emotional train wreck...i'm not trying to get sympathy from anyone on here...i am just tired of all the family trying to tell me that it will be ok...don't have any friends that i can turn to...and some of you on here during what i thought was my tww have helped and encouraged me get through these couple weeks...i'm really new to yahoo answers but i feel like some people on here really made me feel like there is a light at the end of the tunnel...has any one ever had uterine fibroids and got pregnant??? please no rude comments I'm already crying trying to type this, so go somewhere else if you want to be mean.

    • ANSWER:
      are you sure the fibroids are cancerous? uterine fibroids are almost always benign. i think only 1 in 1000 of all fibroids are cancerous and i think it mainly happens with older women (like 50's). if you were told that they are cancerous (perhaps b/c of rapid growth or something), get a second opinion, to be on the safe side.

      as for the carrying a child, you don't know that yet. the first step is to have a good ultrasound (from an ultrasound technician, i didn't know they exist until i left texas), then an mri, and then surgery. i have been told for YEARS that i will never have children b/c of the size and number of fibroids, i had a laproscopic myomectomy and the fibroids only penetrated about 1 cm into my uterine wall so i can go through natural child birth. i had surgery 3 weeks ago so i don't know about pregnancy yet :) also, there's nothing wrong with adoption. i've come to terms with the fact that i might never have a child of my own and there are many children out there who need the love and support of a person willing to give it...remember that! if your fibroids are not cancerous, there are a lot of women all over the world who have children either having the fibroids or having some surgery to remove them. having fibroids DOES NOT mean you will never have children.

      but please, if you were told it is cancer, get a second opinion!

  17. QUESTION:
    what are the symptons of fibroids?

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroids are very common. They are benign tumors that grow in the smooth muscle of the uterine wall. They are not cancers. Rapidly growing fibroids may turn into cancer but this only happens in 1 in 1000 pre menopausal women. This risk rises to 1 in 100 post menopausal women.

      Fibroids are very common. Only 25% of women have large enough fibroids to cause symptoms. The 2 most common symptoms are
      1. heavy menstrual bleeding
      2. a feeling of pressure in the pelvis

      We do not yet really understand what causes fibroids. Some studies suggest that it is partially genetic. They also occur more in African-Canadian women.

  18. QUESTION:
    What r fibrods ?
    If one has fibrods,can u most likly get cancer?,

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroids are an overgrowth of the muscle cells of the uterus. They are a benign tumor, not cancer, and do not turn into cancer if left untreated. The danger with fibroids is their size. The grow to an excess of 2 pounds, causing pain, heavy and/or irregular bleeding, uterine prolapse, and pregnancy complications.
      Surgery can be done to remove the fibroids, but unless the entire uterus is removed (hysterectomy) they often grow back.

  19. QUESTION:
    why would a 21 year old have fibroids?
    I just turned 21 in April, I don't have any kids nor have I ever been pregnant. I have had horrible periods since I was 15 both heavy and painful. I also have spotting and cramping in between periods. I have complained to many dr's about this problem and they all just pushed me aside. I'm guessing just because I'm so young. However, the new obgyn I went to did a sonohist? and he found a fibroid that measured 2.88 cm and just today I had an mri with and without contrast and am awaiting the results of that to see if theres more and exactly how big this fibroid is? All the research i've done says that women my age shouldn't have these and if we do we wouldn't have any symptoms and I was just wondering why would I have one? And if anyone else has had this at a young age and what they did to treat them?

    • ANSWER:
      You know, most of the time they actually find fibroids quite by accident in the majority of cases. Depending on which studies you read, you will find rates quoted between 50 and 75% of all women having fibroids at some point in life. They are also most common in women of child-bearing age, and that's you. Most women with them don't have symptoms at all, regardless of their age. A lot depends on where the fibroid is located, and if it is the sort with a stem or not. It may also not be the complete explanation for your monthly pain either. That may just be the result of strong uterine contractions, and the fibroid is just a "by the way" kind of finding. There's also no way of knowing if this has been there for long or not. There is still way too much they don't know about fibroids. Your research will have told you they tend to run in families. But without checking every female relative you have, there's no way to always know if they run in yours. Family history also doesn't quite explain it either. I know. My mother had them to the point she eventually had a hysterectomy. My sister had them in her 20's, or at least that's when they were detected. It just so happened, she was pregnant with her first baby at the time. At the same time, so far as I'm aware, I don't have them, nor have I ever had them. As far as treatment, yours is actually not that big. Your doctor will most likely suggest a wait and see approach, and he/she may suggest you try birth control pills to see if that won't help with the spotting and cramping. It won't have any effect on the fibroid at all. There are medications that would shrink it, but those can have some more serious repurcussions down the road. Finally there is surgery- should the symptoms get that bad. There is one sort, a myomectomy, which removes the fibroids but spares the uterus. It's highly recommended for ladies who wish to have a family later on in life. A hysterectomy is the surgery of last resort, and from the sounds of it, you are definitely not a candidate for that. For right now, you need to just stay calm and work with the doctor to find the answers you need and to decided on a treatment (if it's needed) that is right for you. It sounds awful, but it really isn't that bad in most cases. It doesn't turn into cancer, and it usually has no real effect on your day to day life. My mom had fibroids evidently most of her adult life, and still had four kids. My sister is much the same, and she had two. So for now, think positive and just wait to see what the future brings.

  20. QUESTION:
    Should I be worried about this? My dr didn't have time to explain!! Pls. Help. ?
    Ultrasound showed fibroid. Dr didn't seemed concerned about it, however, I'm worried about. What is a fibroid, should I be concerned about it. I'm 30 1/2 weeks pregnant, will it cause any problems to the baby? Also, the dr just said that she was going to monitor me every 2 weeks now. She said she was going to start giving me a non-stress test and ultrasound every two weeks. (I'm 35 and high-risk). She said she wants to monitor my fluid levels and check to make sure my placenta is not wearing down. What does that mean? Is that a normal procedure? She didn't seem too concerned, however, she did say I would not make it to may due date. She said that she will check the next time I come in to see if I have started dilating. Please let me know if this is normal or should I be worried. Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi there!

      Firstly I would say that fibroids are NON CANCEROUS, benign tumours that DO NOT "turn" into cancer. Sorry for stressing that so strongly but I don't want you to worry anymore than you already are.

      Fibroids in pregnancy can cause some problems and I am guessing this is why your doctor want to monitor you every two weeks. YOur doctor will want to check that "red degeneration" hs no occured. This is where the blood supply to the fibroid is cut off which can cause pain and in a small amount of cases, contractions. Please do not worry about contractions though as they can give you drugs to stop the contractions. Your doctor has suggested that you may not make it to your delivery date however the intention would be to wait as long as possible, giving you drugs to stop any contractions, until it is safe for your baby to be delivered.

      Following the birth of your gorgeous little miracle it is important for you to know that most of the time fibroids don't cause any symptoms and therefore do not need any form of treatment. If it does cause you problems then they would most likely try a drug call GnRH analogues to reduce the levels of pestrogen in your system (oestrogen causes fibroids). If that didn't help then they may try a Myomectomy where they remove the fibroid(s) individually, leaving the womb intact or a Uterine artery embolisation (blocking the blood supply to the fibroids).

      I really hope this helps and please try not to worry and enjoy the rest of your pregnancy. Rest assured that your doctor is aware of your fibroid and will monitor you very closely. I should also say that I know of no reason why this would affect your baby directly.

      Good luck!

      Indigo

      xxx

  21. QUESTION:
    What is wrong with my body? Why am I bleeding?
    So I just turned 18. My last period was from May 17- May 22. I had sex May 29th, with a condom. The same day a couple hours later, I started bleeding bright red blood. It was kind of heavy like a period type blood. I didn't say anything and kind of just shrugged it off until morning. But then all day the 30th I was bleeding too. It wasn't as heavy though and it wasn't bright red. It turned a little, very little, brown color and had more of a muscus in it with some chunks. It was like that all day the 30th. And today is the 31st and it is still going. A little less blood now, but it was just like the 30th's coloring and texture. I don't feel any itching, scratching, burning, pain or anything. A little sore still from the sex, but that's it. I have been googling and can't find nothing to match this and I don't know if he went rougher than usual or not. Help?

    • ANSWER:
      Causes

      The symptom 'brown discharge' does not say anything by its own. You need to take into account several other factors that may point to a specific cause. These factors include finding if it is brown discharge after period or before it, whether it continues for 3 to 5 days (like normal period) or occurs only for a day or two. Similarly, the intensity of discharge also plays a role in identifying the cause.

      Late Period
      In more than half cases of brown discharge between periods, the reason is late period! Female vagina is a self cleaning system. Every month it clears the thickened endometrium lining if there has been no fertilization of egg (the thick endometrium is body's preparation for possible pregnancy). The body expels this lining as menstrual flow. If the entire lining is not expelled during menstruation, it resides inside the uterus until the next month. When you get your period the next month this old lining is expelled along with other blood cells. The old blood is particularly responsible for brown discharge. You may only get it for a couple of days after which you may have your normal period. Sometimes, you may get this discharge for a day or two, then nothing, followed by your normal period.

      Implantation Bleeding
      If you experience brown discharge before period, chances are high that you might have implantation bleeding. After the fertilization occurs the fertilized egg or zygote travels down the fallopian tube to the uterus. Cell division takes place during this journey and the zygote develops into an embryo. The embryo burrows into the uterine lining or endometrium, which results in pinkish brown discharge. You can easily tell implantation bleeding from a normal period, as it is far lighter than a normal period and does not last for more than a couple of days. Implantation bleeding occurs 6 to 12 days after fertilization. If you have been tracking your ovulation time, implantation bleeding should occur a week before your impending period. Thus, brown spotting instead of period could be an early sign of pregnancy.

      Diseases
      In rare cases, brown discharge may be an indication of a serious underlying disease. Cervical cancer, Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID), syphilis, chlamydia and some other sexually transmitted diseases may also contribute to this condition. However, in that case, you may also look out for some other symptoms that may point to any of these diseases. If you have had intercourse with multiple/unknown partner(s), then your changes of contracting these diseases is pretty high. In such case, you will have a thick brown discharge with heavy bleeding and severe pain. Also watch out for unusual/foul odors. Other symptoms to watch for include vaginal dryness, itching, burning, painful intercourse, urinary tract infections, etc. Polyps or uterine fibroid and endometriosis may also lead to heavy brown discharge.

  22. QUESTION:
    bleeding for 5 weeks now! HELP!?
    Ok so im kind of starting to freak out a little. 5 weeks ago I started my period like normal, my issue is i'm STILL bleeding. i am 25 and since i started my period at 13 i started my period on time every month adn for the same length every month. never changes ever, not on birth control, haven't been on it for about 4 years, haven't been having sex in about 3 years. nothing has changed in my stress levels and anything. only thing different is i have gained about 15-20 pounds. my sister has crazy periods for like 10 years because of her weight. i am by no means obese, just after having my son 2 years ago i haven't been able to loose the weight. but for the last 2 years my period has been exactly the same till now. uterine cancer runs in my family at pretty young age about mid 30's. i'm only 25 and freaking out! i had my reg period 5 wks ago and after the 7 days looked normal but i never stopped spotting. i spotted for about 4 days some day new blood, some day old. and then go right back into another period (comparing) but i noticed it was a lot more new blood and not as much old blood. it was heaver then the norm and went for about 8-10 days. then i spotted couple days, stopped for about 2 days, then spotted for a couple day (old blood) and day 3-4 later full force new blood AGAIN!!! a lot more new blood then norm( none of this is actually norm!) was heavy for about 4-5 days and started slowing down. same pattern for now 5th week. started slowing down last few days and just barely spotting and now AGAIN full on again today. a LOT of fresh blood again! i'm getting scared, i have made a few apts and something has always come up n i had to cancel. i am anemic as it is, i can only imagine what it's doing to it know. i am so extremely tired all the time, barely get out bed, dizzy and get the shakes in my hands a LOT through out the day. in the begining when my second wave of bleeding started 2 wks into this i had very severe pelvic pains, very bad, labor pain like, still getting it but not as bad as it was. anyone know what it could be by? sorry for the book i wrote just wanted all my details out for the best responces. thank you for your help!

    • ANSWER:
      Your health matters more than anything else.

      Tension and stress can affect ovulation which in turn affects menses. Your current bleeding however, if it is due to stress, is not due to the stress at this moment. Rather it is likely that the bleeding now represents stress in the month before this period started. The stress somehow causes a dysfunctional ovulation and then the menstrual bleeding after that is what is disturbed.

      As you are already anaemic you need to make an appointment and keep it. Worrying but doing nothing about it will make it worse - that's stress.
      Stress, weight gain, hormone changes or an underlying physical condition (eg a fibroid or pelvic inflammatory disease - which isn't always sexually transmitted).
      For both your and your son's sake please make and keep an appointment.
      Your health is important to you both. too important to cancel appointments even if you are apprehensive about the outcome.

  23. QUESTION:
    Why am I bleeding during intercourse with the same person and no one else?
    I recently had sex with my boyfriend while trying to conceive with him. But all the day before we had sex I had been having increased vaginal discharge which I found out from my doctor was my body ovulating.So I decided to insert a tampon into my lubricated vagina about an hour before me and my boyfriend had sex. Then while we were having sex, about 15minutes into it I started bleeding. But I wasn't supposed to be on my period for another 3weeks. Then about 7days later I starrted having pregnancy symptoms. But me and My boyfriend fell apart and I turned to someone else for pleasures because of my anger at my boyfriend. During this time, I didn't bleed. Then about 2 days after this Me and my boyfriend got back together and we started having sex again and this time I bled again!!! Why am I only bleeding with him??? Was the first time i bled from wearing a tampon when my vaggina wasn't lubricated enough and pulling it out after only an hour and it wasn't completly used?? Then was I only bleeding the secound time because of my implantation blood of my baby because we had sex on the 9th day on conseption or what?? SOMEBODY PLEASE PLEASE HHELP ME TO UNDERSTAND WHAT'S GOING ON!!
    Keep in mine that while me and my boyfriend was having intercourse i did "get wet" and it got lubricated
    Also keep In mind that the 2nd person I had sex with was someone I knew very well and no im not a "whore" just a lost teenager who didn't know what else to do after my boyfriend cheated.
    And please don't leave me rude comments I just really am searching for an answer. I need help. Someone please help me.

    • ANSWER:
      Bleeding during or after sex is not considered normal and therefore should be evaluated at all times. The only time bleeding during or after sex is considered normal in some cases is if you are having sexual intercourse for the first time.

      Some causes of vaginal bleeding after sex, such as vaginal dryness after menopause or in some cases by the use of certain types of birth control pills are not serious and may be easily treated.

      However, in some cases, vaginal bleeding after sex can be a sign of a serious underlying problem, including:

      * Inflammation of the cervix (cervicitis).
      * Sexually transmitted diseases, such as chlamydia or gonorrhea.
      * Cervical polyps.
      * Cervical ectropion, a condition in which the cervical tissue is more susceptible to abrasion.
      * Endometriosis or ovarian cysts.
      * Pelvic inflammatory disease.
      * Uterine fibroids.
      * Cancer of the cervix, uterus or vagina.

      If you continue to experience bleeding during or after sex, I would recommend that you consult with your doctor/gynaecologist to see what they think could be causing this.

      Good luck :)

  24. QUESTION:
    Is a partial hysterectomy worth it?
    I'm trying to talk some sense into my best friend, but I'm having a hard time trying to convince her. She's 40, never wanted or wants kids. Doesn't want to (or can't) take birth control pills anymore (I think strokes or blood clots run in her family) and she says she's got fiberoids and her periods are torture and she doesn't want to wait another 10 years for nature to "take its course and turn off a body part she's not using." She wants to have a partial hysterectomy - just the uterus removed, but the ovaries are left. She says if she only gets the partial, it will remove all her discomforts, but she'll still have the hormones from her ovaries. BUT - I've read, that the uterus produces hormones and even if she only has that removed - she's still going to start the aging process and will have hormone changes. Plus I've also read that it messes with your bladder and intestines and sex is never as great. Can anyone back me up on this? Or am I mistaken? The only reason I'm fighting so hard is: once she removes it and find out it was a mistake - she won't be able to undo it. So, please don't say it's not my business - I just want to make sure she knows all the pros AND cons. If there are any "pros" please feel free to list them as well. Thanks for your help!
    Usually, in the USA you can't just demand one of these either- but she found a doctor,in Los Angeles (of course! - the same city Heidi Montag was able to get 10 plastic surgeries in a day). Just because she found a money-hungry doctor willing to do this, doesn't mean it's going to make her life better, am I right? She says her fiberoids are so large it blocked the view of one of her ovaries when they did a sonogram.
    For those of you saying this is "none of my business" IT IS! She is my friend - and if she makes a mistake she ends up reretting - I'm the one who will have to hear about how this mistake ruined her life for as long as we remain friends. And how am I supposed to live with myself and think I am a good friend if I didn't research the facts myself. What am I supposed to do? Just shrug my shoulders when she occassionally has 2nd thoughts and looks to me for answers and asks: "Do you think this is the right thing to do?" It IS my business. At least if I consider myself a "good friend" it is. A good friend SHOULD care and take an interest when their friends are facing major medical decisions. Wouldn't you do the same for a friend diagnosed with breast cancer? Wouldn't you want to find out everything you could about the pros and cons of a masectomy so in a moment of weakness, your friends asks: "What do you think I should do?" I'm sorry but responding "It's your body and your life, the
    I'm sorry I called her doctor "Money Hungry". My bad. I don't know the suffering she is in, and I didn't know all the information that ALL OF YOU have been providing, so I just thought: "How can a doctor justify such an extreme proceedure in a woman so young, he must be money hungry". Until I started reading your answers, I had no idea how bad fiberoids could be. Sorry. Please don't hold it against me. I just want to make sure when we talk about it, I'm giving her GOOD, SOUND advice. She's even asked me: "I might chicken out.... I'm counting on you to talk me back into it". I need all your advice bad and good to be able to to do that. Thank you everyone so far. Please keep the information coming. I have researched on the internet, but it's medical sites - I want to hear personal experiences from WOMEN who have had it done or know someone and what the good and bad were. I'm so scared for her because, it's SO FINAL. It's like an amputation. I feel like I have this HUGE responsibi

    • ANSWER:
      If her fibroids were that bad, then hysterectomy is the usual way to deal with it. That said, it's important to keep in mind that there are other ways to deal with fibroids than hysterectomy, such as uterine artery embolization (UAE)--the doc blocks the main artery to the fibroid, starving it so it shrinks and dies. But then she may get more fibroids, since if you've got one, you may be prone to them. I'd still say she should try UAE and see if it works. A hysterectomy is major surgery and it takes quite awhile to fully get over it. And there could potentially be permanent negative problems, such as the ones you have named with sex and bladder. On the other hand I know those for whom sex was better and the bladder was stronger after the hysterectomy. Problem is you never know which type of person you'll be till after the surgery, and you can't go backwards. So I totally agree with you about only realizing afterwards that it was a mistake.

      A few things: the uterus doesn't produce hormones. But what you may be referring to is that the ovaries may stop working a few months after the surgery, or a few years. In any case, menopause will be earlier. So there will be hormone changes despite not getting the ovaries out. She can take hormone replacement, but it's not as good as the real thing and you can often spend a lot of time trying to figure out what is a good type and level of hormones.

      That other person who said to avoid hormones because they cause breast cancer isn't really right. It's a complicated issue, but bottom line is that if her ovaries stop working at her age, then she'll likely be better off taking hormones, because studies have shown that life expectancy is shortened and mortality is increased if you go into surgical menopause before a certain age (they tested it till age 42. It might be true at somewhat older ages--average age of menopause is 51--but they haven't studied it sufficiently to say one way or the other. What's known is that if you take hormones beyond the natural age of menopause, your breast cancer risk will go up... if you take estrogen AND progesterone. Taking estrogen only doesn't actually raise risk of breast cancer, it's starting to look like, which is counter-intuitive. Without a uterus, she'd take no progesterone.) On the other hand, taking no hormones will reduce breast cancer risk. Yet because of the increased risk of other problems, you've got more death from other causes without hormones than death from breast cancer with hormones. And can she even take hormones anyway, if she can't take birth control pills?

      So you can see that it's a really complex issue. I agree 100% with all of your concerns, but I think the severity of your friend's problems may warrant a hysterectomy anyway, because she may very well be better off after hysterectomy than before. I know a lot of women who were absolutely delighted with their hysterectomy.

      Also: I'm the kind of person who is totally against unnecessary surgeries, and thinks that women's body parts are removed with far too much frequency. But I object to the characterization that since she found a doct to do it, he was "money-hungry". Sure, there ARE unscrupulous docs out there, but in this case, truly, if her fibroids are that bad, then hysterectomy may be the only feasible solution and the doc is likely behaving in exactly the way medical ethics dictate.

  25. QUESTION:
    Estrogen????
    What happens when a male takes non-prosription estrogen like estroven for a while?
    also what happens if you consume a lot of estroven in one day?

    • ANSWER:
      if you take higher does of estrogen you are def going to see changes with your masculinity
      Estrogen: General information and side effects

      Less common side effects are bleeding gums, breakthrough vaginal bleeding, vaginal spotting, changes in menstrual flow, painful menstruation. pre-menstrual syndrome, no menstrual period during and after estrogen use, enlargement of uterine fibroids, vaginal infection with Candida, a cystitis-like syndrome, mild diarrhea, jaundice or yellowing of the skin or whites of the eyes, rash, loss of scalp hair, and development of new hairy areas. Lesions of the eye and contact-lens intolerance have also been associated with estrogen therapy. You may experience migraine headache, mild dizziness, depression, and increased sex drive (women) or decreased sex drive (men).

      Prescribed for:
      Menopause symptoms (moderate to severe) and the prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis. Estrogen drugs are also prescribed for ovarian failure, breast cancer (in selected women and men), advanced cancer of the prostate, osteoporosis, abnormal bleeding of the uterus, vaginal irritation, female castration, and Tumers syndrome. Estrogens may also be prescribed for birth control. They are effective as a "morning after" contraceptive but should only be used as an emergency treatment because of the damage they can cause to developing fetuses. There is no evidence that these drugs are effective for nervous symptoms or depression occurring during menopause: They should not be used to treat these conditions; they should be used only to replace the estrogen that is naturally absent after menopause. Premarin (Equine) contains a very large amount of this very potent form of estrogen which is one of many reasons why it should not be used.

      General Information:
      There are six different estrogenic substances that have been identified in women, but only 3 are actually present in large amounts: estrone, estradiol, and estriol. E-1 Estrone is the most potent of the three and is the major estrogen produced by the ovaries. E-2 17beta Estratiol is the most prevalent and is naturally modified to estrone, which is then turned into E-3 estriol, the least potent of the three. All of the Estrogens listed in this section will produce equal effects and side effects when their doses are equal, taking their various potencies into account. More potent medicines require a smaller dose to produce the same effect. E-2 is the most prevalent estrogen produced by the ovaries prior to menopause.

      Estrogens should not be used during pregnancy to prevent a possible miscarriage; they don't work for this purpose and are danoerous to the fetus.

      Estrogens are natural body substances with specific effects on the human body, including growth and maintenance of the female reproductive system and all female sex characteristics. They promote growth and development of all parts of the reproductive system and breasts; the affect the release of hormones from the pituitary (master) gland that controls the opening of the capillaries (the smallest blood vessels); they can cause fluid retention; they affect protein breakdown in the body; they prevent ovulation and breast engorgement in women after giving birth; and they continue in the shaping and maintenance of the skeleton through their influence on calcium in the body.

      The differences between the various products lie in the specific estrogenic substances they contain. Their dose, and, in some cases, the fact that they affect one part of the body more than another. For the most part, however, estrogen products are interchangeable, as long as differences in dosage are taken into account.

      Cautions and Warnings:
      Estrogens have been reported to increase the risk of endometrial cancer in postmenopausal women taking them for prolonged periods of time by a factor of 4.5 to 14 times; the risk tends to depend upon the duration of treatment and the dose of the Estrogen being taken. When long-term estrogen therapy is indicated for the treatment of menopausal symptoms, the lowest effective dose should be used. Low-dose estrogens taken in a cyclic fashion (the way you take birth control pills) can reduce their risks. If you have to take an estrogen for an extended period of time, you should see your doctor at least twice a year for an assessment of your current condition and your need to continue the drug therapy.

      Postmenopausal women taking estrogens have a 2 to 3 times greater chance of developing gall-bladder disease. If you are taking an estrogen product and experience recurrent, abnormal, or persistent vaginal bleeding, contact your doctor immediately. If you have active thrombophlebitis or any other disorder associated with the formation of blood clots, you probably should not take this drug. If you feel that you have a disorder associated with blood clots, and you are taking an estrogen or a similar product, contact your doctor immediately.

      Estrogens have been used to treat painful breast engorgement with milk that sometimes develops after giving birth. This condition usually responds to pain relievers and other treatments, and their use in this situation should be weighed against the possible embolism problem that is associited with large single estrogen doses.

      Animal studies have shown that prolonged continuous administration of estrogen substances can increase the frequency of cancer (breast, cervix, vagina, kidney, and liver) in these animals, and there is evidence that these drugs may increase the risk of various cancers in humans. They shound be taken with caution by women with a strong family history of breast cancer and by those who have breast nodules fibrorystic disease of the breast, or abnormal mammograms.

      It is possible that women taking Estrogens for extended periods of time may experience some of the same long-term side effects as women who have taken oral contraceptives for extended periods of time. These long-term problems may include the development of blood-clotting disorders, liver cancer or other liver tumors, high blood pressure, glucose intolerance (symptoms similar to diabetes) or worsening of the disease in diabetic patients, unusual sensitivity to the sun, and high blood levels of calcium.

      Vaginal estrogen creams may stimulate bleeding of the uterus. They can also cause breast tenderness. Vaginal discharge, and withdrawal bleeding (if the product is suddenly stopped). Women with endometriosis may experience heavy vaginsl bleeding.

      Pregnancy/Breast-feeding:
      Estrogen products should never be used during pregnancy*. If used during the earlier stages of pregnancy, estrogens can seriously damage a developing fetus. Estrogens may reduce the flow of breast milk. The effects of estrogens on nursing infants are not predictable. Either avoid the drug while breast-feeding or bottle-feed your baby.

      *Addendum submitted by Katy Giller, R.N.: According to Briggs, Freeman and Yaffe, authors of "Drugs in Lactation", 1993, estrogens are compatible with breastfeeding. While it is, of course, better to avoid them while breastfeeding, the benefits of breastfeeding far outweigh the risks. In addition, the risks involved with feeding formula, a "chemical soup", to a baby are greater than breastfeeding when the mother is taking estrogen.

      Seniors:
      Estrogens may be taken without special precaution by most seniors, but the risk of some side effects increases with age, especially if you smoke.

      Possible Side Effects:
      The most common side effects include enlargement or tenderness of the breasts (both sexes), swelling of the ankles and legs, loss of appetite, weight changes, retention of water, nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramps, and feeling of bloatedness. The estrogen patch can cause skin rash, irritation, and redness at the patch site.

      Less common side effects are bleeding gums, breakthrough vaginal bleeding, vaginal spotting, changes in menstrual flow, painful menstruation. pre-menstrual syndrome, no menstrual period during and after estrogen use, enlargement of uterine fibroids, vaginal infection with Candida, a cystitis-like syndrome, mild diarrhea, jaundice or yellowing of the skin or whites of the eyes, rash, loss of scalp hair, and development of new hairy areas. Lesions of the eye and contact-lens intolerance have also been associated with estrogen therapy. You may experience migraine headache, mild dizziness, depression, and increased sex drive (women) or decreased sex drive (men).

      Rare side effects include stroke, blood-clot formation, dribbling or sudden passage of urine, loss of coordination, chest pains, leg pains, difficulty breathing, slurred speech, and vision changes. Men who receive large estrogen doses as part of the treatment for prostate cancer are at a greater risk for heart attack, phlebitis, and blood clots in the lungs.

      Drug Interactions:
      Phenytoin, Ethotoin, and Mephenytoin may interfere with estrogen effects. Estrogens may reduce your requirement for oral anticoagulant (blood-thinning) drugs, an adjustment your doctor can make after a simple blood test.

      Estrogens increase the amount of calcium absorbed from the stomach. This interaction is used to help women with osteoporosis to increase their calcium levels.

      Estrogens may increase the side effects of antidepressants and phenothiazine tranquilizers. Low estrogen doses may increase phenothiazine effectiveness.

      Estrogens may increase the amount of Cyclosporine and adrenal corticosteroid drugs in your blood. Dosage adjustments of the non-estrogen drugs may be needed.

      Estrogen increases the toxic effects of other drugs on the liver, especially in women over 35 and people with preexisting liver disease.

      Rifampin, barbiturates, and other drugs that stimulate the liver to break down drugs may reduce the amount of estrogen in the blood.

      Estrogens may interfere with the actions of Tamoxifen and Bromocriptine.

      Women, especially those over 35, who smoke cigarettes and take an Estrogen have a much greater chance of developing stroke, hardening of the arteries, or blood clots in the lungs. The risk increases as age and tobacco use increase.

      Estrogens interfere with many diagnostic tests. Make sure your doctor knows that you are taking an estrogen before doing any blood tests or other diagnostic procedures.

  26. QUESTION:
    why are my periods like this?
    im 16 now and i had my first period a few months before i was 14 and that was a normal period but since then i will miss about 4-6 months of them. Sometimes they come randomly but ive only ever had about 5 in my life. i weigh 136lbs and im 5ft 7. I went to the doctors last year and they said theres no rush to get them back. But when i was 15 i was on my period for 3 and a half weeks so i went to the doctors and they put me on the pill, im off it now but they are still not right. i havent been on for 7 months now. Any sugestions?

    • ANSWER:
      Abnormal/Irregular Bleeding

      A normal menstrual period lasts from 2 to 7 days. The normal cycle patterns can range from 21 to 35 days. When bleeding occurs that is not part of the regular cycle; periods are longer or heavier than normal; occurs between periods; time between periods is longer than normal; or there is an absence of periods, this is called abnormal or irregular uterine bleeding. There are various causes of abnormal bleeding, but the most common is a hormone imbalance. At both ends of the menstrual life of a woman, periods may be irregular. Reasons for abnormal periods can be both normal and abnormal. The most normal reason is pregnancy. Hormone imbalance (not enough or too much of certain hormones) can also be a common reason. This can occur as a result of weight loss or gain; heavy exercise; stress; illness; or certain medications. The most common result of a hormone imbalance is loss of ovulation. If this occurs over a long period of time, a condition called endometrial hyperplasia can occur. Endometrial hyperplasia is the result of constant estrogen bombardment of the endometrium (the lining of the uterus shed every month with your period). Untreated, endometrial hyperplasia (when the lining of the uterus becomes too thick) can sometimes turn into cancer.
      There are many reasons for abnormal/irregular periods. The chart below will list the most common reasons, their cause, other symptoms that may occur, diagnostic methods and treatment options. Remember, this is not a replacement for the advice of your care giver, but rather information to help you become aware of your body.

      Irregular/Abnormal Bleeding CONDITION CAUSE OTHER SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS TREATMENT OPTIONS
      Polycystic ovary disease (syndrome) No ovulation Irregular bleeding, irregular periods, infertility, acne , excessive hair growth Made with examination and lab tests to check hormone levels Birth control pills, progesterone supplementation every three months; infertility drugs when pregnancy desired
      Pregnancy Can be normal; as a result of miscarriage or ectopic (tubal) pregnancy May have right or left lower abdominal pain; cramping Pregnancy test, sonogram If normal – observe; miscarriage may need a D&C; ectopic is a medical emergency and needs IMMEDIATE Surgery
      Infections of the uterus or cervix Some Sexually transmitted diseases Pain with period, foul smelling discharge, greenish to green-yellow discharge Exam, cultures, other specific blood test Appropriate for the STD
      IUD Irritation of the lining of the uterus. The uterus can’t stop bleeding after a period Cramping, heavy clotting If periods were normal before the IUD was placed, you may need to have it removed. If they return to normal after removal, the IUD was the cause Remove the IUD
      Birth Control Pills Missed pills, newly starting the pill, improper hormone mixture for YOUR body Brown staining to bright red bleeding in the middle of the cycle; heavy to no periods Missed pills are obvious; your doctor can make the diagnosis based on the description of what your periods are like compared to before starting the pill Wait for 2-3 months after starting a new pill; change pills
      Uterine fibroids Growths of smooth muscle non-cancerous tumors in the uterine muscle. These are more common in black women, but are not uncommon in white women. They are very uncommon in Oriental women Heavy periods, bleeding between cycles, problems with kidneys, increasing abdominal girth, pressure feelings in the lower abdomen, infertility Exam, sonogram, possibly MRI Dependant on the size and symptoms a myomectomy, rather than a hysterectomy, can be done. This removes the fibroids and rebuilds the uterus
      Blood clotting problems Von Willebrand’s Disease, Factor abnormalities, hemophilia Heavy periods; long periods lasting more than 10 days; clotting Exam, family history, appropriate blood test Treatment based on the disease
      Cancer of the uterus, cervix or vagina Cancer can cause abnormal bleeding cause normal tissues are not present Heavy bleeding, bleeding with intercourse, bleeding between periods Exam, biopsy, D&C, other testing specific for the cancer looked for Surgery specific to the cancer found
      Genetic abnormality in anatomy Abnormal development of the organs No periods, heavy periods Exam, sonogram, hysterosalpingogram (putting dye in the uterus to look at the anatomy of the uterus and tubes) Surgery if needed to nothing

  27. QUESTION:
    Dull aching pain in lower back, groin, and down to knees?
    I have pain in my lower left and right side of my back, and straight thru to my lower abdomen/groin. This pain travels down to my knees, front and inner thigh. This has been going on for a few days now, and i've had this in the past which was accompanied by a fever. This whole process lasted about a week or two. Now it's happening again. It f'n hurts. I was hospitalized for this in the past and they said it has something to do with during ovulation an egg bursting or something like that. What can be done about that if that's really the case? What can i do to prevent going back there if this is happening again? Or could it be something else?

    • ANSWER:
      See your health care provider as soon as possible (neurologist or gynecologist). There are many problems dealing with your symptoms. Here is two or more causes:

      Pain due to muscular strain is usually confined to the back. Occasionally it may extend into the buttocks or upper leg. Pain that extends down the leg to below the knee is called sciatica, and suggests pressure on the nerves as they leave the spinal cord. Sciatica often responds to home treatment, but the following symptoms mean that immediate help from a doctor may be required:

      Loss of bladder or bowel control
      Weakness in the leg

      Heat applied to the affected area will provide some relief. You may take acetaminophen, aspirin, ibuprofen, or naproxen as long as you feel significant pain.

      This may not be your case. A blood test called CA-125 is being used to monitor the treatment of women with ovarian cancer and to check for recurrence. The test is very sensitive but not specific: It can detect ovarian cancer, but it also can turn up positive in the presence of other conditions, including pregnancy, endometriosis, uterine fibroids, and pelvic inflammatory disease. For that reason, many physicians do not use CA-125 as a screening test for ovarian cancer unless a women is a high risk because of family history. Such a women should have a CA-125 blood test annually and should discuss with her physician the suitability of having an annual transvaginal ultrasound examination of the ovaries. In a few years the results of a major cancer screening trial may very well provide better answers as to just how effective the CA-125 test is at detecting ovarian cancer in all women.
      I hope this helps you. And good luck.

  28. QUESTION:
    Pap Smear question!... :( ?
    Okay girls. I'm 16 and my Mom says I need to get a Pap Smear. I had sex a handful of times LAST YEAR, some protected, some unprotected. It was with the same guy everytime. My ex boyfriend. I moved, so I'm not having sex now. Anyway, I'm honestly REALLY scared to get a pap smear, I don't know why? Anyway, how far in do they stick the "swab" thing? Is it painful? :(
    I know I sound immature but I'm really scared about it. XD
    Please tell me about pap smears.

    Thanks..
    :O wow, someone likes giving thumbs downs.
    Thanks for the answers, guys...
    I'm a little less worried. >_>

    • ANSWER:
      You don't sound immature at all.. don't worry :)

      Basically, A Pap smear is a test your doctor does to check for signs of cancer of the cervix. The cervix is part of your uterus (womb). During a Pap smear, your doctor takes a sample of cells from your cervix to be tested and examined.
      To take the sample, your doctor will put a special instrument called a speculum into your vagina. This helps open your vagina so the sample can be taken. Your doctor will gently clean your cervix with a cotton swab and then collect a sample of cells with a small brush, a tiny spatula or a cotton swab. This sample is put on a glass slide and sent to a lab to be checked under a microscope.

      Once you're sexually active, you should have a pap once a year. It will just determine if things are working properly down there. I don't know exactly how far in they stick the swab, but it might hurt a little like a pinch. It will be over before you know it and once you get the first one out of the way, it will be a breeze from here on out.

      Don't worry.. no one really looks forward to this.. I'm 15.. I had one last year.. I was just as nervous as you are now... everyone is....

      I'll be honest with you... it's not comfortable... (but really? why would it be when someone is checking that out?) .. there are points where it might hurt.. but very little... afterward.. you might feel a little weird down there... like a little sore from when you were being examined but don't worry.. it goes away after a couple of hours... so don't worry :)

      Don't be scared. It is not painful at all - just uncomfortable

      The swab goes up as far as your cervix - so what I'm trying to say, it depends on the length of your vagina.

      Pap smears are important - they detect any abnormalities ie cancer etc.

      Have one - get used to it - you will need to have one at least 1 x per year
      They make you change out of your clothes into some paper thing so they have easy access..

      Some women like to talk to the doctor while being examined, others like to stare at the ceiling (there are often pictures up there for that purpose). A nurse should be present while you are being examined. Some doctors will explain what is happening if they know this is your first exam. My nurse put a little camera on mine.. and it went on some big screen ( like a tv) ... she would look up at that to see where else to look.. as her guide.
      Pap smears should not hurt, at least much. Don't let the stories you hear scare you. At worst (like right before or after your period), it's a quick pinch and it's over with - no long term pain unless there is a major problem. A dentist visit is far more painful.

      The worst part is that we are taught as kids that our genitals are private, so the exam is embarrassing. Just remember, the doctor sees these parts every day, he/she is not getting turned on, and he/she knows you are uncomfortable (stirrups are kind of weird the first time, my wife says).

      The doctor should let you know he/she is going to touch you before he/she touches you. You will probably get a palpitation exam of the uterus and ovaries (doc will insert one finger into you and press another hand on your lower abdoman to feel the size and shape of the organs - irregular periods may be due to ovarian cysts or uterine fibroids).

      Just try to remain calm and relaxed. It's a medical exam. There's a doctor and a nurse, and millions of women do it everyday.

      In a way, women are the braver gender, a prostate exam for men is no less embarrassing (drop your pants, bend over, doctor sticks his finger up your anus to feel the prostate) but far fewer men will get them even when they need one.

      Advice.. just close your eyes and relax.. most likely since your pretty young (like me) ... they will get some very nice lady like I did.. :) they will talk to you... tell you not to be nervous.. and since it's your first time.. they will explain everything they are doing... :)

      Also, take a nice good shower.. so you won't have any funky odors smelling.. and also.. wear clean underwear. :)

      Hint: Wear a pair of flip flops or something that will not make your feet stink (not flats, they tend to stink your feet up)... they will make you take your shoes off.. so you can put your feet up while laying down.. (that was an embarrassing moment for me.. :P

      You will have to put your feet up on this thing here.....
      so that they can have easy access..

      http://zeldalily.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/04/gyno.jpg

      and another view of it....

      http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1087/776769895_2129b6abfc.jpg

      Good luck!! :)

do uterine fibroids turn into cancer

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