Can Simple Ovarian Cysts Be Cancerous

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Ladies, if you had an ovarian cyst and it was growing, would you opt for surgery (laproscopic) or leave it?
    Ultrasound shows a "simple" cyst. (not likely cancerous)
    alone? It really doesn't hurt me much - just a little achy at times.
    I have concerns about anesthesia.
    Thanks everyone who answers.

    • ANSWER:
      I did opt for surgury. There is no way of telling if the cyst is benign or malignant or if the cells are beginnng to change. It isn't really safe to leave this in your body. The only way a biopsy can be done is to have it removed.

  2. QUESTION:
    How to treat an ovarian cyst?
    I just found out I have a little ovarian cyst. I've already been in pain for two weeks. I can't take anymore. What's gonna happen?? Supposebly they go away on their own, how long till it goes awayy? Help

    • ANSWER:
      Hi,
      You can't depend on symptoms alone to tell you if you have an ovarian cyst. In fact, you'll likely have no symptoms at all. Or if you do, the symptoms may be similar to those of other conditions, such as endometriosis, pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy or ovarian cancer. Even appendicitis and diverticulitis can produce signs and symptoms that mimic a ruptured ovarian cyst.

      Still, it's important to be watchful of any symptoms or changes in your body and to know which symptoms are serious. If you have an ovarian cyst, you may experience one or more of the following signs and symptoms:

      ■Menstrual irregularities
      ■Pelvic pain — a constant or intermittent dull ache that may radiate to your lower back and thighs
      ■Pelvic pain shortly before your period begins or just before it ends
      ■Pelvic pain during intercourse (dyspareunia)
      ■Pain during bowel movements or pressure on your bowels
      ■Nausea, vomiting or breast tenderness similar to that experienced during pregnancy
      ■Fullness or heaviness in your abdomen
      ■Pressure on your rectum or bladder — difficulty emptying your bladder completely
      When to see a doctor
      Seek immediate medical attention if you have:

      ■Sudden, severe abdominal or pelvic pain
      ■Pain accompanied by fever or vomiting
      These signs and symptoms — or those of shock, such as cold, clammy skin, rapid breathing, and lightheadedness or weakness — indicate an emergency and mean that you need to see a doctor right away.
      Treatment depends on your age, the type and size of your cyst, and your symptoms. Your doctor may suggest:

      ■Watchful waiting. You can wait and be re-examined in one to three months if you're in your reproductive years, you have no symptoms and an ultrasound shows you have a simple, fluid-filled cyst. Your doctor will likely recommend that you get follow-up pelvic ultrasounds at periodic intervals to see if your cyst has changed in size.

      Watchful waiting, including regular monitoring with ultrasound, is also a common treatment option recommended for postmenopausal women if a cyst is filled with fluid and is less than 2 centimeters in diameter.

      ■Birth control pills. Your doctor may recommend birth control pills to reduce the chance of new cysts developing in future menstrual cycles. Oral contraceptives offer the added benefit of significantly reducing your risk of ovarian cancer — the risk decreases the longer you take birth control pills.
      ■Surgery. Your doctor may suggest removal of a cyst if it is large, doesn't look like a functional cyst, is growing or persists through two or three menstrual cycles. Cysts that cause pain or other symptoms may be removed.

      Some cysts can be removed without removing the ovary in a procedure known as a cystectomy. Your doctor may also suggest removing the affected ovary and leaving the other intact in a procedure known as oophorectomy. Both procedures may allow you to maintain your fertility if you're still in your childbearing years. Leaving at least one ovary intact also has the benefit of maintaining a source of estrogen production.

      If a cystic mass is cancerous, however, your doctor will advise a hysterectomy to remove both ovaries and your uterus. After menopause, the risk of a newly found cystic ovarian mass being cancerous increases. As a result, doctors more commonly recommend surgery when a cystic mass develops on the ovaries after menopause.

  3. QUESTION:
    how reliable is ovarian cance that is being detected when you have a CT scan and ultrsound?
    I other words can ovarian cancer be tetected on the CT scan and ultrasound? I heard it is hard to diagnose. Can it come up a cyst? Becasue I have unulual fluid in my right ovarie, and needs further tests. Now I just want to know can cysts show up on the scan that could be cancer? They said a small amount of non specific free fluid was seen in the Pouch of Douglas. So my right overie is bigger than my left one. Please help me here. I have an appointment to go back to the doctors on Thursday next week, and a gyni appointment next month. I have PMT cramps everyday, and indigestion, and bloated so bad, and lower back pain. So are these scans reliable to pick up ovarian cancer? If not can they just show up some abnormality like a cyst?

    • ANSWER:
      The CT and the ultrasound show abnormalities in the ovaries and the areas around.
      Sometimes the results are very clear: 'It's a cyst and don't worry about it, but we should remove it.' Or: 'This really looks like cancer, we need to remove it and make sure."

      Sometimes the results show cysts and masses that aren't that easy to define-they are more complex than just a simple cyst, they have other features, They look like they could be cancer, but not for sure, they are more dense, less dense, too big, too small to be easily classified. In those cases they will want to do more testing.

      It the radiologist who reads the films thinks that something looks cancerous he/she will ususally add line in that says something like "suspicious for malignancy.' That is a tip-off to worry, for sure.

      My understanding of ovarian cancer is that it is hard to detect in its early stages because it doesn't cause a lot of symptoms. But it is not particularly hard to diagnose once the doctor starts looking for it.

      So, I'm just a nurse, not a ovarian cancer expert, but here's my advice:
      If your doctor has looked at your CT and ultrasound and doesn't think that you have cancer, then a return visit next week and a gyn visit next month is fine. But if he is suspicious about cancer, then that is wayyyyy to slow. Why don't you give him a call and ask his opinion about the films? Its not reasonable to have to wait a week, wondering.

      And even if your doctor thinks it is just cysts and stuff, you can call the gyn office and explain that you are having so many problems and such pain. Perhaps they can get you in earlier.

      Good luck to you. I really hope it turns out to be something easily treated.

      MM

  4. QUESTION:
    Does a pap smear test for cancerous cells as well as STIs?
    I had my first pap smear a few months ago, that came back totally clear. I've forgotten though, do they test for cancerous cells as well? Or is that a seperate test?

    • ANSWER:
      Most women are uneducated when it comes to a pap smear. They think it covers all aspects of everything. They do test for cancer cells in your cervix ,but not for ovarian.If you are concerened about ovarian cancer then you should ask your Gynecologist to do a CA 125 test and a vaginal ultrasound. I recently had a pap smear that came back clear but ,I had an ultrasound that revealed a cyst on one of my ovaries.It's always best to have the doctor do ALL the necessary tests.Women are not eductaed on types of cancer like ovarian.We think a pap smear does it all.Women can get canceres that are NOT detected by a simple pap smear.Good Luck.

  5. QUESTION:
    I have a 6cm Ovarian Cyst. Should I surgery to remove it?
    I am 55 and have a 6cm ovarian cyst found on a ct scan. I never had any symptoms and the ct scan was done just because my gastroenterologist recommended it. I then went for an ultrasound which showed that it was a simple cyst(not appearing cancerous). My gyn recommended surgery to remove it. Is this my only option? Is it wise to just let it remain there?

    • ANSWER:
      Are you menopausal? If so, I'd get it removed. I'd be scared it was cancerous because cysts are quite unusual in menopausal women, and any cyst larger than about 3cm is suspicious as being something other than a simple benign cyst. But FIRST: I'd go see a gynecologic-oncologist. Gynecologists know pretty much nothing about ovarian cancer. They MAY have seen it one time in their entire career. But a gynecologic-oncologist sees ovarian cancer every day, and he/she can take a look at your cyst and speak with much more authority about whether it truly looks safe and it's Ok to leave it there, or if it's worth the risks and unpleasantness of surgery to remove it. Docs by no means recommend that every little cyst get removed. Most are harmless and go away on their own. But your cyst has 2 red flags: your age and its size. But a gyn onc will be the one to make the best determination. Also: many women with ovarian cancer have no symptoms, especially in the early stages, so it is kind of meaningless that you have not had any symptoms. Ovarian cancer is just so dire if it has spread, and so treatable if found early, that it seems you should move on this. There's not a huge downside to having the surgery. You can just get one ovary removed, so if you're not menopausal, you still won't be.

  6. QUESTION:
    im barely 15 years old and i have been diagnosed with an ovarian cyst?
    im real scared. altough the pain had been gone for two days i feel its coming back.

    • ANSWER:
      Are you seeing a doctor? Its important to know what type of cysts you have that way you can get proper treatment for it.

      Every woman after puberty gets them. Every gynecologist feels them. Thankfully, most of them don't really matter at all. You can suugest to your parents and doctors going on a birth control pill. Cysts can be melted away usually with the temporary use of birth control pills.The pill works by suppressing ovulation and therefore the cysts that may develop from it.

      Pre-cancerous cysts don't go away with birth control pills, so a failure here may indicate that there's something more dangerous than a functional cyst. This is when gynecologists start discussing laparoscopy to either make a diagnosis or to shell it out, saving the ovary it's in if possible. A test called "CA-125" is a blood test that could raise the index of suspicion if abnormal. And ultrasound is helpful to indicate whether the cyst is a simple sack (encouraging) or complex (worrisome).

      Family history also plays a part in how aggressive a doctor may be. If a patient's mother or sister had cancer of the ovary, we worry over any cyst, resolved to prove it functional or not. A family history is when things start to get a little creepy, because one out of seventy women will get ovarian cancer; but if a mother had it, a daughter's chances are anywhere between one in twelve to one in twenty. If two close members of her family have it, the chances can get as ridiculously high as one in two! No wonder we worry.

  7. QUESTION:
    what is a cystic lestion in the left adnexa of my ovary mean?
    Please only medical professionals. Thank you. Could it be ovarian cancer? Thanx

    • ANSWER:
      It means you have a cyst. Cysts are not usually cancerous. They can be fluid filled or solid. Simple, complex or dermoid. Most simple cysts will disappear on their own, and doctors will take a wait and see attitude with confirming ultrasounds every few months. Only cysts over 5 cm, ones that cause pain, are twisted or complex are of concern. And by concern that does not mean possible cancer.

  8. QUESTION:
    How effective are birth control pills?
    Is pregnancy impossible when the pill and condom are combined?

    • ANSWER:
      What is The Pill?

      “The Pill” is the common name for oral contraception. Combination pills are made of hormones like those made by a woman’s ovaries — estrogen and progestin.
      How Does the Pill Work?

      Combination pills prevent pregnancy in at least three ways:

      * by suppressing ovulation
      * thickening cervical mucus prohibiting the sperm from entering the uterus
      * thinning the lining of the uterus causing it to be unsuitable for a fertilized egg

      How Effective is The Pill?

      Perfect use failure rate in first year: 1%
      Typical use failure rate in first year: 5-8%
      Advantages of The Pill

      * nothing to put in place before intercourse
      * periods become more regular and lighter
      * decreases menstrual cramping, acne, iron deficiency anemia, premenstrual tension, menstrual flow and endometriosis
      * may protect against ovarian and endometrial cancers, pelvic inflammatory disease, non-cancerous growths of the breast, ovarian cysts, and osteoporosis (thinning of the bones)
      * fewer tubal pregnancies
      * simple and convenient
      * pills are relatively inexpensive
      * protects fertility

      Disadvantages of The Pill

      * must be taken correctly and consistently to be fully effective
      * does not protect against sexually transmitted infections
      * must take a pill everyday
      * possible side effects include spotting in between periods, breast tenderness, mood changes, breast enlargement, mild headaches, and decreased libido (not everyone experiences all or any of these possible side effects)

      Who Should Take The Pill?

      * women who can take a pill everyday
      * women who prefer not to get a shot, such as Depo-Provera
      * women that would like to become pregnant in the near future, but not right now

      There are many benefits of taking the pill. The following are some reasons why a woman would take the pill:

      * to regulate periods
      * to decrease menstrual problems (like cramping, heavy flow, irregular cycles)
      * to decrease acne

      Who Should not Take The Pill?

      There are certain medical conditions that should be monitored while taking the pill. They may also be indicators that a woman should not take the pill. These medical conditions include women who:

      * smoke and are 35 or older
      * have high blood pressure
      * have had blood clots in the leg or lung
      * have unexplained bleeding from the vagina
      * have had an abnormal growth or cancer of the breast or uterus
      * have very high cholesterol levels
      * have a severe liver disease or have had growths of the liver
      * think they might be pregnant

  9. QUESTION:
    What to expect with Ovarian Cyst?
    I just went to a family practice Dr. (not my normal OB/GYN) for what I thought was a bladder infection. Turns out I have an ovarian cyst on my right ovary. I am going in for an unltra-sound on Wednesday. Has anyone ever had a cyst on their ovaries? What should I expect as far as care/treatment? What are the chances it is cancerous? A bit worried about the future and confused as to what to expect, any info you have to offer is greatly appreciated.
    I had an ultra-sound today, the cyst is an inch in diameter and fluid filled. They called it a simple cyst.

    • ANSWER:
      I have had a number of bilateral ovarian cysts (which included functional (simple cysts) and hemorrhagic and endometrioma cysts (complex cysts)) over the past 10 years. I have only needed surgery for 2 of these cysts because they didn't resolve after a few cycles (as they usually do resolve after a few cycles on their own).

      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman's childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain - constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that you discuss your options with your doctor/OB/Gyn and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I'm currently using birth control pills to treat and try to prevent my ovarian cysts from recurring, however I have a simple cyst that is 3.2cm at the moment, meaning that the birth control pills does not always help to stop cysts from coming back.

      If you have any other questions, you can email me - the link to my email is in my profile. I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  10. QUESTION:
    What is an ovarian sectated cyst and is it cancerous?

    • ANSWER:
      "Septated" means that the cyst is divided into segments. The significance of this is partly in how thick the walls ("septa") are between the parts. A thicker wall is thought to be a higher risk of being malignant, as is a complex cyst (which has solid and non-solid areas in it). Usually when there is a simple cyst, another ultrasound will be done in month, whereas with a complex one they would remove it and evaluate it for ovarian cancer. It sounds like in your case, not knowing which it is, the recommendation is to split the difference

  11. QUESTION:
    When a COMPLEX ovarian cyst ruptures, does the fluid from the sac cause any harm ?
    From the answers I recieved for my previous question, I learned that if the cyst ruptures, it does not cause infertility but causes a lot of pain. But i forgot to mention that the cyst that I have is a complex one as found from ultrasound. So, PLEASE give me more information.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi again. That does change things a bit, doesn't it? A complex ovarian cyst needs to be evaluated further. A small percentage of these can be cancerous.

      "Sometimes cysts are complex, either containing partly fluid elements and partly solid elements or having septations (walls) within a fluid-filled cyst. In general, complex cysts are evaluated further, as some complex cysts may be cancerous. Depending on exactly how the cyst looks on ultrasound, your doctor may recommend blood work, a CT or MRI scan to get a better look at the cyst, or even surgery to remove the cyst. Many times a complex cyst can be evaluated via laparoscopy, but sometimes a large abdominal incision is required." http://health.ivillage.com/gyno/cysts/0,,4ltl,00.html

      "With a complex one they would remove it and evaluate it for ovarian cancer." http://www.baymoon.com/~gyncancer/library/blqa32septcyst.htm
      If it was my body, since the cyst is not a simple cyst, I would have it removed. If it were truly a simple cyst, with NO malignant characteristics on ultrasound, I would leave it and see if it remedied itself. But, it sounds like there are no guarantees that this mass is benign. So, in my opinion, it does not matter if it ruptures or not. A cancer is a cancer, and I would not like to have that uncertainty in my body.

  12. QUESTION:
    Hi everyone, I placed this question in the womens section and I will have to ask this question regarding my?
    right ovary. on the 28th of last moth I got an ultrasound and it showed 2 septated ovarian cysts and fluid in the pouch of Doglous, and last Monday I bleed soooooo much when it was not my period I almost hemeraged. No the cysts did not burst becasue I was told I would be in a lot more pain than I was. Now today I had another ultrasound internally and it showed fluid still in my right ovary and the septated cyts have gone and now there is fluid in my pelvis for the first time, and it shoed a simple cysts or a follicle. What the? I cannot understand this. 3 weeks ago it was a sus septated cysts not it has gone and now shows a differnet cyst wtih fluid in my pelivs as well as the ovary. Is it possible that ovarian cancer is hard to detect and that will wlll show free range fluid but things that look like a cysts. I mean to go from a spetated one to a simple one ar possilbe follicle has me confused.What is this? Will I need a biopsy? Is it possible that it is cancerous and the fluid has
    from the ovary to the pelvis?I had a ca125 done about 3 weeks ago and it showed cancer antigen in my body of 21. Will I need an MRI? Please help. I am 38
    from the ovary to the pelvis?I had a ca125 done about 3 weeks ago and it showed cancer antigen in my body of 21. Will I need an MRI? Please help. I am 38

    • ANSWER:
      The normal values for a CA-125 depend on the lab running the test. In general, levels above 35 U/ml are considered abnormal.
      In pre-menopausal women, the test is less reliable as values are often elevated due to a number of non-cancerous causes, and a value above 35 is not necessarily a cause for concern.
      Polycystic ovary syndrome is characterized by mild obesity, irregular menses or amenorrhea, and signs of androgen excess (hirsutism, acne). Typically, the ovaries contain multiple cysts. Diagnosis is by pregnancy testing, hormone level measurement, and imaging to exclude a virilizing tumor. Treatment is symptomatic.
      Complications of PCOS:-
      * Sterility
      * Obesity-related conditions, like high blood pressure and diabetes
      * Increased the risk of endometrial cancer -- this is because the endometrium (lining of the uterine wall that sheds when you menstruate) can get thicker and thicker (hyperplasia) due to the lack of ovulation
      * Possible increased risk of breast cancer
      Please see the web pages for more details on Cancer Antigen-125 and Polycystic ovary syndrome.

  13. QUESTION:
    can a cyst be dangerous if not treated in time?
    if a cyst is not taken care of after a period of time, can the cyst be cancerous

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease or cancer related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman's childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain - constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that if you think you have an ovarian cyst that you consult with your doctor/gyno about this and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 11 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn't anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  14. QUESTION:
    Is anybody familiar with ovarian cysts?
    I'm scheduling an appointment with the doctor, but in the meantime, I'd like to hear from some of you who have had this problem before. I'm not sure this is what's going on, but today is the twelfth day of my cycle, if it is counted since the day my period started, which would make me just a few days from ovulation. The problem is, I am having incredible pain on the left side, right next to my hip bone but inward a little bit. The pain reaches around to my lower back and aches down my left thigh. This doesn't happen every month, just every two or three, and always on the left side. My breasts are very tender as well. Are these symptoms consistent with what any of you have dealt with when it comes to ovarian cysts? Any and all help will be greatly appreciated. Also...what helps? Would an NSAID be better than, say, a percocet?

    • ANSWER:
      It's a good thing you are monitoring and tracking your periods. My best friend was diagnosed with uterine cysts, which are in the uterus instead of inside the ovaries. It can cause excessive (more than unusual bleeding--longer periods) there is frequent soreness and also painful sex. The best thing to do if the pain persists is to first get a pelvic exam from your gyn. Explain the issues you are having. Women are more likely to be misdiagnosed than men because there are many things going on in our bodies, and depending on your gyn--they have a tendency to think women are neurotic. On the other hand, if you are in tune with your body, you KNOW when somethings not right. If you feel you aren't getting the right treatment--get a second opinion. Have them do an ultrasound if the problem persists so they can find any cysts if there are any. These days there are many more options besides surgery, just know that with cysts, there is a chance they can return. You are doing a great job monitoring yourself, keep that up so you'll be armed with info when you see your doctor-If you're anything like me, I tend to forget or freeze up when it's my time to ask my gyn questions :)
      Just please understand that's it's important to get a second opinion and don't let doctors cut corners. For instance, my best friend's doctor was in a hurry and didn't do a simple pelvic exam, which would have shown she had pain in that area and that her uterus was swollen and enlarged. Cysts, which many women get, can get quite painful and grow larger--they also can grow cancerous. I do not want to scare you in any way, I just want you to understand in case you have a doctor who brushes off any pain with a little darvocet. Pain killers aid, but they don't cure. Best of luck to you! :)

  15. QUESTION:
    What is the best treatment for Poly Cyst in Overies?

    • ANSWER:
      Ovarian Cyst Definition
      An ovarian cyst is a fluid-filled sac that develops near the surface of the ovary. The ovaries are two small organs on each side of a woman's uterus that produce eggs and female hormones. Mostly an ovarian cyst is small and benign (not cancerous). However, the larger ovarian cyst can cause pain and other problems. A woman can develop one or many ovarian cysts.

      Ovarian Cyst Causes
      Structures called follicles normally grow in the ovaries each month. They produce hormones and release an egg during ovulation. In some cases, follicles may become cysts. There are two main types:

      Functional cyst – occurs when a normal monthly follicle does not mature properly and the egg is not released. These cysts often go away on their own within one to three menstrual cycles.
      Follicular cyst – can occur after an egg is released. These cysts usually go away on their own in a few weeks.

      Most ovarian cysts are functional cysts and only occur during childbearing years. Many other, less common types of benign cysts can also develop from ovarian tissue. For example, women with endometriosis may develop endometriomas. Endometriosis is a condition in which tissue from the uterine lining grows outside the uterus. Endometriomas are cysts that grow from the uterine tissue on an ovary.

      Polycystic ovary syndrome is also associated with cysts. Women with this condition have several small cysts in their ovaries.

      A very small percentage of women have cysts that are caused by cancer.

      Ovarian Cyst Risk Factors
      A risk factor is something that increases your chances of getting a disease or condition. The main risk factor for ovarian cyst is being a woman of childbearing age.

      Ovarian Cyst Symptoms
      Most ovarian cysts do not cause symptoms. When they do, pelvic pain and irregular menstrual bleeding are the two most common symptoms. Pain is usually caused by:

      Direct pressure from the cysts on the ovaries and surrounding structures. This causes chronic pelvic fullness or a dull ache.
      Bleeding from a cyst into and around the ovary. This causes more intense, sharp pain.

      Pain may come and go on a regular basis. Or, it may become more noticeable just before or after a period or during intercourse.

      Other symptoms may include:

      Urinary discomfort associated with bladder pressure or irritation
      Nausea
      Diarrhea

      In rare cases, an ovarian cyst may become twisted and cut off its own blood supply. This can cause severe abdominal pain, vomiting, and fever. This requires immediate medical attention.

      Ovarian Cyst Diagnosis
      The doctor will ask about your symptoms and medical history, and perform a pelvic exam. This includes feeling the ovaries. ovarian cysts are often found during routine pelvic exams when there are no symptoms.

      If a cyst is suspected or found on physical exam, the doctor may recommend a pelvic ultrasound. This is a test that uses sound waves to create images of the ovaries, from which the doctor can determine the type and size of the cyst, and if treatment is needed.

      Other tests or procedures may be used if a cyst:

      Does not go away after several menstrual cycles
      Gets larger and more painful
      Does not appear to be a simple functional cyst

      Other tests may include:

      Laparoscopy – A thin, lighted tube and other small instruments are inserted through several tiny incisions in the abdomen to look at the ovaries directly, drain fluid from a cyst, or take a sample for biopsy.
      Blood test for the protein CA-125 – This test is done when a cyst is suspected of being cancerous. CA-125 is sometimes elevated in the case of ovarian cancer.

      Ovarian Cyst Treatment
      Treatment depends on your age, menstrual status, the size and type of the cyst, and your symptoms. The main types of treatment are:

      Wait and See – This approach involves waiting a few months to see if the cyst goes away on its own.

      Birth Control Pills – If you have a functional cyst, your doctor may prescribe birth control pills to help make it smaller. If you get ovarian cyst often, birth control pills decrease the chance of new ones forming.

      Laparoscopic Surgery – Pelvic laparoscopy may be recommended to remove a cyst if it:

      Grows larger or reaches a size greater than two inches
      Has some solid material in it
      Causes persistent or worsening symptoms
      Lasts longer than two or three menstrual cycles

      If the cyst is not cancerous, often just the cyst can be removed. However, in some cases, your whole ovary may need to be removed. If the cyst is cancerous, you may have your ovary and uterus removed. This requires an open surgical procedure, rather than a laparoscopy.

      Ovarian Cyst Prevention
      Since ovarian cysts are common, and are usually painless and benign, doctors do not routinely recommend any preventive interventions. Women who have recurrent symptomatic cysts may benefit from birth control pills over the long term. The best way to catch cysts early is to:

      Tell your doctor about any changes in your monthly cycles or periods
      Have regular pelvic exams

  16. QUESTION:
    Are simple/follicular ovarian cysts always round like bubbles on a sonogram? If anyone had them please advice?
    I had a sonogram, transabdominal due to pain and discharge and they found a simple ovarian cyst in my left ovary. The doctor who was doing it was a radiologist and he said nothing to worry about its a simple cyst and very small 1.9 cm but when I saw the sonogram images it showed the cyst didnt look round. Why would that be? Also initially when he started the sonogram he said there is no cyst but then looked around and found it and said it could be missed because it is so small.

    Please I am very worried.

    • ANSWER:
      You have posted several times on here about this cyst and how worried you are.
      If you are so worried talk to your doctor again. No body on here knows better than your doctor. All we can give you are opinions.
      If you're doctor isn't worried, then you shouldn't be either. Why are you so worried? The doctor would notice if it was cancerous.

  17. QUESTION:
    Abnormal Complex Ovarian Cyst?
    Doc says my mom (43) has an Abnormal Complex Ovarian Cyst.

    What is this, where can I find more info, what will happen?

    • ANSWER:
      Abnormal ovarian cysts are very different from functional cysts since they have resulted from abnormal cell growth. However, that need not mean that they are all cancerous as most of them are simple benign growths. And none knows for sure what has caused them to grow. However, abnormal ovarian cysts that include cystadenoma cyst, dermoid cyst, endometrioma cyst or Chocolate cyst and 'polycystic ovarian cyst' are believed to occur due to imbalance of 'female hormones (estrogen and progesterone) and a multitude of other direct and indirect reasons. In many women, these cysts have remained all through their lives without the host being aware of their presence. But in some rare cases, they may burst, needing immediate surgical interference.

      Cystadenoma cysts

      These abnormal ovarian cysts develop from cells on the outer surface of the ovaries and can grow to a very large size. Mucinous Cystadenoma cysts take the form of biggest tumours in women often weighing approximately 328 lb or around 149 kg, These cysts reportedly occur at an early age and the cyst turned tumour happens to be unilateral and are often found attached to the ovary by a stem. As there is a rare chance of these cysts or tumours turning malignant, they may be classified historically and treated accordingly. Falling under the category of asymptomatic cysts, they may be found in the form of large abdominal mass during a routine check up of a person complaining abdominal pain and associated distressing condition.

      Dermoid cyst or teratomas

      As a fairly bizarre phenomenon, Dermoid cysts, clinically termed as 'cystic teratoma' are classed more as tumours than cysts. In fact, they are solid structures filled with pieces of bone, hair, teeth and skin, as well as hair follicles, pockets of blood, sebum and in some cases 'thyroid tissue'. Though they are normally benign, the rarely occurring malignant dermoid cyst usually develops as 'squamous cell carcinoma' in adults. Incidentally, a Pilonidal cyst often resembles dermoid cyst in several ways, the most significant resemblance concern the presence of Germ Cell Tumour. In case of any evasive surgery care must be taken so that there is no spillage while the opinion of an oncologist will be helpful.

      Periorbital Dermoid Cysts

      Even the kids are not spared of Dermoid cysts - often kids get them close to the eyebrow's lateral aspect and they feel like rubber. When the cysts are seen, medical practitioners sometimes keep them under observation and at other times they are surgically removed. However when they are meddled with, the cysts may lead to an inflammation. And even after treatment, the cyst may make a comeback, particularly if the entire growth has not been removed. But the problem is, the complete cyst can often be difficult to remove with surgery, particularly when it is a 'Dumbbell Configuration', in which, it needs to be cut along the suture line of the skull.

      Endometrial cysts or Chocolate cysts

      Endometriosis is a medical terminology that indicates a condition when the endometrium or the lining of the womb begins to grow in parts of the body other than the womb. These endometrial patches also forms on the ovaries, creating cysts popularly known as Chocolate cysts as they are invariably filled with chocolate coloured pre-stored blood. During the menstrual period every month, these endometrial patches of tissues that have been encapsulated in cyst will also bleed, but since there is no outlet for bleeding, the cyst go on getting larger in size and eventually may burst.

      Polycystic ovarian cyst

      Cysts forming from small egg follicles causing ovaries to get thickened and enlarged, often accompanied by hormonal imbalance in women are known as polycystic ovarian cyst that grow in numbers.

      Holistic approach as plausible cure

      Since OTC medications and prescription drugs can hardly solve the problem of abnormal ovarian cysts in your body and surgical removal of the cyst involves many factors that may not prove beneficial, a holistic approach towards a plausible cure seems to be the best answer. You need also to remember that the surgical removal of a cyst is not foolproof since a recurrence can never be ruled out.

      The holistic approach to the cure is more practical too as the cyst formation involves a multitude of factors starting from hormonal imbalance to psychological trauma. Besides, the holistic approach will add newer dimension towards the treatment that includes change of food habits, change of lifestyle and appropriate physical exercise, topics hitherto unheard of as right line of treatment for abnormal ovarian cysts.

  18. QUESTION:
    How does your body produce a Cist? and WHY does it?
    Explain please:) x

    • ANSWER:
      do you mean a cyst? a cyst is a closed sac of fluid, air, or semisolid material that forms on a body tissue (they can form externally on the skin or internally on organs), and must be removed surgically once formed. they can form almost anywhere; there are literally hundreds of different varieties.
      Most cysts are benign (non cancerous), but a few are signs of skin cancer, so if any new cysts form get them checked out asap.
      When a cyst forms on or in a duct or tube within the body it can disrupt normal function and will have to be removed (examples are ovarian cysts or vocal cord cysts).
      They can be caused by infection, tumors, genetic defects, chronic inflammatory conditions, or simple obstructions to fluid flow within the body.

  19. QUESTION:
    i want to know if septated cysts can lead to ovarian cancer?

    • ANSWER:
      Simple ovarian cysts are very rarely cancerous - various types of simple cysts are quite common during the childbearing years.

      "Septated" means that the cyst is divided into segments. The significance of this is partly in how thick the walls ("septa") are between the parts. A thicker wall is thought to be a higher risk of being malignant, as is a complex cyst (which has solid and non-solid areas in it). Usually when there is a simple cyst, another ultrasound will be done in month, whereas with a complex one they would remove it and evaluate it for ovarian cancer. It sounds like in your case, not knowing which it is, my recommendation would be to get it checked if u have one

  20. QUESTION:
    How can they tell?
    Hows can they tell the difference between a cyst and tumour on an ultrasound? What charaterstics do they have that differ from one another?

    • ANSWER:
      What is a cyst?

      A cyst is a closed sac- or bladder-like structure that is not a normal part of the tissue where it is found. Cysts are common and can occur anywhere in the body in persons of any age. Cysts usually contain a gaseous, liquid, or semisolid substance. Cysts vary in size; they may be detectable only under a microscope or they can grow so large that they displace normal organs and tissues. The outer wall of a cyst is called the capsule.
      What are the causes of a cyst?

      Cysts can arise through a variety of processes in the body, including:

      * "Wear and tear" or simple obstructions to the flow of fluid
      * Infections
      * Tumors
      * Chronic inflammatory conditions
      * Genetic (inherited) conditions
      * Defects in developing organs in the embryo

      What are the signs and symptoms of a cyst and how are they diagnosed?

      Sometimes you can feel a cyst yourself when you feel an abnormal "lump". For example, cysts of the skin or tissues beneath the skin are usually noticeable. Cysts in the mammary glands (breasts) also may be palpable (meaning that you can feel them when you examine the area with your fingers). Cysts of internal organs such as the kidneys or liver may not produce any symptoms or may not be detected by the affected individual. These cysts often are first discovered by imaging studies (x-ray, ultrasound, computerized tomography or CAT Scan, and magnetic resonance imaging or MRI).
      What are the types of cysts?

      There are hundreds of types of cysts that can arise in the body. Some of the more well-known types of cysts are:

      * Cysts in the breast which are part of benign proliferative ("fibrocystic") disease (fibrocystic breast disease)
      * Ovarian cysts
      * Cysts within the thyroid gland
      * Baker cyst (popliteal) behind the knee
      * Ganglion cysts of the joints and tendons
      * Cysts of the glands within the eyelid, termed chalazions
      * Sebaceous cysts of the small glands in the skin

      The majority of cysts are benign, but some may produce symptoms due to their size and/or location. Rarely, cysts can be associated with malignant tumors (cancers) or serious infections. If you're concerned about any abnormal swelling or "lump," talk to your doctor. He or she can recommend appropriate diagnostic tests to determine the cause of the cyst.
      What is the treatment for a cyst?

      The treatment for a cyst depends upon the cause of the cyst along with its location. Cysts that are very large and result in symptoms due to their size may be surgically removed. Sometimes the fluid contained within a cyst can be drained, or aspirated, by inserting a needle or catheter into the cyst cavity, resulting in collapse of the cyst. Radiologic imaging may be used for guidance in draining (aspirating) cyst contents if the cyst is not easily accessible.

      If there is any suspicion that a cyst is cancerous, the cyst is generally removed by surgery, or a biopsy is taken of the cyst wall (capsule) to rule out malignancy. In certain cases, aspirated fluid from a cyst is examined under a microscope to determine if cancer cells are present in the cyst.

      If a cyst arises as part of a chronic medical condition (for example, in polycystic ovary syndrome or fibrocystic breast disease), treatment is generally directed at the underlying medical condition.

      not sure what type of tumor you are referring to but if you go to www.webmd.com you can read more information on cysts and tumors. Hope this helps.

  21. QUESTION:
    Has anyone ever had a cyst on their ovaries? What are some of the symptoms?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, I have an ovarian cyst. Usually it only bothers me during and before my cycle, and when I move or twist certain ways.

      One burst a couple of months ago, and I experienced severe pain, but once it burst, it felt better (I went to the ER).

      Symptoms can be a pinching or cramping feeling, passing dry blood or "water" when it is not your time of the month.

      Sometimes they will do surgery for them. I don't want surgery because I'm on Coumadin, so I'm holding out as long as I can!

      Some are dangerous, and need medical attention...

      Here's some stuff you might find helpful:

      What symptoms are caused by ovarian cysts?

      Most cysts are never noticed and resolve without women ever realizing that they are there. When a cyst causes symptoms, pain in the belly or pelvis is by far the most common one. The pain can be caused from rupture of the cyst, rapid growth and stretching, bleeding into the cyst, or twisting of the cyst around its blood supply.

      How are ovarian cysts diagnosed?

      Most cysts are diagnosed by ultrasound, which is the best imaging technique for detecting ovarian cysts. Ultrasound is an imaging method that uses sound waves to produce an image of structures within the body. Ultrasound imaging is painless and causes no harm.

      Cysts can also be detected with other imaging methods, such as CAT scan or MRI scan (magnetic resonance imaging).

      How can the physician decide if an ovarian cyst is dangerous?

      If a woman is in her 40’s, or younger, and has regular menstrual periods, most ovarian masses are “functioning ovarian cysts,” which are not really abnormal. They are related to the process of ovulation that happens with the menstrual cycle. They usually disappear on their own during a future menstrual cycle. Therefore, especially in women in their 20’s and 30’s, these cysts are watched for a few menstrual cycles to verify that they disappear. Because oral contraceptives work in part by preventing ovulation, physicians will not really expect women who are taking oral contraceptives to have common “functioning ovarian cysts.” Thus, women who develop ovarian cysts while taking oral contraceptives may be advised against simple observation; rather, they may receive closer monitoring with pelvic ultrasound or, less commonly, surgical exploration of the ovary.

      Other factors are helpful in evaluating ovarian cysts (besides the woman's age, or whether she is taking oral contraceptives). A cyst that looks like it’s just one simple sac of fluid on the ultrasound is more likely to be benign, than a cyst with solid tissue in it. So the ultrasound appearance also plays a role in determining the level of suspicion regarding a serious ovarian growth.

      Ovarian cancer is rare in women younger than age 40. After age 40, an ovarian cyst has a higher chance of being cancerous than before age 40, although most ovarian cysts are benign even after age 40. CA-125 blood testing can be used as a marker of ovarian cancer, but it does not always represent cancer when it is abnormal. , First, many benign conditions in women of childbearing age can cause the CA-125 level to be elevated, so CA-125 is not a specific test, especially in younger women. Pelvic infections, uterine fibroids, pregnancy, benign (hemorrhagic) ovarian cysts, and liver disease are all conditions that may elevate CA-125 in the absence of ovarian cancer. Second, even if the woman has an ovarian cancer, not all ovarian cancers will cause the CA-125 level to be elevated. Furthermore, CA-125 levels can be abnormally high in women with breast, lung, and pancreatic cancer.

  22. QUESTION:
    can ovarian cysts cause infertility?
    my doctor just told me that i have ovarian cysts on both of my ovaries. i just wanted to know if they cause infertility

    • ANSWER:
      yes! they sure can. have em checked out..

      What are ovarian cysts?
      Ovarian cysts are fluid-filled, sac-like structures within an ovary. The term cyst refers to a fluid-filled structure. Therefore, all ovarian cysts contain at least some fluid.

      What causes ovarian cysts?
      Ovarian cysts form for numerous reasons. The most common type is a follicular cyst, which results from the growth of a follicle. A follicle is the normal fluid-filled sac that contains an egg. Follicular cysts form when the follicle grows larger than normal during the menstrual cycle and does not open to release the egg. Usually, follicular cysts resolve on their own over the course of days to months. Cysts can contain blood (hemorrhagic or endometrioid cysts) from injury or leakage of tiny blood vessels into the egg sac. Occasionally, the tissues of the ovary develop abnormally to form other body tissues such as hair or teeth. Cysts with these abnormal tissues are called dermoid cysts.

      What symptoms are caused by ovarian cysts?
      Most cysts are never noticed and resolve without women ever realizing that they are there. When a cyst causes symptoms, pain in the belly or pelvis is by far the most common one. The pain can be caused from rupture of the cyst, rapid growth and stretching, bleeding into the cyst, or twisting of the cyst around its blood supply.

      How are ovarian cysts diagnosed?
      Most cysts are diagnosed by ultrasound, which is the best imaging technique for detecting ovarian cysts. Ultrasound is an imaging method that uses sound waves to produce an image of structures within the body. Ultrasound imaging is painless and causes no harm.

      Cysts can also be detected with other imaging methods, such as CAT scan or MRI scan (magnetic resonance imaging).

      How can the physician decide if an ovarian cyst is dangerous?
      If a woman is in her 40's, or younger, and has regular menstrual periods, most ovarian masses are "functioning ovarian cysts," which are not really abnormal. They are related to the process of ovulation that happens with the menstrual cycle. They usually disappear on their own during a future menstrual cycle. Therefore, especially in women in their 20's and 30's, these cysts are watched for a few menstrual cycles to verify that they disappear. Because oral contraceptives work in part by preventing ovulation, physicians will not really expect women who are taking oral contraceptives to have common "functioning ovarian cysts." Thus, women who develop ovarian cysts while taking oral contraceptives may be advised against simple observation; rather, they may receive closer monitoring with pelvic ultrasound or, less commonly, surgical exploration of the ovary.

      Other factors are helpful in evaluating ovarian cysts (besides the woman's age, or whether she is taking oral contraceptives). A cyst that looks like it's just one simple sac of fluid on the ultrasound is more likely to be benign, than a cyst with solid tissue in it. So the ultrasound appearance also plays a role in determining the level of suspicion regarding a serious ovarian growth.

      Ovarian cancer is rare in women younger than age 40. After age 40, an ovarian cyst has a higher chance of being cancerous than before age 40, although most ovarian cysts are benign even after age 40. CA-125 blood testing can be used as a marker of ovarian cancer, but it does not always represent cancer when it is abnormal. , First, many benign conditions in women of childbearing age can cause the CA-125 level to be elevated, so CA-125 is not a specific test, especially in younger women. Pelvic infections, uterine fibroids, pregnancy, benign (hemorrhagic) ovarian cysts, and liver disease are all conditions that may elevate CA-125 in the absence of ovarian cancer. Second, even if the woman has an ovarian cancer, not all ovarian cancers will cause the CA-125 level to be elevated. Furthermore, CA-125 levels can be abnormally high in women with breast, lung, and pancreatic cancer.

      How are ovarian cysts treated?
      Most ovarian cysts in women of childbearing age are follicular cysts (functional cysts) that disappear naturally in 1-3 months. Although they can rupture (usually without ill effects), they rarely cause symptoms. They are benign and have no real medical consequence. They may be diagnosed coincidentally during a pelvic examination in women who do not have any related symptoms. All women have follicular cysts at some point that generally go unnoticed.

      A follicular cyst in a woman of childbearing age is usually observed for a few menstrual cycles because the cysts are common, and ovarian cancer is rare in this age group. Sometimes ovarian cysts in menstruating women contain some blood, called hemorrhagic cysts, which frequently resolve quickly.

      Ultrasound is used to determine the treatment strategy for ovarian cysts because if can help to determine if the cyst is a simple cyst (just fluid with no solid tissue, seen in benign conditions) or compound cyst (with some solid tissue that requires closer monitoring and possibly surgical resection).

      How are ovarian cysts treated? continued...
      In summary, the ideal treatment of ovarian cysts depends on the woman's age, the size (and change of size) of the cyst, and the cyst's appearance on ultrasound.

      Treatment can consist of simple observation, or it can involve evaluating blood tests such as a CA-125 to help determine the potential for cancer (keeping in mind the many limitations of CA-125 testing described above).

      The tumor can be removed either with laparoscopy, or if needed, an open laparotomy (using and incision at the bikini line) if it is causing severe pain, not resolving, or if it is suspicious in any way. Once the cyst is removed, the growth is sent to a pathologist who examines the tissue under a microscope to make the final diagnosis as to the type of cyst present.

      Ovarian Cysts At A Glance
      Ovarian cysts are fluid-filled, sac-like structures.
      Ovarian cysts form for numerous reasons.
      When a cyst causes symptoms, pain in the belly or pelvis is by far the most common one.
      Most cysts are diagnosed by ultrasound.
      The treatment of ovarian cysts varies from observation and monitoring to surgical procedures.

      hope that this info helps.

  23. QUESTION:
    Question about ovarian cysts and CT scan........?
    I hope somebody out there might know the answer to this. I had an abdominal/pelvic CT scan done about 6 or 7 wks ago which showed that I have an ovarian cyst on my right ovary. I'd had a laparascopy done about 6 wks prior to the CT scan but the dr wasn't able to see my right ovary during the procedure. I've been experiencing extreme pain right in the area where the right ovary is but the dr isn't sure if it's the cyst causing the pain or something else so we're trying a couple of different things & I go see him again in about 3 wks from now. But now I'm worried thinking, oh my god, if he couldn't see the ovary during the laparoscopy, & I have a cyst on my ovary, how do I know that it might not be cancer? I know that the majority of cysts are not cancerous & are just fluid-filled, but I'm assuming that the CT scan wouldn't be able to tell if it was fluid filled or not. So how would they know that it's a cyst as opposed to a tumour? Is there anybody out there who can give me more info?
    I'm also worried because I'm bleeding (like a light period) but I don't know if this is actually a period or not, or maybe if the cyst is bleeding. I don't know whether to expect a period because I've got a Mirena IUD, plus I've been give 2 injections of Lupron to shut my ovaries down to see if that helps with the pain. Is it dangerous if the bleeding IS coming from the cyst? I don't know what to do and I don't want to go running to the ER and wait for hours to see the doctor if they're just going to send me home and tell me to wait and see my dr.....

    • ANSWER:
      Hey! I had a masive cyst on my left ovary 3 years ago that was picked up in a simple ultrasound (and i mean massive it had 5 litres of fluid in it). The only way that you can tell if its a tumour and cancerous or just a cyst is when its removed, they take it off for testing and come back and tell you if its cancerous or not.. as you said more times that not it is non cancerous and just fluid filled! The best thing to do is stop stressing out and wait untill the doctor removes it!!
      Good Luck!

  24. QUESTION:
    Ovarian Cyst?
    What is the normal size of an ovarian cyst? And how large does it have to be before it is considered abnormal? Also what does it mean if fluid is seen when you have an ultrasound done ?

    • ANSWER:
      Small cysts (smaller than one-half inch) may be present in a normal ovary while follicles are being formed. Ovarian cysts have nothing to do with disease. Most ovarian cysts are benign, meaning they are not cancerous, and many disappear on their own in a matter of weeks without treatment.
      A woman may develop 1 or more of them.

      In an ultrasound image, ovarian cysts resemble bubbles. The cyst contains only fluid and is surrounded by a very thin wall. This kind of cyst is also called a functional cyst, or simple cyst.

  25. QUESTION:
    What are ovarian cysts and how do i know if have them?
    I'm panicking, my mom found out i used birth control and she told me that you can get some type of sickness, i dont know what it's called but she said that i can get like my grandfather if i keep using the pills, im not sure what happened but he couldn't talk, and he can't do a lot of force.. anyway i started researching to see if i can find anything that relates to that but now i read something about ovarian cysts.. it said something about it MAY not be cancerous so now im scared!!

    Should i stop taking birth control pills?? Ive been using them for almost 2 years now, what are the consequences of using birth control... i really need your help! and some advice would be great.. thanks in advance
    Sorry.. also should i change my birth control method?? my boyfriend keeps telling me to use Mirena but i'm too scared to use that, wont it get stuck?? i sound dumb but im freaking out yo! lol

    • ANSWER:
      Birth control pills are not dangerous. If they were, there would be millions and millions of women out there with problems and birth control pills would not be prescribed by doctors anymore, so unfortunately your Mum is wrong.

      Birth control pills are a synthetic form of the hormones progesterone and estrogen. They prevent ovulation by maintaining more consistent hormone levels. Without a peak in estrogen, then, the ovary doesn't get the signal to release an egg. No egg means no possibility for fertilization and pregnancy. They also thicken cervical mucus so the sperm cannot reach the egg, and make the lining of the uterus unreceptive to the implantation of a fertilized egg.

      Some common minor side effects of birth control pills can include some mild nausea when first starting birth control pills, spotting or breakthrough bleeding, breast tenderness, mood changes, decreased sex drive, weight gain, cervical changes and vaginal discharge.

      Birth control pills can be good at helping prevent ovarian cysts from forming on your ovaries as ovarian cysts usually form during ovulation.

      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease or cancer related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman's childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain - constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that if you think you have an ovarian cyst that you consult with your doctor/gyno about this and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 11 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn't anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  26. QUESTION:
    Are ovarian cyst normal?
    Less than a month ago, i got a cat scan that showed an ovarian cyst. It seemed as though the doctors shrugged it off but i'm having some weird symptoms. What i want to know is how are doctors, radiologists able to determine if a cyst is cancerous or not? I dont have any trust because a long time ago i knew someone and the doctors told him it was just a cyst and it turned out to be cancer and he's not here anymore. :(

    Sometimes i can feel soreness in the area of the cyst. How will it go away or how long should it take to go away?

    • ANSWER:
      Ovarian cysts are not uncommon in young women in their teens and twenties. There are two types of cysts, simple and complex. Simple cysts are basically just sacs of fluid on your ovaries that form when you try to ovulate. Every woman forms a small cyst on her ovary that bursts during ovulation, releasing that month's egg. For some women the sac doesn't burst, it just keeps getting bigger and bigger, and that is an ovarian cyst.

      Complex cysts are more, well, complex, as the name would suggest. They are usually made up of body tissues, and are more likely to be cancerous. Some complex cysts actually have teeth, fingernails, etc. as part of the mass... crazy, huh? But they are much less common, and even if the cyst is complex it's unlikely to be cancerous.

      If your doctor shrugged off the cyst as being nothing then it is probably because it is a simple cyst, which are never cancerous because they are not made of body tissue but are just a sac of fluid that will eventually either reabsorb into the ovary or rupture. If the cyst was complex on the CT scan they would have taken a biopsy to see if it was cancerous or not. Simple cysts do not require a biopsy.

      However, if you are having pain and your doctor is not paying attention to your pain or giving you any options for treatment, then I would suggest you get a second opinion from another doctor. If you aren't already on it, birth control pills can shrink current cysts and prevent cysts from forming in the future. Aside from that though, there isn't much you can do about a cyst other than wait for it to reabsorb into the body or rupture. Rupturing is extremely painful so I hope for your sake that it just reabsorbs. If you are in significant pain though and the cyst has not ruptured, then sometimes they will surgically drain the cyst.

      Tell your doctor about the pain you're having and ask them what your options are. If they will not explain everything in thorough detail to you and give you options, then find a new doctor. They are employed by you, they should take care of you and answer all of your questions. If they aren't doing that then they aren't being a good employee and it is totally within your right as the patient to "fire" your doctor and get a new one. Good luck!

  27. QUESTION:
    Anyone had an ovarian cyst?
    I went to my doctor today and he said I might have an ovarian cyst. I was just wondering if anyone else has had one and what it felt like and how they were treated. I will be setting up an appointment with an OBGYN soon to get checked out, but I was just curious to see other people's experiences and compare symptoms. Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi daphner!!!

      You do not say how big in cetimeters they are, and that could be a huge difference on the specific treatment.

      This cysts are very common and some of them even almost desapeare afte a while. If you are ovulating you will find out this symtoms, and size will altered. But they are usually bening(no cancerous), still there is a need for concern.

      Some times it could be one as it could then be many.
      Your monthly periods rather changes with their presence and it could be accompany with much pain and cramps. Some times you can experience cramps and pain even without, ovulating.

      Always keep your appointments and you should ask for
      an "Internal Transversal Vaginal, Ultrasound". Don't be scare of the sofisticated name, is just a simple painless exam, where they "probe" the vaginal conduct, and by means of sound waves they can actually, see internally. (NO, it doesn't hurt a bit).

      This is the best way to determine the size or sizes and locations, to alert the doctor of any emergency or real inmidiate emergency care.

      Daily routines such as walking, running, walking "down stairs", or sexual activities, may be uncomfortable and even painful, at times.

      Please, keep healthy and let us know how you feel from time to time.

      GOD BLESS YOU, STAY HEALTHY, HAPPY LIFE

      ALLIV Z

  28. QUESTION:
    Swollen ovaries: What can this mean?
    My fiance (26 years old) has been undergoing a lot of tests lately as she's had a lot of abnormal symptoms. At her last appointment, her doctor discovered that one of her ovaries is swollen. We've researched ovarian cancer, and we know this is a possiblity. Her doctor hasn't said much, but has scheduled her for an ultrasound. Other than cancer, what else could cause this swelling?? I just want to help her discover some other possiblities, as she's so scared now of cancer that she can hardly eat. Any advice would be GREATLY appreciated!!

    • ANSWER:
      Without a scan, how does the doctor know the ovary is swollen??? A scan is the best way to find out what is going on- it is most likely to be a simple cyst, which is most common in women her age. this is not cancerous. There are other cysts which may be cancerous, but unfortunately without a scan, its very hard to know what your doctor meant when he said the ovary was swollen. Another cause for enlarged ovaries could be polycstic ovaries where the ovary fails to release the eggs every month.

  29. QUESTION:
    I have an ovarian cyst!!!!! help?
    K so I was having sex with my boyfriend and I got really sharp pain in my stomach next thing you know i feel like Im about to give birth i go to the ER and they diagnosed me with a ovarian cysts I been having pain still but not as bad .. Do you guys know anything that triggers the pain so i can avoid doing those things ?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi,
      You can't depend on symptoms alone to tell you if you have an ovarian cyst. In fact, you'll likely have no symptoms at all. Or if you do, the symptoms may be similar to those of other conditions, such as endometriosis, pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy or ovarian cancer. Even appendicitis and diverticulitis can produce signs and symptoms that mimic a ruptured ovarian cyst.

      Still, it's important to be watchful of any symptoms or changes in your body and to know which symptoms are serious. If you have an ovarian cyst, you may experience one or more of the following signs and symptoms:

      ■Menstrual irregularities
      ■Pelvic pain — a constant or intermittent dull ache that may radiate to your lower back and thighs
      ■Pelvic pain shortly before your period begins or just before it ends
      ■Pelvic pain during intercourse (dyspareunia)
      ■Pain during bowel movements or pressure on your bowels
      ■Nausea, vomiting or breast tenderness similar to that experienced during pregnancy
      ■Fullness or heaviness in your abdomen
      ■Pressure on your rectum or bladder — difficulty emptying your bladder completely
      When to see a doctor
      Seek immediate medical attention if you have:

      ■Sudden, severe abdominal or pelvic pain
      ■Pain accompanied by fever or vomiting
      These signs and symptoms — or those of shock, such as cold, clammy skin, rapid breathing, and lightheadedness or weakness — indicate an emergency and mean that you need to see a doctor right away.
      Treatment depends on your age, the type and size of your cyst, and your symptoms. Your doctor may suggest:

      ■Watchful waiting. You can wait and be re-examined in one to three months if you're in your reproductive years, you have no symptoms and an ultrasound shows you have a simple, fluid-filled cyst. Your doctor will likely recommend that you get follow-up pelvic ultrasounds at periodic intervals to see if your cyst has changed in size.

      Watchful waiting, including regular monitoring with ultrasound, is also a common treatment option recommended for postmenopausal women if a cyst is filled with fluid and is less than 2 centimeters in diameter.

      ■Birth control pills. Your doctor may recommend birth control pills to reduce the chance of new cysts developing in future menstrual cycles. Oral contraceptives offer the added benefit of significantly reducing your risk of ovarian cancer — the risk decreases the longer you take birth control pills.
      ■Surgery. Your doctor may suggest removal of a cyst if it is large, doesn't look like a functional cyst, is growing or persists through two or three menstrual cycles. Cysts that cause pain or other symptoms may be removed.

      Some cysts can be removed without removing the ovary in a procedure known as a cystectomy. Your doctor may also suggest removing the affected ovary and leaving the other intact in a procedure known as oophorectomy. Both procedures may allow you to maintain your fertility if you're still in your childbearing years. Leaving at least one ovary intact also has the benefit of maintaining a source of estrogen production.

      If a cystic mass is cancerous, however, your doctor will advise a hysterectomy to remove both ovaries and your uterus. After menopause, the risk of a newly found cystic ovarian mass being cancerous increases. As a result, doctors more commonly recommend surgery when a cystic mass develops on the ovaries after menopause.

  30. QUESTION:
    Should I be worried ( ovarian cyst)?
    A few months ago I found out I had a (small) 21mm cyst on my right ovary via vaginal ultrasound (was in ER for miscarriage). I had a sharp pinching sensation in my right side that went away a couple of weeks later. Now it's almost 3 months later and I again felt the pinching at the start of my period a week ago. I went to my OBGyn last week who did a pelvic and said she felt nothing. She said the ER report had said they found "no adnexal mass", which meant it was a simple cyst. Neither she nor the ER docs seemed worried in the least. I am worrying myself sick (that's my nature!) about this whole thing and would love to hear from others who have had ovarian cysts! Please tell me some things so I can stop making myself sick with worry - I've never been diagnosed w/one before so it's freaking me out. I have a toddler but would like more kids and am worried about that as well... thanks in advance!

    • ANSWER:
      I had one at age 19, but it went away. And I have three children now. You gyno will keep an eye on this when she does your pap test. Simple cyst do not turn cancerous.
      It is easy to say, "Dont worry", but hard to do it. Later on in life I had a small tumor on an ovary, but the doctor did one of those micro incisions, and I went home the same day.
      Trust your doctors dear.

  31. QUESTION:
    first visit to gyno? ovarian cysts?
    Okay well I'm 20 and have never been to a gynecologist...yes I know I was supposed to go years ago but I haven't. The other night I was in such pain that I went to the emergency room and found out from a cat scan that I have cysts on both ovaries. The ER doctor didn't tell me what size they were or anything like that, but he did say they were both fairly small. I'm supposed to follow up with a gynecologist this week and basically I'm terrified. So basically my questions are what should I expect at this appointment? Should I do anything to prepare for it (like shaving)? and how are ovarian cysts normally treated? thanks so much.

    • ANSWER:
      Don't worry -- there is nothing to be afraid of when visiting the gynecologist for the first time. Believe me, I was scared out of my mind the first time I went for my first pap smear -- but it turns out I had nothing to be afraid of! The whole experience was completely painless and over before I knew it.

      Since this is your first visit to the gyno, your doctor will probably perform a speculum exam and a pap smear. The speculum is a metal or plastic instrument that looks sort of like tongs and is designed to hold the walls of the vagina apart so the doctor can look inside. The doctor will look into your vagina to make sure everything looks healthy and normal, checking for redness and inflammation of the vaginal walls (signs of infection); for cuts, tears, or cysts in the cervix; and for unusual discharge. Next comes the pap smear. The doctor will insert a swab that looks like a large Q-tip into your vagina and rub it across your cervix to sample some cells. This sounds painful, but whatever discomfort you experience is minor and very momentary. The cell sample is analyzed to check for cancer or a pre-cancerous condition of the cervix.

      After the speculum is removed, the doctor will perform a bimanual vaginal exam, checking your internal organs with his or her hands. The doctor inserts one or two fingers into your vagina while putting his or her other hand on your lower abdomen. By feeling around and pressing with both hands, the doctor can assess the size, shape, and position of your uterus, ovaries, and fallopian tubes and check for swelling or growths. This might feel weird, but it shouldn't hurt. If you feel pain, tell the doctor.

      Sometimes a rectal exam is also performed. The physician will insert a finger into your rectum to feel the internal organs from a different angle.

      Since you have cysts on your ovaries, your doctor may want to do some x-rays and discuss possible treatment options with you. Most ovarian cysts usually don't need treatment. Birth control pills (oral contraceptives) may help make cycles normal and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts. Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5 - 10 centimeters and complex ovarian cysts that don't go away should be removed with surgery (laparoscopy or exploratory laparotomy).
      The doctor may recommend other treatments if a disorder, such as polycystic ovary disease, is causing the ovarian cysts.

      By the way, you definitely don't have to shave down there, so don't worry about that. Your doctor won't care whether you're shaved or not. :)

  32. QUESTION:
    Do you know anything about ovarian cysts? ?
    I've been having pain in my lower abdominal for a few months now. It gets very painful when I run especially. I also have been having irregular periods for about a year now. Lately, I have been reading online about having cysts on your ovaries. The pain in causes people and much more. A few times I almost went to the ER because the pain was so bad.

    Do you know anything about ovarian cysts?

    Thanks! Any help would be good.

    And yes I'm going to a doctor, I'd just like some peoples opinions.

    • ANSWER:
      Ovarian cysts are simply fliud filled sacs that form on your ovaries. They are benign(non-cancerous). They can cause a lot of discomfort, especially if the rupture! I have had them, as well as one rupture. All you need is an ultrasound to drtermine if that is the cause or not. The treatment is simple, if any at all. so no sweat. It also possible to have endometriosis. Which is when the uterine lining grows outside the uterus.

  33. QUESTION:
    Ovarian cysts??????
    I went to the ER in August b/c I was having an early miscarriage. They did an ultrasound to confirm the miscarriage (which was a blighted ovum), and found I had a 21mm cyst on my right ovary (which made sense b/c I was having sharp shooting pains in my right side). They said it was small and functional and not to worry about it since there were no masses. Got my period in normal time and everything was back to normal (no pains). My second cycle post-miscarriage was really weird. When I ovulated it was late and I had severe bloating and cramping the evening I ovulated, then it went away, but for the 2 weeks before my period I had weird symptoms that made me think I was pregnant (breasts got huge, felt sick to my stomach, etc). And when I did get my period I felt a little throbbing on my right side for the 1st day or so. Then it went away. My 3rd post-miscarriage period started last night, and I have felt some little jabs in my right side, but they have gone away this morning. I should mention I've been to my OBGyn twice in the last 4 weeks as well as the ER (there was no pain but I was just worrying myself sick b/c I tend to obsess about this kind of stuff and I wanted to be seen asap) and had 3 pelvic exams and was told everything was completely normal and my ovaries felt totally normal and not to worry. But I can't help worrying... do you think the cyst they found on the ultrasound went away and these are all different cysts? Could I have had these all my life and never known? Some info on me that may help- I'm 29, have an 18-month-old son, weigh 130 pounds. Hubby and I will start trying for #2 in a few weeks so I just want to make sure everything is good to go!
    Thanks everyone- I really already know all the info that is out there on the internet about cysts- I really just want to hear personal stories from other women who have had them- thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Most ovarian cysts are functional in nature, and harmless (benign).In the US ovarian cysts are found in nearly all premenopausal women, and in up to 14.8% of postmenopausal women. The incidence of ovarian carcinoma is approximately 15 cases per 100,000 women per year.Ovarian cysts affect women of all ages. They occur most often, however, during a woman's childbearing years.
      Some ovarian cysts cause problems, such as bleeding and pain. Surgery may be required to remove those cysts

      Some, called functional cysts, or simple cysts, are part of the normal process of menstruation. They have nothing to do with disease, and can be treated.

      There are also types of other ovarian cysts you caould of been missed diagnoised with functional-more info here-
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ovarian_cyst

      Symptoms
      Some or all of the following symptoms may be present, though it is possible not to experience any symptoms:

      Dull aching, or severe, sudden, and sharp pain or discomfort in the lower abdomen (one or both sides), pelvis, vagina, lower back, or thighs; pain may be constant or intermittent -- this is the most common symptom
      Fullness, heaviness, pressure, swelling, or bloating in the abdomen
      Breast tenderness
      Pain during or shortly after beginning or end of menstrual period
      Irregular periods, or abnormal uterine bleeding or spotting
      Change in frequency or ease of urination (such as inability to fully empty the bladder), or difficulty with bowel movements due to pressure on adjacent pelvic anatomy
      Weight gain
      Nausea or vomiting
      Fatigue
      Infertility
      Increased level of hair growth
      Increased facial hair or body hair

      Treatment
      About 95% of ovarian cysts are benign, meaning they are not cancerous. [citation needed]

      Treatment for cysts depends on the size of the cyst and symptoms. For small, asymptomatic cysts, the wait and see approach with regular check-ups will most likely be recommended.

      Pain caused by ovarian cysts may be treated with:

      pain relievers, including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), acetaminophen (Tylenol), or narcotic pain medicine (by prescription) may help reduce pelvic pain.NSAIDs usually work best when taken at the first signs of the pain.
      a warm bath, or heating pad, or hot water bottle applied to the lower abdomen near the ovaries can relax tense muscles and relieve cramping, lessen discomfort, and stimulate circulation and healing in the ovaries. Bags of ice covered with towels can be used alternately as cold treatments to increase local circulation.
      chamomile herbal tea (Matricaria recutita) can reduce ovarian cyst pain and soothe tense muscles.
      urinating as soon as the urge presents itself.
      avoiding constipation, which does not cause ovarian cysts but may further increase pelvic discomfort.
      in diet, eliminating caffeine and alcohol, reducing sugars, increasing foods rich in vitamin A and carotenoids (e.g., carrots, tomatoes, and salad greens) and B vitamins (e.g., whole grains).
      combined methods of hormonal contraception such as the combined oral contraceptive pill -- the hormones in the pills may regulate the menstrual cycle, prevent the formation of follicles that can turn into cysts, and possibly shrink an existing cyst. (American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists
      Also, limiting strenuous activity may reduce the risk of cyst rupture or torsion.

      Cysts that persist beyond two or three menstrual cycles, or occur in post-menopausal women, may indicate more serious disease and should be investigated through ultrasonography and laparoscopy, especially in cases where family members have had ovarian cancer. Such cysts may require surgical biopsy. Additionally, a blood test may be taken before surgery to check for elevated CA-125, a tumor marker, which is often found in increased levels in ovarian cancer, although it can also be elevated by other conditions resulting in a large number of false positives.

      For more serious cases where cysts are large and persisting, doctors may suggest surgery. Some surgeries can be performed to successfully remove the cyst(s) without hurting the ovaries, while others may require removal of one or both ovaries.

  34. QUESTION:
    Ovarian Cyst?
    I have a doctor appt. next week, bt just wondering if this sounds like one. Very irregular periods, almost certain i am not pregnant, painful sex, bloating, sharp pains and cramping in lower left side of my stomach. just wondering if this sounds like I may have a cyst? thanks for the help.

    • ANSWER:
      I have them also and here is some information that helped me

      What are ovarian cysts?
      Ovarian cysts are fluid-filled, sac-like structures within an ovary. The term cyst refers to a fluid-filled structure. Therefore, all ovarian cysts contain at least some fluid.
      What causes ovarian cysts?

      Ovarian cysts form for numerous reasons. The most common type is a follicular cyst, which results from the growth of a follicle. A follicle is the normal fluid-filled sac that contains an egg. Follicular cysts form when the follicle grows larger than normal during the menstrual cycle and does not open to release the egg. Usually, follicular cysts resolve on their own over the course of days to months. Cysts can contain blood (hemorrhagic or endometrioid cysts) from injury or leakage of tiny blood vessels into the egg sac. Occasionally, the tissues of the ovary develop abnormally to form other body tissues such as hair or teeth. Cysts with these abnormal tissues are called dermoid cysts.
      What symptoms are caused by ovarian cysts?

      Most cysts are never noticed and resolve without women ever realizing that they are there. When a cyst causes symptoms, pain in the belly or pelvis is by far the most common one. The pain can be caused from rupture of the cyst, rapid growth and stretching, bleeding into the cyst, or twisting of the cyst around its blood supply.
      How are ovarian cysts diagnosed?

      Most cysts are diagnosed by ultrasound, which is the best imaging technique for detecting ovarian cysts. Ultrasound is an imaging method that uses sound waves to produce an image of structures within the body. Ultrasound imaging is painless and causes no harm.

      Cysts can also be detected with other imaging methods, such as CAT scan or MRI scan (magnetic resonance imaging).
      How can the physician decide if an ovarian cyst is dangerous?

      If a woman is in her 40's, or younger, and has regular menstrual periods, most ovarian masses are "functioning ovarian cysts," which are not really abnormal. They are related to the process of ovulation that happens with the menstrual cycle. They usually disappear on their own during a future menstrual cycle. Therefore, especially in women in their 20's and 30's, these cysts are watched for a few menstrual cycles to verify that they disappear. Because oral contraceptives work in part by preventing ovulation, physicians will not really expect women who are taking oral contraceptives to have common "functioning ovarian cysts." Thus, women who develop ovarian cysts while taking oral contraceptives may be advised against simple observation; rather, they may receive closer monitoring with pelvic ultrasound or, less commonly, surgical exploration of the ovary.

      Other factors are helpful in evaluating ovarian cysts (besides the woman's age, or whether she is taking oral contraceptives). A cyst that looks like it's just one simple sac of fluid on the ultrasound is more likely to be benign, than a cyst with solid tissue in it. So the ultrasound appearance also plays a role in determining the level of suspicion regarding a serious ovarian growth.

      Ovarian cancer is rare in women younger than age 40. After age 40, an ovarian cyst has a higher chance of being cancerous than before age 40, although most ovarian cysts are benign even after age 40. CA-125 blood testing can be used as a marker of ovarian cancer, but it does not always represent cancer when it is abnormal. , First, many benign conditions in women of childbearing age can cause the CA-125 level to be elevated, so CA-125 is not a specific test, especially in younger women. Pelvic infections, uterine fibroids, pregnancy, benign (hemorrhagic) ovarian cysts, and liver disease are all conditions that may elevate CA-125 in the absence of ovarian cancer. Second, even if the woman has an ovarian cancer, not all ovarian cancers will cause the CA-125 level to be elevated. Furthermore, CA-125 levels can be abnormally high in women with breast, lung, and pancreatic cancer.

      How are ovarian cysts treated?

      Most ovarian cysts in women of childbearing age are follicular cysts (functional cysts) that disappear naturally in 1-3 months. Although they can rupture (usually without ill effects), they rarely cause symptoms. They are benign and have no real medical consequence. They may be diagnosed coincidentally during a pelvic examination in women who do not have any related symptoms. All women have follicular cysts at some point that generally go unnoticed.

      A follicular cyst in a woman of childbearing age is usually observed for a few menstrual cycles because the cysts are common, and ovarian cancer is rare in this age group. Sometimes ovarian cysts in menstruating women contain some blood, called hemorrhagic cysts, which frequently resolve quickly.

      Ultrasound is used to determine the treatment strategy for ovarian cysts because if can help to determine if the cyst is a simple cyst (just fluid with no solid tissue, seen in benign conditions) or compound cyst (with some solid tissue that requires closer monitoring and possibly surgical resection).

      In summary, the ideal treatment of ovarian cysts depends on the woman's age, the size (and change of size) of the cyst, and the cyst's appearance on ultrasound.

      Treatment can consist of simple observation, or it can involve evaluating blood tests such as a CA-125 to help determine the potential for cancer (keeping in mind the many limitations of CA-125 testing described above).

      The tumor can be removed either with laparoscopy, or if needed, an open laparotomy (using and incision at the bikini line) if it is causing severe pain, not resolving, or if it is suspicious in any way. Once the cyst is removed, the growth is sent to a pathologist who examines the tissue under a microscope to make the final diagnosis as to the type of cyst present.

  35. QUESTION:
    What does septated mean ?
    Related to a septated cyst..

    • ANSWER:
      Q&A of the Week: Septated Ovarian Cyst

      Debra writes: I have recently received results from an ultrasound indicated that I have a adnexal septated complex cyst versus simple cysts on my left ovary. I have had several surgeries in the past for cysts and endometriosis (mild). I have left discomfort constantly and intercourse in certain positions is uncomfortable. My doctor is repeating the ultrasound in a couple of weeks. I question this due to my history or repetitive cysts. Almost every couple of years I have to have a D&C because my bleeding becomes so very heavy.

      What does complex adnexal septated exactly mean.... This culprit that brought me back to the doctor this time was clotting and leg aches.

      It sounds as though the ultrasound isn't clearly showing whether there is one complex cyst or more than one simple cyst (presumably close together). A simple cyst would be one "sac", usually filled with fluid. Simple ovarian cysts are very rarely cancerous - various types of simple cysts are quite common during the childbearing years.

      "Septated" means that the cyst is divided into segments. The significance of this is partly in how thick the walls ("septa") are between the parts. A thicker wall is thought to be a higher risk of being malignant, as is a complex cyst (which has solid and non-solid areas in it). Usually when there is a simple cyst, another ultrasound will be done in month, whereas with a complex one they would remove it and evaluate it for ovarian cancer. It sounds like in your case, not knowing which it is, the recommendation is to split the difference.

      Adnexal just means it's in the area near the uterus, which includes the ovaries and fallopian tubes.

      Endometriosis sometimes produces its own kind of cyst on the ovary, called an endometrioma, or "chocolate" cyst.

      Another test that can be done to possibly give clues as to the malignancy of a cyst is the CA 125 blood test, although this test is not infallible.

      Best wishes to you. Please let us know how you are doing.

  36. QUESTION:
    Could I be pregnant? Please help - doctors would be great.?
    I apologise now if this is a little bit of an essay but for you to understand what I'm going through I need to tell you everything without missing details off. I would appreciate it if you didn't judge me and gave me serious answers only.

    I have been panicking for the past few months that I may be pregnant. I would be at a real loss if I was and would have to do some serious thinking.
    In my franticness I have taken around 16 pregnancy tests all in the mornings but at different times.
    I have been pregnant before at 17 (around six years ago) and had to terminate at 9weeks, it was a mistake, and I had only just stopped having treatment for anorexia... I was in a bad place.
    It was the single most horrific experience of my life and I think my worry is stemming through ever having to re-live it.

    I have still been having periods (light-medium).
    I haven't gained any weight.
    The only differences in me are my heavy feeling/swollen tummy, dull aches in my tummy, and my nipples have 'milk-spots' or more scientifically 'montgomery tubercles'.
    If I was pregnant both my partner and I can only see how it could have been from one time around 17weeks ago.

    I have been to the doctors and have told them about how worried I have been and how it's playing on my mind - they have finally (after blood tests been taken for other things) found that I have low FSH and LH levels and consequently agreed to send me for an ultrasound scan to check all of my lower pelvis - for pregnancy, ovarian cysts and any signs of swelling or things that may be cancerous (also got to have a trans vaginal ultrasound :( )

    The reasons I think I could be pregnant are - around 17 weeks ago I had unprotected sex. This isn't as bad as it seems as myself and my partner have been together for 8years, both are sexually healthy and I take the contraceptive pill 'Femodene'.
    Now, 17weeks ago I had loose stools (not diarreah) and took my pill 6hours late as I was waiting for the stools to become more solid again. They became more solid but then as the day wore on losened once again.

    My ultrasound isn't until the 27th of this month and I am wearing a hole in my brain because I do not want a child - by the time I had the scan I would be 19 weeks pregnant. Can anyone shed any light on this, please?
    @Savanna -
    I HAVE had the details back from the blood work (as stated above).
    I HAVE been in and out of the doctors surgery for the past 12-13weeks - all they sent me away with was the worry of having a urine infection and took pregnancy tests there also for me. Sending me away telling me if the test is negative, I'm not pregnant (which we all know isn't always true).

    I don't know where in the world you are but over here in England they don't like to just send you for tests and things that cost money - you have to wait in line, which is what I have been doing.

    Please don't speak to me like I'm a stupid child. I am taking the contaceptive pill which most girls use alone, the only difference is I didn't use a condom like I normally do that time, 17weeks ago.

    • ANSWER:
      If you had potentially unsafe sex 17 weeks ago you would now be 19 weeks pregnant (you add 2 extra weeks to the counting) You may not particularly show as yet, I ballooned up at 24 weeks but pregnancy tests would be showing up as positive and the doctor would have been able to feel the baby in the Uterus just by doing a simple external exam of you.

      I think it is safe to say you are worrying yourself about nothing and it is that worry that may be causing the symptoms, stress does really funny things to your body.

      I hope everything is ok for you.

      42, Mum to 3 children pregnant with number 4 and more to the point in England and know just how slowly everything moves, doctors make money in America, more tests more money, here the Surgery has to justify the expense. I very very much doubt you are pregnant but they do need to find out what's wrong with you and if you focus on the pregnancy part rather than the symptoms they may keep saying No and fobbing you off. With my first child I was under the doctors care for suspected arthritis and having all sorts of tests and x rays and injections, plus long term pain killers for an unrelated issue I was about 18 weeks before anyone worked out that I was pregnant I then gave birth to an incredibly healthy 8lb 14 baby girl on my due date. All pre-natal care in the UK means is basically checking your blood pressure, they believe in far less interference in pregnancy and labour over here and I personally think we are much better for it. Don't let people who do not have a clue how things here work get to you lets face it the only reason they push all these things in the US is to make more money

  37. QUESTION:
    Haemorragic cyst/endometrioma?
    Been told by my doc that I have 36x36x34mm cyst and might be either haemorrhagic cyst/polyp or fibroid pse help I am worried sick

    • ANSWER:
      Ovarian Hemorrhagic Cyst An ovarian cyst is a sac of fluid or tissue that develops on or inside an ovary. Types of cysts in the ovary may vary in size from pea-sized growths to a cyst as large as a grapefruit.

      Approximately 95 percent of ovarian cysts are harmless and benign. An ovarian cyst can occur in women of any age, but most often affect women during their childbearing years. Some ovarian cysts can rupture, bleed or cause pain. Painful or large ovarian cysts may need to be removed through surgery. A small percentage of ovarian cysts are cancerous, so all types of cysts should be carefully diagnosed.

      Ovarian Hemorrhagic Cyst
      Hemorrhagic cysts are amongst the most common types of cysts. This ovarian cyst is also known as a blood cyst or hematocyst. These occur when a blood vessel in the wall of a cyst breaks, causing blood to flood into the cyst.

      Hemorrhagic cysts are a type of functional cyst, meaning that they occur during the course of the female menstruation process and are affected by the hormones. Functional cysts, also known as simple cysts, have nothing to do with disease. These types of cysts can require no treatment, and usually resolve without the need for surgery.

      Symptoms of Hemorrhagic Cysts
      When women experience symptoms of hemorrhagic cysts, the first sign is usually abdominal pain. Ovarian hemorrhagic cyst pain usually develops on one side of the body. If these types of cysts rupture, it can bleed into the ovary, causing pain and the rapid stretching of the ovarian wall. If this occurs, a sonogram may reveal blood clots that have formed in the ovary. Anemia-related signs and symptoms may be present.

      While a ruptured ovarian hemorrhagic cyst is quite painful, the chance of these types of cysts rupturing is low. Most often, this type of ovarian cyst will regulate itself. In some cases, even hemorrhagic cysts that rupture resolve without the need for surgery. A large hemorrhagic cyst may require surgical removal.

      In order to ease minor pain or other symptoms of hemorrhagic cysts, medical professionals may prescribe:

      •Narcotics
      •OTC pain relievers, such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen
      •Prescription pain medications.
      Some other methods of releasing tension and stimulating circulation include using:

      •Heating pads
      •Hot water bottles
      •Ice packs.
      If you have hemorrhagic cysts, or any type of ovarian cyst lasting longer than two or three menstrual cycles, talk to your doctor about treatment options. Women with a family history of ovarian cancer should have ovarian cysts checked carefully for signs of malignancy.

      Ovarian Hemorrhagic Cyst Surgery
      If ovarian cyst surgery becomes necessary, doctors often employ laparoscopy to remove hemorrhagic cysts. A laparoscopy is minimally invasive, often referred to as keyhole surgery or pinhole surgery. During a laparoscopy, a doctor will make very small incisions for hemorrhagic cysts, generally around the belly button area. He'll then insert a thin rod lens and camera system to perform surgery and remove the ovarian cyst.

      Some of the advantages of a laparoscopy ovarian cyst removal are:

      •Less blood loss
      •Less pain
      •Less scarring due to smaller incisions
      •Shorter recovery periods.
      Note that a very large ovarian hemorrhagic cyst may require a larger incision, and sometimes, a more traditional surgical method involving a large abdominal incision.

  38. QUESTION:
    Anyone have these symptoms, and what was your diagnosis?
    Okay. I have always had irregular periods. They are usually 24 or 25 days long. In the last 4 months they have been shorter - 21 days mostly. They have also gotten a bit heavier, and about half the time they are more clotty than before. I've been depressed and moody and tired. I'm pretty sure I have low blood pressure because I feel woozy whenever I stand up. And for the last 3 weeks my bowels have been irritated mildly, which is unusual for me (it also could be some kind of bug).

    Anyone have these problems, and if so, what did it turn out to be? I have a history of ovarian cysts but last time I had one the symptoms were different. I'm trying to conceive another child so I have to figure out what's wrong with me first. Any advice would be really great ladies!
    My period only lasts for a few days. The length of time from the start of one period to the start of the next is often only 21 days, which is short even for me!
    Hearingtheword - you didn't offend me! LOL You never do. It was a good question. And hey! Now I know you're a woman! Cool. It's hard sometimes to tell the gender of my fellow Yahoo-ers. : )

    • ANSWER:
      I had the same thing happen to me when I was 17. It kept getting worse and worse until I was never off my period. Come to find out that the four walls of my uterus were all maturing out of sync with each other and so I never had relief. I was literally bleeding out. All you have to do is have a simple DNC it's easy breezy inpatient and takes about 20 mins...about 20-30 to come up from the anesthesia. You must go to your gynecologist and have a checkup first, you could have something else wrong. Please message me when you've talked to your doctor and I'll put you on my prayer list.

      Love and God bless, Pami xoxo

      PS IN EDIT:

      I FORGOT SOMETHING...I NOW HAVE ENDEMETRIAL HYPERPLASIA WHICH IS VERY DANGEROUS AS IT CAN TURN CANCEROUS...ASK THEM TO CHECK...IT'S FOUND BY ULTRA SOUND.

  39. QUESTION:
    Is not getting my period for 6 months normal?
    I haven't had my period since september. There has been no sexual activity from then to now so i don't know where my period went. It's probably just hormones, but I'm just wondering because my cycle has been pretty regular for the past couple of years
    I started my period at 11 and now i'm 16. I get all my nutrition and lately I would feel like I started my period (my skin would break out, more discharge) but then nothing. Sometimes there would be a speck of blood but nothing more than a little.

    This is starting to get annoying because I actually want to know when my period will be coming ahead of time and to know I don't have some ovarian cyst of some sort. anyways, yeah i just wanted to know if this is normal from going to regular periods every month to just randomly not getting it at all except for the occasional tiny ounce of blood when i wipe.

    thanks

    • ANSWER:
      I am not trying to scare you, but you definitely need to make an appointment with your gynecologist. It may be nothing, especially since you say that there has been no sexual activity, however you could have a buildup of the lining in your uterus or cysts that aren't allowing you to have a proper period. If it is one of these problems they are very easily taken care of with a simple scraping procedure to remove the cysts or extra lining. Many women get cysts in their uterus or on their ovaries that have no effect and are not cancerous, simply growths that appear. Have you experienced any weight loss or gain? Are you on a new kind of birth control, or any other new medications? These can also affect your period. I have personally had quite a few problems with my period over the years and I have been told by my gynecologist that we do not actually need to have a monthly period. So if there is nothing wrong, then stay prepared and enjoy the amount of time that you aren't having your period!

  40. QUESTION:
    ovarian cancer metatasis??!!?
    ok i have ovaqrian cyst the size of a lemon for six months now the size has not changes at all....my doctor says he cant tell me whether it is cancer or not - now i keep getting weird pains in my ribs hip bones and kidney area and the fromt of my chest, i have had a normal ca-125, i am afraid that i do have ovarian cancer and it has spread to my bones and kidneys - could this be true - i am also frequently short of breath
    the cyst is complex

    • ANSWER:
      It sounds like you have done an Ultrasound to “picture” the cyst? Is it filled with clear fluid or blood or any internal solid elements?

      Have you had a Doppler Study? This is a special ultrasound measuring the flow of blood to and from the ovary and cyst and may help in deciding if the cyst is actively growing and being fed by the vascular system. If the cyst is found to have solid elements, it’s also helpful to get an x-ray which can detect characteristic teeth, bone and/or cartilage in dermoid cysts.

      Finally, a CT scan or MRI can help determine whether the cyst is suspicious for malignancy or whether it’s pressing on or invading adjacent organs, lymph glands or blood vessels.

      Most cysts are benign, especially those that occur during the reproductive years. The incidence of ovarian cancer begins to increase after menopause. If there is no significant family history of ovarian cancer or combinations of certain cancers, such as breast, colon, and prostate cancer, you don’t have a known genetic risk, and if you are younger than 50, you should be reassured. If the cyst appears on ultrasound to be filled with clear fluid ( a simple cyst), it’s less than six centimeters in diameter and you’re not in pain, a wait-and-see approach over the next three months is appropriate.

      Know that 90 percent of simple cysts are functional and will disappear after five weeks. Your doctor may repeat the ultrasound to make sure the cyst is gone. If, however, you are over the age of 50 and/or the cyst has solid elements and appears complex (with internal walls), further workup is usually done. This includes a blood test for the protein CA125, which you have done and is normal. That is a good sign but, this test is not foolproof. About 50 percent of early ovarian cancers don’t produce detectable amounts of CA125. And non-cancerous diseases such as uterine fibroids and endometriosis can cause mild elevations in the level of the CA125 protein.

      The final diagnosis, especially if the cyst looks suspicious, may have to be surgical via a laparoscopic procedure. The cyst (and sometimes the ovary) will be removed and examined. In women who are menopausal, both ovaries are usually excised in order to prevent recurrences and/or reduce the future risk of ovarian cancer. If the doctor has a very high suspicion of cancer, a laparotomy (an abdominal incision) may be indicated. And if ovarian cancer is found, the surgery usually includes hysterectomy, removal of both ovaries, tubes, adjacent lymph glands and an excision of all visible cancer. This should be scheduled at surgical centers where a specialist in gynecologic cancer surgeries (a gynecologic oncologist) can be present.

      Hope this info helps, it sounds like you should ask your Dr. to do further testing. I agree with you, it is always better to err on the side of caution, whenever there is any question of cancer. It most likely is not cancer but, in my experience, Ovarian Cancer is very difficult to detect & my Gynecologist doesn't even like to use the CA-125 test because of it's unreliability. I also am encouraged by the fact that the cyst isn't growing, but more testing is needed to provide you with a definitive diagnosis. Good luck!

      Edit:
      Here's what I found on complex cyst.

      Differentiating between benign and malignant ovarian masses is necessary because ovarian cancer is lethal, and there are no proven screening techniques. Clinicians must consider the patient's medical profile (ie, risk factors, size of the mass, clinical presentation) to critically evaluate the likelihood of an early ovarian cancer. Diagnostic screening must include three essential components: an accurate medical history, a careful physical examination, and the judicious use of diagnostic procedures (eg, ultrasound, computed tomography [CT] scan, laparoscopy).

      15-year retrospective study reviewed medical records of 72 patients who developed early stage ovarian carcinoma. The study showed that 78% of these patients presented with one or more of the following signs or symptoms:

      * ascites (12.5%),

      * bloatedness or increased abdominal girth (32%),

      * increased CA-125 (approximately 52%),

      * palpable abdominal mass (72%),

      * pelvic pain (35%),

      * simple cyst noted in ultrasound (15%),

      * simple cyst noted on CT scan (17%), and

      * vaginal bleeding (19%).

      A finding of a simple cyst on either ultrasound or CT scan should not be clinically alarming; however, 15% of the women whose ultrasound showed a simple cyst and 17% of the women whose CT scans showed a simple cyst actually had early ovarian carcinoma. These results demonstrate that false negatives are possible with radiological tests for ovarian carcinoma. The interval time from presenting symptom to time of diagnosis is 4.6 months as a result of these false negative results. (22)

      Symptoms usually are associated with the location of the tumor and its effect on surrounding organs. The most common symptoms reported by women found to have ovarian cancer include ascites (ie, peritoneal seeding), abdominal distention/swelling/ bloating/pain/discomfort, dyspepsia, nausea, anorexia, and constipation. (23) Vaginal bleeding may occur if the ovarian tumor is active hormonally. Symptoms tend to be nonspecific and can mimic nongynecological conditions, such as irritable bowel syndrome. Acute abdominal pain should alert the clinician to a possible ectopic pregnancy, ovarian torsion, cyst rupture, or bleeding hemorrhagic cyst.

      Diagnostic screening. When screening for ovarian cancer, clinicians use three main approaches. Clinicians must be aware of other differential diagnoses that can mask an ovarian cancer (Table 2). Limitations, however, exist for all three screening methods. The three screening examinations include

      * transvaginal or pelvic ultrasound,

      * CA-125 tumor marker, and

      * pelvic examination. Pelvic ultrasound can

      * determine ovarian cyst size;

      * differentiate between cystic or solid components including the description of internal echoes and septae;

      * determine whether the cyst is unilocular or multilocular; and

      * describe borders as either regular or irregular.

      Transvaginal sonography provides a better image compared to the transabdominal approach. Radiologists may report a cyst as complex if there is no clear and convincing evidence that the mass is simple in nature because of the fear of missing an ovarian cancer. A CT scan should be considered if malignancy is suspected, or an abdominal flat film may be ordered to rule out a calcified fibroid or teeth from a possible dermoid.

      Neovascularization is characteristic of malignant tumors. Vessels in malignant tumors have an irregular course, fail to taper, and have arterial-venous shunts with high flow velocities. There is low resistance to flow with little systolic versus diastolic variation in blood velocity because of the incomplete muscularization of tumor walls. (24) Doppler scanner sonography has improved the ability to evaluate ovarian cysts for increased vascularity and lower flow impedance to the ovarian cyst, which are possible signs of an early malignancy.

      A recent study of 191 patients demonstrated that preoperative regression analysis of several variables could discriminate accurately between malignant and benign adnexal masses. These useful variables include

      * menopausal status,

      * CA-125 tumor marker,

      * presence of at least one or more papillary growths greater than 3 mm in size, and

      * a color score indicative of increased vascularity and blood flow.

      This regression analysis has a documented sensitivity of 95.9% and specificity of 87.1%. (25) A similar study described the Tumor Ovarian Index as an accurate method for predicting ovarian malignancy of a suspected ovarian mass in the clinical setting. This tool combines age and specific ultrasound markers. (26)

      Intravascular sonogram contrast agents, such as microbubble echo-enhancing contrast agent provide improved visualization of tumor vasculature compared to color doppler sonography as a result of three mechanisms. First, the number of recognizable vessels before and after contrast enhancement was significantly higher in malignant tumors compared to benign ones. Second, the time interval from administration of contrast to its visually detectable effect in tumor vessels was shorter in malignant tumors compared to benign tumors. Third, doppler signal intensity after contrast was higher in malignant tumors than in benign tumors. Sonography-enhanced studies using contrast agents, therefore, are superior to doppler sonography in differentiating between a benign ovarian mass versus a malignant ovarian mass. (27)

      Tissues derived from coelomic epithelium produce the antigen CA-125 tumor marker. Only 80% of ovarian epithelial carcinomas produce CA-125; therefore, some women with ovarian cancer will have normal CA-125 levels or false-negative sera tests. (28) The CA-125 antigen also is expressed by various other pathologic and normal tissues of mullerian (ie, mesodermal) origin (Table 3). The CA-125 antigen has a low specificity, especially in premenopausal women. In women younger than 50 years of age, an elevated CA-125 is associated with a malignant mass less than 25% of the time compared to women older than age 50 with an elevated CA-125 who have a malignancy 80% of the time. (29)

      Based on its lack of specificity, no recommendation can be made to order an annual CA-125 on all women as part of screening for ovarian cancer. Testing for CA-125 is best reserved for postmenopausal women with an identified adnexal mass found on either routine pelvic examination or on pelvic ultrasound. It also can be effective in detecting relapse of a known ovarian cancer and for monitoring during primary therapy in women being treated for ovarian cancer. (30) Detection of a truly early ovarian cancer is not pos

  41. QUESTION:
    Ovarian problems 3 yrs after hysterectomy?
    I have been in the doctor's office more times than I want to count in the past 3 years following my hysterectomy due to discovery of precancerous cells that moved from cervix into my uterus. I am only 26 yrs old. My concerns are sharp stabbing pain in my right ovary during intercourse (has ruined my sex life with my hubby - who is not very happy with the situation). I have a constant dull achy pain in my side and back all the time. If I ride in a car longer than an hr I get to hurting extremely bad. My doctor has done ultra sounds which show a cyst every time, but he says it is likely a functional cyst and no need for concern. I am very fatigued and I am concerned it may be related to my pain. I am at whit's end with the situation. Where should I go from here? Any ideas if the situation is worth a 2nd opinion by a cancer doctor or stick with my OBGYN? There have been no blood tests. I am tired of hurting and being tired. Any thoughts would be appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi - it is odd that no blood tests have been performed.

      You have been living in Hell for quite long enough, and your marriage is under strain. It is indeed time to seek a second opinion. You do not have to stick with ANY professional who seems unable to alleviate, or is oblivious to, your patent suffering.

      Cancer at your age was rare enough to begin with; that in itSELF should raise red flags for keeping a very close eye on you, in case of recurrence. Your gynae has let you down. You deserve answers.

      Pain will make you extremely fatigued, as will stress.

      The dull achy pain you describe could be caused by a simple non-cancerous adhesion (these tough 'strings' of unwanted membrane often grow into body spaces that were once filled, in your case by your uterus). Adhesions are easily dealt with, surgically. Once you have sought your second opinion and you have someone new and more professional dealing with you, you may like to consider the removal of those tricky ovaries; the Big C likes, given the opportunity, to travel to a woman's ovaries. I would not be wanting to hang onto them myself.

      To continue down the road you are on now, is to continue living your precious life in pain and in fear of your cancer returning. Place yourself into new hands.

      So sorry that you have suffered for so long, and I'm sorry that the help and advice and care that you deserve has not been forthcoming.

      Good luck for the future.

  42. QUESTION:
    Whats this surgery all about please help?
    only 17 with golf ball size Cyst on my right ovary i have a ob/gyn Monday morning IM way to sacred i don't know that gonna happen and my mom told me i need to try to stop smokeing cus most likely the ob/gyn gonna want to put me on (BC) << birth control ( please no mean or rude comments ... me smoking a cigarette is 100 times better then all the other parents letting their kids smoke weed ... joints and. Drink alcohol but i know if i stop smoking that ill go crazy and eat 10 times a day lol ^^^but no joke. And when they doctors did a CT scan i also find out that all my insides are smashed on top of each other cus IM too skinny . I don't know what to do anymore IM on 4
    different pain killer that the E.R GAVE me and IM very worried about all this. ....
    So i guess IM questions is what if i need surgery or something like that cus my mom had to do a surgery and no longer gets her menstral cycle and say if she wanted a kid she can't have one cus the surgery she had and Please please please... explain what kind of surgery is every telling me about and if i have to do surgery would it stop me from haveing kids. And please don't say well u need to stop smoking cus really i don't need to

    • ANSWER:
      Most likely, at your age, an ovarian cyst is simply a matter of fluid build up that has caused your ovary to literally 'balloon' up. Removing your ovary would be last case scenario and would still leave you with one other ovary. (You have 2. one on each side.) Your ovaries are what produce eggs and at 17, unless the cyst is cancerous, they will most likely 'aspirate' it. All this means is that they will numb your side and inject an empty needle attached to a syringe to withdraw the fluid that that has caused your ovary to 'balloon' up. It's a simple procedure done in the office. As far as having kids, as long as you still have your uterus, you can be impregnated. Ovaries make the eggs. Your 'tubes' carry the eggs to the uterus, the uterus is where the impregnated (with sperm) egg attaches to the wall and grows into a baby. As far as smoking, birth control pills ad to the normal risks of smoking, however, there are many other forms of birth control that don't. Stop asking your mom questions and take a copy of your questions from above with you to ask your Doctor instead. You don't have to have your mom in the room with you. Ask for a private consultation with your doctor. Good luck, and try to relax. You're hearing all the 'worst' things that can happen. Ovarian cysts are so common, and many go away without even needing aspirations.
      As far as skinny, anorexia is a major cause of reproductive problems. Women in concentration camps and other enforced starvation situations first symptoms of reproduction problems start with cramping and end with no more periods and the destruction over time of the reproductive organs.

  43. QUESTION:
    I'm really scared - ovarian cancer?
    I'm 18 years old and I had a scan in august which found a few cysts on my right ovary. My doctor said they would just go away and nothing to worry about but booked me to have a repeat scan a few months after.
    In december I had the repeat scan and they were still there but bigger. Apparently I had bled into one aswell and so I had a tiny hemmorhage (sorry about spelling). When my doctor rang me up to tell me the results he said it looks like im going to have to have a laparascopy to investigate and I had to go see him. When I saw him he said it needs to be checked asap because at 18 years old and not sexually active i shouldnt be getting them.
    He referred me to a gynaecologist but she made me feel like I was wasting her time. she did no pelvic exam, scans or x rays (all what i got told would happen) she just said to wait 4 months for the operation.
    3 other doctors are telling me I need to be seen to asap and to get a 2nd opinion to check for ovarian cancer. Im so scared. What should I do? Get a 2nd opinion or wait until may/june?

    • ANSWER:
      It's pretty strange that you have such vastly different doctor's opinions. There's a lot to discuss here. So, first of all: ovarian cysts are incredibly common. Having sex has nothing to do with getting them, nor does age--as long as your ovaries are working, cysts happen. It's only when you are too young to have a period, or past menopause that you get cysts, then they are worrisome. But if you are normally menstruating, then getting a cyst is not unusual at all. They are almost always harmless. That's probably why that one doctor gave you the feeling that you were wasting her time. She shouldn't have done that, but it sounds like she's gotten jaded over the years because cysts are so common, and ovarian cancer so rare at your age, that she just wrote you off as fine automatically.

      There are 3 ways to treat cysts: 1) wait and see if they go away on their own; 2) take birth control pills to see if that will shrink them; 3) remove them surgically. However, while cysts are usually harmless, there are signs they have that put them into the category of potentially more risky. One such sign is size: if they are larger than 3mm in diameter, then they need to be checked out further. I'm guessing that yours is bigger than that and that's why so many docs said it should be looked at further in case of ovarian cancer. Let me hasten to tell you that being this size does NOT mean it's cancerous. It just means the risk is greater. Yet it's still probably just a simple benign cyst.

      Another worrisome trait of a cyst is if it is complex (has internal divisions in it). And there are also many different kinds of cysts. From your description, it sounds to me like your cyst is what is called a "chocolate cyst". It gets that name because it's filled with old blood, which is brown and looks like chocolate. Such cysts are usually caused by endometriosis. That doesn't show up on any tests, so it wouldn't do any good to do x-rays or scans, etc. You can only diagnose it surgically.

      So basically, what we have here is that you really do need to get this checked out just because that's the proper protocol for the type of cyst you have. But your bored doc is probably right that it's no big deal. But I would definitely get a second opinion--you shouldn't wait till may/june, because that would be not the normal protocol.

  44. QUESTION:
    my employer wants to see my discharge papers, i was missing from work for only 2 days......?
    i work for a large corporation and we get paid sick time etc..i called in two days in a row due to me being in the hospital. the manager was upset and is now requesting discharge paperwork. my discharge paperwork has all my vitals, perscriptions, illness etc. the doctor however did give me a very simple note for my employer stating i was admitted for two days, and i needed 1 week recovery time. do i have to show my manager all my discharge information? the doctor said to give them the note, but im afraid the note wont have enough info on casue of visit.

    • ANSWER:
      Too many employers are overstepping their bounds in this economy because they know they can.

      Here's what you do. Make a copy, black out the prescription information etc, on the copy and give him that, If he isn't satisfied with that, go job hunting.

      I mean seriously would he dare ask a female employee who went to the hospital for paper describing the medication and and procedure she required for a ovarian cyst? or the removal of her a cancerous cervix?

  45. QUESTION:
    Is this cancer hereditary?
    I'm a 13 year old healthy girl.
    My mom is 57. Her mom died when she was in her late 60's of ovarian cancer.
    My mom's sister had breast cancer when she was 50 but lived.
    My mom had a non-cancerous (but it could have turned into cancer if she didn't remove it, but she is ok now) cyst on her ovary she just got removed.

    I don't know if they all have a BRCA mutation, but I think its a pretty big coincidence for them all to get breast/ovarian cancer.

    Do you think they do? If they do, what is my chance?
    How can I get tested, and what is the procedure?
    Ovarian cancer is fairly uncommon.
    Breast is like a 1 in 8 chance of getting it in your life, but ovarian is like 1 in 30.

    • ANSWER:
      I doubt it is hereditary as both women were 50 or older when diagnosed.
      If it was hereditary and if your mother has the gene than you would have a 50% chance of getting the gene too. It is simple to be tested for the BRCA gene mutations as all they need is a blood sample, but it costs about ,000. And you are correct, ovarian cancer is fairly uncommon.

  46. QUESTION:
    could this be dangerous?
    my cousin said she found a lump in her skin in her private area. it is inside her skin and she said it was round and she could feel it and kind of move it around.
    she is young and not sexually active, and we were wondering if anyone knew what it was, like if it could be cancer or something.

    • ANSWER:
      Assuming it is on the labia: These are merely sebacious glands and they come and go on their own. Unless it is irritated or full of pus, it is not infected. If you pull down your bottom lip (of your mouth, of course) you can see little bumps under the skin. This is the same idea, only larger, and there are more of them. They feel kind of pearly, like they move, and are under the skin, not on the surface.

      If it is on the skin surrounding the genital area, it could be anything as simple as an ingrown hair or a pimple.

      Don't pick or scratch at them, and don't try to pop them. This just opens you up to a world of infection. If it gets larger, infected, or painful you can visit a doctor. If you leave it alone it should go away.

      At this age (as she is not sexually active) there is no need to worry about sexually transmitted infections unless there has been sexual abuse, and a cancerous cyst is very unlikely. Cervical, ovarian, or uterine cancers would affect the internal genital area, and would not be found on the skin. Melanoma, especially in this location and at this age, is highly highly highly unlikey.

  47. QUESTION:
    Help! constant left side abdominal pain...?
    Ok, so i have done a lot of research on the web to see if any has symptoms like me. Turns out there is a lot of you out there. So to start off i have been having pain in my lower left side of my abdomen for a few months now. It is there a lot and is sometimes a stabbing pain other times dull nagging pain. It has now moved up to my upper left side and is just under my rib cage. It feels tender and when i breathe in i feel a stabbing pain. Its a constant pain that is sometimes worse or barely noticeable at all. My lower left side of my back just recently has started to hurt as well. To make things worse i have severe menstrual cramps and always have since i started my period. They are so bad and i have been hospitalized for the pain. The cramps are usually worse on the left side then the right. I also feel bloated and have gas along with a burning indigestion feeling that has recently started. Im very worried about all this and don't have health insurance. So if anyone has helpful advice or any ideas of whats wrong i would really appreciate it! Thanks so much for your time!

    • ANSWER:
      Hello-
      It sounds like an ovary problem. It can be an ovarian cyst filled with fluid or it can even be ovarian cancer. I don't want to scare you but you asked and that's the answer. Most likely it's just a cyst. You have to go to a gyn doctor, describe your symptoms and demand an ultrasound (sonogram). With an ultrasound the doctor can see if there's a cyst and with a simple blood test they can see if it's cancerous. There are many different kinds of cysts and they can all be corrected, but don't go for the 'natural rememdies' you see online because they won't work.
      (http://www.emedicinehealth.com/ovarian_cysts/article_em.htm

      I'm sorry you don't have health insurance. Depending on where you live there may be free healthcare or assistance if you are under 21. There may also be special assistance for people under a certain income level. If you google 'help for people with no health insurance' + your state, you should come up with some resources to research.

      Take care of yourself and don't put it off. This is getting worse, not better, right? So get busy! Wishing you all the best-

      P.S.: A hernia won't give you bloating and gas. Your appendix is on the right side, not the left.

      PSPS: Symptom check
      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/ovarian-cancer/DS00293/DSECTION=symptoms

  48. QUESTION:
    Wow, this really hurts.?
    It's not pms no period pains.
    They just occur on random days at random times.
    Ok, so i am a non sexually active 15 yr. old female.
    Lately, i have been noticing a wretched pain in my pelvis.
    It is a pain that is so terrible until it's indescribable.
    It usually last for about 30 minutes or so and it interrupts whatever I am doing.
    I don't know of any way to stop it nor make it go away.
    The pain is wherever it comes.
    It also is a very sharp pain.
    If anybody has any suggestions as to what it could be, it would be very much appreciated.
    Thank You!

    • ANSWER:
      It could be something as simple as a urinary tract infection or perhaps common ovarian cysts which usually dissipate on their own. However sometimes they do NOT, I recommend you go see your obgyn just to play it safe (since ovarian cysts can sometimes be cancerous). UTI needs to be treated w/ an antibiotic. If they are cysts,they may go away on their own but sometimes they need to be removed. Ovarian cysts ARE very common (most women dont even know they have them). I found a few sites on this topic that you can refer to as well & listed them below. But either way I recommend you see your Dr. if your having pain. I hope this helps & you feel better soon!

can simple ovarian cysts be cancerous

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