Can Large Fibroids Be Shrunk

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    How soon can you get a fibroid removed after having a baby by c- section?
    If I am having a c- section, how soon after the baby is born can they remove a large fibroid? Mine is big and has caused problems in the past.

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroids grew during pregnancy and shrink after. If you are having a c-section, your doctor will be able to see exactly where the fibroid is and tell you if it can be removed without causing problems. I know women who had the fibroids removed during the c-section and later had more children without problems, but there are other women who could not have the fibroids removed because it would have caused too much blood loss. If the fibroid is not causing any problems during your pregnancy and you want more children, than leave it alone because it will shrink after giving birth. Only you and your doctor can decide if the fibroid must or can be removed and when.

  2. QUESTION:
    What will the hospital stay be for abdominal hysterectomy?
    I'm 29, having an abdominal hysterectomy next week. I am having this due to a large fibroid on my uterus. My insurance isn't the best, so I'm sure I am going to have a lot of money invested in this. I have read that most people are in the hospital for 2 nights. Will there be anyway I will only have to stay for one night? If I am doing fine, will I have this option?

    • ANSWER:
      I had an abdomial hysterectomy 13 months ago. I was there for 3 days, but it was because they were afraid that I was going into pneumonia. I tend to breathe shallow. There is a yahoogroup for women who were or already had a hysterectomy and they were soooo helpful. They were so sweet and gave out alot of tips. I had two grapefruit size fibroids and then they said that there were smaller ones. What was really cool tho, my doctor took a pics of them for me. Everyday after surgery you get better and better. I didn't go back to work for 10 weeks. So don't go back too soon. Hospital food hasn't changed much. It's bland the first day. After that I loved the pudding, and popsicles. It is so nice not having your period anymore. Now mine was a total. I have her take everything out, so this is a decision between you and your doctor. But I figure, I am 50 at the time, and if I left my overies that what happens if they go bad and I had to go back in for surgery. I wasn't going to do that. Did your doctor talk to you about maybe trying to shrink them first?

      Also, I have never in this year have any symptoms of menopause. I was very lucky. I don't take anything at all. I take vitamins from GNC, and make sure you keep up on your calcium okay. If you want to email me with questions, I would be happy to talk to you.

  3. QUESTION:
    What is the average size of a human uterus ??
    I have been scanned and found to have two large fibroids but not sure how their size compares to the size of my uterus. Or what the treament may be.

    • ANSWER:
      The uterus varies in size depending on the woman's age and whether she has had previous pregnancies. The average adult uterus is about 3 inches long, 2 inches wide, and 1 inch thick. After menopause, the uterus shrinks to the pre-adolescent size.

      Uterine fibroids are tumors or growths, made up of muscle cells and other tissues that grow within the wall of the uterus (or womb). Although fibroids are sometimes called tumors, they are almost always benign (not cancerous). The medical term for fibroids is uterine leiomyomata (you-ter-in lie-oh-my-oh-mah-tah). Fibroids can grow as a single growth or in clusters (or groups). Their size can vary from small, like an apple seed (or less than one inch), to even larger than a grapefruit, or eight inches across or more.

      Uterine fibroids are the most common, benign tumors in women of childbearing age, but no one knows exactly what causes them. They can be frustrating to live with when they cause symptoms. Not all women with fibroids have symptoms, but some have pain and heavy menstrual bleeding. Fibroids also can put pressure on the bladder, causing frequent urination.

  4. QUESTION:
    How can you get rid of Uterine Fibroids without having surgery?
    I have a uterine fibroid that's 8cm in diameter, about the size of an orange. Anyway, what other ways besides surgery can I get rid of it?

    • ANSWER:
      There is nothing you can do naturally. My MIL has one the size of a grapefruit and she's one of those herbal loving people who is convinved herbs/natural remedies can cure all. So she set out on taking a bunch of weird crap like tree bark and pussywillow fluff...( LOL I don't know the exact names but this is good enough) and told herself it would shrink her fibroid. Well,....it didn't. It's now even larger than before and she risks rupturing her uterus because she won't get it treated by a medical doctor. Please don't follow her steps. These can be really dangerous if you leave them untreated.

  5. QUESTION:
    Anyway to heal or cure uterine fibroids without drugs and surgery? Like naturally or with herbal remedies?
    I was recently diagnosed with uterine fibroids and my doctor offered me options that I don't like - drugs and surgery. I am searching for alternatives and wanted to know if anyone has maybe tried a homeopathic or herbal remedy that they could recommend. I would have asked my doctor but don't believe I would get an objective answer. I'm deathly afraid of surgery and hate taking drugs. I'm african-american and 28 years old and want children in the future. Thanks in advance.

    • ANSWER:
      I did a search and pulled this off a website I found:

      How To Shrink Uterine Fibroids By Up To 86%...
      Without Drugs, Surgery Or Harmful Side-Effects

      Inside you'll discover...

      The risks and side effects of medical treatments for uterine fibroids you will never hear from your doctor

      Tried and tested strategies for overcoming painful intercourse

      How to stop heavy bleeding, cramps and bloating within hours

      How to get fast relief from period pain - without drugs or nasty side effects

      7 easy lifestyle changes you can make today to shrink your fibroids and restore your periods to normal

      How to get pregnant even if you have large fibroids, and tips on fibroids and pregnancy

      Why you should never have surgery for fibroids (especially fibroid embolization)

      7 foods for shrinking fibroids, and 7 foods that make them grow (and how to avoid these dangerous foods)

      And the latest scientific breakthroughs on natural remedies for uterine fibroids

      You can sign up for their newsletter on that website.
      Hope that's what you were looking for. Best wishes.

  6. QUESTION:
    Anyone have any luck getting pregnant after taking Vitex (Chasteberry) with uterine fibroids?
    Hello,

    My SIL has a couple very large uterine fibroids and has been having a lot of trouble getting pregnant. She definatly doesn't want to get surgery. I have been looking into homeopathic medicine and found some materials on Vitex for shrinking the fibroids....Just wondering if anyone has used this, or know of success with this....Thanks so much!

    • ANSWER:
      hi i don't know about vitex but I had huge fibroids when i got pregnant. i even had a surgery before getting pregnant to remove the fibroids which were as big as 20 weeks pregnancy. but they grew back within the heeling period. so i had no other option other than to try to conceive. i was lucky enough to get pregnant but the fibroides got bigger during the pregnancy. my daughter was born premature at 30 weeks pregnancy, doctors removed the uterus when my baby was taken out which was nearly 6kg big due to all the fibroids. my daughter was 2 lb when born, she stayed in hospital ISU for 2 months. Now she is 2 years old and she is fine.

  7. QUESTION:
    Is there a way to prevent or reduce the growth of fibroids?
    I understand that fibroids are common and once developed, it really doesn't go away. But is there a way to prevent getting any more of them or having them grow larger? Is there a certain diet or lifestyle that can be contributed to them?

    I thought I read somewhere that although it is not a certain cause, fibroids seem to occur often in women who experience weight gain.

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroids develop from abnormal cell growth in the uterus (womb). The exact cause of these benign tumors is not known. However, both genetic and environmental conditions have been identified as contributing risk factors for fibroids. A number of factors may increase a woman’s likelihood of developing uterine fibroids. These include:

      Age. Although they can occur at any age after puberty, fibroids most frequently appear in women aged 30 to 40 years old. In addition, early age at menarche, especially before age 10, is considered a risk factor for the condition later in life.

      Genetics and heredity. Research indicates that many fibroids contain alterations in genes that code for uterine muscle cells. Women who have a mother or sister with fibroids appear to be at increased risk of developing them.

      Ethnicity. Fibroids tend to appear more frequently among black women than Caucasians. Also, black women tend to develop fibroids at younger ages, and also typically experience numerous and/or larger fibroids.

      Hormonal changes. Research indicates that the hormones estrogen and progesterone appear to influence the growth of uterine fibroids. When a woman with uterine fibroids experiences hormonal changes during pregnancy, the fibroids typically enlarge. However, after childbirth the fibroids tend to shrink back to the original size. In addition, when women stop menstruating (menopause), uterine fibroids usually shrink or disappear altogether. Other studies indicate that hormones that help the body maintain tissues, such as the insulin-like growth factor, may also affect fibroid growth.

      High-fat diet and alcohol consumption. Significant consumption of red meats (e.g., beef, ham) and alcoholic beverages, especially beer, is associated with an increased risk of developing fibroids in the uterus.

      Obesity. Having a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or greater appears to increase a woman’s risk of developing these benign tumors of the uterus.

      There's really a lot of great information on fibroids - their prevention, treatment, signs and symptoms at the women's site below. Take a look - I'm sure you'll find it helpful!

      http://obgyn.health.ivillage.com/uterineovarianhealth/uterinefibroids.cfm

  8. QUESTION:
    What does it mean if your uterus is too large?
    My doctor said that my uterus is too large, I don't know what that mean.
    I am not pregnant, never had any children. In fact I am still a virgin.

    • ANSWER:
      The size of a woman's uterus depends on if she has had children or not, and can be anywhere from slightly smaller than her fist to stretched all the way up to the belly button in a term pregnancy. It will then usually shrink back down to just slightly larger than her fist. Using that as the size guage is one way to suspect pregnancy, since the enlargement is usually something that can be palpated. Aside from pregnancy, a uterus can sometimes be distended if there are multiple tumors or fibroids present inside. If you aren't having problems, though, and they don't suspect something like pregnancy, fibroids or tumors, a slightly larger than usual size really doesn't mean a lot. Just that you've had a baby, possibly multiples like twins, or have had several pregnancies. And you wouldn't expect to suffer from cramps much, since the muscles that make up the uterus are stretched and somewhat lax. It could also be yours is just on the large side. People and organs come in a variety of sizes. If the doctor didn't look concerned then you can probably relax, because size alone doesn't mean anything. And on the brighter side, at least you don't have to diet to get it down to a smaller dress size.

  9. QUESTION:
    I have been diagnosed with a 7cm x 9 cm uterine fibroid.?
    I am schuelded for a consult to discuss my treatment options. Any input from anyone?? Does this sound like an unusually large fibroid?

    • ANSWER:
      In the past, if fibroids caused heavy frequent periods, a hysterectomy was performed especially in women over 35. Now, the fibroid can be removed leaving the uterus intact. It can be surgically removed, burned or frozen. The latest technique is inserting a catheter in the femoral artery and blocking the artery that feeds the fibroid, thus cutting off the blood supply and causing the fibroid to shrink away. With this method there is only a tiny cut in the leg where the catheter was inserted. The patient is usually discharged the next day. All needed info will be given to you during your consult as there are more than a few options available today. Your fibroid is large, but not unusually so.

  10. QUESTION:
    Are there any options for fibroid treatment?
    I am working on my research on fibroid; how does it effect women and what are the sign/symptoms. But the question is: what type of treatment that can be much safer and curable for women when recover from a fibroid.

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroids can be treated with medication or surgery.

      Treating fibroids with medication

      GnRHA

      GnRHA (gonadotropin released hormone agonist), administered by injection. GnRHAs make the woman's body produce much lower quantities of estrogen, which makes the fibroids shrink. GnRHA stops the woman's menstrual cycle. It is important to remember that GNRHAs are not contraceptives, and they do not affect a woman's fertility when she stops treatment.

      GNRHAs are also very helpful for women who have heavy periods and discomfort in their abdomen. GNRHAs may have menopause-like symptoms as their main side-effect, this might include hot flashes (UK: flushes), a tendency to sweat more, and vaginal dryness. Although thinning of the bones (osteoporosis) is also a possible side-effect, it is rare.

      GnRHAs may be administered to the patient before surgery in order to shrink the fibroids. GNRHAs are for short-term, not long-term use.

      GNRHAs combined with HRT (hormone replacement therapy) are sometimes prescribed to prevent menopause-like symptoms.

      Other drugs may be used to treat fibroids; however, they are less effective for larger fibroids. These include:

      Tranexamic acid - they are presented in tablet form and are taken by the patient from the day pre menstrual period starts for up to 4 days. This is done each month. If symptoms do not improve within three months the patient should stop taking this medication. Tranexamic acid helps blood in the uterus clot, which reduces bleeding. A woman's fertility will not be affected by this treatment as soon as it is over.

      Anti-inflammatory drugs - these medications are taken for a few days during the patient's menstrual period. They may include such drugs as mefanamic and ibuprofen. Anti-inflammatory medications reduce the amount of prostaglandins the body produces. Prostaglandins are hormones which are associated with heavy periods. These drugs are also painkillers. They do not affect a woman's fertility.

      The contraceptive pill - these are used to stop menstruation from occurring.

      LNG-IUS (Levonorgestrel intrauterine system) - this is a plastic device which is placed inside the uterus. LNH-IUS releases levonorgestrel (progestogen hormone). This hormone stops the lining of the uterus from growing too fast, which effectively reduces bleeding. One of the side-effects of this treatment is irregular bleeding for up to six months, headaches, breast tenderness, and acne. In very rare cases it can stop the woman's periods.

      Surgery to treat fibroids

      When medications have not worked, the patient may have to undergo surgery to cure the Fibroids. The following surgical procedures may be considered:

      Hysterectomy - removing the uterus. This is only ever considered if the fibroids are very large, or if the patient is bleeding too much. Hysterectomies are sometimes considered as an option to stop recurrences of fibroids (stop them coming back). Hysterectomies have two possible side-effects: 1. Reduced libido. 2. Early menopause.

      Myomectomy - the fibroids are surgically removed from the wall of the uterus. This option is more popular for women who want to get pregnant (as opposed to a hysterectomy). Women with large fibroids, as well as those whose fibroids are located in particular parts of the uterus may not be able to benefit from this procedure.

      Endometrial ablation - this involves removing the lining of the uterus. This procedure may be used if the patient's fibroids are near the inner surface of the uterus. This procedure is considered as an effective alternative to a hysterectomy.

      UAE (Uterine Artery Embolization) - this treatment stops the fibroid from getting its blood supply. UAE is generally used for women with large fibroids. UAEs effectively shrink the fibroid. A chemical is injected through a catheter into a blood vessel in the leg - it is guided by X-ray scans.

      Magnetic-resonance-guided percutaneous laser ablation - an MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan is used to locate the fibroids. Then very fine needles are inserted through the patient's skin and pushed until they reach the targeted fibroids. A fiber-optic cable is inserted through the needles. A laser light goes through the fiber-optic cable, hits the fibroids and shrinks them.

      Magnetic-resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery -" an MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan locates the fibroids, and then sound waves are aimed at them. This procedure also shrinks the fibroids.

      Most experts say Magnetic-resonance-guided percutaneous laser ablation and Magnetic-resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery are both effective - however, there is some uncertainty regarding their benefits vs. risks.

  11. QUESTION:
    How to shrink uterus fibroids without surgical operation?
    I have a large number of uterus fibroids since many years that increased in size and enlarged my uterus than its normal size, i become like a pregnant in around 5 months and started to cause bleeding I am 48 years old now. what should I do to shrink fibroids without surgical operation? Can food shrink fibroids and what other ways should I follow?
    Tks

    • ANSWER:
      I am unaware of anything you can do non-surgical to shrink fibroids. Everyone I've known who've had these have ended up with a hysterectomy. Sorry I don't have more positive suggestions. Best of luck!

  12. QUESTION:
    Natural ways of shrinking uterine fibroids and ovarian cysts?
    Today I was diagnosed with three uterine fibroids (3 cm each) and a small ovarian cyst. I don't want to get surgery as it could be dangerous for other organs. Are there any natural ways of shrinking them?

    Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroids are benign uterine growths. Many women have no symptoms while others experience bleeding, increased urination, bladder displacement, urine retention, constipation, infertility, miscarriage, pain during intercourse and anemia. Ovarian cysts are enlarged follicles that fail to rupture and release an egg. Women may experience general pain, disrupted periods, pain in the back and abdomen and painful intercourse. Both of these conditions are caused by imbalances in estrogen production. There are many natural treatments to deal with both of these conditions. Talk to your doctor about any natural supplements you are using.

      Herbal Treatments for Fibroids

      Herbal treatments that address bleeding often work quite quickly, but supplements that control hormone levels take about three months of use before bringing about noticeable results.

      Black cohosh controls bleeding and relieves pain; take 500 milligrams daily. Cinnamon oil has a long history of use in traditional American medicine to control bleeding fibroids. Use 10-to-15 drops every 15 minutes until the bleeding stops. Dan shen, which should only be used under professional supervision, treats congealed blood, dark red clots during menstruation, and relieves pelvic congestion. Reishi tincture alleviates pelvic inflammation. Take one tablespoon in ¼ cup of water three times daily.

      There are three traditional Chinese formulas that are commonly used to treat uterine fibroids. Take as directed on the product label.

      Augmented Rambling powder lowers estrogen levels and is most useful for women who are also suffering from painful or difficult urination. Cinnamon Twig and Poria Pill lowers estrogen levels without interfering with the menstrual cycle or causing weight gain. Four Substance Decoction treats fibroids and is especially useful for women who eat a poor diet.
      Herbal Treatments for Ovarian Cysts

      Dioscorea tincture, also known as wild yam, alleviates cramping caused by ovarian cysts. Take as directed on the label. Dong quai relieves pain resulting from this condition. Take 1,000 milligrams daily during the two-week period after menstruation and then discontinue for two weeks.

      There are several Chinese formulas used to treat ovarian cysts. Use as directed on the product label.

      Dong Quai and Peony Powder reduces estrogen levels and the formation of inflammatory substances in the tissues that line the uterus. Two Cured Decoction reduces estrogen levels. Augmented Rambling Powder and Cinnamon Twig and Poria pill, which are listed above, can also be used for ovarian cysts

      Estrogen is produced from body fat. Excess weight increases the amount of estrogen in the body, so make an effort to maintain a normal weight. Do your best to exercise regularly and reduce stress levels. Avoid the following herbs that stimulate estrogen production: Coleus, Cordyceps, fennel seed, licorice, and moutan.
      What Are Uterine Fibroid Cysts?
      Uterine fibroid cysts are noncancerous tumors that grow in or around the uterus. Uterine fibroids are a common medical complaint, occurring in up to 80 percent of ...
      Uterine Cysts
      Uterine cysts are tumors that can vary in size from less than 1 inch to as large as a melon. Also referred to as uterine fibroids, or simply fibroids, these growths ...
      Dong Quai Benefits

      Dong quai (Angelica sinensis) is a plant found at high altitudes in the mountain regions of China, Korea and Japan. It has been used for thousands of years to treat a ...
      How to Cure Ovarian Cysts & Uterine Fibroids

      Ovarian cysts and uterine fibroids are two problems that commonly affect women. In many cases, they go away on their own, without requiring treatment. However, they ...
      Uterine Fibroid Laser Treatment

      Uterine fibroids are quite common, and usually go away on their own. Even when this does not occur, these fibroids are usually benign. However, when they result in ...
      How to Treat Uterine Fibroids With Natural Medicine

      Uterine fibroids are hard growths that occur in the muscle tissue of the uterus, particularly in women between the ages of 35 and 45. Often fibroids cause little or ...
      Herbs to Take for Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

      Polycystic ovary syndrome is a disorder of the ovaries that causes multiple follicles to develop and form into clumps. Rather than disintegrate during menstruation ...
      Ovarian Fibroid Procedures

      According to the University of Pennsylvania, fibroids are a common abnormal growth within the uterus and are the No. 1 reason U.S. women have a hysterectomy. Fibroids ...
      Homeopathic Treatment Help for Shrinking a Uterus Fibroid

      In some cases, homeopathic medicine can be extremely helpful in shrinking uterine fibroids. A fibroid is a muscle tumor that can produce heavy menstrual bleeding ...

  13. QUESTION:
    Doe anyone have personal knowledge of the reduction/disappearance of a large fibroid without surgery?
    I've been offered a date for surgical removal of a large fibroid, but don't want to go ahead without being sure of having exhausted less drastic options.
    Small fibroids have been known to go away of their own accord but how about larger ones?
    There are lots of claims over the internet, but they are generally linked to someone trying to sell something.
    Does anyone have PERSONAL KNOWLEDGE of this, or of something (other than surgery) that actually worked?

    • ANSWER:
      I have personal knowledge,Persistent..knowledge gained from seeing many women fall victim to the myth that fibroids can be removed without surgery.
      It IS a myth - not reality at all.Surgery seems drastic to all of us; that's only natural. But, the truth of the matter is simply that fibroids don't disappear any other way.
      I have seen women of child-bearing age cling to the hope of non-surgical removal for years, trying one herbal "remedy" after another..until they reached their menopause and were no longer fetrtile; when they could have surgically removed the fibroids and had children.
      lf you are peri-menopausal and will soon cease menstruation,or are not interested in child-bearing,then there is a tablet that can shrink the fibroid and stop all symptoms - it's called DANAZOL.
      Ask your doctor about it.
      All the best wishes for your health.

  14. QUESTION:
    I am at the brink of menopause should I still get a hysterectomy because I have fibroid?
    Hysterectomy is still considered a big surgery and many painful days of recovery, the fibroid I have sits on my bladder that is making me very uncomfortable. My question is should I get it all taken out now?

    • ANSWER:
      Normally with the onset of menopause with the estrogen levels going down your fibroid tumors will shrink on its own. Hence is is worth to adopt a wait and watch approach in the hope that your fibroids will automatically clear up with surgery post menopause.

      In the meantime try making diet, lifestyle changes which can relieve you of fibroid symptoms to a large extent. Accupuncture is also very useful for treating fibroids naturally.
      http://ezinearticles.com/?Diet,-Herbs,-and-Exercise---3-Components-of-a-Natural-Fibroid-Cure&id=4147877

  15. QUESTION:
    What was your best and worst experience with a fibroid tumor when pregnant?
    I knew something was wrong. I just didn't know what. I have the worst time getting up, going to the bathroom and still have trouble holding my food. Being five months along the dr when hearing my symtoms became concerned. When checking for the baby we found what looked to be like a blood clot. Dr placed me on meds and we waited two weeks. Went back on thursday to take another look. I told the Dr that I am still sick and I felt bad. Another sonogram to chk the baby and there was this mass that got larger. Then the Dr confirmed it is a Fibroid tumor. As he rolls over the area where the fibroid is located the sensitivity to my stomach is rather tender and somewhat painful. No more work for me and nothing but bedrest. I am 5 months as of Sunday. What was some of your experiences? Any full term deleveries? What happened to you after delivery with the tumor. I was reallly worried, but a call came from the dr Fri. Test were in from the amnio. Baby is heathy and it's a boy! Tumor still scary!

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroids are actually pretty common. My doc discovered mine when I was pregnant with my second child. She was full term. She has disabilities, but it is a chromosome abnotmality, nothing to do with the fibroid at all. Estrogen can may fibroids swell. That's why they get so big when your close to starting your period or are pregnant. By the time my daughter was born, it was the size of her head! Then it shrank a little after I had her. With my my third child, we knew it was there and knew what to expect. He was also born full term and healthy as a horse. I did measure further along than what I really was because of the mass, but my doc knew that was the reason. Keep up with your OB after you have that baby boy. Fibroids can often cause heavy periods and make you look slightly prego if they are too big. In that case you have them removed. Not a big deal either. Good Luck with a beautiful baby boy.

  16. QUESTION:
    How is a uterine/ovarian cyst/fibroid diagnosed?
    Hi guys! I was just wondering, how does a Dr check for a uterine/ovarian cyst/fibroid? Does he/she perform an ultrasound on you, similar to the one done on pregnant women?
    Afterwards, what treatment options are available? Can a woman have sex/children afterwards?
    Thank you so much for your help!!

    • ANSWER:
      If they're big enough, the doc can feel it during an exam. Then the doc will order an ultrasound and can see it on the ultrasound. For ovarian cysts, the doc will usually do an internal ultrasound--the ultrasound wand is put in your vagina. It's easier to see small things that way. But for something large, then the doc will do an external ultrasound (on your belly) like they do for pregnant women.

      For ovarian cysts, there are 3 things possible to do:
      1) nothing--wait and see if it goes away on its own
      2) birth control pills--see if they make it go away
      3) surgery to remove the cyst

      Sometimes cysts interfere with pregnancy, sometimes not. Depends on the type of cyst. Sometimes when removing the cyst, the ovary must be removed too. But you can be fertile with just one ovary.

      For uterine fibroids, there are several possibilities. They will never go away on their own.
      1) uterine artery embolization (UAE)--a relatively new procedure to non-surgically shrink the fibroid so it goes away, via blocking the artery supplying it with blood.
      2) surgery to remove the fibroid only--called myomectomy
      3) hysterectomy
      With UAE, you can remain fertile. With hysterectomy, you won't be fertile anymore. And having a fibroid can interfere with carrying pregnancy.

  17. QUESTION:
    Hi, anyone out there from Ohio. I am soon to have an hysterectomy to have fibroids and my uterus removed?
    Should be able to keep ovaries. I am in the Cincinnati Ohio area. Tell me about your TAH. I need encourgament I am almost at the point to cancel my surgery date which is in 3 weeks.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi
      I'm not from Ohio, but am a writer about women's health issues-I have written hundreds of articles on fibroids!
      Have you had any thoughts at all about trying natural treatments to shrink your fibroids? I know it's not an easy task but if you are committed, it can definitely work. I guess it will largely depend on how large your fibroids are though and what problems they are causing.
      If you go ahead with surgery, you should certainly do everything possible to keep your ovaries, although it's no guarantee that you won't go into an early menopause as sometimes the shock can send women over the edge. Additionally, women who have had hysterectomies do traditionally go through the menopause(even when ovaries are intact) earlier than those who still have their uterus.

      I assume you've looked at all the less invasive procedures, such as ablation and myectomy etc?

      For more info, you might like to look at my website, How To Shrink Fibroids- there are details of all the various procedures etc on there. Good luck.

      http://www.shrink-fibroids.info

  18. QUESTION:
    What is the best way to get rid of a fibroid tumor??
    I was diagnosed with a fibroid tumor over two years ago. The thing has gotten bigger over time and is now starting to look like the early stages of a pregnancy,. I cannot wear any of my cute little dresses anymore because the stomach bulge from the tumor is embarassing.
    I haven't been to the obgyn in two years because I do not have very good health insurance and it is very expensive. The last time I did go she just told me that as long as I am not having any complications from it, than there is nothing I should do about it. I am starting to become embarassed with the way that I look and I want to get rid of it. I have done some online research about it but it talks about having surgery or getting pills to shrink it. Surgery is too expensive and I can't afford it and the pills seem like a gimmick.
    Is there anything that I can do to rid mysel of this ugly tumor?? Help
    I am only 30 and I do not want to have to dress like an old lady.

    • ANSWER:
      Que paso Stacy,

      Im drorganico, natural health practitioner for 12 years and have dealt with several dozens cases like yours and every single one of them, when they client followed every step of the protocol that is, has been cleared up with 6 to 8 weeks of detoxing and making the right adjustments in their lifestyles.

      As you said, your 30 and lots of carefree living in front of you so please get a hold of your emotions and forget the old lady analogies, lets get you back to the secure and sexy image that you know you have of yourself. This can be dealt with faster than you can imagine. However I do need to mention that lack of action on your part will make not being able to wear cute little things a very minor issue compared to other complications that will certainly come about.

      Forget surgery and forget additional costly "toxic legal poison" known as pharmaceuticals prescribed by docs that realy dont know that there are legit, effective and economic solutions that work in harmony with your body, not against it, Ill give you some basic info and if you cant find a decent natural practitioner in your city, and you want some detailed help, contact me through yahoo, my email is listed.

      Stacey, my business slogan is EDUCATE SO AS NOT TO MEDICATE, so bear with me while I give you some basic information so your informed and at least make informed decisions not just heresay, trendy and gossip decisions.

      The fibroid tumor is a hard, benign (noncancerous) tumor that generally occurs in the uterine wall. It usually has no toxic effects on the body and causes problems only if it grows large enough to physically encroach on vital structures. If such tumors are present in the uterus as a woman approaches menopause, they may produce abnormal menstrual bleeding.

      At times this bleeding can be controlled only by removing the uterus. In many cases, much less extreme and natural measures are more than satisfactory. The cause of fibroid tumors remains medicaly unproven though there are many solid theories. Researchers in my natural health field believe its due to certain trace mineral deficiencies via an imbalance of the body PH, more on that in bit.

      The balance of ovarian hormones must play some part in their formation because as a woman goes through menopause, the fibroids present frequently retrogress and atrophy along with the normal shrinking of the uterus.

      Many tumors are in the early stages respond well to the use of certain detox protocols and trace mineral supplementation, this in combination of consuming less acid forming foods and more alkaline forming foods and the all important stress management aspect which also plays a factor in why these tumors formed in the fist place since its a know scientifica fact that un managed stress releases a large amount of unnecessary acid in your system.

      To accomplish this, I recommedn certain detox herbs, supplements with natural detox agents; essential vitamins that reinforce the immune system, vegetable protein and supplementation.

      This combined with spiritual reconnection therapy is effective in virtualy all cases within a time frame of 7 days to get rid of pain, 8 to 12 weeks for the enitre detox process to take hold and at about 12 weeks after the process begins get an ultrasound to confirm what you will already know and feel, the tumor has been flushed out naturaly with no drugs or toxins.

      Now Stacy, about one of the main root causes of your tumor, PH out of balance. Let me explain.

      The body is dominated by 2 chemicals, alkaline and acid, when the acid takes over for a considerable length of time the entire cell structure and tissues are deprived of sufficient oxygen, this is called an "anaerobic enviroment" this was discovered by 2 time Nobel Prize winner in science and medicine, Dr. Otto Werberg, a German physician that won those prestigious awards in 1931 and then again 1938, he also documented that once you get the PH to get more alkaline than acid, the oxygen comes back and no way that any tumor, germ, bacteria, paraiste, fungus or any illness can stay in the body since it doesnt have its required food, acid.

      So as you continue to remain in a Candida state, over acid, fungus starts to form in the inner organs, in your case the uterus and fellopian tubes, to try and combat this over acid state the body now produces mucus, the same icky yellowy stuff we have when we deal with head colds, the reason is that the acid we consume via canned and processed foods or foods that convert into acid in your body, toxic medicines, untreated stress and other factors, these acids have the ability to damage the membranes of your nerves and tissues, therefore the body as a defense mechanism engulfs the acid/toxins with the mucus and in a body with the proper PH balance, it ejects it, detoxes from the body and no problem.

      However in a body out of PH balance, which I suspect is your case, resulting in candida and anaerobic enviroment, the mucus now begins to accumulate in the inner wall of the intestines, tissues, joints, lungs, cells and inner organs so now the body has to produce EXTRA FAT CELLS to engulf the mucus to protect the organs from damage.

      Stacy I dont know if weight gain is an issue in your case, but in most over acid states it is. So in one sense the extra fat cells are actualy saving your life, however the negative result is the weight that wont come off cause your are constantly over acid. That is why it makes sense to eat foods high in alkaline and that way your body wont need to make mucus or fat cells to protect you.

      The solution?....... forget about calories, forget about fat grams, forget about cholesterol count, concentrate on detoxing your body with natural foods I will recommend, get rid of excess acid, get and maintaing the proper PH balance and the tumors will go away, your other symptoms will disipate, your mood will change to positive, weight will come off naturaly and with out these fad diets or toxic pills.

      Glad to help, Live healthy,
      droorganico

  19. QUESTION:
    What causes fibroids in the uterus and what the recommended treatment?

    • ANSWER:
      The exact cause of uterine fibroids is not known. Fibroids begin when cells overgrow in the muscular wall of the uterus. Once a fibroid develops, the hormones estrogen and progesterone appear to influence its growth. A woman's body produces the highest levels of these hormones during her childbearing years. After menopause, when hormone levels decline, fibroids usually shrink or disappear.
      Estrogen is thought to play a major role in fibroid growth because fibroids tend to grow larger when a woman's body produces more estrogen (during pregnancy), and usually shrink when a woman's body produces less estrogen (after menopause). Progesterone also seems to stimulate fibroid growth, even when estrogen is not present. Some women do not receive treatment because they do not have symptoms. Other treatments include: pain medication, medical therapy, and surgery to remove just the fibroid, to cut off the blood supply to the fibroid, or to remove the entire uterus.
      Doctors are exploring less-invasive surgeries and hormone therapy as other options.

  20. QUESTION:
    can uterine sarcoma occur without any vaginal bleeding in premenapausal women?
    I am a 47 premenopausal woman diagnosed with 5 fibroids (largest being 35*41) three years ago. I only experience occasional pelvic pain.

    • ANSWER:
      To look at your fibroids, I will quote from the Merk manual.

      "Uterine fibroids are benign uterine tumors of smooth muscle origin. Fibroids frequently cause abnormal vaginal bleeding (eg, menorrhagia, menometrorrhagia), pelvic pain and pressure, urinary and intestinal symptoms, and pregnancy complications. Diagnosis is by pelvic examination and imaging. Treatment of symptomatic patients depends on the patient's desire for fertility and desire to keep her uterus and may include oral contraceptives, brief presurgical gonadotropin-releasing hormone therapy to shrink fibroids, and more definitive surgical procedures (eg, myomectomy, hysterectomy, endometrial ablation). "

      Then to look at what the Merk says on endometrial cancer.
      "Symptoms and Signs. Most (> 90%) women have abnormal uterine bleeding (eg, postmenopausal bleeding, premenopausal recurrent metrorrhagia); 1⁄3 of women with postmenopausal bleeding have endometrial cancer. A vaginal discharge may occur weeks or months before postmenopausal bleeding."

      So, I would say that there are approximately 10% of endometrial cancers that do not present with vaginal bleeding or discharge to begin with. I think you are needlessly worrying about something. Continue to have your fibroids checked, especially if you have any change in discharge or bleeding!

  21. QUESTION:
    I am suffering from uterine fibroids what are my options?
    I am seeing a gynocolgist and he is not sure wheather I am going through menopause for they might shrink?I don't really want surgery(no insurance)but one fibroid is poking into my bladder!Need 2nd opinion???Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Treatment of Fibroids

      The most important question to ask is do the fibroids need to be treated at all. The vast majority of fibroids grow as a woman gets older, and tend to shrink after menopause. Obviously fibroids that are causing significant symptoms need treatment. While it is often easier to treat smaller fibroids than larger ones, most of the small ones never will need to be treated. So just because we can treat fibroids while they are small, it doesn't follow that we should treat them. And many women have successful pregnancies without removing the fibroids as long as they are not inside the uterine cavity. The location of the fibroids plays a strong influence on how to approach them.

      Treatment with medicines:

      There are not any currently available medicines that will permanently shrink fibroids. Often heavy bleeding can be decreased with birth control pills. There are a number of medications in the family of GnRH agonists, which induce a temporary chemical menopause. In the absence of estrogen myomas usually decrease in size. Unfortunately, the effect is temporary, and the fibroids rapidly go back to their pre-treatment size when the medication is discontinued. Mifepristone, better know as the 'French abortion pill, or RU-486, also may cause a decrease in size of myomas, and often stops abnormal uterine bleeding. It also has undesireable side effects. It's use is promising, but it is not currently available in the United States.

      Surgical treatment of Fibroids:

      There have been a number of procedures recently promoted for treatment of fibroids. Some are truly new. Others are being marketed as new in order to promote the sale of expensive instruments, without offering any real advantages. Many new procedures prove over time to be major advances; we may look back on others as not so wonderful. With any new procedure, it is important to look at studies published in peer-reviewed medical journals as well as promotional materials by a physician, clinic, or instrument manufacturer. Ask questions: how many of these procedures have been done in published studies; what is the outcome; how long have these patients been followed? In deciding whether any procedure is for you, you should look at advantages and disadvantages of all available options.

      Intracavitary Fibroids

      When a fibroid is inside the uterine cavity, it will almost always cause abnormal bleeding and cramping. If it is not currently causing problems, the odds are very high that it will. For this reason, I usually recommend that they be removed. These can usually be removed by using a special kind of hysteroscope, or resectoscope. The resectoscope is a telescope with a built-in loop that can cut through tissue. It has been used for years to treat enlargement of the male prostate gland, and has more recently been used inside the uterus. This is called hysteroscopic resection of myomas. In skilled hands most myomas inside the uterus can be removed in an outpatient setting. Click here to learn more about hysteroscopic resection of myomas.

      Submucous Fibroids

      Unlike intracavitary myomas, some of the fibroid is also in the wall of the uterus. Submucous myomas often cause abnormal bleeding. Many of these can also be treated by hysteroscopic resection. During the process of removing submucous myomas by this method the uterus contracts, and tends to push the portion of the myoma that is in the wall into the cavity of the uterus. The decision on which myomas should be treated by this method should be made by an experienced hysteroscopic surgeon. If heavy bleeding is the main reason for desiring treatment, and fertility is no longer desired, an endometrial ablation may also be done at the same time.

      Intramural and Pedunculated Fibroids

      Myomas that are in the wall of the uterus or on the outside of the uterus are not accessible to treatment through the cervix. If these need to be treated, there are essentially three types of procedures: remove the fibroid(s), destroy the fibroid(s), or remove the uterus. All of the surgical options available are variations on one of these themes. Some have been available for years. Others are very new and have had very little or no long term testing.

      Hysterectomy:

      Hysterectomy is the only procedure that comes with a guarantee: no more bleeding and no regrowth of fibroids. Like any alternative, there are advantages and disadvantages of having a hysterectomy. Click here to learn more about hysterectomy.

      Removal of the fibroid(s):

      This is also called myomectomy. Myomectomy, with one exception, means making an incision into the uterus and removing one or more fibroids. If the fibroid is on a stalk (pedunculated) it is not necessary to cut into the uterus to cut the stalk. Unless the fibroid is on the outside surface of the uterus, the uterus is repaired, usually with sutures. One of

  22. QUESTION:
    Fibroid tumor pushing uterus to one side?
    What do you do if you have a fibroid tumor pushing uterus to one side, so therefore sperm can't find its way to the egg? I have been examing and my tubes and everything looks good to get pregnant.

    • ANSWER:
      "There are 3 general locations for fibroids:
      Subserosal - on the outside surface of the uterus

      Intramural - within the muscular wall of the uterus

      Submucous - bulging in to the uterine cavity "

      "The only type that is supposed to have a large impact on reproductive function (unless they are large or numerous) is the submucous type that pushes in to the uterine cavity. These are much less common than the other 2 types of fibroids. Because of their location inside the uterine cavity, submucous fibroids can cause infertility problems or miscarriages."

      "The decision to actively treat fibroids can only be made on an individual basis. Most women require no treatment at all. If the tumors are small and cause no problems, most physicians will simply schedule an examination every six months to make sure the fibroids aren't growing.

      Reasons for Treatment
      Your doctor may decide to treat fibroids if they start growing rapidly, cause serious pain or discomfort, or may interfere with your ability to become pregnant"

      Option : " Myomectomy. Understandably, the prospect of any type of gynecologic surgery is upsetting to a woman who hopes to become pregnant. Yet continued presence of fibroids may in itself make pregnancy impossible. For women faced with this dilemma, a myomectomy is the procedure of choice.

      A myomectomy is the surgical removal of each tumor separately without damaging or disturbing the uterus. The procedure is successful in almost all women who choose to have it performed. Generally, it doesn't matter how numerous or how big the fibroids are or where they are located."

      "Physicians are starting to evaluate ways to treat fibroid tumors without surgery. A few have begun using lasers to remove them or reduce the size of fibroid tumors. Several scientific studies are underway to test a new drug treatment that shrinks fibroids. Most of the women who have used the drug had their fibroids shrink to half their starting size. The drug is leuprolide acetate (Lupron), a synthetic form of the naturally occurring substance known as gonadotropin-releasing hormone (also called GnRH)."

      If it's pushing your uterus to the side, wouldn't it push a baby also? I guess that's something to ask the doctor.

  23. QUESTION:
    I have been diagnosed with a anteverted uterus and intramural fibroid on the right lateral wall of my uterus?
    I have searched the web and nothing really explains to me what either of these diagnosis mean. I have been 'feeling' this fibroid alot recently and appears to be growing bigger causing a feeling of a large mass on my right hand side. Can anyone explain if this is normal and what intramural and anteverted uterus mean. Also if anyone knows of any natural ways the fibroid could be shrunk, I would be grateful to hear of them. Thanks in advance.

    • ANSWER:
      Let's see if I can help. Anteverted uterus refers to the direction the top of the uterus is pointing. Some are anteverted and some are retroverted. Anteverted is the most common and acceptable position of the uterus. This implies that the top is towards your front, or tummy. So there is nothing wrong with that. It is completeley normal--now on to the fibroid issue.

      Fibroids

      Fibroids, or myomas, are growths or benign tumours that form inside the uterus (womb). Around four in 10 women over the age of 40 will have fibroids. No one knows why fibroids develop, but it is suspected that the sex hormones - oestrogen and progesterone - play significant roles. This is because fibroids rarely grow in prepubescent girls and postmenopausal women. Pre-existing fibroids stop growing, and may even shrink, once a woman passes the menopause. Fibroids often cause no problems, but may occasionally be associated with infertility, miscarriage and premature labour. Other possible problems include heavy, lengthy and painful periods. Treatment depends on the size, number and location of the fibroids, but may include drugs and surgery. Fibroids rarely turn cancerous.
      .
      Different types
      Fibroids are categorised by their location, which includes:
      Intramural - growing in the uterine wall. Intramural fibroids are the most common variety.
      Submucosal - growing in the uterine lining (endometrium). This type tends to cause excessive menstrual bleeding and period pain.
      Subserosal - growing on the exterior wall of the uterus. They sometimes appear like long stalks

      Generally speaking if it doesn't bother you too much, just let it be.

  24. QUESTION:
    What treatments should I consider for a fibroid?
    I am a 30year old female. I got married 7months ago and we have been trying to get pregnant since then. Before marriage, I was not on any pills, I have never taken one... What I practised was abstinence.. I am sure it may sound weird!
    I went for an ultrasound when I noticed a palpable mass in my lower abdominal region, just inferior to the belly button and I was told I have a large fibroid growing out of the posterior wall of the fundus of the uterus. uterus and ovaries were normal. The fibroid itself measured 9*7*2, larger than the uterus measuring ~ 8cm, forgot other dimensions. it is however asymptomatic.. no pain, no bleeding, no blood spotting..
    I am awaiting a referral to a specialist, but my doctor told me that the likely effective solution is a surgery.
    I have been really disturbed, I really want to have children..... What do you think..? how successful is the likely outcome of surgery and is there any other treatment.. Is the fibroid preventing me from getting pregnant?

    • ANSWER:
      i am sorry to hear that
      Freedom from Fibroids,
      without the worries of surgery.

      Embolization is a medical advance that shrinks uterine fibroids. One tiny incision allows us to solve the problem quickly, safely and without surgery. Fibroids: Uterine Fibroid Tumor Treatment without Hysterectomy, at the Fibroid Treatment CollectiveIf you have fibroids and you don't want a hysterectomy, you should know about Uterine Fibroid Embolization. terine Artery Embolization: The Non-Surgical Cure for Fibroid Tumors.

      Embolization has existed as a medical procedure since 1975. In gynecology it was used to reduce bleeding during uterine surgery. Founding members of the Fibroid Treatment Collective noticed another important effect. It shrank fibroids. The promise of an effective, non-invasive treatment led to research, trials and medical acceptance. Today more than several hundred thousand women world-wide have found relief with this safe, simple procedure. The Fibroid Treatment Collective performed the very first fibroid embolization in America, and has perfected the procedure with thousands of successful treatments to date.

  25. QUESTION:
    I have large fibroids in my uterus (5 month pregnant) and c-section will be performed. Will it be painful?
    I went to see the gyc. and she said that she will not touch the fibroids during C-section. If she does what are the chances of Hysterectomy (removal of uterus) ? I am scared as it is my first pregnancy and I need more kids. Will these fibroids decrease in size by themselves or I need the treatment after pregnency?

    • ANSWER:
      "After pregnancy, fibroids tend to shrink in size, and probably won’t cause you any problems." I found a website that might be able to answer some of your questions.

      http://www.pregnancy-info.net/fibroids.html

  26. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know anything about fibroid tumors?
    I was wondering if surgery is the only way to get rid of them?
    and can they cause death?

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroid tumors are NOT necessarily cancerous; and certainly NOT deadly. But they CAN grow very large and become painful. After menopause they can SHRINK. Prior to that, however, you doctor COULD give you medication to shrink them. . . .but it COULD ALSO cause you to grow facial hair. A myomectomy would help to get rid of them while STILL preserving your uterus.

  27. QUESTION:
    has any one used alternative medicine to cure uterine fibroids? what kind was it?
    i have 2 fibroids and im 27 years old i dont want surgery and would like to use alternative medicine to cure them . but i would like to now if any one has actually use this method to cure them and what was it? or any doctor or clinic you guys reccommend? if any one could help me i would apprecciated!!!

    • ANSWER:
      Uterine fibroids are benign tumors of the smooth muscle that makes up most of the uterus. They are mostly found incidently duiring a routine ultrasound, and don't cause much of a problem. If they are large or numerous however they may cause pain and heavy periods.

      Since the surgery to remove them may interfere with your ability to become pregnant, surgery is only recommended for severe cases in women who definitelly are finished with having a family. There is a newer, non-surgical technique called embolization. With this, the blood supple to the fibroid is plugged, and they just shrink.

      On a review of Cochrane and PubMed, there is no "alternative" technique that has been shown to work.

  28. QUESTION:
    is it good to be on a birth control with a high level of hormones or low? 10pts.?
    Okay well I want to know what's the difference between both. Like high estrogen? Low estrogen? What makes my boobs stay larger? Haha please help give me all the info.

    • ANSWER:
      The hormone level you need is determined by the doctor. Most doctors prescribe low-dose hormones due to lower problems associated with lower doses. For the most part, they prescribe higher doses of hormone when a woman has reproductive problems such as endometriosis or fibroids because both attack the body, but can be slowed or even stopped by hormones. I've never heard of a birth control pill that shrinks your breasts...and depending on you and whatever pill you are prescribed, your breasts might grow. If they don't grow, they will stay the same size. For every pill, there are tons of women who will say their breasts got bigger, and tons of women who will say don't take it to help your breasts grow...breast growth is subjective to the individual user.

  29. QUESTION:
    Do fibroids hurt? do they make your stomack big? do they go away or is surgery reguired?
    What are the affects/signs of fibroids?

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroid symptoms can include incontinence, as they may put pressure on the bladder/bowel as they become larger - large enough to fill the abdominal cavity. Heavy periods. Pain. They can grow during pregnancy, which may be hormone influenced, and can reduce in size after pregnancy. They may also shrink following menopause. Surgical options include removal of the fibroids themselves, with potential regrowth, and hysterectomy. Embolization is a non surgical option where a catheter is inserted into the femoral artery and the blood vessels which supply the fibroids can be blocked when located.

  30. QUESTION:
    Anyone here with bad uterine fibroids?
    Wondering if anyone wants to share their story of having a uterine fibroid bad enough to warrent surgery. What were your symptoms. Did you have mucus discharge and bleeding?

    • ANSWER:
      For years now, I've considered myself the Queen of Uterine Fibroids.

      I've had them for over ten years now. And over that time, they have increased in size. The strange thing is that I only feel them during my menstrual cycle.

      In an ultrasound I had five months ago, I was told that there were two very large fibroids. When I was first diagnosed ten years ago, it was just ONE small fibroid the size of my thumb. Now there are two and they are now each the size of a fist.

      They run in my family. My mother has them as well, and happily for her, they shrunk away after she began menopause. I've got a few years to go before I can look forward to that "shrinkage."

      For now, I have no plans to have surgery for them, as they are not debilitating.

      They do cause heavier periods. I had a doctor who had suggested surgery, but I decided against that.

      I hope yours are better.

      Take care and I wish you well.

  31. QUESTION:
    What is Fybroid Tumors on the uterus?
    Why have an hysterectomy?

    • ANSWER:
      What are fibroids?
      Fibroid tumors are usually benign (non-cancerous) tumors found, most often, in the uterus of women in their 30's and 40's, although they occasionally develop on other organs which contain smooth muscle cells.
      Fibroid tumors are solid tumors which are made of fibrous tissue, hence the name 'fibroid' tumor. Most often fibroids occur as multiple tumor masses which are slow-growing and often cause no symptoms.

      The size of fibroids varies immensely among women and some are so small that a microscope is required to see them. However some women experience a single large fibroid tumor the size of a grapefruit or a fibroid which is so large it encompasses the entire abdominal area. Such large tumors can weigh as much as 50 pounds; the largest, reported, fibroid ever recorded weighed in at 140 pounds.

      No one is sure why fibroid tumors develop, but some facts are quite clear-- they do not develop before the body begins producing estrogen during the onset of menstruation-- estrogen, such as in birth control pills and taken for menopausal symptoms, does cause fibroid tumors to grow and fibroid tumors will grow very quickly during pregnancy when the body is producing extra estrogen-- they often shrink and disappear after menopause when the body stops producing estrogen--a woman will almost never develop fibroid tumors after menopause.

      The estrogen connection appears to be quite clear, although there are still some who doubt the role estrogen plays in the development of fibroid tumors because women with fibroids often have blood levels which reveal normal amounts of estrogen.

      Types of Fibroid Tumors
      Submucous Fibroids

      These fibroids occur just below the lining of the uterus and can cause menstrual problems, including pain as they grow and move around the pelvic area.

      Intramural Fibroids

      A round fibroid most often within the uterine wall which can cause enlargement of the uterus as they grow.

      Subserous Fibroids

      This fibroid grows on the outer wall of the uterus and usually causes no symptoms until it grows large enough to interfere with other organs.

      Pedunculated Fibroids

      These fibroids develop when a subserous fibroid grows a peduncle (stalk), as they grow larger they may become twisted and cause severe pain.

      Interligamentous Fibroid

      A fibroid which grows sideways between the ligaments which support the uterus in the abdominal region. This type of fibroid is especially difficult to remove without the possibility of interfering with the blood supply or other organs.

      Parasitic Fibroid

      The rarest form of fibroid tumor occurs when a fibroid attaches itself to another organ.

      Diagnosis of Fibroid Tumors
      Diagnosis of fibroids is generally made by your physician during your annual gynecological exam when your physician feels a mass, they often are found when your physician is looking for something else or may never be discovered if you do not experience symptoms. However larger fibroids may make examination of your ovaries impossible if they grow near your ovaries.

      An ultrasound scan is often ordered when such masses are felt by your physician to determine the cause of the mass, however some fibroids appear on sonograms as ovarian tumors and surgery is the only way an accurate diagnosis can be made.

      Although most fibroids cause no symptoms, the estimated 25 percent of women who do have symptoms may have abnormal bleeding, pain during menstruation, and as the fibroid tumors grow larger, women will often experience a swollen abdomen.

      Larger fibroids may cause frequent urination or an inability to control your bladder, either the ability to control the urge or in severe cases, a women may find that she is unable to urinate at all. If a fibroid extends towards a woman's back it may push on the bowels, causing constipation and a backache.

  32. QUESTION:
    Will i have to have a hysterectomy?
    Just found out I have a large benign tumor in my uterus and a markedly enlarged uterus. Aka...fibroid uterus....or do u think they will just remove the tumor?

    • ANSWER:
      Depending on how large the size is, if it's disrupting your life, and if you even want it done, they might want to remove it to keep it from becoming cancerous if it ever does. but you shouldn't worry, they usually will put you on a depo. shot try to shrink the fibroid or do a myomectomy (removing the tumor while leaving the uterus intact) a hysterectomy is most times, a last resort when it comes to benign conditions. Hope this helped and good luck.

  33. QUESTION:
    What do you know about fibrods?
    What are the consequences? Symptoms? Treatment? Is there any way to get rid of them?

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroids

      Fibroids, or myomas, are growths or benign tumours that form inside the uterus (womb). Around four in 10 women over the age of 40 will have fibroids. No one knows why fibroids develop, but it is suspected that the sex hormones – oestrogen and progesterone – play significant roles. This is because fibroids rarely grow in prepubescent girls and postmenopausal women. Pre-existing fibroids stop growing, and may even shrink, once a woman passes the menopause.

      Symptoms
      Most women with fibroids have no symptoms. When present, symptoms may include:

      Heavy periods
      Lengthy periods
      Period pain
      Spotting between periods
      Painful intercourse
      A sensation of heaviness or pressure in the back, bowel and bladder
      Frequent urination
      A lump or swelling in the lower abdomen.

      Fibroids often cause no problems, but may occasionally be associated with infertility, miscarriage and premature labour. Other possible problems include heavy, lengthy and painful periods. Treatment depends on the size, number and location of the fibroids, but may include drugs, procedures performed under local anaesthetic and surgery. Fibroids rarely turn cancerous.

      Treatment
      Treatment depends on the location, size and number of the fibroids, but may include:
      Monitoring – if the fibroids are causing no symptoms and are not large, a ‘wait and see’ approach is usually adopted.
      Drugs – such as hormones, used in combination to shrink the fibroids prior to surgery.
      Arterial embolisation – under local anaesthetic, a fine tube is passed via an artery in the arm or leg into the main artery supplying the fibroid with blood. The whole process is monitored by x-ray. Fine particles (like sand) are then injected into the artery to block the blood supply to the fibroid. The fibroid slowly dies and symptoms should settle over a few months.
      Hysteroscopy – the fibroids are removed via the cervix, using a hysteroscope.
      Laparoscopy – or ‘keyhole surgery’, where a thin tube is inserted through the abdomen to remove the fibroids.
      Open surgery – larger fibroids need to be removed via an abdominal incision. This procedure weakens the uterine wall and makes Caesarean sections for subsequent pregnancies more likely.
      Hysterectomy – the surgical removal of some, or all, of the uterus. Pregnancy is no longer possible after a hysterectomy.

  34. QUESTION:
    Mother-in-law has fibroids can i do anything to help her?
    My mother in law has fibroids, my father in law has ms and she looks after him I will try to be there for her but I do not live near them. So what kind of help will she need? How do they treat this? If you have an op how long, are you in for?
    Thanks for your help :)

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroids are very common and many women have them without realising. Sometimes they can cause heavy periods, painful periods, bleeding in between periods and/or painful intercourse. They are not usually dangerous as they are made out of the same muscle tissue as the uterus, but they can grow quite large. They usually shrink down after the menopause.

      Unless they are troubling her she will not need any treatment. If they grow large or are giving her period problems then she might be offered a hysterectomy (removal of the uterus). If so, then she would need your help post-op to look after your FIL as you are not supposed to do any heavy lifting or strenous housework until the cut muscles have healed ( at least 8 weeks). Following a hysterectomy you are usually in hospital for a couple of days, then sent home to recover.

  35. QUESTION:
    Large solid mass found on my left ovary?
    I went to the doctor almost a month ago and got a vaginal ultrasound only to reveal i have a large solid mass on my left ovary. Could this possibly be a cyst or fibroid?? If so could this have been preventing me from becoming pregnant? {next doc appt is april 1st for another ultra sound to see if it has shrunk, grown, or disappeared}
    Could this possibly be why i haven't became pregnant although we have been trying
    Could this possibly be why i haven't became pregnant although we have been trying

    • ANSWER:
      You must ask your doctor what it is.

      Exciting, you must tell us how it went!

  36. QUESTION:
    Good medicine to take for period cramps?
    I mean like stuff I can find in the counter; Advil, Tylenol, etc. What do you think works best? Or what else do you use?? Thanks:)

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroids are benign tumors within or along the uterine wall," says Dr Brill. They can be as small as an apple seed or as large as a grapefruit, and several can occur at once. They typically crop up in your 30s and 40s; 40 percent of women have one by their mid-30s. African-American women have a higher risk.

      Though fibroids can cause pain, they generally trigger a feeling of moderate pressure in the pelvis at any given time. And the closer they are to the lining of the uterus, the heavier your flow-it may last longer than seven days and/or you may have to change your tampon every hour or two, says Dr Minkin.

      The good news is that unless the pelvic pressure is really major or having a heavy flow is a hassle, there's no need to treat them. But if the pain and blood flow are bad, your gyno can shrink them via medication or, in rare cases, recommend surgery to remove the growths.

      Symptom-"I get insane pelvic pain throughout the month-even during sexual intercourse."
      Possible culprit-Endometriosis

      You should go to a doctor as soon as these symptoms start. It's hard to diagnose partly because so many women think it's just severe menstrual cramps, so they don't even see their gyno for tests. Endometriosis typically brings on a really killer pain in the lower abdomen-and sometimes in the back and thighs as well-that often can't be alleviated by OTC meds.

      This pain can pop up any time of the month. A heavy flow can also be a sign, as can be painful sex. "It'll feel like you have cramps during intercourse because your guy's penis rubs the tissue growing outside of the uterus," says Dr. Minkin.

      Any of this sound familiar to you? Then make an appointment with your gyno as soon as possible. If she diagnoses you with endometriosis, birth-control pills or other hormones can slow the growth of the renegade tissue. In extremely severe cases, surgery may be needed to reduce the amount of tissue that's built up outside the uterus.

  37. QUESTION:
    Where can I find natural cures for miomas of the uterous?

    • ANSWER:
      myomas are more often called uterine fibroids.
      sometimes acupuncture can be helpful for them depending on the size or the number of the fibroid(s). if it (they) are very large or not controlled w/ acupuncture, then the most common treatment would be birth control pills to keep a steady stream of hormones in the system to perhaps shrink the fibroid, and stop bleeding if that was a symptom and if that didn't work, a simple outpatient surgery can be done in an hour or so.

  38. QUESTION:
    i have a fibroids it is really large i look like im 3 months pregnant can anyone tell me how to shrink it?
    is there any medication i can take that will shrink the uterine fibroid without affecting my chances of getting pregnant. is there any method to shrink it apart from having surgery. or any food that causes it to shrink. i have already had a operation about three years ago to remove fibroids but it grew back. it is really very embarassing looking like i am pregnant.
    the fibroid is uterine that is it is in my womb i want to get rid of it without affecting my chances of getting pregnant i am getting married soon and want to have kids.

    • ANSWER:
      Seriously I would recommend surgery again - there is no meds to remove fibroids - I have one myself it was small when I found out but now it has grown and I would not hesitate to go with surgery. Sorry! I know you did not want to hear that but yes Surgery is the only answer!

  39. QUESTION:
    My Dr. found 4 large fibroid tumors on my Uterus...Hysterectomy?
    I went in for an ultrasound, because I had severe stomach bloating, pain and cramps, and they found that I had a cyst on my ovary that ruptured. Well during my ultrasound, they found 4 large fibroids on my uterus (an inch or bigger in size each). The biggest one leans right on my bladder, which explains why I urinate so frequently, and also explains why I have such horrible menstrual bleeding with clots etc.....so I guess my question is, should I opt for a partial hysterectomy? I am 33 years old and I have 2 children (and am not wanting any more). Can anyone tell me if they have been in similiar situations, and what they did. If you had a partial hysterectomy, was it vaginally or thru an incision, and how long to recover? I run a daycare out of my home, and do not want to be off work too long! Thank you!

    • ANSWER:
      I had one the approximate size of a cueball, like on a pool table (about 2 1/4 inches), and another smaller one. The large fibroid pressed on my bladder, too, and gave me pretty bad periods. My doctor had a wait-and-see attitude, recommending increased dosage of ibuprofen (3 times the package's directions) and making sure I wasn't becoming anemic through blood loss. The option of a hysterectomy was always there, but put off-able month after month. I, too, had my family complete and didn't want more children.

      In the end, I didn't get the hysterectomy, largely because the nature of what I do lets me dash to the bathroom often, and endure a couple of bad days every month. When I became perimenopausal, the big fibroid began to shrink. It's down to about 1 3/4 inches now and still getting smaller.

      Ultimately, the decision for you should be based on how negatively it's impacting your life.

  40. QUESTION:
    Question about a uterine fibroid?
    I have a large uterine fibroid that is bigger than my uterus. My treatment consists of 3 lupron shots to decrease the size before surgery. I just got my 3rd shot today and they did an ultrasound, which showed that the fibroid had only shrunk 1 cm. It's still too big to have laproscopic surgery done at this size. I was wondering if anyone has had or knows if the third lupron shot should produce the most shrinkage?? Thanks!!

    • ANSWER:
      It can take 3 months of being on the Lupron to find out if it's going to help shrink the fibroid. This third shot is when you may notice the most improvement.

      I have the link to a site that may be able to give you even more information. It's at: http://forums.obgyn.net/womens-health

  41. QUESTION:
    My ultrasound showed a 8.4 * 8.0 cm fibroid in the posterior wall of my uterus is this a big fibroid?
    My uterus is enlarged the size of 11.2 * 8.1cm, my ovaries are normal and also my kidneys could having this fibroid stop me from becoming pregnant PLEASE HELPPPPPPPPPPP PLEASEEEEEEEE could I have some response ASAP PLEASEEEEEEEEE thank you

    • ANSWER:
      Help for Women With Fibroids
      c. 2002 Susun S. Weed

      Wise Woman herbal and home remedies are simple, safe ways to help yourself when you have a diagnosis of uterine fibroids.

      Uterine fibroids are solid muscle tissue growths in the uterus. They are also called fibroid tumors, myomas, or leiomyomas. Fibroids occur so frequently (in up to half of all women over forty) that they could be considered a normal irregularity. The occasional fibroid can become enormous (medical literature reports one that was 100 pounds!), but the majority (80%) remain as small as a walnut.

      Fibroids are the number one reason American women have hysterectomies.

      The causes of uterine fibroids are unknown, but estrogens, especially estradiol, promote their growth. After menopause fibroids disappear. But because estrogen levels can rise during the early menopausal years, previously asymptomatic fibroids may grow in the years just before the cessation of menses, resulting in symptoms such as feeling of heaviness in the belly, low back pain, pain with vaginal penetration, urinary frequency or incontinence, bowel difficulties, or severe menstrual pain and flooding.

      Women of color are three to nine times more likely to have fibroids than white women, and theirs will grow more quickly.

      Fibroid tumors are not cancer, not malignant. Tumor means a swelling or a growth, not a malignancy, not cancer. Less than 0.1% of all uterine fibroids are malignant.

      Small fibroids often disappear spontaneously. Larger fibroids are more difficult to resolve, but not impossible to control with natural measures.

      • The “root chakra” (lowermost energy center in the body, which includes the uterus) said to store unexpressed anger. It is believed that any unwanted growths in these organs can be countered by allowing the anger to safely discharge.

      • One woman’s fibroids (and menstrual cramps) disappeared within three months of beginning a vigorous exercise program. Exercise helps insure regular ovulation, and irregular ovulation seems to worsen fibroids.

      • Consuming three or more servings of whole grains or beans daily not only reduces the size of fibroids but offers protection from breast and endometrial cancers as well.

      • Red clover flowers (Trifolium pratense), are one of my favorite infusions, but use during the menopausal years may increase difficulty with fibroids.

      • Strengthening the liver with herbs such as dandelion, milk thistle seed, or yellow dock root helps it metabolize estrogen out of the body, thus reducing fibroids.

      • Vitex or chasteberry tincture, 25-30 drops two to four times daily, often shrinks small fibroids within two months. But results come from long-term use — up to two years.

      • Ask someone to burn moxa over the area of the fibroid while you envision the heat releasing the treasures in your uterus. What is locked up in this fibroid? What can you give birth to?

      • Acupuncture treatments can shrink fibroids.

      • Poke root (Phytolacca americana), used internally as a tincture (1-10 drops per day; start small) and externally as a belly rub oil, has gained a reputation as a profound helper in relieving pain and distresses from fibroids. CAUTION: Poke is considered poisonous; it is not often found for sale. This is one remedy you may have to make yourself to try.

      • Warm castor oil packs on the belly, or ginger compresses (soak a towel in hot ginger water) relieve pain and help shrink the fibroids.

      • The use of progesterone to treat women with uterine fibroids is hotly debated. One side holds that fibroids are created by lack of progesterone. The other side makes, to my mind, the better case: that progesterone increases fibroids. Evidence? Fibroids increase in size during pregnancy, when progesterone production is high, and atrophy after menopause, when progesterone levels decrease. Whichever side is right, eating more whole grains and beans usually changes estrogen/progesterone ratio for the better and shrinks fibroids.

      • Reduce fibroids by reducing your exposure to estrogen: avoid birth control pills, ERT/HRT, estrogen-mimicing residues from herbicides and pesticides used on food crops (eat organically- raised products). Tampons that are bleached with chlorine may mimic the bad effects of estrogen, too.

      • Lupron (leuprolide acetate), a drug which induces “artificial menopause”by shutting down the body's production of estradiol causes a significant decrease in fibroid size within 8-12 weeks. Fibroids do regrow to about 90 percent of their original size when the drug is withdrawn however.

      • Major advances have been made in surgical treatments for women with fibroids. There are many options now besides hysterectomy (removal of the uterus), including hysteroscopic resection, uterine embolization, myomectomy, and suprecervical hysterectomy. Since these are fairly new procedures, take the time to find a surgeon who is skilled in the procedure.

      • Hysterectomy can be a life-saving procedure, but by the age of sixty, more than one-third of American women will have given up their wombs to the surgeons. The presence of non- symptomatic fibroids is never sufficient reason, to my mind, for a hysterectomy. Of my students and apprentices who have had hysterectomies because of fibroids, those who “did their homework” — that is, helped themselves before and after their surgery with all the tools at their disposal — seemed to fare much better than those who did not.

      • With very few exceptions, no woman is healthier without her ovaries. So, even if you elect a hysterectomy, keep your ovaries.

      These Wise Woman ways, and lots more, are in my book New Menopausal Years the Wise Woman Way, available from www.ashtreepublishing.com. They are arranged in order of risk: the safest first, the most dangerous last. If you have a uterine fibroid and it is a problem, begin with the mildest remedies first. Set a time limit for your use of any remedy, but, except in an emergency, don't go on to stronger remedies until you are sure the safer ones aren't effective for you. As with any advice, you are the best judge of what works for you.

  42. QUESTION:
    natural progesterone cream?
    I have a couple of large fibroids that are really giving me a lot of trouble. I can get a partial hysterectomy but would rather not. A holistic doctor suggested that I use bioidentical progesterone cream to back down my estrogen levels which may help the tumors shrink plus use some liver detox pills. Has anyone had success in this area. I'm a little afraid of the cream. Used it two days in a row now and feel as though I'm experiencing some weird side effects.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Susie, you will feel weird effects because your body is absorbing the progesterone-- a male hormone.....I can't tell you what's best for you but you ONLY have fibroids--not cancer--and in that case, you should be more careful with the rest of your health and not use creams that can cause other side affects and may even cause hormone imbalances. Get another OB/GYN opinion....go to the biggest city near you--a teaching hospital preferably, and get all your xrays, cat scans, blood tests and take them with you and see someone else. Big institutions see strange things everyday and deal with them everyday--little hospital docs may never have seen a case like yours or it could have been years--and may not be well informed on the newest protocols for treating those types of fibroids..........please see a new specialist......stop the cream immediately before you have more side effects..........good luck to you......

  43. QUESTION:
    Does Vitalzymes help shrink large uterine fibroids?

    • ANSWER:

  44. QUESTION:
    Why would one have a period longer than 30 days?

    • ANSWER:
      Symptoms of uterine fibroids include excessive menstrual bleeding and cramping. Fibroids are not cancerous and usually are more of an annoyance than a serious medical problem. Fibroids have the potential to interfere with pregnancy. According to MayoClinic.com, women with fibroids have a slightly increased risk of early miscarriage, premature labor, abnormal fetal position and separation of the placenta from the uterine wall. Not all fibroids cause these problems, and women with multiple fibroids or very large fibroids that distort the uterine cavity are more likely to experience problems. Treatment of menorrhagia due to fibroids consists of using various hormones to either shrink the fibroids or control the monthly cycle.
      You really need to consult a doctor and take an iron suppliment, very best of luck.

  45. QUESTION:
    Is a uterine fibroid that is 4 centimeters large?

    The fibroid is also pedunculated.
    Two doctors are recommending a hysterectomy. I also have a lot of pelvic pain.

    • ANSWER:
      If your doctor isn't worried about it, then you have no need to worry about it either.

      Besides, as you get closer to menopause, and then when you're post-menopausal, fibroids will shrink. You still need to be monitored, though, in case you develop other fibroids. Depending on the shape, size and location of them, they could cause problems. If they're entirely interior (inside your uterus, they can grow from the outside of the uterine muscle as well), there are surgical procedures that can remove them without a hysterectomy, but for any given woman, that may or not be possible.

      As well, it's possible for a fibroid to grow on a peduncle, that is, to grow from your uterine muscle in such as way as to have a slim "neck". If that peduncle gets twisted, the blood supply may be cut off and that fibroid can become gangrenous. That would mean that you'd need a hysterectomy. I have a family history of this, although I seem to have escaped that particular piece of it.

      These are just reasons to have this monitors. If they are monitored, you and your doctor will be better able to see any problems before they become dangerous, and you can decide between you on the most appropriate action.

  46. QUESTION:
    Please tell me more about fibroids?
    I had an ultrasound scan today. I was referred for the scan because I've been trying to conceive and nothing has happened in a year and a half of trying.

    It turns out I have 3 fibroids in my womb. The woman who did the scan said that 2 were "fairly big". She also said it was the reason I've always had very heavy, painful periods.

    Does anyone else have fibroids? I'd like to hear other people's experiences, and find out more information (e.g. useful websites etc.).

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroid tumors are usually benign (non-cancerous) tumors found, most often, in the uterus of women in their 30's and 40's, although they occasionally develop on other organs which contain smooth muscle cells.

      Fibroid tumors are solid tumors which are made of fibrous tissue, hence the name 'fibroid' tumor. Most often fibroids occur as multiple tumor masses which are slow-growing and often cause no symptoms.

      The size of fibroids varies immensely among women and some are so small that a microscope is required to see them. However some women experience a single large fibroid tumor the size of a grapefruit or a fibroid which is so large it encompasses the entire abdominal area. Such large tumors can weigh as much as 50 pounds; the largest, reported, fibroid ever recorded weighed in at 140 pounds.

      No one is sure why fibroid tumors develop, but some facts are quite clear-- they do not develop before the body begins producing estrogen during the onset of menstruation-- estrogen, such as in birth control pills and taken for menopausal symptoms, does cause fibroid tumors to grow and fibroid tumors will grow very quickly during pregnancy when the body is producing extra estrogen-- they often shrink and disappear after menopause when the body stops producing estrogen--a woman will almost never develop fibroid tumors after menopause.

      The estrogen connection appears to be quite clear, although there are still some who doubt the role estrogen plays in the development of fibroid tumors because women with fibroids often have blood levels which reveal normal amounts of estrogen.
      Types of Fibroid Tumors

      Submucous Fibroids

      These fibroids occur just below the lining of the uterus and can cause menstrual problems, including pain as they grow and move around the pelvic area.

      Intramural Fibroids

      A round fibroid most often within the uterine wall which can cause enlargement of the uterus as they grow.

      Subserous Fibroids

      This fibroid grows on the outer wall of the uterus and usually causes no symptoms until it grows large enough to interfere with other organs.

      Pedunculated Fibroids

      These fibroids develop when a subserous fibroid grows a peduncle (stalk), as they grow larger they may become twisted and cause severe pain.

      Interligamentous Fibroid

      A fibroid which grows sideways between the ligaments which support the uterus in the abdominal region. This type of fibroid is especially difficult to remove without the possibility of interfering with the blood supply or other organs.

      Parasitic Fibroid

      The rarest form of fibroid tumor occurs when a fibroid attaches itself to another organ.
      Diagnosis of Fibroid Tumors

      Diagnosis of fibroids is generally made by your physician during your annual gynecological exam when your physician feels a mass, they often are found when your physician is looking for something else or may never be discovered if you do not experience symptoms. However larger fibroids may make examination of your ovaries impossible if they grow near your ovaries.

      An ultrasound scan is often ordered when such masses are felt by your physician to determine the cause of the mass, however some fibroids appear on sonograms as ovarian tumors and surgery is the only way an accurate diagnosis can be made.

      Although most fibroids cause no symptoms, the estimated 25 percent of women who do have symptoms may have abnormal bleeding, pain during menstruation, and as the fibroid tumors grow larger, women will often experience a swollen abdomen.

      Larger fibroids may cause frequent urination or an inability to control your bladder, either the ability to control the urge or in severe cases, a women may find that she is unable to urinate at all. If a fibroid extends towards a woman's back it may push on the bowels, causing constipation and a backache. Treatment of Fibroids

      If your fibroid tumors are severe enough that they cause certain symptoms, surgery is often, the required treatment. Symptoms which justify surgery include: extremely heavy bleeding during your menstrual cycle, which causes anemia that does not respond to treatment; pain, which has become intolerable to the woman or discomfort caused by the pressure of the fibroids on another organ; or when the location of the tumors is likely to cause further problems.

      Surgery for fibroid tumors includes, myomectomy and hysterectomy. Myomectomy is the surgical removal of each individual tumor without damage to the uterus, preserving a woman's ability to conceive. However, fibroids will often grow back and although it is possible to have a myomectomy repeated, multiple myomectomies can cause other problems such as the walls of the uterus sticking together due to scarring.

      Women should also consider uterine artery embalization. Uterine artery embalization leaves the uterus intact in a non-surgical procedure.
      Sponsored Links

      Shrink Fibroid TumorsDissolve fibroid tumors naturally. Great info. Nutritionist on staff.www.EnergeticNutrition.com

      FibroidsFibroids info. We've done the work!infoscouts.com

      Ovarian Fibroids InfoArticles, Tips, and Information on Ovarian Fibroids - free advice.BusinessChambers.com
      Polyvinyl particles are placed into the uterine artery at a point just before the nexis of vessels spread out into the uterine tissue. The particles flow into the vessels and clog them. This prevents the fibroids from receiving the constant blood supply they require and causes the fibroids shrink overtime. However, almost immediately the symptoms of heavy bleeding and pelvic pain are significantly reduced.

      The sad fact is that because fibroids do grow back, most women will eventually have to face a hysterectomy. Removing the uterus is the only permanent way to effectively relieve most women of fibroids.

      Hysterectomy is, most often, the procedure of choice for fibroid tumors when a women with severe symptoms, has completed her family and her uterus has grown to the size of a uterus at twelve weeks of pregnancy; a women has excessively large fibroid tumors; severe abnormal bleeding occurs; or when the fibroids are causing problems with other organs such as the bladder and bowels.

      Science is starting to evaluate other options for treating fibroids, including the use of Lupron which may be beneficial for those who want to become pregnant or for women approaching menopause when fibroids often shrink naturally. Lupron shrinks fibroids in most women with continued use, but one drawback is that the fibroids will quickly grow back once treatment is stopped.

      If you have fibroid tumors, investigate your options before deciding what treatment you want to try. There are many alternatives to hysterectomy currently available, and science is creating more options for women everyday.

  47. QUESTION:
    fibroids , can it disappear if u diet an excise .?
    if u hav fibroids an want them to go without operation , i was told that u can diet an excise to get rid of them . what kind of excise ? an what kind of diet would be best . thanks 4 ur ans.

    • ANSWER:
      A uterine fibroid is a non-cancerous tumor that grows in a woman's uterus. Typically it affects women who are 25-35. They can be small or large (so if you have a little pooch in your lower ab, this may be the cause). The fibroids can be on the inside wall of your uterus, or inside the wall there are four types in total all dependant upon the placement of the fibroid. It is EXTREMELY important that you do not let ANY DOCTOR tell you that a hysterectomy (removing your uterus entirely) is the only cure for your fibroids. That is absolutely not true, and often older doctors say this because decades ago, that was true. Today there are several procedures out there that can rid you of fibroids (UFE). In my case, I want to preserve my uterus because I want to have children. Often, the fibroids grow back when you remove them, so because I am not ready to have kids now, I am not removing the fibroids. It is possible, if the fibroids are small, to still get pregnant with the fibroid. So again, my doctor has me on a wait and see.

      There is a great Yahoo group that has three doctors who post regularly on the board. You can ask questions, or just read through the various posts and see... you'll learn a lot. I have pasted a few very informative links. If you have anymore questions after you skim through, you can email me through the links on my profile. Most of all, try not to worry too much, this is unfortunately very common in women, predominately women who are not of Caucasian descent.

      Many things can help you "manage" the fibroids, such as a change in diet (eating less red meat, eating hormone free meats, eating more green leafy vegetables, staying away from anything you find triggers your symptoms - mine are swelling and sugar and red meat cause me to bloat). Exercise.. .etc... basically, taking care of yourself the way "they" always told us to take care of ourselves by eating properly and exercising. These sorts of things eventually (assuming your fibroid is not very large) add to your quality of life. If you are near menopause, the fibroid typically shrinks at menopause because your body produces much less estrogen. Other than managing your fibroids, there are several options out there besides a hysterectomy, which was done for decades back in the day, and today it is considered an EXTREME measure. Below are some useful links.

  48. QUESTION:
    I have no more fibroids or periods, Thank God!!?
    For all women who have very heavy periods. I had days where my periods were SO bad. My doctor said I had large fibroids and I told her I did not want a hysterectomy. I was only 53. She said she would try depro provera shots...4 in one year and try to stop my period, and then the fibroids would shrink. That is what she tries first w/her patients. After two shots I gained some weight, but my periods stopped. For five months I did not get my period. I then got one, but it was not bad. Then, I never got one again and my fibroids are now gone. It only took two shots for me. I'm 54 now and it was the best advice. Besides weight gain, I had no side effects. I lost the weight and am happy my periods are gone! Try it first before anything else. My male gyno wanted to do a hysterectomy.
    This is not a question. I did not put the question mark at end, they automatically do it, but it's advice for anyone out there who is going through fibroid problems.
    No, blood does not go somewhere else, but it throws us older women into menopause, which is better than hysterectomy.

    • ANSWER:
      Excellent! Thank God, indeed!

      As far as recommendations for birth control pills: CAREFUL! because most pills are combination pills, combining estrogen and progesterone... ESTROGEN GROWS FIBROIDS... There are also estrogen sources in your diet (hormone-overgrown poultry, soy, etc.) that you need to be aware of...

      There are ambivalent reports about caffeine being related to fibroid growth, also... Worth letting go!

      They tried to treat mine with BCPs... All it did was grow larger! Someone had advised me not to do this, based on the estrogen content + her experience; I chose to follow doctor's orders and it got me a bigger fibroid!...that ultimately had to be removed surgically!
      And in fact, they wanted to put me on Seasonale to make me have less periods (because with the change in pills I had started to get menstrual migraines; they thought, less periods, less migraines)... Yeah, but because you don't take that 1 week break in there every month you essentially get something like 9 more weeks of estrogen doses per year... ESTROGEN GROWS FIBROIDS!

      (You gotta do your homework because some of these people will prescribe or recommend treatments that are counterproductive or that address a secondary issue but not the primary issue!)

      Not sure if Depo-provera is combination or progesterone, only...? I understood that Lupron can throw you into menopause and also shrink fibroids, but I had not heard this about the Depo shot yet...

      Did you have a follow-up ultrasound to confirm that you had zero fibroids? Please let us know! I'm glad you shared this!

  49. QUESTION:
    How long does it take for fibroids to shrink after pregnancy?
    I just delivered my beautiful baby boy a few weeks ago via c-section.

    During my pregnancy I had 3 fibroids , one the size of a large grapefruit , one the size of an orange and the other near my cervix (which is the reason for the c-section)

    Its been over 3 weeks now - I have lost all my pregnancy weight and then some but I still have a belly (looking like I am about 3-4 months pregnant) . I can see that my left side of my stomach (where my large fibroid is) is still sticking out more than my right side.

    My question is, how long does it take for fibroids to shrink down after pregnancy????

    • ANSWER:

  50. QUESTION:
    what is fibroid and why does it occur in black women?
    fibroids in the uterus

    • ANSWER:
      It does not have black women as exclusive hosts; can happen to any woman.

      What are fibroids?
      Fibroid tumors are usually benign (non-cancerous) tumors found, most often, in the uterus of women in their 30's and 40's, although they occasionally develop on other organs which contain smooth muscle cells.

      Fibroid tumors are solid tumors which are made of fibrous tissue, hence the name 'fibroid' tumor. Most often fibroids occur as multiple tumor masses which are slow-growing and often cause no symptoms.

      The size of fibroids varies immensely among women and some are so small that a microscope is required to see them. However some women experience a single large fibroid tumor the size of a grapefruit or a fibroid which is so large it encompasses the entire abdominal area.

      Such largetumors can weigh as much as 50 pounds; the largest, reported, fibroid ever recorded weighed in at 140 pounds.

      No one is sure why fibroid tumors develop, but some facts are quite clear-- they do not develop before the body begins producing estrogen during the onset of menstruation-- estrogen, such as in birth control pills and taken for menopausal symptoms, does cause fibroid tumors to grow and fibroid tumors will grow very quickly during pregnancy when the body is producing extra estrogen-- they often shrink and disappear after menopause when the body stops producing estrogen--a woman will almost never develop fibroid tumors after menopause.

      The estrogen connection appears to be quite clear, although there are still some who doubt the role estrogen plays in the development of fibroid tumors because women with fibroids often have blood levels which reveal normal amounts of estrogen.

      For more info go to source:)

can large fibroids be shrunk

Comments are closed.