Can Fibroids Cause Stomach Swelling

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What does it means to have a swollen uterus?
    I am having sharp and dull pains on the sides of my stomach. my peroid is off and on lasting for a month and staying off for a month. I am 51 years old is this because of I am going thourgh menopause. what can this be. The doc. told me that my womb was uterus

    • ANSWER:
      your uterus (or womb as it is commonly called) is a muscular organ. If it is swollen there is inflammation of the muscle tissue, which may be caused by infection, causing swelling. There could also be fibroid or benign cyst tissue adding to the size of the uterus. You are at the right age for menopause. A simple blood test to determine hormone levels will diagnose that. Your doctor should be able to tell you if any of this applies to you.

  2. QUESTION:
    What was your best and worst experience with a fibroid tumor when pregnant?
    I knew something was wrong. I just didn't know what. I have the worst time getting up, going to the bathroom and still have trouble holding my food. Being five months along the dr when hearing my symtoms became concerned. When checking for the baby we found what looked to be like a blood clot. Dr placed me on meds and we waited two weeks. Went back on thursday to take another look. I told the Dr that I am still sick and I felt bad. Another sonogram to chk the baby and there was this mass that got larger. Then the Dr confirmed it is a Fibroid tumor. As he rolls over the area where the fibroid is located the sensitivity to my stomach is rather tender and somewhat painful. No more work for me and nothing but bedrest. I am 5 months as of Sunday. What was some of your experiences? Any full term deleveries? What happened to you after delivery with the tumor. I was reallly worried, but a call came from the dr Fri. Test were in from the amnio. Baby is heathy and it's a boy! Tumor still scary!

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroids are actually pretty common. My doc discovered mine when I was pregnant with my second child. She was full term. She has disabilities, but it is a chromosome abnotmality, nothing to do with the fibroid at all. Estrogen can may fibroids swell. That's why they get so big when your close to starting your period or are pregnant. By the time my daughter was born, it was the size of her head! Then it shrank a little after I had her. With my my third child, we knew it was there and knew what to expect. He was also born full term and healthy as a horse. I did measure further along than what I really was because of the mass, but my doc knew that was the reason. Keep up with your OB after you have that baby boy. Fibroids can often cause heavy periods and make you look slightly prego if they are too big. In that case you have them removed. Not a big deal either. Good Luck with a beautiful baby boy.

  3. QUESTION:
    Im going to make my question a little more clear since people seem to think im like 12 asking this question, I?
    Am 20 years old, and me and my bf are sexually active, and we dont use protection, I have been cramping for 2 weeks and was supposed to start my period the 5th, well today is the 13th and still no period.. Maybe I can get better more helpful answers by specifying more. Thank you

    • ANSWER:
      Early Symptom of Pregnancy: Spotting and Cramping

      A few days after conception, the fertilized egg attaches itself to the uterine wall. This can cause one of the earliest signs of pregnancy -- spotting and, sometimes, cramping. Known as implantation bleeding, this early symptom occurs anywhere from six to 12 days after the egg is fertilized.
      The cramps resemble menstrual cramps, and some women mistake them and the bleeding for the start of their period. The bleeding and cramps, however, are slight.

      In addition to bleeding, you may notice a white, milky discharge from your vagina. This is related to the fact that, almost immediately after conception, the vaginal walls begin to thicken. It is the increased growth of cells lining the vagina that causes the discharge. This discharge can continue throughout your pregnancy.

      Early Symptom of Pregnancy: Breast Changes
      Changes in your breasts are another very early sign of pregnancy. When you conceive, your body undergoes a rapid change in hormone levels. Because of the changes in hormones, you may notice in one to two weeks that your breasts have become swollen, sore, or tingly. Or they may feel heavier or fuller or feel tender to the touch. In addition, the area around the nipples, called the areola, may darken.

      Early Symptom of Pregnancy: Fatigue
      Feeling unusually fatigued is an early pregnancy symptom that can occur as soon as one week after you conceive. The excessive tiredness is often related to a high level of progesterone in your system, although other things such as lower levels of blood sugar, lower blood pressure, and increased blood production can all contribute.

      Early Symptom of Pregnancy: Nausea (Morning Sickness)
      The elevated levels of estrogen in your system can slow the emptying of your stomach. This contributes to another early symptom of pregnancy, nausea, or what many women call morning sickness.

      Early symptom of pregnancy- Missed Period

      The most obvious early symptom of pregnancy -- and the one that prompts most women to get a
      pregnancy test -- is a missed period.

      CAUSES OF IRREGULAR PERIODS:

      Significant weight gain or loss
      Over-exercise
      Poor nutrition (or a diet too high in carbohydrates)
      Smoking
      Drug use
      Caffeine
      Excessive alcohol use (interfering with how the liver metabolizes estrogen and progesterone)
      Eating disorders
      Increased stress
      Polycystic ovarian syndrome/estrogen dominance
      Uterine abnormalities (fibroids/cysts/polyps/endometriosis)
      Hormonal imbalance related to perimenopause
      Medications
      Chemotherapy
      Recent childbirth, miscarriage, or D&C
      Breastfeeding

      http://www.womentowomen.com/menstruation…

  4. QUESTION:
    I've been getting pain on the right side of my head lately, any ideas?
    I've never had migraines before, but from what people have told me, this doesn't seem similar. This pain comes from the back of my head, goes right up and over towards my right eye. It wakes me at night or I can't sleep from it. I've been taking Advil Liqui-Gels and they help, but I can tell when the medicine is gone because the pain comes right back. This has been going on for about 5 days.

    • ANSWER:
      Homeopathic Treatment :-
      Please read the following carefully and let me know if you have symptoms similar to these, if you find it similar to your own conditions especially the Head symptoms, please take this remedy in 30 potency thrice a day for complete cure of your Headache(Migraine) :-

      SANGUINARIA CANADENSIS
      Blood Root
      (SANGUINARIA)

      Is a right-sided remedy pre-eminently, and affects chiefly the mucous membranes, especially of the respiratory tract. It has marked vaso-motor disturbances, as seen in the circumscribed redness of the cheeks, flashes of heat, determination of blood to head and chest, distention of temporal veins, burning in palms and soles, and has been found very applicable to climacteric disorders. Burning sensations, like from hot water. Influenzal coughs. Phthisis. Sudden stopping of catarrh of respiratory tract followed by diarrhœa. Burning in various parts is characteristic.

      Head.--Worse right side, sun headache. Periodical sick headache; pain begins in occiput, spreads upwards, and settles over eyes, especially right. Veins and temples are distended. Pain better lying down and sleep. Headaches return at climacteric; every seventh day (Sulph; Sabad). Pain in small spot over upper left parietal bone. Burning in eyes. Pain in the back of head "like a flash of lightning".

      Face.--Flushed. Neuralgia; pain extends in all directions from upper jaw. Redness and burning of cheeks. Hectic flush. Fullness and tenderness behind angle of jaws.

      Nose.--Hay-fever. Ozæna, with profuse, offensive yellowish discharges. Nasal polypi. Coryza, followed by diarrhœa. Chronic rhinitis; membrane dry and congested.

      Ears.--Burning in ears. Earache with headache. Humming and roaring. Aural polypus.

      Throat.--Swollen; worse, right side. Dry and constricted. Ulceration of mouth and fauces, with dry, burning sensation Tongue white; feels scalded. Tonsillitis.

      Stomach.--Aversion to butter. Craving for piquant things. Unquenchable thirst. Burning, vomiting. Nausea, with salivation. Sinking, faint all-gone feeling (Phos; Sep). Spitting up of bile; gastro-duodenal catarrh.

      Abdomen.--Diarrhœa as coryza improves. Pain over region of liver. Diarrhœa; bilious, liquid, gushing stool (Nat sulph; Lycop). Cancer of rectum.

      Female.--Leucorrhœa fetid, corrosive. Menses offensive, profuse. Soreness of breasts. Uterine polypi. Before, menses, itching of axillæ. Climacteric disorders.

      Respiratory.--Œdema of larynx. Trachea sore. Heat and tension behind the sternum. Aphonia. Cough of gastric origin; relieved by eructation. Cough, with burning pain in chest; worse, right side. Sputum tough, rust-colored, offensive, almost impossible to raise. Spasmodic cough after influenza and after whooping-cough. Cough returns with every fresh cold. Tickling behind sternum, causes a constant hacking cough; worse at night on lying down. Must sit up in bed. Burning soreness in right chest, through to right shoulder. Severe soreness under right nipple. Hæmoptysis from suppressed menses. Severe dyspnœa and constriction of chest. Offensive breath and purulent expectoration. Burning in chest as of hot steam from chest to abdomen. Fibroid phthisis. Pneumonia; better, lying on back. Asthma with stomach disorders (Nux). Valvular disease with lung development, phosphates in urine and loss of flesh. Sudden stoppage of catarrh of air passages brings on diarrhœa.

      Extremities.--Rheumatism of right shoulder, left hip-joint and nape of neck. Burning in soles and palms. Rheumatic pains in places least covered by flesh; not in joints soles of feet burn. Right-side neuritis; better touching the part.

      Skin.--Antidotes: Rhus poisoning. Red, blotchy eruptions; worse in spring. Burning and itching; worse by heat. Acne, with scanty menses. Circumscribed red spots over malar bones.

      Modalities.--Worse, sweets, right side, motion, touch. Better, acids, sleep, darkness.

      *********************************************************
      The symptoms given above are taken from the Materia Medica of Homeopathic Medicine By Dr William Boericke MD.

      Take Care and God Bless you !

  5. QUESTION:
    Question about sex on the pill?
    I had sex last night and I missed my pill on Monday. I've been taking it at the right time etc since then. I've been on the pill (micronor) for over 4 months now and that is the first time I've missed it. He didn't ejaculate into me but could I be pregnant?

    • ANSWER:
      Hello, I do feel you are safe. Here are early symptoms of pregnancy and reasons for irregular periods.

      Early Symptom of Pregnancy: Spotting and Cramping

      A few days after conception, the fertilized egg attaches itself to the uterine wall. This can cause one of the earliest signs of pregnancy -- spotting and, sometimes, cramping. Known as implantation bleeding, this early symptom occurs anywhere from six to 12 days after the egg is fertilized.
      The cramps resemble menstrual cramps, and some women mistake them and the bleeding for the start of their period. The bleeding and cramps, however, are slight.

      In addition to bleeding, you may notice a white, milky discharge from your vagina. This is related to the fact that, almost immediately after conception, the vaginal walls begin to thicken. It is the increased growth of cells lining the vagina that causes the discharge. This discharge can continue throughout your pregnancy.

      Early Symptom of Pregnancy: Breast Changes
      Changes in your breasts are another very early sign of pregnancy. When you conceive, your body undergoes a rapid change in hormone levels. Because of the changes in hormones, you may notice in one to two weeks that your breasts have become swollen, sore, or tingly. Or they may feel heavier or fuller or feel tender to the touch. In addition, the area around the nipples, called the areola, may darken.

      Early Symptom of Pregnancy: Fatigue
      Feeling unusually fatigued is an early pregnancy symptom that can occur as soon as one week after you conceive. The excessive tiredness is often related to a high level of progesterone in your system, although other things such as lower levels of blood sugar, lower blood pressure, and increased blood production can all contribute.

      Early Symptom of Pregnancy: Nausea (Morning Sickness)
      The elevated levels of estrogen in your system can slow the emptying of your stomach. This contributes to another early symptom of pregnancy, nausea, or what many women call morning sickness.

      Early symptom of pregnancy- Missed Period

      The most obvious early symptom of pregnancy -- and the one that prompts most women to get a
      pregnancy test -- is a missed period.

      CAUSES OF IRREGULAR PERIODS:

      Significant weight gain or loss
      Over-exercise
      Poor nutrition (or a diet too high in carbohydrates)
      Smoking
      Drug use
      Caffeine
      Excessive alcohol use (interfering with how the liver metabolizes estrogen and progesterone)
      Eating disorders
      Increased stress
      Polycystic ovarian syndrome/estrogen dominance
      Uterine abnormalities (fibroids/cysts/polyps/endometriosis)
      Hormonal imbalance related to perimenopause
      Medications
      Chemotherapy
      Recent childbirth, miscarriage, or D&C
      Breastfeeding

      TAKE CARE! Mama Bear

      http://www.womentowomen.com/menstruation…

  6. QUESTION:
    i have a sharp pain in my left breast?
    im 20 years old and every few months i get a sharp pain in my left breast. it last for about 20 minutes then goes away does anyone know what it could be.

    • ANSWER:
      There are numerous causes for pains in the left breast:
      1) Mastitis & Clogged Ducts
      Mastitis is the inflammation of the breast tissue that may be caused due to an infection, or a clogged milk duct or may be brought on by some kind of an injury and usually happens to lactating women. This is usually seen in women who are breastfeeding and the various mastitis symptoms include redness, swelling and sharp pain in left breast when breathing. There may also be systemic symptoms like fever and chills, malaise and other symptoms that may even mimic the flu. The mastitis treatment will entail treating the underlying cause or infection in the body.

      2) Ulcer and GI Related Conditions
      There are many important structures that are present in the vicinity of the breast area. The area just under the left breast is what houses the stomach. Hence, if a person is suffering from pain under left breast, then this could be due to a stomach ulcer or even due to heartburn. A stomach ulcer will typically cause pain after eating, especially, after eating a heavy meal that contained spicy food. However, due to the proximity of the stomach to the left breast, it may be difficult for the woman to differentiate between pain in left breast/chest area and pain in the upper abdominal area. A few tests, like a CT scan or a barium swallow can help diagnose this condition correctly. Ulcer treatment will consist of taking antacids and in cases of severe conditions, it may end up being an emergency condition requiring surgical intervention.

      3) Fibrocystic Breast Disease and Breast Cancer
      There are many different conditions that can lead to the formation of a painful lump in the breast. Not all breast cancers are malignant. There are many benign conditions that could lead to the formation of a lump in the breast. These include fibroid breast tumors, fibroadenomas, intraductal papillomas, etc. In fact, sometimes, what may appear as a lump may in fact be a cyst in the breast. All of these conditions can lead to sharp pain in left breast area. A malignant breast cancer can especially be diagnosed by identifying the early symptoms of breast cancer, like breast tenderness, pain, dimpling of skin, swollen and tender nipples, etc. Breast cancer treatment will range from surgical removal of the lump to radiation and chemotherapy, depending on the type of breast cancer.

      Other Causes
      There are many other causes of pain in left breast area. Muscle pain, especially pectoral muscle pain may be wrongly interpreted as breast pain. However, at times, breast pain may even be physiological. This may occur due to hormonal changes in the body of a woman, like it may be one of the early pregnancy symptoms before missed period. Some women may experience breast pain and breast tenderness before period. If a person experiences left breast pain in the morning, then it may be due to sleeping in an improper position. In such cases, there is no need for any kind of treatment for breast pain, as the pain resolves on its own after a while.

  7. QUESTION:
    Why havnt my period come down?
    I been tryn for a babie. My last period was in December, in February i had sex after i started bleeding a little it lasted for 3days.. what is wrong wit me

    • ANSWER:
      Hello Pretty, Here are early symptoms of pregnancy and reasons for irregular periods.

      Early Symptom of Pregnancy: Spotting and Cramping

      A few days after conception, the fertilized egg attaches itself to the uterine wall. This can cause one of the earliest signs of pregnancy -- spotting and, sometimes, cramping. Known as implantation bleeding, this early symptom occurs anywhere from six to 12 days after the egg is fertilized.
      The cramps resemble menstrual cramps, and some women mistake them and the bleeding for the start of their period. The bleeding and cramps, however, are slight.

      In addition to bleeding, you may notice a white, milky discharge from your vagina. This is related to the fact that, almost immediately after conception, the vaginal walls begin to thicken. It is the increased growth of cells lining the vagina that causes the discharge. This discharge can continue throughout your pregnancy.

      Early Symptom of Pregnancy: Breast Changes
      Changes in your breasts are another very early sign of pregnancy. When you conceive, your body undergoes a rapid change in hormone levels. Because of the changes in hormones, you may notice in one to two weeks that your breasts have become swollen, sore, or tingly. Or they may feel heavier or fuller or feel tender to the touch. In addition, the area around the nipples, called the areola, may darken.

      Early Symptom of Pregnancy: Fatigue
      Feeling unusually fatigued is an early pregnancy symptom that can occur as soon as one week after you conceive. The excessive tiredness is often related to a high level of progesterone in your system, although other things such as lower levels of blood sugar, lower blood pressure, and increased blood production can all contribute.

      Early Symptom of Pregnancy: Nausea (Morning Sickness)
      The elevated levels of estrogen in your system can slow the emptying of your stomach. This contributes to another early symptom of pregnancy, nausea, or what many women call morning sickness.

      Early symptom of pregnancy- Missed Period

      The most obvious early symptom of pregnancy -- and the one that prompts most women to get a
      pregnancy test -- is a missed period.

      CAUSES OF IRREGULAR PERIODS:

      Significant weight gain or loss
      Over-exercise
      Poor nutrition (or a diet too high in carbohydrates)
      Smoking
      Drug use
      Caffeine
      Excessive alcohol use (interfering with how the liver metabolizes estrogen and progesterone)
      Eating disorders
      Increased stress
      Polycystic ovarian syndrome/estrogen dominance
      Uterine abnormalities (fibroids/cysts/polyps/endometriosis)
      Hormonal imbalance related to perimenopause
      Medications
      Chemotherapy
      Recent childbirth, miscarriage, or D&C
      Breastfeeding

      TAKE CARE! Mama Bear

      http://www.womentowomen.com/menstruation…

  8. QUESTION:
    can someone help me find out what this is?
    i am hurting really bad in my lower stomach and it hurts so bad and it is swollen where my uterus and overies are and it hurts so bad!!! i had my period for 3 days and it stoped and i had sex one week and 4 days ago and it was unprotected i dont know whats going on whats wrong with me can anyone tell me have they went through something like this and i know the guy that i was with sont have anything so what is it?

    • ANSWER:
      Go get medical attention. If its an ectopic pregnancy and it ruptures the Fallopian tube it can cause death quickly. Don't want to scare you. It may also be a fibroid, cyst or STD.

  9. QUESTION:
    Help I've been experiencing pain in my right ovary and in my right leg?

    could it be cancer (ovarian cancer)
    just had my period five days a go

    • ANSWER:
      What are the symptoms of ovarian cysts?
      Many ovarian cysts don't cause symptoms. Others can cause

      * pressure, swelling, or pain in the abdomen pelvic pain
      * dull ache in the lower back and thighs
      * problems passing urine completely
      *pain during sex
      * weight gain
      * pain during your period
      * abnormal bleeding
      * nausea or vomiting
      * breast tenderness
      If you have these symptoms, get help right away:

      * pain with fever and vomiting
      * sudden, severe abdominal pain
      * faintness, dizziness, or weakness
      * rapid breathing

      How are ovarian cysts found?
      Doctors most often find ovarian cysts during routine pelvic exams. The doctor may feel the swelling of a cyst on the ovary. Once a cyst is found, tests are done to help plan treatment. Tests include:

      An ultrasound. This test uses sound waves to create images of the body. With an ultrasound, the doctor can see the cyst's:

      shape, size, location, mass—if it is fluid-filled, solid, or mixed

      A pregnancy test. This test may be given to rule out pregnancy.
      Hormone level tests. Hormone levels may be checked to see if there are hormone-related problems.
      A blood test. This test is done to find out if the cyst may be cancerous. The test measures a substance in the blood called cancer-antigen 125 (CA-125). The amount of CA-125 is higher with ovarian cancer. But some ovarian cancers don't make enough CA-125 to be detected by the test. Some noncancerous diseases also raise CA-125 levels. Those diseases include uterine fibroids (YOO-tur-ihn FEYE-broidz) and endometriosis. Noncancerous causes of higher CA-125 are more common in women younger than 35. Ovarian cancer is very rare in this age group. The CA-125 test is most often given to women who:
      * are older than 35
      * are at high risk for ovarian cancer
      * have a cyst that is partly solid

      How are cysts treated?
      Watchful waiting. If you have a cyst, you may be told to wait and have a second exam in 1 to 3 months. Your doctor will check to see if the cyst has changed in size. This is a common treatment option for women who:

      are in their childbearing years
      have no symptoms
      have a fluid-filled cyst
      It may be an option for postmenopausal women.

      Surgery. Your doctor may want to remove the cyst if you are postmenopausal, or if it:

      doesn't go away after several menstrual cycles
      gets larger
      looks odd on the ultrasound
      causes pain
      The two main surgeries are:

      Laparoscopy (lap-uh-ROSS-kuh-pee)—done if the cyst is small and looks benign (noncancerous) on the ultrasound. While you are under general anesthesia, a very small cut is made above or below your navel. A small instrument that acts like a telescope is put into your abdomen. Then your doctor can remove the cyst.

      Laparotomy (lap-uh-ROT-uh-mee)—done if the cyst is large and may be cancerous. While you are under general anesthesia, larger incisions are made in the stomach to remove the cyst. The cyst is then tested for cancer. If it is cancerous, the doctor may need to take out the ovary and other tissues, like the uterus. If only one ovary is taken out, your body is still fertile and can still produce estrogen.

      Birth control pills. If you keep forming functional cysts, your doctor may prescribe birth control pills to stop you from ovulating. If you don’t ovulate, you are less likely to form new cysts. You can also use Depo-Provera®. It is a hormone that is injected into muscle. It prevents ovulation for 3 months at a time.

      Can ovarian cysts be prevented?
      No, ovarian cysts cannot be prevented. The good news is that most cysts:

      don't cause symptoms
      are not cancerous
      go away on their own
      Talk to your doctor or nurse if you notice:

      changes in your period
      pain in the pelvic area
      any of the major symptoms of cysts

      When are women most likely to have ovarian cysts?
      Most functional ovarian cysts occur during childbearing years. And most of those cysts are not cancerous. Women who are past menopause (ages 50­–70) with ovarian

  10. QUESTION:
    Uterine Fibroids???
    ok im only 25 and i have a fibroid on the left ovary the size of a tennis ball. It took the doctors forever to discover it because they feel i'm too young to have any major problems in and around my uterus. Anyway I believe the tumor(fibroid) is causing my stomach to increase in size because of how big it it. Not only that, my Doc claims there may may another one on the left side that right now is small and he wants to keep a close eye on it to see if the left side goes down before doing surgery. That's complete BS to me! The tumor on the right side may be increasing and causing me to gain massive weight.
    I want to know if it's all in my head that i'm gaining weight in my stomach because of the tumor, or am i just getting Fat! I use to be so small, now i weigh 140 at 5'8 which isn't that big but for me it is bigger than i've ever been. I now go to the gym disregarding the fact that there is a tennis ball in my stomach in hopes of slimming back down but am I just waisting my time??

    • ANSWER:
      hello - slow down a bit - fibroids are in the womb (sometimes swelling outwards) and your ovaries are NOT in your womb or the same as your womb. Lumps on ovaries are normally referred to as cysts. A tennis ball sized fibroid might make your abdomen swell, but think about pregnancy and how big a baby is before a woman 'shows'. Your stomach might be retaining fluid...if you are only 25 its no wonder your Dr wants to wait before surgery - any surgery carries risk - usually you are offered eg mirena coil if there is pain or heavy bleeding - you aren't too young to have major problems, but it is less likely - what do you mean by gaining massive weight? If you are sure about this, get yourself back to your Dr (and actually I think you should anyway - you sound awfully confused about your anatomy) . Look up fibroids on the net - there are some very good US and UK based sites with diagrams, validated by doctors - try NHS for the UK (that is the state run health service) - I'm assuming you are american but I'm not sure why. And try not to worry; but you should always question calmly and confidently and if you don't agree or understand ask again, or get a second opinion. Also a fibroid won't stop you going to the gym. Most fibroids are just an overgrowth of muscle tissue, completely benign and nothing to freak about (especially if you aren't bleeding heavily). Lits of women have them and lead perfectly normal lives - but don't let that stop you honestly assessing any problems you personally have.

      On the other hand cysts on your ovary, if that is what you have might be polycystic ovarian syndrome PCS, which will make it harder to lose weight - its chicken and egg really, no-one seems to know whether you get PCS because you are fat or you get fat because you have PCS. My understanding of PCS is that they encourage you to lose weight because you can be prone to problems if you don't, and that it is much harder to lose weight (but not impossible it just takes longer). Again, get back to your Dr and check what is wrong.

  11. QUESTION:
    no baby ? ultrasound? pregnant?
    Okay. Hi Everyone! this is my very first time posting on this site however I've visisted quite often. In March i went to the doctor for an annual check up. They took a pregnancy test and did a paps smear and it was negative. I went in again for the follow up and I had gained nearly 20 pounds in less than a month. Themonth after that i gained another 23 pounds in less than a month.So , I go to an OB and he did a blood pregnancy test, negative. Urine pregnancy test, negative. I then requested an ultrasound to explain the rapid weight gain and VERY enkarged abdomen. Results came back and they ssaid I only had a few fibroids in my pelvic region (Pelvic ultrasound) that were either the size of a small golf ball or smaller, nothing to worry about. So I ended up having to request the stuff myself to look at it because i just could not see three small fibroids smaller than a miniature glof ball causing all the weightgain and stomach swelling. I got the pictures back and I saw something on the ultrasound that looks just like a BABY! Of course, my pelvis looked empty but the thing floating at the top looks like a fetus and there is no way these flutters in my stomache could be getting stronger and my abdomen looks like it houses a babseball and there is nothing to it but a few fibroids??? Come on people! i do not have insurance and cannot afford to keep paing to have people tell me its my mind when I was fine ( and didnt desire a baby or think about one) until my body did what it did. I had intercourse twice this year. Onc in january and once three days before Valentines day. Taking it from Valentines Day, I would be due around November 25-30..... I just dont feel im wrong. Besides, before this even happened, everyone i know was having dreams of me holding a newborn baby and it was a girl recurrently, including me. Above all of this, I only had sex TWICE!!! no one even thinks im sexually active at 28, but I was! Please, what do yall think/ I wish I could upload the pictures......

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroids in the pelvic region are more common in women that can grow bigger/Multiples in numbers. It is better to Consult Gynecologist. Again re check for pregnancy and confirm Good Luck have new one!

  12. QUESTION:
    Ladies who have or had uterine fibroids.?
    Can you please explain how they affect you and the discomfort effects they cause.A GF has been diagnosed with them .She says they effect her in every way.Similar to urine infection.Bowels feel affected and her mind plays up.Can anyone please help me out to understand what she is going through.Thanking you all

    • ANSWER:
      generally, uterine fibroids cause your gf a lot of lower abdomen pain and discomfort, especially around her period. they are physically a small, non-cancerous mass of tissue on a uterus. if the size is rather large, you can actually feel the masses if you press on her stomach. there are four (?) different types, which you can look up. these masses push up against other organs in your lower stomach area, like your uterus and bladder and these little things make you feel like you're pregnant.

      for me, fibroids cause me a lot of lower stomach cramping and pain throughout the month. also, i have a lot of lower back pain and constipation from them. the lower back pain also causes problems if i stand for long periods of time. because of their size and location, sex is very painful for me as well, so don't be surprised if sometimes you have to stop. it also hurts when i orgasm. i have to urinate a lot (going to the bathroom about 8 times a day, if not more). I never really had extreme pms, but when i'm not feeling well, i get cranky. Another symptom is a swelling of the stomach. For me, i have the uterus the size of a 15 week pregnant woman and i look like it too. because of the size and number, i cannot get pregnant and i have had one miscarriage. i have met women who can get pregnant and carry the child to full term, and i have also met women who have had a premature child because of fibroids. it all depends on several factors. this also makes the problem somewhat psychological because a woman can feel inadequate if she cannot bear children.

      needless to say, menstruation is a horrible time of the month for your gf because of the menses and heavy bleeding. she is probably very tired during that time of the month.

      the good news is that your gf has a lot of options available to her now to help control the fibroids. if she has just been diagnosed, i would recommend taking 800 mg of ibuprofen a day and it helps tremendously. of course, this cannot be a long term solution to the problem because you'll destroy your stomach. Another thing that helps is exercise and, for me, pilates. pilates (and perhaps yoga) will help to relieve the menses. She should also consider eating non-hormone beef and dairy products. luckily today, this is possible and most grocery stores carry these products.

      if she's considering medical treatment, acupuncture has helped as well. not only will it relieve the back problems, but the size of my fibroids has reduced by 1 cm (Ooo, i know, but it's still something). After that, i would consider options such as uterine fibroid embolyzation and myomectomy. if she's lucky, the myomectomy can be performed laproscopically and will require very little hospitalization and down time. i would only recommend a hysterectomy if it's absolutely necessary. they are coming out with new treatments all the time and i would only take out the uterus if you've explored all other options. there are also hormone shots that she can take. DO NOT TAKE THESE! lupron shots put your body into temporary menopause to reduce the size. once you're off of them, the fibroids grow back.

      this is probably more info than you wanted to know, but i hope it helps.

  13. QUESTION:
    swollen abdomen causes?
    What are the possible causes of a swollen abdomen primarily when standing up. Gradually enlarging despite weight loss. Some back pain from lower ribs downwards also. Do not feel that it is gas. No changes in toilet habits. Swelling evident from waking and does not seem related to food or fluid intake.

    • ANSWER:
      Abdominal swelling has many possible underlying causes. General conditions that can cause abdominal swelling include infection, malignancy, inflammation, trauma, obstruction and other abnormal processes.
      Abdominal swelling can result from gastrointestinal or digestive conditions or from conditions of other body systems, such as the endocrine, nervous, reproductive and urinary systems.

      Gastrointestinal causes of abdominal swelling
      Abdominal swelling may accompany other conditions affecting the digestive tract including:

      •Appendicitis
      •Celiac disease
      •Colorectal cancer and pancreatic cancer
      •Diverticulitis
      •Food poisoning
      •Gastritis
      •Inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis)
      •Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)
      •Lactose intolerance and other food intolerances
      •Liver disease (hepatitis, cirrhosis, liver failure)
      •Overeating
      •Pancreatitis
      •Viral gastroenteritis

      Other causes of abdominal swelling
      Abdominal swelling can also be caused by problems in body systems other than the digestive tract including:

      •Abdominal tumor or mass
      •Advanced stages of certain cancers, such as lymphoma and breast, colon, stomach or ovarian cancer
      •Alcohol abuse
      •Ascites
      •Ovarian cyst
      •Portal hypertension
      •Pregnancy
      •Swallowing air
      •Uterine fibroids
      •Weight gain

      hope this helps

  14. QUESTION:
    Are these pregnancy or period signs?
    I had sex with my boyfriend a week on Saturday and he checked the condom didn't have a whole by squeezing It all to the top and nothing came out, but all this week I've been having these symptoms;
    •cramps
    •tiredness
    •dizziness
    •spots
    •back aches
    •dierha
    •belly aches
    •headaches

    are these signs of pregnancy? or could it be that my periods coming?

    I'm due on today/tomorrow but I haven't come on yet:(

    • ANSWER:
      Early Symptom of Pregnancy: Spotting and Cramping

      A few days after conception, the fertilized egg attaches itself to the uterine wall. This can cause one of the earliest signs of pregnancy -- spotting and, sometimes, cramping. Known as implantation bleeding, this early symptom occurs anywhere from six to 12 days after the egg is fertilized.
      The cramps resemble menstrual cramps, and some women mistake them and the bleeding for the start of their period. The bleeding and cramps, however, are slight.

      In addition to bleeding, you may notice a white, milky discharge from your vagina. This is related to the fact that, almost immediately after conception, the vaginal walls begin to thicken. It is the increased growth of cells lining the vagina that causes the discharge. This discharge can continue throughout your pregnancy.

      Early Symptom of Pregnancy: Breast Changes
      Changes in your breasts are another very early sign of pregnancy. When you conceive, your body undergoes a rapid change in hormone levels. Because of the changes in hormones, you may notice in one to two weeks that your breasts have become swollen, sore, or tingly. Or they may feel heavier or fuller or feel tender to the touch. In addition, the area around the nipples, called the areola, may darken.

      Early Symptom of Pregnancy: Fatigue
      Feeling unusually fatigued is an early pregnancy symptom that can occur as soon as one week after you conceive. The excessive tiredness is often related to a high level of progesterone in your system, although other things such as lower levels of blood sugar, lower blood pressure, and increased blood production can all contribute.

      Early Symptom of Pregnancy: Nausea (Morning Sickness)
      The elevated levels of estrogen in your system can slow the emptying of your stomach. This contributes to another early symptom of pregnancy, nausea, or what many women call morning sickness.

      Early symptom of pregnancy- Missed Period

      The most obvious early symptom of pregnancy -- and the one that prompts most women to get a
      pregnancy test -- is a missed period.

      CAUSES OF IRREGULAR PERIODS:

      Significant weight gain or loss
      Over-exercise
      Poor nutrition (or a diet too high in carbohydrates)
      Smoking
      Drug use
      Caffeine
      Excessive alcohol use (interfering with how the liver metabolizes estrogen and progesterone)
      Eating disorders
      Increased stress
      Polycystic ovarian syndrome/estrogen dominance
      Uterine abnormalities (fibroids/cysts/polyps/endometriosis)
      Hormonal imbalance related to perimenopause
      Medications

      http://www.womentowomen.com/menstruation…

  15. QUESTION:
    sereve abdominal pain?
    I have been having lower abdominal pain for a few years now and doctors do not seem to know what it is. I have had blood tests done and i was positive for H.pylori and had 2 courses of the treatment, but i still have the same pain. I had an abdominal ultrasound but nothing showed up

    My symptoms are extreme stomach bloating/swelling, low back pain, pelvic pain on my periods, frequent urination

    P.s. I'm 17

    Anyone have any ideas?

    • ANSWER:
      Abdominal/pelvic pain that is similar to that of period cramping may indicate a problem in a reproductive organ (like the pain around your ovaries or uterus).

      This includes conditions such as endometriosis (when tissue from the uterus is displaced to somewhere else like the pelvic wall or ovaries), uterine fibroids (thick bands of muscular and fibrous tissue in the uterus), ovarian cysts, ovarian cancer (rare), or pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) infection of the reproductive organs, usually from a sexually transmitted disease.

      If you have pain in your ovary area, you might have an ovarian cyst. I have experienced that same type of pain whenever I have had an ovarian cyst. I was also diagnosed with endometriosis in 2007 which caused me severe pelvic pain and intense and painful period cramping.

      If a gynaecological reason cannot be found for the pain you are experiencing, then it could be a gastroenterology problem which could be caused by excessive gas, chronic constipation, viral gastroenteritis (stomach flu), IBS (Irritable bowel syndrome), heartburn or indigestion, gastroesophageal reflux, ulcers, cholecystitis (inflammation of the gallbladder) with or without gallstones, appendicitis (inflammation of the appendix), diverticular disease, including inflammation of small pouches that form in the large intestines (diverticulitis), bowel obstruction (in addition to pain, this causes nausea, bloating, vomiting, and inability to pass gas or stool), food allergies, food poisoning (salmonella, shigella), hernia, kidney stones, UTI’s (urinary tract infections), pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas) or dissecting abdominal aortic aneurysm (bleeding into the wall of the aorta).

      Based on your symptoms and what you wrote, I would recommend that you should see your doctor/gynaecologist, and if nothing is found that you see a gastroenterologist just to rule out any serious GI causes.

      Good luck :)

  16. QUESTION:
    Why is my period like this ?
    My period this month was a slight bit of old blood and that's all chance I might be pregnant but what does this period mean?

    • ANSWER:
      Hello Kaydubs, Here are early symptoms of pregnancy and reasons for irregular periods.

      Early Symptom of Pregnancy: Spotting and Cramping

      A few days after conception, the fertilized egg attaches itself to the uterine wall. This can cause one of the earliest signs of pregnancy -- spotting and, sometimes, cramping. Known as implantation bleeding, this early symptom occurs anywhere from six to 12 days after the egg is fertilized.
      The cramps resemble menstrual cramps, and some women mistake them and the bleeding for the start of their period. The bleeding and cramps, however, are slight.

      In addition to bleeding, you may notice a white, milky discharge from your vagina. This is related to the fact that, almost immediately after conception, the vaginal walls begin to thicken. It is the increased growth of cells lining the vagina that causes the discharge. This discharge can continue throughout your pregnancy.

      Early Symptom of Pregnancy: Breast Changes
      Changes in your breasts are another very early sign of pregnancy. When you conceive, your body undergoes a rapid change in hormone levels. Because of the changes in hormones, you may notice in one to two weeks that your breasts have become swollen, sore, or tingly. Or they may feel heavier or fuller or feel tender to the touch. In addition, the area around the nipples, called the areola, may darken.

      Early Symptom of Pregnancy: Fatigue
      Feeling unusually fatigued is an early pregnancy symptom that can occur as soon as one week after you conceive. The excessive tiredness is often related to a high level of progesterone in your system, although other things such as lower levels of blood sugar, lower blood pressure, and increased blood production can all contribute.

      Early Symptom of Pregnancy: Nausea (Morning Sickness)
      The elevated levels of estrogen in your system can slow the emptying of your stomach. This contributes to another early symptom of pregnancy, nausea, or what many women call morning sickness.

      Early symptom of pregnancy- Missed Period

      The most obvious early symptom of pregnancy -- and the one that prompts most women to get a
      pregnancy test -- is a missed period.

      CAUSES OF IRREGULAR PERIODS:

      Significant weight gain or loss
      Over-exercise
      Poor nutrition (or a diet too high in carbohydrates)
      Smoking
      Drug use
      Caffeine
      Excessive alcohol use (interfering with how the liver metabolizes estrogen and progesterone)
      Eating disorders
      Increased stress
      Polycystic ovarian syndrome/estrogen dominance
      Uterine abnormalities (fibroids/cysts/polyps/endometriosis)
      Hormonal imbalance related to perimenopause
      Medications
      Chemotherapy
      Recent childbirth, miscarriage, or D&C
      Breastfeeding

      TAKE CARE! Mama Bear

      http://www.womentowomen.com/menstruation…

  17. QUESTION:
    Pain in lower abdomen?
    I have had a dull pain in my lower stomach and all around my lower back for about 2 weeks now. It was a bit like period pains. The pain is still there now and I also have a pain in my right hip. I have also been feeling a bit sick with the pain as well wot could this be?

    Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Your health Wellbeing Your sex life Discussion Diaries Ask the doctor Support groups News Video

      Lower abdominal pain in women

      Reviewed by Dr Philip Owen, consultant obstetrician and gynaecologist

      What causes lower abdominal or pelvic pain?

      All women feel discomfort or pain in the lower abdomen below the navel from time to time, for instance, before or during menstruation.

      Taking note of certain symptoms will help you and your doctor accurately diagnose the problem, although this can be difficult.

      In many cases it can be difficult to identify the cause of the pain, but noting certain features will help you and your doctor come to a likely diagnosis.

      The most common causes are a urinary disorder such as a bladder or kidney problem, a bowel problem or a condition involving the reproductive system - the uterus, Fallopian tubes and ovaries.

      Type of pain arising from the urinary system

      Pain from the urinary system can indicate such conditions as cystitis (inflammation of the bladder), inflammation of the collecting system of one or both kidneys (pyelonephritis), kidney stones or uncommonly tumours.

      Typical symptoms of infections are a burning sensation when passing urine and a need to empty the bladder more frequently. In addition, pain travelling from the back and around to the front might suggest a kidney infection or kidney stone.

      The pain associated with kidney stones may be particularly severe. The presence of blood in the urine raises the possibilities of infection, kidney or bladder stones or even a bladder or kidney tumour. Both benign and malignant tumours can first make themselves noticed in this way. The presence of blood in the urine always requires further investigation and should be reported to your doctor.

      The duration of the pain will further help you and your doctor to make the correct diagnosis.

      Type of pain arising from conditions of the intestines

      The bowel can give rise to a wide variety of symptoms including pain.

      Constipation and diarrhoea can be painful in themselves, and the change in bowel habit usually identifies the pain as coming from the bowel. Pain from the bowel is often described as colicky in nature. This means that the pain or discomfort comes in waves with little or no discomfort in between the pain.

      Bloating or swelling of the lower abdomen may be present in many intestinal (bowel) conditions including irritable bowel syndrome.

      The passing of fresh blood or altered blood (black motions) from the back passage should be reported to your doctor as investigation is usually necessary.

      Type of pain arising from conditions of the reproductive organs

      Pain might originate from the uterus (womb), Fallopian tubes or ovaries. It is usually felt in the middle of the lower abdomen, above the line of pubic hair as far up as the navel. Occasionally, the pain is more to one side, which is more typical of a pain coming from an ovary.

      There might be discomfort or even pain during intercourse (called dyspareunia) felt deep within the pelvis.

      Pain originating from the uterus is usually worse at the time of a woman's period (dysmenorrhoea).

      Examples of conditions of the reproductive organs giving rise to pain include endometriosis, pelvic inflammatory disease, ovarian cysts, fibroids and problems related to the early stages of pregnancy such as miscarriage and ectopic pregnancy.

      In any case of sudden, severe, unexplained abdominal pain your doctor should be contacted.

      What will the doctor do?

      Acute and sudden pains are always worrying but chronic pain can also have serious implications and a doctor should be consulted.

      The doctor will ask about periods, passing of urine and bowel movements. They might also ask if there have been episodes of nausea, vomiting, or fever. If appropriate, they may ask questions concerning the person's emotional life - family, friends, work - and their sex life.

      The doctor will want to examine you. This will involve feeling your abdomen and, in addition, an internal examination (vaginal,rectal or sometimes both) may be necessary.

      Further investigations or treatment will be based upon the description of the pain and the findings of the doctor's examination.

      Typically, a urine sample will be requested and tested for any signs of infection.

      If a kidney problem is suspected than an ultrasound scan of the kidneys and bladder will be arranged.

      If a problem with the womb or ovaries is suspected, swabs from the vagina looking for any infection might be performed and an ultrasound scan of the womb and ovaries is commonly performed.

      If a bowel problem is suspected, a sample of the motion is often investigated for signs of infection and you may be recommended to have a telescopic examination of the bowel called an endoscopy.

      Based on a text by Dr Erik Fangel Poulsen, specialist

      Last updated 02.04.2007

  18. QUESTION:
    HELP lower abdominal pain fibroid or appendicitis?
    i am a 39 year old female. i have lower abdominal pain on the right side of the abdomen. the pain is unbearable worst them childbirth, the pain is sharp pain and sometimes its constantly there for hours and hours. i always feel the pain there but it gets really bad sometimes. ive been told that i have fibroid in my womb but its only 1cm so it doesn't need removing. i had my smear test which was normal and an ultrasound which only shows the fibroid. my stomach is very swollen and the pain hits the back of my hip and down my right leg. ive recently realized that my skin is really itchy also. as well as the pain i feel nausea and i don't feel like eating. my GP said its not my appendix but the symptoms show that it could be appendicitis which could explode and kill me.

    please help asap because i cant live like this.......
    does anyone no what is can be

    • ANSWER:
      You really do need a second opinion or to get a check over in the emergency room. Possibilities include...
      Ectopic pregnancy, ruptured ovarian cyst, right kidney stone, right sided kidney infection, crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis and right lower lobe pneumonia are other common causes of pain in the right side of the abdomen.

  19. QUESTION:
    I have this kind of hard lump in my stomach, wondering if anyone would know about it.....?
    It's in my belly button area. I I put my finger in my belly button and press I can feel a lump right there that is probably a little bit smaller then a golf ball. When you squeeze it, it will go a different shape I think, but it is rather hard. I am going to go to the doctor about it, but just wondering if anyone would know.

    • ANSWER:
      Just get in to see your doctor as soon as possible.
      Here are some things that i can think of.
      1) An abdominal mass is swelling or enlargement on one side of your abdomen
      2) Abdominal aortic aneurysm can cause a pulsating mass around the navel.
      3) Bladder distention (urinary bladder over-filled with fluid) can cause a firm mass in the center of the lower abdomen above the pelvic bones, and in extreme cases can extend as far up as the navel.
      4) Cholecystitis can cause a very tender mass that is felt below the liver in the right-upper quadrant (occasionally).
      5) Colon cancer can cause a mass almost anywhere in the abdomen.
      6) Crohn's disease or bowel obstruction can cause multiple tender, sausage-shaped masses anywhere in the abdomen.
      7)Gallbladder tumor can cause a moderately tender, irregularly shaped right-upper quadrant mass.
      8) Hydronephrosis (fluid-filled kidney) can cause a smooth, spongy-feeling mass in one or both sides or toward the back (flank area).
      9) Kidney cancer can sometimes cause a mass in the abdomen.
      10) Liver cancer can cause a firm, lumpy mass in the right upper quadrant. .
      11) Pancreatic pseudocyst can cause a lumpy mass in the upper abdomen in the epigastric area.
      12) Renal cell carcinoma can cause a smooth, firm, nontender mass near the kidney (usually only affects one kidney).
      13) Uterine leiomyoma (fibroids) can cause a round, lumpy mass above the pelvis in the lower abdomen (occasionally can be felt if the fibroids are large).
      14) Volvulus can cause a mass anywhere in the abdomen.

      If you have any pain where you feel the lump you need to get to the hospital. Do you have any other symptoms other than that lump you feel by your belly button???Do you work out alot? That can also cause a firm lump but should go away after stopping the exercises for a couple days or weeks..

      I hope i helped

  20. QUESTION:
    Lower Stomach / Uterus Pain?
    For the past few days I feel like my lower stomach/uterus is sore. Kind of like if I pulled a muscle in that area. I have not done any exercise so I know it's not that and my next period isn't until June 18th. And when I stretch in the mornings after waking up it feels like if I did a 100 crunches. Any ideas on what is causing this pain?

    • ANSWER:
      Causes of Pain in the Lower Abdomen

      Pain in the lower section of the abdomen could be attributed to several medical conditions. Here are some of the health problems that could be responsible for abdominal pain.

      Appendicitis
      Pain in the lower part of the abdomen could be caused due to appendicitis. The appendix is a narrow tube or a finger-like pouch that is located on the lower right quadrant of the abdomen. This close ended narrow tube is situated at the ileocecal junction, the place where the ileum from the small intestine and the cecum from the colon come together. It could become inflamed due to inflammatory bowel diseases, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, infection in the gastrointestinal tract or trauma to the abdomen. Besides pain in lower right abdomen, an inflamed appendix could also give rise to symptoms such as nausea, loss of appetite and abdominal swelling. Those who have been experiencing pain that starts from the belly button and moves on to the lower right abdomen, must consult a doctor soon. If left untreated, the appendix may burst giving rise to an infection. Sometimes such complications can even lead to death.

      Cystitis
      Cystitis is a medical condition associated with the inflammation of the lining of the bladder. It is one of the most common types of urinary tract infection. Though both men and women can suffer from cystitis, women are more vulnerable. The symptoms of interstitial cystitis include swelling in the abdomen, burning sensation while urinating, a feeling of pressure in the lower abdomen, blood in urine and pain in the lower section of the abdomen. An early diagnosis is important because lack of medical treatment can lead to complications. If left untreated, this might cause an infection in your kidneys. Pain in the lower abdominal region could also be caused due to gallbladder problems. The obstruction of the passage of bile out of the gallbladder is one of the common causes of gallbladder disease. The symptoms of gallbladder disease also include a feeling of fullness in the abdomen, nausea, heartburn, fever and vomiting.

      Kidney Stones
      Abdominal pain could also be caused due to kidney stones. When the minerals and salts such as calcium, struvite, cystine or uric acid present in the urine get crystallized, it leads to the formation of kidney stones. When the stones become large, a sharp abdominal pain is felt when these move through the ureter. Besides the abdominal pain, affected individuals are also likely to experience symptoms such as pain during urination, back pain and frequent urge to urinate.

      Stomach or Intestinal Disorders
      Medical conditions such as Crohn's disease, peptic ulcers, irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel diseases, colon cancer or digestive health problems can also cause pain in the abdomen. Constipation, diverticulitis, pelvic inflammatory disease, celiac disease, food poisoning and bowel obstruction are some of the diseases wherein the patient may experience pain in the lower part of the abdomen after eating.

      Conditions Associated with Reproductive Organs
      Pain and cramps in the lower abdomen might also be experienced by women during menstruation. Women who suffer from dysmenorrhea, ovarian cysts, uterine fibroids and endometriosis could also experience pain in lower abdomen. Ectopic pregnancy is a condition that is caused due to implantation of fertilized egg in the fallopian tube or the ovary. When the egg develops, the tube starts stretching. If left undetected, the embryo will continue to develop in the fallopian tube. This causes lower right abdominal pain. Men can also suffer from pain in the abdomen due to testicular torsion or seminal vesiculitis.

      Treatment for Pain in the Lower Abdomen

      The treatment options will depend on its underlying cause. It is extremely important to identify the underlying cause. The earlier the diagnosis, the better will be the chances of recovery. Doctors generally conduct some diagnostic tests such as blood test, urine analysis and imaging procedures such as ultrasound, endoscopy, X-ray and CT scan to ascertain the underlying cause. Many a time, pain might be attributed to unhealthy dietary habits. Under these circumstances, one might find relief by changing one's dietary habits. If abdominal pain is associated with medical conditions such as appendicitis, cystitis, gallbladder diseases, kidney stones, hernia or peptic ulcers, the treatment will generally involve the use of prescription drugs, lifestyle changes or surgery.

      These were the causes and treatment options for lower abdominal pain. If you have been experiencing recurring bouts of pain in your lower abdomen, don't ignore it. Consult a doctor immediately

  21. QUESTION:
    sharp tummy pains 4 days after period?
    it comes and goes it gets stronger or weaker its in my lover tummy this has been happining since yesterday, iv had bowl movements fine but the pain is still there, any suggestions? im 22 and healthy.
    i meant in my lower tummy lol

    • ANSWER:
      Causes of Pain in the Lower Abdomen

      Pain in the lower section of the abdomen could be attributed to several medical conditions. Here are some of the health problems that could be responsible for abdominal pain.

      Appendicitis
      Pain in the lower part of the abdomen could be caused due to appendicitis. The appendix is a narrow tube or a finger-like pouch that is located on the lower right quadrant of the abdomen. This close ended narrow tube is situated at the ileocecal junction, the place where the ileum from the small intestine and the cecum from the colon come together. It could become inflamed due to inflammatory bowel diseases, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, infection in the gastrointestinal tract or trauma to the abdomen. Besides pain in lower right abdomen, an inflamed appendix could also give rise to symptoms such as nausea, loss of appetite and abdominal swelling. Those who have been experiencing pain that starts from the belly button and moves on to the lower right abdomen, must consult a doctor soon. If left untreated, the appendix may burst giving rise to an infection. Sometimes such complications can even lead to death.

      Cystitis
      Cystitis is a medical condition associated with the inflammation of the lining of the bladder. It is one of the most common types of urinary tract infection. Though both men and women can suffer from cystitis, women are more vulnerable. The symptoms of interstitial cystitis include swelling in the abdomen, burning sensation while urinating, a feeling of pressure in the lower abdomen, blood in urine and pain in the lower section of the abdomen. An early diagnosis is important because lack of medical treatment can lead to complications. If left untreated, this might cause an infection in your kidneys. Pain in the lower abdominal region could also be caused due to gallbladder problems. The obstruction of the passage of bile out of the gallbladder is one of the common causes of gallbladder disease. The symptoms of gallbladder disease also include a feeling of fullness in the abdomen, nausea, heartburn, fever and vomiting.

      Kidney Stones
      Abdominal pain could also be caused due to kidney stones. When the minerals and salts such as calcium, struvite, cystine or uric acid present in the urine get crystallized, it leads to the formation of kidney stones. When the stones become large, a sharp abdominal pain is felt when these move through the ureter. Besides the abdominal pain, affected individuals are also likely to experience symptoms such as pain during urination, back pain and frequent urge to urinate.

      Stomach or Intestinal Disorders
      Medical conditions such as Crohn's disease, peptic ulcers, irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel diseases, colon cancer or digestive health problems can also cause pain in the abdomen. Constipation, diverticulitis, pelvic inflammatory disease, celiac disease, food poisoning and bowel obstruction are some of the diseases wherein the patient may experience pain in the lower part of the abdomen after eating.

      Conditions Associated with Reproductive Organs
      Pain and cramps in the lower abdomen might also be experienced by women during menstruation. Women who suffer from dysmenorrhea, ovarian cysts, uterine fibroids and endometriosis could also experience pain in lower abdomen. Ectopic pregnancy is a condition that is caused due to implantation of fertilized egg in the fallopian tube or the ovary. When the egg develops, the tube starts stretching. If left undetected, the embryo will continue to develop in the fallopian tube. This causes lower right abdominal pain. Men can also suffer from pain in the abdomen due to testicular torsion or seminal vesiculitis.

      Treatment for Pain in the Lower Abdomen

      The treatment options will depend on its underlying cause. It is extremely important to identify the underlying cause. The earlier the diagnosis, the better will be the chances of recovery. Doctors generally conduct some diagnostic tests such as blood test, urine analysis and imaging procedures such as ultrasound, endoscopy, X-ray and CT scan to ascertain the underlying cause. Many a time, pain might be attributed to unhealthy dietary habits. Under these circumstances, one might find relief by changing one's dietary habits. If abdominal pain is associated with medical conditions such as appendicitis, cystitis, gallbladder diseases, kidney stones, hernia or peptic ulcers, the treatment will generally involve the use of prescription drugs, lifestyle changes or surgery.

  22. QUESTION:
    Cramps a week after period?
    Ive been having cramps a week after my period. Im on the mini pill which causes me to bleed irregulary (which is normal). Im not bleeding now but i am having a clear to light yellow discharge(TMI) i also get constipation like once every few months(TMI again) is that what the problem is?I took laxatives last night and since ive been hurting in my whole stomach including lower. Whats up?!? I know tmi sorry

    • ANSWER:
      Menstrual cramps or dysmenorrhea are usually felt in the lower or middle abdomen, which can even radiate to the hips, thighs and back. Commonly described as a "colicky" type of pain due to sudden rise and fall of pain, the severity of cramps varies widely from woman to woman and even between the same woman's periods. Menstrual cramps can be primary or secondary which normally begin a day or so before menstruation. Primary dysmenorrhea is common in women whose first period was early in life whereas, secondary dysmenorrhea is diagnosed in women having other health ailments like endometriosis, fibroid tumors, pelvic adhesions, and ovarian cysts. Cramps after periods is also experienced in women who use intrauterine device (IUD) for birth control.

      How Menstrual Cramps Happen
      A substance called prostaglandins is the most prominent cause for menstrual cramps in women. It is produced by the body and is found in the uterine lining. When the lining starts to shed with menstruation, these substances or hormones are released by the body. They cause the uterus to contract forcefully, which causes menstrual cramps. Prostaglandins also cause vasodilation of the circulatory system, i.e., the arteries and veins expand. This results in pelvic congestion (blood pooling in the pelvis) and further leads to discomfort and heaviness. It can even drop the woman's blood pressure and cause contraction and spasm of the smooth muscle of the gastro-intestinal tract, which causes nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, lightheadedness along with menstrual cramps. Heavy flow or clots during menstruation cause stretching of the small opening of the cervix which leads to mild or sometimes intense abdominal pain.

      Menstrual Cramps After a Period Ends
      Quite often, women do experience abdominal cramps after menstrual period, closer to ovulation. To understand why this happens, let us divide the woman's cycle in to three phases:

      Phase I: During this phase, the uterus sheds its endometrial lining and a surge of estrogen serves to thicken the mucus to prepare the body for ovulation.

      Phase II: This is the woman's fertile time period where she may experience ovulation pain and cramping which can last two to three days. Post menstrual cramping usually occur during this phase.

      Phase III: During this phase a surge of progesterone inhibits a subsequent ovulation and serves to maintain the inner lining of the uterus with a rich blood supply.

      Cramps after a period is over can be due to following reasons:
      •A congestion of mucus in the fallopian tubes may cause swelling and pain which occur a few days before the ovulation, as mucus is excreted before ovulation.
      •Another cause for abdominal cramp after period can be a pulsing of the fallopian tubes at ovulation. This pulsing motion enables the ovum to move through the tubes to the uterus.
      •Another cause for the condition can be the small amount of blood released at ovulation, which results in pain and cramping as the abdominal lining is sensitive to internal bleeding. This occurs when the ovarian follicle gets ruptured while releasing an egg, which also causes the tearing of a small blood vessel.
      •Abdominal cramps is also considered to be a sign of implantation, which occurs very early in pregnancy. Believed to be a normal sign of pregnancy, it is the body's way to prepare itself for the baby.
      How to Treat Cramps After a Period
      Although cramping is unavoidable, there are different ways to subside the uneasiness and discomfort. Applying a heating pad and a light circular massage with your fingertips around your lower abdomen will help relieving the pain. Taking over-the-counter anti-inflammatory medicine, such as ibuprofen a day before your period starts till the first few days of your period can reduce the possibilities of having menstrual cramps and pain. Having vitamin B6, calcium, and magnesium supplements, proves to be beneficiary in alleviating pain and discomfort due the menstrual cramps. Drinking warm beverages, eating light but frequent meals and following a diet rich in complex carbohydrates like whole grains, fruits, and vegetables, but low in salt, sugar, alcohol, and caffeine are some effective home remedies for this problem.

      Taking warm showers or baths, practicing relaxation techniques like meditation or yoga and doing regular exercise, are also recommended to overcome pain and cramps after period. However, if these measures don't work and in time the condition worsens, consult a gynecologist to elucidate the case.

  23. QUESTION:
    Do anyone know what could cause left abdominal swelling?
    Hi there.ok so basically my mum who's 37 has been getting a pain in her right side for over 3 months now, just coming and going, sometimes it lasts a couple of days,sometimes a few hours,some days she don't have it at all.Sometimes she goes weeks without having it.So I finally persuaded her to go to the doctor to which she did.The doctor felt all inside her and did a swab test(to which the results came back fine) as well as some water tests to which shes still waiting for the results.While feeling inside her he didn't seem to find anything wrong with her on the right side,but he did say that something didn't feel quite right on her left side.He pressed down on the left and my mum said she felt a bit of pain in her back when he did that.He sed that there was some swelling on the left side to which they will have to rule out a cyst.My mum is now waiting for a letter to have some kind of scan to see what the swelling could be.Other than him feeling inside her on the left,there is no obvious signs of swelling from the outside and there isn't any pain that side either. I was just wondering if anyone would have any ideas of what could be causing this left swelling in her abdomen? as me and my mum feel quite worried about this,with my mum getting quite stressed and upset.My mum also went to a walk in clinic the other day as she felt quite panicked as the days following the appointment she started to feel achy and was experiencing some numbness and pins and needles in her left arm and around her back.The nurse said this was nothing to worry about and was not a sign of a heart attack or stroke,it was simply brought on by stress and anxiety by the doctor saying she would need to have a scan.since the nurse told her that the aching and numbness has slowed down.also while my mum was there, she explained to the nurse about the right abdominal pain which she originally went to the doctor for and the nurse said the pain is likely due to IBS ( there has been some history of bowel problems in my mums side of the family) as my mum said of recent shes also had a gurgling feeling in her stomach.As well as the pain on the right side, my mum said that she feels she goes to the toilet more often now(no more than 7 times a day though which isn't classed as abnormal) doesn't sleep as well as she use to and also her periods have became much lighter(normally last a couple of days) as well as the occasional spotting of blood in between her periods(although shes had this for the past 6-12 months I would say, just every now and then(not all months) and the results are always ok) My mum did wonder if she was starting the menopause early,as her mum did start it fairly early.If anyone could be of any help with this, I would much appreciate it thank you! sorry for such a detailed and long question, but I just wanted to get everything down!

    • ANSWER:
      Fantastic history.. well done.
      Found it very difficult to answer without misleading you but here goes...
      As a "male nurse" I'm not gynae trained....
      Your Mum's symptoms are diffuse - ie - they dont specifically indicate a definite diagnosis... if the doctor "felt something" then this needs to be investigated and an ultra sound scan and maybe abdo xrays would be the first tests. If these results allowed a definite diagnosis then you'll be informed as soon as possible to quell any worry, but if the result is inconclusive then its either more tests or to refer to specialist for him/her to examine and arrange further investigations. Ovarian cysts are common and not dangerous but they can be unpleasant - they can be surgically removed if it;s causing problems with normal daily activity.An ultra sound scan will identify a cyst if it is present. As part of the scan they routinely look at the bladder, bowel, gall bladder, also parts of the liver...and sometimes kidneys. It's a really good all round examination and may identify a reason for the pain in the right side.
      FIBROIDS are benign tumours (safe cancer's) that are lumps usually around the womb - these may require hysterectomy
      IBS is usually a spasmodic abdominal pain that "moves around" and causes lots of wind pain - usually as a response to certain foods.
      UTI (urinary tract infection) - tend to cause a mixture of low abdominal pain (central), burning when you wee, blood in the urine, pain in the back and fever. The urine samples will rule this out.
      Soooo - it doesn;t seem to be related to bowels/ibs..... nor related to UTI
      The GP at the moment has focused on the ovarian area and his comment suggests and ovarian cyst.
      Truly - it's very difficult to really know whats going on.....the only thing you can do is wait for the tests and try not to worry too much....The thing is though - it is more likely to be something harmless/treatable that anything nasty.

      Your Mum's shown a few signs of anxiety.... this is like a stress "overspill" - tingling in the limbs or muscular pain around the neck/shoulder/headaches through tension. Good luck trying to keep her chilled out. Try some relaxation routines if it gets a bit out of hand.
      Good Luck
      S
      I can't guarantee 100% accuracy in the above but I wanted to help as much i can.

  24. QUESTION:
    could i b pregnant please help me?
    recently i have been havin messed up period for the last 4 months but i have start to feel wot feels like a baby moving and kicking is this just my body or could i be pregnant i have don't 2 home test both negative and i also been getting a really bad back ache plus pain in my stomach too

    • ANSWER:
      No you not pregnant. the presence of a period and lack of positive test result indicated this. a variance in your period could be caused by several things like; stress, hormone fluctuations (caused by foods with lots of hormone additives or poor nutrition, lack of sleep, fibroid (a non-cancerous tumor that grows in the uterus but does need treatment), or cyst on the ovary (also treatable). The fibroid and cyst are common in women but very few people talk about them. they can make a women have back pain, and swelling in the lower abdomen. They can be dangerous and make you infertile so get checked out by a gynecologist or doctor. also request a blood test (most countries this is standard procedure) when check out to see if you are pregnant or not. Blood tests are more secure than home tests. NOTE: Also cysts can fluctuate the hormones of a women when located on the ovary. I hope this helps.

  25. QUESTION:
    what is ovarian cancer?
    what is the survival rate for ovarian cancer after a complete hystorectomy is performed?

    • ANSWER:
      What is ovarian cancer?

      Ovarian cancer happens when cells that are not normal grow in one or both of your ovaries. This topic is about epithelial ovarian cancer, the most common type.

      This cancer is often cured when it is caught early. But most of the time, the cancer has already spread by the time it is found.

      It is frightening to hear that you or someone you love may have ovarian cancer. It may help to talk with your doctor or join a support group to deal with your feelings.

      What causes ovarian cancer?

      We do not know what causes it. Some women who have it also have a family history of cancer. But most do not.

      Some women are more likely than others to get this rare cancer. They include women who are past menopause, who have never been pregnant, or who have never used birth control hormones.

      What are the symptoms?

      Ovarian cancer does not usually cause symptoms at first. But most women do have some symptoms in the 6 to 12 months before ovarian cancer is found. The most common symptoms are pain or swelling in the belly and gas. Other symptoms are diarrhea or constipation, or an upset stomach.

      But these symptoms are so general that they are more likely to be blamed on a number of other causes. Most of the time, the cancer has already spread by the time it is found.

      How is ovarian cancer diagnosed?

      Sometimes the doctor may feel a lump in or on an ovary during a routine pelvic exam. Often a lump may be seen during an ultrasound. Most lumps are not cancer.

      The only way to know for sure that a woman has ovarian cancer is with biopsies taken during surgery. The doctor makes an incision in the belly so that he or she can look inside. The doctor will remove bits of any tumors that are found and send them to a lab to confirm that they contain cancer.

      There is a blood test called CA-125 (cancer antigen 125) that is sometimes done in women at high risk, but so far there is not enough proof to show that this test works to find ovarian cancer early in most women. Too much CA-125 in the blood can be caused by many things, like the menstrual cycle, endometriosis, uterine fibroids, as well as many types of cancer.

      How is it treated?

      Surgery is the main treatment. The doctor will remove any tumors that he or she can see. This usually means taking out one or both ovaries. It may also mean taking out the fallopian tubes and uterus. After surgery, most women have several months of chemotherapy, which means taking drugs that kill cancer cells.

      This cancer often comes back after treatment. So you will need regular checkups for the rest of your life. If your cancer does come back, treatment may help you feel better and live longer.

      Ovarian cancer is very serious, but many women do survive it. It depends on your age and overall health, how far the cancer has spread, and how much cancer is left behind during surgery.

      It may help to talk to other women who are going through the same thing. People who take part in support groups usually feel better, sleep better, and feel more like eating. Your doctor or your local branch of the American Cancer Society can help you find a support group. You can also look on the Internet to find support sites where women with this cancer can talk to each other.

      What are my chances of getting ovarian cancer?

      This cancer most often affects women who are past menopause. Women are more likely to get ovarian cancer if others in their family have had it. They are more likely to get it if they have had breast cancer.

      You may also be more likely to get this cancer if:

      You never had a baby.
      You started your menstrual cycles before age 12 and went through menopause after age 50.
      You are unable to become pregnant.
      You have used hormone replacement therapy for menopause symptoms.

      Just follow the links in yahoo health they might be able to help you
      I'm praying for you
      Hope I could help
      Cheer up.!

  26. QUESTION:
    bloating,gas,feeling full,stomach pain on lower right side. What could it be?
    For about 6 to 8 weeks I have had bad gas, bloating pain on right side of stomach and I always feel full never get hungry but im not losing weight even though i work out everyday. The gas and bloating gets worse once I eat. I also always feel like i have to urinate sometimes when i go i pass very little urine. My cycles are heavy with lots of clotting and pain which is always worse on one side. My Dr has scheduled an ultrasound but in the mean time does any one have any clue on what this might be oh yeah my Dr also said my uterus was larger than normal or in other words swollen but i am not pregnant she did a pregnancy s test.

    • ANSWER:
      Your doctor most likely ordered the ultrasound to see if you have fibroids in the uterus (which cause symptoms of heavy periods with passage of clots and the other symptoms you describe). He/she may also be looking for evidence of endometriosis (a condition where endometrial cells appear in the body outside of the uterus where they are normally found) which can also explain your symptoms.

      It sounds like your doctor has ordered appropriate testing and will help you find the cause of the problem.

  27. QUESTION:
    How do I tell if I have Uterine Fibroids?
    My lower stomach has looked enlarged for a couple years now. When I first went to the doctor (years ago) he thought I was constipated, so I tried the laxatives..but it turns out I was not constipated, and that did not help. I haven't been back to the doctor regarding this issue but I am planning to go soon. I think it might be uterine fibroids, as my stomach looks like I could be pregnant (which I am not). I am very thin otherwise, and know that it is not fat. Does anyone know any links to pictures of people with uterine fibroids from the outside? I can only find medical pictures of the actual fibroid, but I want to see if the stomach looks the same as mine.

    Thanks for your help.

    • ANSWER:
      Have they done a sonogram yet? It would have to be an extremely large tumor to cause that much swelling. Please have them check your ovaries. I had fibroids for years as did my daughter but not the swelling you are talking about. I think you need an intensive workup as soon as possible. You can never be too careful and I would go to another MD other than the one you saw that gave you the diagnosis of constipation.

  28. QUESTION:
    What is the cause of my AWFUL period cramps?
    I'm not exactly sure how long it's been like this, but its been at LEAST 3 years.
    I dread "that time of the month" so much. Not because of all the blood, not because I have to worry about leaks, not because of the PMS, but because of the cramps. They hurt so bad I can't even explain it.
    They're usually the worst for the first day of my period then the rest of the time just a throbbing pain.
    But When they're bad, I can't even walk. I lay in my bed, fill up a water bottle with extremely hot water and lay in on my lower stomach. Ive tried midol, i've used motrin, Tylenol, advil, aleve. EVERYTHING. Nothing seems to even help. I just lay there and cry. I can't sleep, I can't think.
    It sometimes even hurts so much I think I'm gonna puke.
    I can NOT live like this anymore.
    What is the cause of this? Is it normal?
    How can I reduce my cramps? I don't need them completely gone, just bearable.
    It seems like they're getting worse and worse every month.
    It's getting ridiculous.
    Please help me :( .
    im 17 if it makes a difference.

    • ANSWER:
      Each month, the inner lining of the uterus (the endometrium) builds up in preparation for a possible pregnancy. After ovulation, if the egg is not fertilized by a sperm, no pregnancy will result and the current lining of the uterus is no longer needed. The woman's estrogen and progesterone hormone levels decline, and the lining of the uterus becomes swollen and dies. It is then shed and will be replaced by a new lining in the next monthly cycle.

      Primary dysmenorrhea is caused by strong uterine contractions brought on by an increase in prostaglandin. When the old uterine lining begins to break down, molecular compounds called prostaglandins are released. Prostaglandin is a hormone that causes muscle spasms of the uterus (endometrium). When the uterine muscles contract, they constrict the blood supply (vasoconstriction) to the endometrium. This contraction blocks the delivery of oxygen to the tissue of the endometrium, which, in turn, breaks down and dies. After the death of this tissue, the uterine contractions literally squeeze the old endometrial tissue through the cervix and out of the body by way of the vagina. Other substances known as leukotrienes, which are chemicals that play a role in the inflammatory response, are also elevated at this time and may be related to the development of menstrual cramps.

      Generally, over-the-counter medications such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as aspirin or ibuprofen can relieve discomfort.

      If cramping is severe, low dosage oral contraceptives may be prescribed to prevent ovulation which thereby reduces the production of prostaglandins. If you suffer from secondary dysmenorrhea, treatment will depend on the underlying cause. Treatment may include antibiotics for the infection, polyps to treat endometriosis or surgery to remove fibroids.

      Natural and holistic treatments are a gentler and safer alternative to alleviate the pain and discomfort of menstrual cramps. Using herbal remedies helps to support the female reproductive system and promotes overall health and well being.

      Herbs such as Foeniculum vulgare (Sweet Fennel) acts as a liver tonic and helps to promote water balance while Pulsatilla vulgaris (Pasque Flower) is a soothing and supportive herb for the female reproductive system. In addition, Dong Quai (Angelica Sinesis) helps to promote hormonal harmony throughout the menstrual cycle and Melissa officinale (Lemon Balm) soothes and promotes stable mood and feelings.

      You may get more info here http://www.healthherbsandnutrition.com/remedies/m/menstrualcrampsdysmenorrhea.htm

  29. QUESTION:
    could this be ovarian cancer?
    **info** im 20 year old female, healthy and fit but overweight and there is no chance that i can be pregnant
    9 hours ago - 4 days left to answer.
    Additional Details
    going for an ultrasound next monday so no point going to doctors

    symptoms are=
    -nausea
    - light headed and dizzyness
    -rapid short breathing
    -swollen stomach
    -lower back pain
    - leg pain
    -shaking
    - really heavy bleeding (as in having to change pad every hour)
    -headache
    -constipation and diarriah
    -gas
    -slight indigestion

    what can it possibly be...just want ideas so i can get my results with a bit more of a clue........im really unwell so any ideas would be much appreciated thanks
    9 hours ago

    found this by mistake http://www.medicinenet.com/ovarian_cancer/page3.htm this is why I posted my qn here
    i originally thought it was PCOS thats why the ultrasound is already booked.my symptoms dont really match up with PCOS though

    • ANSWER:
      honestly, it can be many things. It could be fibroids, or poly-cystic ovarian syndrome, or even endometriosis. Ultrasound will rule out any of the following, but don't immediately think it's cancer. It could also just be a change in your cycle. If you are experiencing an increase in stress or athleticism then that could cause your cycle to change and be extremely heavy and painful. good luck!

  30. QUESTION:
    Fever and pain? Help?
    On Saturday, I had a fever and and from then through Monday I have felt lousy, achy, and sore. Today I have a bad pain in my lower right stomach. What can be the cause of this? Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Pain in the right lower quadrant of the abdomen is a real challenge for physicians, especially surgeons and gynecologists, as many problems can exist there. The first diagnosis that comes to mind is that of appendicitis, yet it is not the most common cause of right lower quadrant pain. Constipation probably leads the list. In children, mesenteric adenitis (swollen lymph glands) can mimic appendicitis. Kidney stones, tumors, diverticulitis of the colon, and inguinal hernias can cause pain in this area. In women, endometriosis, ovarian cysts and tumors, twisted fibroids, ectopic pregnancies, and infections in the fallopian tubes add to the challenge of a diagnosis.

  31. QUESTION:
    should i see a doctor?
    ok, i don't have insurance yet, but am worried. about a week ago, my foot on my right side and my stomach started itching really bad. i've been trying everything from benadryl to calamine lotion, even athletes foot cream. then the other day i noticed that there were blisters forming on the top of my foot and big toe. the blisters are only getting bigger, and still itch. this morning in noticed my stomach is now covered in purple spots (they're the same color as vericose veins) and there's blood under my big toenail. i've covered the blisters, but they're rapidly growing, and there's been no recent injury or trauma to the area. the only thing i did was walk into a box on the floor and bruise my calf really bad? is this stress related, or should i pay the 75 bucks to have a doc look at it?

    • ANSWER:
      Necrotizing fasciitis

      Symptoms
      The infection begins locally, at a site of trauma, which may be severe (such as the result of surgery), minor, or even non-apparent. The affected skin is classically, at first, very painful without any grossly visible change. With progression of the disease, tissue becomes swollen, often within hours. Inflammation does not show signs right away if the bacteria is deep within the tissue. If it is not deep, signs of inflammation such as redness and swollen or hot skin show very quickly. Skin color may progress to violet and blisters may form, with subsequent necrosis (death) of the subcutaneous tissues. Mortality rates have been noted as high as 73 percent. With medical assistance, such as antibiotics, this doesn't take a long time to process.

      Pathophysiology
      “Flesh-eating bacteria” is a misnomer, as the bacteria do not actually eat the tissue. They cause the destruction of skin and muscle by releasing toxins (virulence factors). These include streptococcal pyogenic exotoxins and other virulence factors. S. pyogenes produces an exotoxin known as a superantigen. This toxin is capable of activating T-cells non-specifically. This causes the over-production of cytokines that over-stimulate macrophages. The macrophages cause the actual tissue damage by releasing oxygen free radicals that are normally intended to destroy bacteria but are capable of damaging nearly any macromolecule they contact in the body.

      Treatment
      The diagnosis is confirmed by either blood cultures or aspiration of pus from tissue, but early medical treatment is crucial and often presumptive; thus, antibiotics should be started as soon as this condition is suspected. Initial treatment often includes a combination of intravenous antibiotics including penicillin, vancomycin and clindamycin. If necrotizing fasciitis is suspected, surgical exploration is always necessary, often resulting in aggressive debridement (removal of infected tissue). As in other maladies characterized by massive wounds or tissue destruction, hyperbaric oxygen treatment can be a valuable adjunctive therapy, but is not widely available. Amputation of the affected organ(s) may be necessary. Repeat explorations usually need to be done to remove additional necrotic tissue. Typically, this leaves a large open wound which often requires skin grafting. The associated systemic inflammatory response is usually profound, and most patients will require monitoring in an intensive care unit.

      Prognosis
      This disease is one of the fastest-spreading infections known, as it spreads easily across the fascial plane within the subcutaneous tissue. For this reason, it is popularly called the “flesh-eating disease,” and, although rare, it became well-known to the public in the 1990s. Even with modern medicine, the prognosis can be bleak, with a mortality rate of approximately 25% and severe disfigurement common in survivors.

      Other bacterial strains
      In February 2004, a rarer but even more serious form of the disease has been observed in increasing frequency, with several cases found specifically in California. In these cases, the bacterium causing it was a strain of Staphylococcus aureus (i.e. Staphylococcus, not Streptococcus as stated above) which is resistant against methicillin, the antibiotic used in the laboratory that determines the bacterium's sensitivity to flucloxacillin that would be used for treatment clinically (see Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus for details). “Super Strep” appeared in Ohio and Texas in 1992 and 1993 and was contracted by approximately 140 people. It took under 12 hours to incapacitate most and caused 3 days of very high fevers. The death rate in 1993 was reported to be 10%, with a majority of the victims having mild to severe brain damage.

      Well-known victims
      Alicia Cole, an actress, contracted hospital-acquired necrotizing fasciitis following a routine myomectomy to remove uterine fibroids. She withstood multiple debridement surgeries which removed most of her abdomen and left buttock. The disease was finally contained, sparing her from amputating her left leg. [3]
      David Walton, a leading economist in the UK and a member of the Bank of England’s Monetary Policy Committee which is responsible for setting interest rates, died of the disease within 24 hours of diagnosis on June 21, 2006.[4]
      Lucien Bouchard, former premier of Québec, Canada, who became infected in 1994 while leader of the federal official opposition Bloc Québécois party. He lost a leg to the illness.[5]
      Eric Allin Cornell, winner of the 2001 Nobel Prize in Physics, lost his left arm and shoulder to the disease in 2004.[6]
      Melvin Franklin, bass singer for The Temptations. Though Franklin’s condition was diagnosed early enough to prevent complete amputation of his arm, he died from other health complications soon afterward in 1995.[citation needed]
      Lana Coc-Kroft, a New Zealand television celebrity, was infected after she stepped on a coral reef in Fiji in 2005.[7]
      Jan Peter Balkenende, Prime Minister of the Netherlands since 2002, was infected in 2004. He was in the hospital for several weeks, but recovered fully.[8]
      Alan Coren, British writer and satirist, announced in his Christmas 2006 column for The Times that his long absence as a columnist had been due to contracting the disease while on holiday in France.[9]
      Alexandru Marin, an experimental particle physicist, professor at MIT, Boston University and Harvard University, and researcher at CERN and JINR, died from the disease in 2005.[10]
      Tommy Kwok Chin, Detention Enforcement Officer, United States Department of Justice, Immigration and Naturalization Service, Detention and Deportation. In October 1999, Agent Lee died after contracting the bacteria while detaining 151 illegal Chinese immigrants on a remote island off the coast of Washington state.[11]
      Barbara Miller-Roy, the mother of former NHL superstar goaltender Patrick Roy contracted the disease in October 2005.[12]

      See also
      Mucormycosis, a rare fungal infection which can present like necrotizing fasciitis

  32. QUESTION:
    I am having laproscopic surgery next week to remove a dermoid cyst. Help!?
    I am 25 years always been healthy never any health issues until last year. In March of last year i decided to get off of birth control pills in Feb. i got off the pill and i never recieve a period for about 4 months. After several pregnancy tests resulting negative they gyno decieded to put me back on birth control to regulate my period. My periods have since then been somewhat normal. But a few months ago i started getting pelvic pain, swollen stomach. Dr. just told me i have a dermoid cyst on my right ovary thats about an inch. And a fibroid tumor on my uterus. How do they know its a dermoid cyst and not ovarian cancer? Also why arent they removing the fibroid?

    • ANSWER:
      The composition of a dermoid cyst is different then that of a malignancy. A dermoid cyst is not common, but in women diagnosed with them, they are usually detected during child bearing age. Check out the website I posted below. If you would have ovarian cancer you would have presented with other symptoms in addition to the lump.
      To answer your other question, you should really ask your doctor. However, I would guess they are not removing the fibroid because it is benign and it could cause more damage removing it than leaving it on. If you are trying to have children the doctor will want to be as minimally invasive to your reproductive organs as possible.

  33. QUESTION:
    Need help to see when and if I made a bundle of joy!?
    This is going to be confusing I am sure of it so let me try to make it as simple as possible. First off. I have a fibroid that will make my period painful(3 days before period and during period its all cramps) and heavy. Sometimes maybe a day or two longer. Anyway, now the fun part. I am going to tell you my symptoms and then my cycle info.

    I am having Extreme sensitive nipples and breasts. My nipples seem to stay not hard but, erect.They also seem to look larger. And i have those pimple like bumps too but, they seem to have a little more then usual maybe like 1 or 2 on each nipple.
    My breasts are sore and tender to the touch and worse in a bra. They are more full and swollen.
    I have been feeling very sick the last few days like I am coming down with a stomach flu. It sucks. I am extremely HOT and usually always cold.
    I run at 97.5 all the time. I just took my temp and got 97.9, That's high for me...It has been that temp for a week straight.
    About a week and a half ago I had tonsillitis and it came out of no where! I am much much better now.
    My breasts never are this sore! EVER now for the cycle info.

    My last period was 2 days and the 3rd day was so light it was like not even worth a period. The 2 days I did have a period was weird since I am on a 5-7 day cycle and every now and then about 4-6 days. It was also extremely light! It was Aug 5-7.

    My next period is not due for 8 days. Sept 2.
    Now the confusing part.
    My LMP prior to my short one I just had was 12 days long! Way to long I was in hell it sucked! anyway lasted from July 6-17. I have an app that says when I would of ovulated and fertile and all that good stuff but, I am not sure when I did or if I did since this period was forever long! I have unprotected sex with my bf and we are not preventing a pregnancy but, would love a baby too so we just let the chips fall. Anyway I am wondering since you technically are told you are pregnant for 4 weeks when you really are only 2 weeks. I am wondering if maybe I ovulated or conceived or implanted right around the time my period was so short...I am not very good with all that just to know that a week after your period is when you are fertile. So my question is when do you think I ovulated or conceived if I did. Because, none of these symptoms really hit me till my mom said are you pregnant because, I threw up in the morning one day. I am 21 too so my periods are pretty good. Oh I am on a 28 day cycle at least I was till that long period came along.
    My symptoms showed up eh about 2 or 2.5 weeks ago. I took a test this morning a digital and it said not pregnant. So is it to early for a test? Or what? because, all the boob soreness showed up way to early for pms...and the sickness about 1 to 1.5 weeks ago. Thank you for reading I know its long!

    • ANSWER:
      Okay...gonna try to sort through all that info!

      I have a fibroid too so a lot of this is very familiar to me. It's not uncommon for your cycle to change - EVEN IF it's always been very regular before. Mine was like clockwork - I could predict the day. That's no longer the case - sometimes I go 7 or 8 weeks without one, and then 2 weeks the next. Fibroid can also cause spotting so that may be what was your really light cycle that only lasted 2-3 days.
      As for your breasts - it's very normal for them to become tender during your menstrual cycle or when you are ovulating or even pregnant.
      Your temperature change is not enough to even worry about. You're talking about 0.4 of a degree. Hardly significant. Everyone's temp fluctuates day to day - even morning to night.
      You could be pregnant - it's a little too early to tell. You need to wait til you've actually missed your next normal cycle - which would be next weekend. Those tests detect a hormone your body produces when pregnant and the hormone level doesn't really become detectable until around 5-6 weeks.
      Good luck if you are pregnant - some women with fibroids are never able to conceive. It took me a long time to get pregnant with my daughter.

  34. QUESTION:
    Hospital can't diagnose whats wrong with me?
    What should i do? I've had a colonoscopy, gastroscopy, barium x-ray, ultrasound, blood tests, stool sample as well as various medications incase its IBS and they still can't diagnose me and said theres little more they can do for me. Please answer im desperate. These are my symptoms. I've been ill for 3 months now with a stomach ache almost all the time, my appetite has gone, im struggling to eat and i've lost 30lb now. Im also exhausted all the time, im not normally a lazy person but im needing around 15 hours sleep a night now. Also sometimes i feel like i need the toilet but nothing or some mucus comes out (sorry i know thats sick) and i had diarrhoea until a few weeks ago, im not lactose intollerant, im not stressed and i've hardly been able to leave the house for 3 months. Im 21, dont smoke or drink and was very fit and healthy before i got this. What more could i do? Thanks a lot
    Thanks for all answers, its not mental health as i've never had any problems with that before and im not stressed,depressed or anything.
    And its not an ulcer and its too severe to be IBS.

    • ANSWER:
      You really are desperate asking yahoo questions when the health service can't find out what wrong.

      I would normally never answer this however, you have the similar symptoms that a friend had and it took them three years to diagnose her, then some doctors said it wasn't 'real'

      FM.
      After lots of research, I believe it is a mental health issue ( no don't get upset, if anyone has suffered any form of stress that is mental health and 99% have, mental health just scares us) No 'real' reason for the symptoms, but the pain, tiredness etc is very real.
      I found that NLP helped her a lot, regular meals, eat when hungry, not time, exercise and a Bioflow magnetic bracelet , go to bed when you are tired not by the time.
      I presume they tested for M.E. which was daub-ed the 'juppy disease'

      “Fibroid myalgia” or fibromyalgia as it is better known is a common condition characterised by generalized pain and fatigue. This condition has nothing to do with fibroids.Fibromyalgia is considered a form of arthritis. The cause is unknown but theories implicating abnormal hypothalamic pituitary axis function or dysfunction of neurotransmitter pathways in the brain are currently popular.

      Approximately 2 per cent of the population has fibromyalgia. About 80 per cent of patients with fibromyalgia are women. While fibromyalgia may occur as a primary condition, it is also a secondary condition, occurring in as many as 30 per cent of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis.

      Patients with fibromyalgia complain of generalised pain affecting both sides of the body and both the upper as well as lower part of the body.

      Pain tends to be aggravated by weather changes as well as by stress.

      While patients will complain of subjective joint swelling, objective swelling is absent. Here is a situation where magnetic resonance imaging which is able to detect minute amounts of synovitis that can help in the work up.

      Sleep disturbance occurs in almost all patients. Complaints of chronic fatigue and non restorative sleep (feeling as if they haven’t slept) are common. Sleep apnea may confound the situation.

      Tender trigger points are noted in all patients. A patient with 11 of 18 tender trigger points fulfills a major diagnostic criterion for the diagnosis of fibromyalgia. These trigger point tender areas are stereotypic meaning the same areas are tender in all patients with the diagnosis of FM.

      Other symptoms include migraine headache, decrease in short term memory, cognitive dysfunction, blurred or double vision, hypersensitivity to sound and smells, shortness of breath, chest pains, palpitations, irritable bowel, irritable bladder, painful menses, painful urination, multiple drug allergies, multiple sensitivities to chemicals.

      In fact, the types of symptoms a patient presents with may determine what type of physician that patient will seek out. For instance, patients with bowel symptoms may see a gastroenterologist. Patients with bladder irritability may see a urologist. Patients for whom depression is a problem may see a psychiatrist, and patient s who complain of migraine headaches may see a neurologist. Unexplained aches and pains will usually send a patient to see a rheumatologist or even an orthopedic surgeon.

      Laboratory testing will not be diagnostic. However, laboratory testing will help to exclude other conditions such as polymyalgia rheumatica, hypothyroidism, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, etc., that might masquerade as fibromyalgia. FM is a diagnosis of exclusion so it is imperative that other possible causes of aches and pains are ruled out.

      Imaging tests may also be helpful in establishing the presence or absence of FM.

      Treatment must be individualised. Most patients will respond to a combination of non impact aerobic exercise (swimming, stationary bike, elliptical trainer), cognitive behavioral therapy, and medication.

      Medications that have been found to be helpful include tricyclic antidepressants in low doses, muscle relaxants such as cyclobenzaprine, also in low doses, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs)

      Other medicines such as gabapentin and tramadol may also be helpful. A more complete discussion of FM may be found elsewhere.

      More recently, drugs such as Mirapex have been used for their dopaminergic effect.

  35. QUESTION:
    Worried about my health, point me in the right direction please?
    I've had a lot of issues lately with my health, and I can no longer tell what is a symptom of what.

    PLEASE, I KNOW IT'S LONG, BUT PLEASE, IF YOU ARE WILLING TO READ, THAT WOULD BE SOOOO VERY APPRECIATED.

    THANK YOU!

    1). I've always had issues with my menses. This last time, however, I bled for a few days, skipped two months, and now I've been bleeding since November 11th. It started out VERY light, just a bunch of small blood clots. So, I put tampons in and didn't worry about it. But it started getting heavy for a few days with huge blood clots, then there would be a day of barely any blood or clots and then the next day heavy all over again with clots. Off and on, off and on for over a month. Someone suggested I could have fibroids.

    2). I'm sure my iron is low. I am ALWAYS tired. But, then again, I don't usually go to sleep until 3-6am, and I wake up a bit before 10am. So, I'm not sure if my iron has anything to do with it. I know last month (November) I tried to donate blood, but my iron was too low. She didn't know the number, because the screen just put three "L's".

    3). Constipation, but with blood. I'm not even sure if I'm constipated, but I think I am. I mean, the stool sort of slides out (I'm terribly sorry for any images going through your mind) easily, but I can still feel that there is waste inside me that I cannot push out, and I don't even try
    too hard to do so, because I don't want to hemorrhage. So, if I'm not hemorrhaging, because I'm not straining, I don't get why there is blood in the stool. I am very worried.

    *note: I am severely dehydrated right now. I've taken to drinking strong tea all day everyday, with no water in between. This has been going on for three days, and I just realized last night that the problems I had yesterday (headache, sore neck and shoulders, pain in my left lower/mid back, swollen feet, dry mouth,fatigue) could be signs of dehydration. I know tea dehydrates you. My mum has renal failure, and her nephrologist warns her about tea a lot. She got the illness from streptococcus attacking her kidneys, so I didn't think it was genetic at all, so I wasn't as cautious with my kidneys as others might who has a close relative with renal failure, but now I'm thinking that was a fail. I read that a lot of my symptoms of dehydration are also that of renal failure. It scares me a lot because my mum also had really swollen feet.
    But, I have been eating a lot of Ramen lately, because we haven't gone shopping. So, maybe the sodium in the Ramen is causing water retention?

    4). I'm pretty sure I have Diabetes (type II). I was told 50 pounds ago that I was pre-diabetic, and I started losing weight, but then I started getting depressed, and didn't even care if I died from any health issue. It would have been welcome. But now, I just want the health issues to go away. I'm still depressed, but I feel like these health issues are what's kind of putting me over the edge, along with the other things that normally stress me out.

    5). Severely low in Vitamin D. I was told I was defficient a while ago, but my memory is horrible, and I can never remember to take the pills.

    6). Potassium could be low. I had a Charley Horse in my leg, while in the shower the night before last.

    7). I am vegan/vegetarian.

    8). I've had this on going nervous stomach ache the last few days. I'm not sure if it's because I'm anxious or nervous, but that's the way it feels.

    9). I'm depressed and under a severe amount of stress.

    10). As you can guess from number four, I am very overweight, with a very high (45.5) bmi. Not even a year ago, I was at 39/40, so I am gaining fast. I suppose nine and ten go hand in hand.

    I have pledged to myself to drink 10 8oz. cups of water a day, and to try to stick to a raw veggies and fruit diet with oatmeal, cereals, nuts and veggie "meat" thrown in. I'm hoping to start losing weight (again) and offset these problems before it's too late. I know I can. I can reverse the diabetes by exercising an hour a day and eating healthy (I already eat pretty healthy, but when I get in my 'down' moods, I eat any and everything vegetarian I can find, even if I'm full. ugh. I swear I'm bipolar sometimes and maybe a slight ED) I may also be able to pick up some E-tea from the Herb Shop to shrink the fibroids naturally.

    My Question To You: Can you look through this list and tell me what goes hand in hand? Like, I know that nine and ten feed off of each other, because when I'm stressed, I eat and when I eat, I hate myself. I know the Diabetes and kidney issues can go hand in hand when Diabetes is left untreated. So yes, can you see anymore correlations with these issues?

    Thank you! I know it was very long, but to those who answered, I appreciate it so much.

    I'm 1
    I'm 19 btw, don't take vitamins, avid tea drinker, frequent migraines, asthma, african american
    @Jaya:::::::: lol sorry. I copied this from the same question I asked in 'women's health' and for some reason the whole thing didn't paste! I just added the last sentence in "additional details" sorry about that. If I was one and could type this question out, I'd be one hell of a genius! lol
    I probably should have put this in the actual question: I cannot afford a doctor. I am a college student without a job and without insurance. I have a doctor's appointment scheduled for the 27th, that I can't go to, because I can't afford the 30 dollar fee that is charged to full time college students or those with low income.
    Which is why I'm trying to go the natural way and see if my symptoms clear up.

    • ANSWER:
      I'm sorry you're having these problems. :( That must be hard to deal with on top of your schooling!

      Honestly, you are doing the right thing by asking questions. HOWEVER, you need to ask the right person. That person would be a doctor. I realize you don't have the money, but it would be worth the cost in pride to ask a family member or friend to loan you . Would you rather pay now, or hundreds later when you have a worsened complication requiring the emergency room? Your health is one thing you should put on your priority list ALWAYS. Please go see a doctor.

      Until then, here are my amateur suggestions (which, by the way, are NO replacement for a doctor).
      1. Drink water. Constipation can sometimes be caused by a lack of water. Your body needs water, so it takes it from the stools in the intestines - resulting in dry stools that are hard to "push out".
      2. Sometimes people who are overweight have issues with their periods. I'm not sure if you are already doing this, but if you were to go for a run 3 times a week (or another form of exercise) this could help you lose weight and, therefore, have more regular periods. Your weight is a POSSIBILITY, that does not mean there aren't other underlying issues in addition to that.
      3. Eat spinach every day to help raise your iron levels. Seek out other foods in your house that might have iron. (nuts, seeds, etc.) Also, your lack of sleep could be a symptom of your depression. That coupled with low iron is not a happy combination. Trust me, I've been there and I sympathize. :(

      Anyway, those are just little suggestions from a fellow vegetarian who has been there. All in all, though, I beg you to go see a doctor. The fast weight gain, possible diabetes etc. are all reasons enough to go. Like I said before -- pay a little now or a lot later!! best wishes.

  36. QUESTION:
    Am i pregnant? Please help!!?
    I'm on Microgynon 30, which is a type of pill. I take it every day at 8am, but last week i left my pill at home and slept at my botyfriends. I took it on monday, then missed it on tuesday morning and we had unprotected sex on the tuesday morning (stupid i know) then i went home and took the pill at around 3 on the tuesday. i carried on taking the pill as normal from that day on. However, I was sick on the wednesday (out of the blue) after feeling ill all day but i had not eaten properly because i had stomach ache. i also noticed on the wednesday morning i had the tinyest bit of blood in my discharge. after then i have been fine, untill today. I woke up and took my pill at 8 as usual, but then i havent ate all morning, just had a drink of vimto. it then for to around half 12 and i got stomach ache, so i ate something and then was sick. Does this mean im getting sickness due to pregnancy? I am so worried, im going on holiday next week and am planning on continuing my pill so i dont have the week break (dont have the period) because i will be in the pool etc. but if there is a risk of me bein g pregnant i might not? There is no other time i could have became pregnant or the was a time when i was unpretected other than the situation i just explaind.
    Mature answers only.
    Also when i was sick i feel perfectly fine afterwards.

    • ANSWER:
      Hello Frankie, I do feel you are safe. Here are early symptoms of pregnancy and reasons for irregular periods.

      Early Symptom of Pregnancy: Spotting and Cramping

      A few days after conception, the fertilized egg attaches itself to the uterine wall. This can cause one of the earliest signs of pregnancy -- spotting and, sometimes, cramping. Known as implantation bleeding, this early symptom occurs anywhere from six to 12 days after the egg is fertilized.
      The cramps resemble menstrual cramps, and some women mistake them and the bleeding for the start of their period. The bleeding and cramps, however, are slight.

      In addition to bleeding, you may notice a white, milky discharge from your vagina. This is related to the fact that, almost immediately after conception, the vaginal walls begin to thicken. It is the increased growth of cells lining the vagina that causes the discharge. This discharge can continue throughout your pregnancy.

      Early Symptom of Pregnancy: Breast Changes
      Changes in your breasts are another very early sign of pregnancy. When you conceive, your body undergoes a rapid change in hormone levels. Because of the changes in hormones, you may notice in one to two weeks that your breasts have become swollen, sore, or tingly. Or they may feel heavier or fuller or feel tender to the touch. In addition, the area around the nipples, called the areola, may darken.

      Early Symptom of Pregnancy: Fatigue
      Feeling unusually fatigued is an early pregnancy symptom that can occur as soon as one week after you conceive. The excessive tiredness is often related to a high level of progesterone in your system, although other things such as lower levels of blood sugar, lower blood pressure, and increased blood production can all contribute.

      Early Symptom of Pregnancy: Nausea (Morning Sickness)
      The elevated levels of estrogen in your system can slow the emptying of your stomach. This contributes to another early symptom of pregnancy, nausea, or what many women call morning sickness.

      Early symptom of pregnancy- Missed Period

      The most obvious early symptom of pregnancy -- and the one that prompts most women to get a
      pregnancy test -- is a missed period.

      CAUSES OF IRREGULAR PERIODS:

      Significant weight gain or loss
      Over-exercise
      Poor nutrition (or a diet too high in carbohydrates)
      Smoking
      Drug use
      Caffeine
      Excessive alcohol use (interfering with how the liver metabolizes estrogen and progesterone)
      Eating disorders
      Increased stress
      Polycystic ovarian syndrome/estrogen dominance
      Uterine abnormalities (fibroids/cysts/polyps/endometriosis)
      Hormonal imbalance related to perimenopause
      Medications
      Chemotherapy
      Recent childbirth, miscarriage, or D&C
      Breastfeeding

      TAKE CARE! Mama Bear

      http://www.womentowomen.com/menstruation…

  37. QUESTION:
    Can I be pregnant? Taking the pill?
    Am i pregnant? Please help!!?
    I'm on Microgynon 30, which is a type of pill. I take it every day at 8am, but last week i left my pill at home and slept at my botyfriends. I took it on monday, then missed it on tuesday morning and we had unprotected sex on the tuesday morning (stupid i know) then i went home and took the pill at around 3 on the tuesday. i carried on taking the pill as normal from that day on. However, I was sick on the wednesday (out of the blue) after feeling ill all day but i had not eaten properly because i had stomach ache. i also noticed on the wednesday morning i had the tinyest bit of blood in my discharge. after then i have been fine, untill today. I woke up and took my pill at 8 as usual, but then i havent ate all morning, just had a drink of vimto. it then for to around half 12 and i got stomach ache, so i ate something and then was sick. Does this mean im getting sickness due to pregnancy? I am so worried, im going on holiday next week and am planning on continuing my pill so i dont have the week break (dont have the period) because i will be in the pool etc. but if there is a risk of me bein g pregnant i might not? There is no other time i could have became pregnant or the was a time when i was unpretected other than the situation i just explaind.

    • ANSWER:
      Hello, Here are early symptoms of pregnancy and reasons for irregular periods.

      Early Symptom of Pregnancy: Spotting and Cramping

      A few days after conception, the fertilized egg attaches itself to the uterine wall. This can cause one of the earliest signs of pregnancy -- spotting and, sometimes, cramping. Known as implantation bleeding, this early symptom occurs anywhere from six to 12 days after the egg is fertilized.
      The cramps resemble menstrual cramps, and some women mistake them and the bleeding for the start of their period. The bleeding and cramps, however, are slight.

      In addition to bleeding, you may notice a white, milky discharge from your vagina. This is related to the fact that, almost immediately after conception, the vaginal walls begin to thicken. It is the increased growth of cells lining the vagina that causes the discharge. This discharge can continue throughout your pregnancy.

      Early Symptom of Pregnancy: Breast Changes
      Changes in your breasts are another very early sign of pregnancy. When you conceive, your body undergoes a rapid change in hormone levels. Because of the changes in hormones, you may notice in one to two weeks that your breasts have become swollen, sore, or tingly. Or they may feel heavier or fuller or feel tender to the touch. In addition, the area around the nipples, called the areola, may darken.

      Early Symptom of Pregnancy: Fatigue
      Feeling unusually fatigued is an early pregnancy symptom that can occur as soon as one week after you conceive. The excessive tiredness is often related to a high level of progesterone in your system, although other things such as lower levels of blood sugar, lower blood pressure, and increased blood production can all contribute.

      Early Symptom of Pregnancy: Nausea (Morning Sickness)
      The elevated levels of estrogen in your system can slow the emptying of your stomach. This contributes to another early symptom of pregnancy, nausea, or what many women call morning sickness.

      Early symptom of pregnancy- Missed Period

      The most obvious early symptom of pregnancy -- and the one that prompts most women to get a
      pregnancy test -- is a missed period.

      CAUSES OF IRREGULAR PERIODS:

      Significant weight gain or loss
      Over-exercise
      Poor nutrition (or a diet too high in carbohydrates)
      Smoking
      Drug use
      Caffeine
      Excessive alcohol use (interfering with how the liver metabolizes estrogen and progesterone)
      Eating disorders
      Increased stress
      Polycystic ovarian syndrome/estrogen dominance
      Uterine abnormalities (fibroids/cysts/polyps/endometriosis)
      Hormonal imbalance related to perimenopause
      Medications
      Chemotherapy
      Recent childbirth, miscarriage, or D&C
      Breastfeeding

      TAKE CARE! Mama Bear

      http://www.womentowomen.com/menstruation…

  38. QUESTION:
    please help my lower abdomen hurts?
    a few things to add i cant get up or lay down without it hurting ,i do aerobics at school,i have been coughing alot and no period yet,dont think i am pregant even though dreamed about it the other day what could be wrong
    hmm...i am 22 not a teen

    • ANSWER:
      Hello,

      Causes of Pain in the Lower Abdomen

      Pain in the lower section of the abdomen could be attributed to several medical conditions. Here are some of the health problems that could be responsible for abdominal pain.

      Appendicitis
      Pain in the lower part of the abdomen could be caused due to appendicitis. The appendix is a narrow tube or a finger-like pouch that is located on the lower right quadrant of the abdomen. This close ended narrow tube is situated at the ileocecal junction, the place where the ileum from the small intestine and the cecum from the colon come together. It could become inflamed due to inflammatory bowel diseases, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, infection in the gastrointestinal tract or trauma to the abdomen. Besides pain in lower right abdomen, an inflamed appendix could also give rise to symptoms such as nausea, loss of appetite and abdominal swelling. Those who have been experiencing pain that starts from the belly button and moves on to the lower right abdomen, must consult a doctor soon. If left untreated, the appendix may burst giving rise to an infection. Sometimes such complications can even lead to death.

      Cystitis
      Cystitis is a medical condition associated with the inflammation of the lining of the bladder. It is one of the most common types of urinary tract infection. Though both men and women can suffer from cystitis, women are more vulnerable. The symptoms of interstitial cystitis include swelling in the abdomen, burning sensation while urinating, a feeling of pressure in the lower abdomen, blood in urine and pain in the lower section of the abdomen. An early diagnosis is important because lack of medical treatment can lead to complications. If left untreated, this might cause an infection in your kidneys. Pain in the lower abdominal region could also be caused due to gallbladder problems. The obstruction of the passage of bile out of the gallbladder is one of the common causes of gallbladder disease. The symptoms of gallbladder disease also include a feeling of fullness in the abdomen, nausea, heartburn, fever and vomiting.

      Kidney Stones
      Abdominal pain could also be caused due to kidney stones. When the minerals and salts such as calcium, struvite, cystine or uric acid present in the urine get crystallized, it leads to the formation of kidney stones. When the stones become large, a sharp abdominal pain is felt when these move through the ureter. Besides the abdominal pain, affected individuals are also likely to experience symptoms such as pain during urination, back pain and frequent urge to urinate.

      Stomach or Intestinal Disorders
      Medical conditions such as Crohn's disease, peptic ulcers, irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel diseases, colon cancer or digestive health problems can also cause pain in the abdomen. Constipation, diverticulitis, pelvic inflammatory disease, celiac disease, food poisoning and bowel obstruction are some of the diseases wherein the patient may experience pain in the lower part of the abdomen after eating.

      Conditions Associated with Reproductive Organs
      Pain and cramps in the lower abdomen might also be experienced by women during menstruation. Women who suffer from dysmenorrhea, ovarian cysts, uterine fibroids and endometriosis could also experience pain in lower abdomen. Ectopic pregnancy is a condition that is caused due to implantation of fertilized egg in the fallopian tube or the ovary. When the egg develops, the tube starts stretching. If left undetected, the embryo will continue to develop in the fallopian tube. This causes lower right abdominal pain. Men can also suffer from pain in the abdomen due to testicular torsion or seminal vesiculitis.

  39. QUESTION:
    Worried about my health, point me in the right direction please?
    I've had a lot of issues lately with my health, and I can no longer tell what is a symptom of what.

    PLEASE, I KNOW IT'S LONG, BUT PLEASE, IF YOU ARE WILLING TO READ, THAT WOULD BE SOOOO VERY APPRECIATED.

    THANK YOU!

    1). I've always had issues with my menses. This last time, however, I bled for a few days, skipped two months, and now I've been bleeding since November 11th. It started out VERY light, just a bunch of small blood clots. So, I put tampons in and didn't worry about it. But it started getting heavy for a few days with huge blood clots, then there would be a day of barely any blood or clots and then the next day heavy all over again with clots. Off and on, off and on for over a month. Someone suggested I could have fibroids.

    2). I'm sure my iron is low. I am ALWAYS tired. But, then again, I don't usually go to sleep until 3-6am, and I wake up a bit before 10am. So, I'm not sure if my iron has anything to do with it. I know last month (November) I tried to donate blood, but my iron was too low. She didn't know the number, because the screen just put three "L's".

    3). Constipation, but with blood. I'm not even sure if I'm constipated, but I think I am. I mean, the stool sort of slides out (I'm terribly sorry for any images going through your mind) easily, but I can still feel that there is waste inside me that I cannot push out, and I don't even try
    too hard to do so, because I don't want to hemorrhage. So, if I'm not hemorrhaging, because I'm not straining, I don't get why there is blood in the stool. I am very worried.

    *note: I am severely dehydrated right now. I've taken to drinking strong tea all day everyday, with no water in between. This has been going on for three days, and I just realized last night that the problems I had yesterday (headache, sore neck and shoulders, pain in my left lower/mid back, swollen feet, dry mouth,fatigue) could be signs of dehydration. I know tea dehydrates you. My mum has renal failure, and her nephrologist warns her about tea a lot. She got the illness from streptococcus attacking her kidneys, so I didn't think it was genetic at all, so I wasn't as cautious with my kidneys as others might who has a close relative with renal failure, but now I'm thinking that was a fail. I read that a lot of my symptoms of dehydration are also that of renal failure. It scares me a lot because my mum also had really swollen feet.
    But, I have been eating a lot of Ramen lately, because we haven't gone shopping. So, maybe the sodium in the Ramen is causing water retention?

    4). I'm pretty sure I have Diabetes (type II). I was told 50 pounds ago that I was pre-diabetic, and I started losing weight, but then I started getting depressed, and didn't even care if I died from any health issue. It would have been welcome. But now, I just want the health issues to go away. I'm still depressed, but I feel like these health issues are what's kind of putting me over the edge, along with the other things that normally stress me out.

    5). Severely low in Vitamin D. I was told I was defficient a while ago, but my memory is horrible, and I can never remember to take the pills.

    6). Potassium could be low. I had a Charley Horse in my leg, while in the shower the night before last.

    7). I am vegan/vegetarian.

    8). I've had this on going nervous stomach ache the last few days. I'm not sure if it's because I'm anxious or nervous, but that's the way it feels.

    9). I'm depressed and under a severe amount of stress.

    10). As you can guess from number four, I am very overweight, with a very high (45.5) bmi. Not even a year ago, I was at 39/40, so I am gaining fast. I suppose nine and ten go hand in hand.

    I have pledged to myself to drink 10 8oz. cups of water a day, and to try to stick to a raw veggies and fruit diet with oatmeal, cereals, nuts and veggie "meat" thrown in. I'm hoping to start losing weight (again) and offset these problems before it's too late. I know I can. I can reverse the diabetes by exercising an hour a day and eating healthy (I already eat pretty healthy, but when I get in my 'down' moods, I eat any and everything vegetarian I can find, even if I'm full. ugh. I swear I'm bipolar sometimes and maybe a slight ED) I may also be able to pick up some E-tea from the Herb Shop to shrink the fibroids naturally.

    My Question To You: Can you look through this list and tell me what goes hand in hand? Like, I know that nine and ten feed off of each other, because when I'm stressed, I eat and when I eat, I hate myself. I know the Diabetes and kidney issues can go hand in hand when Diabetes is left untreated. So yes, can you see anymore correlations with these issues?

    Thank you! I know it was very long, but to those who answered, I appreciate it so much.

    I probably should have put this in the actual question: I cannot afford a doctor. I am a college student without a job and without insurance. I have a doctor's appointment scheduled for the 27th, that I can't go to, because I can't afford the 30 dollar fee that is charged to full time college students or those with low income.
    Which is why I'm trying to go the natural way and see if my symptoms clear up.

    • ANSWER:
      It's time to focus on your health and put everything else on hold. The blood in your stool is something you need to pay attention to. It's unusual for a vegan to have constipation. We usually go to the bathroom several times per day. It's concerning that you are constipated and have blood in your stool. Beg, borrow, steal, or sell some stuff to get money to make your medical appointment, or you will be visiting the emergency room soon.

      1) Menses - At the end of the 1800s, the average age of menses was 17. Today it's 12 or 13. Today, most Westerners eat massive quantities of cow milk products and meat. The hormones remain in the food and the consumption of animal based foods are correlated with increased growth and risk of cancers and "early" menses. If you are a young vegan, it may be normal not to have menses for a while. Otherwise see your doctor about this because there are other diseases that can cause this.

      2) Iron - The best source of iron comes from leafy greens such as collards, kale, chard, broccoli, and spinach. In addition, these are high in calcium and protein. Most people would benefit by eating several cups per day. A few rare people may need to eat meat because of a medical or genetic condition.

      3) Constipation - Blood in your stool is a serious health concern. Make an appointment to see your doctor. Commercial food products like breads sometimes add wood fiber to increase fiber content. A "whole plant based diet" is ideal for fiber and nutrition. Avoid tea, juices, and all other commercial drinks. Just drink pure water. See your doctor about the blood!

      4) Diabetes Type II - Eat a "whole plant based diet." Most people can reverse this completely by diet alone. See your doctor. (Dr. Neal Barnard)

      5) Vitamin D - Take an excess dose of Vitamin D. Make sure to get out in the sun for 15 minutes each day. Your skin can produce this critical hormone (it's was misnamed when discovered). Other supplements can block vitamin D.

      6) Potassium - Eat banana, oranges, raisins, melons, and other whole foods that are potassium rich.

      7) Vegan - Being a vegan is a good start. Now try adding the foods you are missing from your diet. Eliminate processed foods. Take B12. Eat ground flax seed for Omega 3 fatty acids. You may have a rare condition that requires animal based products.

      8) Nervous Stomach - Avoid wheat, dairy, and soy products. (Try brown rice, quinoa, and legumes instead.) Avoid eating the same teas, drinks, and commercial food products that you drink right now.

      9) Depressed - Poor diet and lack of sleep can cause depression. Give yourself permission to take a break and focus on your health. Stop eating several hours before you go to sleep. People need at least 7-8 hours of sleep each night. Sleep is critical to health.

      10) Weight Loss - If you eat a "whole plant based diet" you will see immediate weight loss. It's the sugars, refined carbohydrates, salts, oils/fats, and food additives that cause most of the problems. If you drink sodas, stop it. Diet sodas usually contain aspartame which causes an increase in appetite. Another excitotoxin is MSG which is often found in fast foods.

      Add cooked veggies as well as the raw veggies to your diet. Try eating legumes instead of the fake meats. Fake meat often contain too much salt and oils/fats.

      You seem resourceful enough to come up with .00. Get your priorities straight.

  40. QUESTION:
    Why is my friend's belly look so big, when she is only 130 pounds, at 5"1, her tummy is so round.?

    • ANSWER:
      We all have different body types. Her weight may be concentrated in her tummy. Also, if she has had a child, she may tend to hold extra weight there. I'm not wishing this on her, but she may have fibroid tumors which will cause your stomach to swell...almost like you are pregnant. If she suspects that or has a family history of fibroids or cancer, she should see a doctor. Hopefully, it's just that she hold weight there.

  41. QUESTION:
    it may sound weird but is it possible a little tmi sorry?
    ok for a little while i would get this dull pain on my upper left side of my stomach . according to pictures of digestive symptoms it would be my colon the pain has now moved to my lower left side of my abdomen it is the same exact dull pain i was feeling on the upper left side , also according to where i get the pain and pictures of digestive systems it would still be my colon now my question is this sometimes i get this pain it sort of feels as if something is pulling inside my vaginal canal , it only happens on my left side and on the left side down there is where your rectum is , could it be that i am feeling pain from my rectum . i have gone to a gyn and the gyn said that my reproductive system is completely fine i explained the pain to him he thought it might of been fibroids and did a sonogram inside and the results came back clean and with nothing odd , as well as blood tests , i went to my regular primary care physician and she did a full sonogram because she thought it may have been something else and she also could not find anything wrong . she said it might be the food i am eating , i dont eat the healthiest food. so could it just be my colon giving me this pulling feeling i mean it would make sense cause if it was a bit swollen the ending of the colon is behing the vaginal canal so might be that i am feeling , any advise , thanks

    • ANSWER:

  42. QUESTION:
    can green mangoes delay your period?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Diane, I have never heard of foods that delay a menstrual cycle. Here are the reasons for irregular periods and early pregnancy symptoms.

      Cycles between 23–35 days are very common. A woman may get her period only one to four times a year. Or she might have periods that occur two to three times in a month and involve spotting or extremely heavy flow. Alternatively, she may have heavy episodes of bleeding every two to three months. Irregular periods are simply what is irregular for you.

      A wide variety of factors can be responsible for irregular periods, among them:

      Significant weight gain or loss
      Over-exercise
      Poor nutrition (or a diet too high in carbohydrates)
      Smoking
      Drug use
      Caffeine
      Excessive alcohol use (interfering with how the liver metabolizes estrogen and progesterone)
      Eating disorders
      Increased stress
      Polycystic ovarian syndrome/estrogen dominance
      Uterine abnormalities (fibroids/cysts/polyps/endometriosis)
      Hormonal imbalance related to perimenopause
      Medications
      Chemotherapy
      Recent childbirth, miscarriage, or D&C
      Breastfeeding

      Early Symptom of Pregnancy: Spotting and Cramping

      A few days after conception, the fertilized egg attaches itself to the uterine wall. This can cause one of the earliest signs of pregnancy -- spotting and, sometimes, cramping. Known as implantation bleeding, this early symptom occurs anywhere from six to 12 days after the egg is fertilized.
      The cramps resemble menstrual cramps, and some women mistake them and the bleeding for the start of their period. The bleeding and cramps, however, are slight.

      Early Symptom of Pregnancy: Breast Changes
      Changes in your breasts are another very early sign of pregnancy. When you conceive, your body undergoes a rapid change in hormone levels. Because of the changes in hormones, you may notice in one to two weeks that your breasts have become swollen, sore, or tingly. Or they may feel heavier or fuller or feel tender to the touch. In addition, the area around the nipples, called the areola, may darken.

      Early Symptom of Pregnancy: Fatigue
      Feeling unusually fatigued is an early pregnancy symptom that can occur as soon as one week after you conceive.

      Early Symptom of Pregnancy: Nausea (Morning Sickness)
      The elevated levels of estrogen in your system can slow the emptying of your stomach. This contributes to another early symptom of pregnancy, nausea, or what many women call morning sickness.

      Early symptom of pregnancy- Missed Period

      The most obvious early symptom of pregnancy -- and the one that prompts most women to get a
      pregnancy test -- is a missed period.

      TAKE CARE!

  43. QUESTION:
    abdominal pain and bleeding after sex?
    Last week i had really bad abdominal cramps on my lower abdomen on the right hand side, it was about the time of ovulation and they lasted around 3-4 days so left it to that. Recently i have noticed some (sorry if it sounds horrible) slimy discharge and discomfort when i use the toilet.
    When having sex last night it was really painful to the extent when i had to stop, my man is around 11 inches and I was wondering if this could be a reason? After sex i noticed some blood but not a lot just mucus, brownish type.. (sorry again). it still hurts when i use the toilet and sometimes my stomach around where my cervix is hurts when i sit down... any ideas as to what this could be?? anybody had the same symptoms? please help.

    • ANSWER:
      Here’s a look at the top 10 causes of vaginal bleeding after sex, I hope this information helps you to answer a few of your questions. Take care.

      Cervical dysplasia: Cervical dysplasia is precancerous changes of the epithelial cells that line the cervix. Risk increases with multiple sexual partners, sex before age 18, childbirth before age 16, or a past history of STDs. Treatment is usually cryosurgery or conisation.

      Chlamydia: A bacterial infection that is usually transmitted through sexual activity or contact with semen, vaginal fluid, or blood.

      Gonorrhea: A usually sexually transmitted disease caused by a bacteria. Several pharmaceutical treatments are available.

      Vaginitis or Cervicitis: Inflammation or swelling and infection of the vagina or cervix. Treatment depends on the cause.

      Cervical polyps: Cervical polyps are smooth, red or purple, finger-like growths that grow out of the mucus layer of the cervix or the cervical canal. Cervical polyps are extremely fragile, extending out of the cervix, and easily and painlessly removed.

      Trichomoniasis: A usually sexually transmitted disease caused by protozoan. Can also be passed to newborns during vaginal birth by infected mothers. Although rare, transmission is also possible in tap water, hot tubs, urine, on toilet seats, and in swimming pools. May cause vaginitis.

      Vaginal Yeast Infection: An overgrowth of the normal fungi that inhabits the vaginal area. Common symptoms include itching, burning, and an odorless, white, cheese-like discharge.

      Endometritis or adenomyosis: Endometritis is defined by Dorland’s Medical Dictionary, 27th Edition as an inflammation of the endometrium (the innermost layer of the uterus). Both conditions are associated with endometriosis. Adenomysis is when endometrial tissue attaches itself to the uterus, or another organ such as the ovaries, and grows outside of the uterus.

      Uterine polyps: Uterine polyps occur when the endometrium overgrows causing these protrusions into the uterus. It is extremely rare for these growths to grow in a way that is either benign or malignant. Women with uterine polyps frequently experience bleeding between periods (metrorrhagia), other symptoms includes vaginal bleeding after sex, spotting, menorrhagia, bleeding after menopause, and breakthrough bleeding during hormone therapy. Hysteroscopic-guided curettage is the preferred treatment, since the normal D&C is basically an unguided procedure that may miss many of the uterine polyps.

      Fibroid tumors: Uterine fibroid tumors are usually benign tumors. They are solid masses made of fibrous tissue. Fibroid tumors are rarely malignant. Symptoms of fibroid tumors vary among women, with some women never experiencing any symptoms at all. Women who can wait until menopause will see their fibroids shrink and disappear once their bodies stop producing estrogen. It’s important that women with fibroids make sure they never take estrogen, in any form including birth control pills, since estrogen increases fibroid growth. Several treatments are currently available for uterine fibroid tumors from myomectomy and uterine artery embolization to the traditional hysterectomy.

      The article reprinted from http://digghealth.com/reasons-bleeding-s…
      Source(s):
      http://digghealth.com/reasons-bleeding-s…

  44. QUESTION:
    Sudden Change in pms for the worse?
    Since the beginning of this year my pms has become unbearable, I've never had a normal cycle (normal for be was one heavy period of bleeding with flooding for about a week every 6-8. Weeks)

    At the end of last year I noticed that the night before bleeding began I was getting cramps so severe I basically curled up and couldn't move, it usually kept me awake most of the night too

    Each month things seemed to get progressively worse until at the beginning of this year I had to call in the doctor for an emergency homevisit as I was having nausea (not good for someone with a deadly fear of vomiting) sinus problems and felt very out if it and shaky, I was bedbound and thought I had a bug or the flu. The doctor seeing the state I was in prescribed tablets normally used for acid reflux 24 hour acid suppressant and valium both as a muscle relaxant and a tranquilizer so I could sleep through the next few days.

    It later turned out that i was feeling very Ill 2 weeks before my period began later progressing to around 3 weeks before bleeding and lasting for a while after bleeding stopped

    Various pms symptoms that I had never had before started appearing, such as very oily skin, pallor, headaches, backache , nausea and lack of appetite , suicide ideology and rationalization ,feeling of being very heavy when trying to walk, bloating with noticeable abdominal distention, sinus congestion, sticky eyes with a lot of mucous production, and lots of pelvic pain, constant urination, dry mouth and hard stools multiple times a day.

    The most notable and unusual thing is a feeling of congestion in my pelvis, vaginal dryness and hard swelling like tigbtness ( swelling can be felt and it's difficult almost impossible to insert a finger)

    Previously I just got a bit more anxious, had a sore stomach and cramp before hand and felt lightheaded during)

    Now every 8-10 weeks I feel sick, allergic, pass out , feel like a weight is pressing in my pelvis, feel axious, headachy, have so much oil and acne my hand literally slides off my face, hot flushes, irritability. And no longer have any fertile eggwhite mucous when before I cad cookie amounts during parts of my cycle with normal lubrication the rest of the time. Now I'm dry swollen achy and have small amounts of thick creamy white to yellow tinged discharge the texture of lotion, that when I squeeze my muscles I can occasionally get some to release which helps the congested feeling briefly, also my last period was almost non-existent starting and stopping lasting only a few days, and more like wiping dry paint off a brush than an actuall period even the clots were recognizable as bits of cellular tissue.

    My doctor ran standard blood tests to check kidneys and anemia (he was certain I was anemic , because of fainting, pale nail beds, pallor and not eating many iron sources) but they all came back surprisingly healthy.

    Im 22 and have never been to a gyno.
    I'm wondering what could be wrong and thinking of ore-mature menopause, endometriosis (due to heavy pulling feeling and stabbing rib pain) fibroids (a few years ago I passed a 1.5" greyish lump that I would have thought was a miscarriage had I not been celibate)

    I'm defiantly at my wits end and the thought of enduring another month like this again makes me not want to be around for it.

    The doctor just said that as bloods were normal he doesn't know, fobbed me off with the pill( which he knows I won't take due to phobias) said take it or leave it basically

    Should I see a gynecologist? What the heck could be wrong? I am underweight but I have been all my life, I have been at a lower weight before and not had periods stop and had been maintaining a normal weight for years, but all this menstrual hell has left me with no apatite and barely able to eat during 'attacks'
    I'm con

    The doctor ran standard blood t
    It's the nausea and vomiting side effect that bothers me, I have OCD and panic attacks (have all my life) and control it well with medication mirtazipine and fluoxitine but my phobia of vomiting is the one thing that scares me more than anything else in the world.

    I have a hard time taking new medications for that reason especially ones so wellknown for causing stomach problems.

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, you should see a gynecologist. Sounds to me like you might have endometriosis. No test will show that you have it--the only way to be diagnosed with it is to have surgery.

      Birth control pills can help with the pain, so it seems to me like you should be trying them. I'm not sure why your anxiety would cause you to be afraid of something that is helpful, but if your anxiety is that great, then you should think about taking medication to treat your anxiety.

  45. QUESTION:
    Why do I look pregnant when I am not?
    Hi, Over the past couple months I have been gaining weight. I have gained about 15 lbs. or so. And I am gaining it all in my stomach area.
    Here is the pics of what I looked like a couple months ago, and 2 pics of my stomach now.

    http://s402.photobucket.com/albums/pp110/lauraj1989/

    Do you think something may be wrong with me because it looks swollen and round. Also I am relaxing my muscles in the pics. I am def. sure I am not pregnant as I went to the Dr. a month ago and Blood test came back as 5, essentially negative. What would cause this?
    Do you think I am just gained weight and maybe bloated? Thanks, please no rude comments....
    No, I am not on BC

    • ANSWER:
      you could have a fibroid that can cause you to look pregnant. I would ask an OBGYN.

  46. QUESTION:
    Really bad and abnormal period...what to do?
    I'm 14 years old. I've had my period for over a year consistently. I barely ever have really bad cramps. They're usually only like 2 days, just in my stomach, and they don't usually last all day. It'll just be parr of the day. But one, I started having cramps in my stomach last night and didn't get my period until this afternoon. I've had like the worst cramps ever today and they've lasted for like 15 hours. It's not just my stomach. My stomach, lower back, and legs all hurt so bad. Legs are the worst. It hurts to stand, heck I'm laying down, and they still ache.

    I ate a TON of food over a winter break. I'm 5'5 131 pounds right now. I was on a diet and lost 3 pounds and Gained 4 over break. So you can tell the major diet change. Could all that food before my period be causing bad cramps? I usually exercise a lot during my period because it makes them about 2 days shorter. But I did 50 jumping jacks and was exhausted today. Should I not exercise or do you think it will help? Bananas dont really work and all I have in the medicine drawer is bayer and advil and neither of them work AT ALL. Advice?

    Also, do you think I should to to my doctor and talk about getting some kind of prescription? Because I live solely with my grandmother because I was taken away from my parents when I was 5 by child services. And my doctor is a male and I am really uncomfortable discussing this with either one of them.

    • ANSWER:
      Having your period is hard enough without any complications. Now you have to deal with cramps on top of the hormonal imbalances and the regular side effects! Cramps are caused by the contraction of your uterus as it sloughs off the fertile layer it had prepared for a possible pregnancy; if there is an absence of a fertilized egg after ovulation has occurred, the uterine wall swells and sheds. Menstrual cramps are usually side effects of greater-than-normal uterine muscle contractions. The pain occurring during these contractions can be mild, moderate or severe. Menstrual cramps have been known to occur in the abdomen (in the general area of the uterus), the lower back, and, in some cases, the legs. Ibuprofen, acetaminophen, and other pain medications can be used to dull the pain-- however only prescribed doses are recommended for treatment, as harmful overdoses are always a possibility

      Stick to a healthy diet. This includes plenty of fresh fruit and vegetables, as well as plenty of water. Attempt to keep track of how particular foods affect your period. Plenty of fiber is particularly useful in cleansing the body of excess estrogen (which can lead to heavier and more painful periods and cramps).

      Make sure to have regular health check-ups to ensure health. Mention to doctors any menstrual problems you feel you might be having, and take into consideration how conditions such as IBS or anemia may make you feel during menstruation. In addition, menstrual cramps can be caused by an underlying disorder such as endometriosis or fibroids, in which case the surgical removal of tissue may be required to help alleviate your symptoms.

      Use painkillers around the clock as soon as you notice your period. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAIDs), medicines such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin etc.) or naproxen (Aleve) actually reduce menstrual blood flow not just the pain associated with menses. Acetaminophen, while helpful for the pain, is not nearly as effective as the NSAIDs. Many women find that painkillers can decrease menstrual pain. If you can't tolerate ibuprofen or naproxen sodium, simple aspirin or acetaminophen can help a lot. The effectiveness of NSAIDs builds up over time, so if your cramps are so severe that the painkillers don't do much, start taking ibuprofen every six hours up to a couple of days before you expect to get your period and continue until your cramps abate. If over-the-counter NSAIDs do not help, your doctor may prescribe a prescription NSAID such as mefenamic acid (Ponstel).

      Lie in different positions. Laying on your side with your knees tucked into your chest can temporarily reduce the pain. Some people say to lay face down on the bed, with your face in a pillow. Stick your butt up in the air. This will relieve gas and help you feel better. Also try lying on your back, keeping your feet elevated by pillows.

      Try placing a hot water bottle or heating pad on your abdomen. This helps ease your muscles. A hot wash cloth or even just a warm blanket can also help. According to the Mayo Clinic, this appears to be just as effective as over-the-counter pain killers. Also try taking a hot bath of shower

      Do some mild exercise. Walk around the neighborhood, run on the treadmill, go ride your bike, or any other exercises you enjoy. This will increase blood flow which will help the cramps go away.

      Use the body's own pain-killers. If you're worried about over-use of traditional pain-killers, or they are not available, you may also wish to make use of the body's own pain-management mechanisms.

      * Distract yourself from the pain. Distraction is one of the most powerful and readily available painkillers. So if you have intense cramps, do something that normally totally absorbs you, such as socializing with good friends, reading a book, playing a computer game, or spending time on facebook.
      * Get regular exercise. Exercise increases your overall serotonin levels. Serotonin is the body's own painkiller, and also makes us feel happier.

      Try to wear clothing that doesn't pressure your abdomen, such as all-in-ones. They are comfortable, warm and help reduce period cramps caused by tight clothing. Dance Direct sell some good-quality ones.

      # Lightly massage your abdomen, or get someone else to do it for you. This promotes blood flow to the tired muscles, which brings more oxygen and nutrients, and takes away the acidic byproducts produced by tired muscles.
      # Try several different period-relief pills. Different brands work better for different women.
      # If you're going to take a pill, take it right away. Don't give yourself time to get nauseous, or you may not be able to keep the pill down.
      # Eat calcium and magnesium rich foods/beverages. Take in a lot of those in milk, cheese, yogurt, and supplements too.

      Hope this helps!(:

  47. QUESTION:
    My period only lasted two days and now I have pain and discharge... help?
    My period lasted two days, rather than 4-5. Following, I have had some brown discharge and a day or two later, bad abdominal pains, off and on throughout the day. Now I woke up today with even worse pain that hasn't gone down, along with a fire/burning sensation in my mid abdomen. Not heartburn, either. And I keep getting the 'I want to vomit' feeling, but very little comes up... Also, when I eat, I get full extremely fast, and feel bloated! And then two hours later, I'm starving again. My boyfriend and I were intimate a lot last month, unprotected, including my fertile days. (May 23-29, period was June 10-11)
    Could these symptoms be a sign of pregnancy? I plan on getting a hpt tonight to test today and tomorrow, however I'm not sure if it would give an accurate result? Please help if you have any advice or idea as to what is causing my body to go through this.. thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Early Symptom of Pregnancy: Spotting and Cramping

      A few days after conception, the fertilized egg attaches itself to the uterine wall. This can cause one of the earliest signs of pregnancy -- spotting and, sometimes, cramping. Known as implantation bleeding, this early symptom occurs anywhere from six to 12 days after the egg is fertilized.
      The cramps resemble menstrual cramps, and some women mistake them and the bleeding for the start of their period. The bleeding and cramps, however, are slight.

      In addition to bleeding, you may notice a white, milky discharge from your vagina. This is related to the fact that, almost immediately after conception, the vaginal walls begin to thicken. It is the increased growth of cells lining the vagina that causes the discharge. This discharge can continue throughout your pregnancy.

      Early Symptom of Pregnancy: Breast Changes
      Changes in your breasts are another very early sign of pregnancy. When you conceive, your body undergoes a rapid change in hormone levels. Because of the changes in hormones, you may notice in one to two weeks that your breasts have become swollen, sore, or tingly. Or they may feel heavier or fuller or feel tender to the touch. In addition, the area around the nipples, called the areola, may darken.

      Early Symptom of Pregnancy: Fatigue
      Feeling unusually fatigued is an early pregnancy symptom that can occur as soon as one week after you conceive. The excessive tiredness is often related to a high level of progesterone in your system, although other things such as lower levels of blood sugar, lower blood pressure, and increased blood production can all contribute.

      Early Symptom of Pregnancy: Nausea (Morning Sickness)
      The elevated levels of estrogen in your system can slow the emptying of your stomach. This contributes to another early symptom of pregnancy, nausea, or what many women call morning sickness.

      Early symptom of pregnancy- Missed Period

      The most obvious early symptom of pregnancy -- and the one that prompts most women to get a
      pregnancy test -- is a missed period.

      CAUSES OF IRREGULAR PERIODS:

      Significant weight gain or loss
      Over-exercise
      Poor nutrition (or a diet too high in carbohydrates)
      Smoking
      Drug use
      Caffeine
      Excessive alcohol use (interfering with how the liver metabolizes estrogen and progesterone)
      Eating disorders
      Increased stress
      Polycystic ovarian syndrome/estrogen dominance
      Uterine abnormalities (fibroids/cysts/polyps/endometriosis)
      Hormonal imbalance related to perimenopause
      Medications
      Chemotherapy
      Recent childbirth, miscarriage, or D&C
      Breastfeeding

      http://www.womentowomen.com/menstruation…

  48. QUESTION:
    pain in my lower stomach.. best answer 5 stars.?
    Im a female, 21. Ive never been pregnant. I no it's not my period. I have had this discomfort and pain for a little over a week. I went to my gyno. They did tests she put me on a antibiotic. The test came back all normal so i didn't continue the meds. They also did a ultrasound of my cervix and stuff to see if there where any cysts there weren't. Also i have a history of cervical cancer. When she touched my cervix i about cried. I don't understand why it hurt so bad and nothing is wrong. Also i have stage one kidney disease. My gyno told me it might be my appendix so i went to my regular dr. She did more blood work and a urine sample. I have to wait until monday to get the results back. She said if it gets worse i need to go to the hospital. I'm not sure what this could be. I don't want to wait till monday. I have waited a while now. Does anyone have any ideas on what this could be? thanks in advance.
    Sorry, but im not taking some random meds. I can't take anything because of my kidneys.

    • ANSWER:
      What causes lower abdominal or pelvic pain?

      All women feel discomfort or pain in the lower abdomen below the navel from time to time, for instance, before or during menstruation.
      In many cases it can be difficult to identify the cause of the pain, but noting certain features will help you and your doctor come to a likely diagnosis.

      The most common causes are a urinary disorder such as a bladder or kidney problem, a bowel problem or a condition involving the reproductive system - the uterus, Fallopian tubes and ovaries.

      Type of pain arising from the urinary system

      Pain from the urinary system can indicate such conditions as cystitis (inflammation of the bladder), inflammation of the collecting system of one or both kidneys (pyelonephritis), kidney stones or uncommonly tumours.

      Typical symptoms of infections are a burning sensation when passing urine and a need to empty the bladder more frequently. In addition, pain travelling from the back and around to the front might suggest a kidney infection or kidney stone.

      The pain associated with kidney stones may be particularly severe. The presence of blood in the urine raises the possibilities of infection, kidney or bladder stones or even a bladder or kidney tumour. Both benign and malignant tumours can first make themselves noticed in this way. The presence of blood in the urine always requires further investigation and should be reported to your doctor.

      The duration of the pain will further help you and your doctor to make the correct diagnosis.

      Type of pain arising from conditions of the intestines

      The bowel can give rise to a wide variety of symptoms including pain.

      Constipation and diarrhoea can be painful in themselves, and the change in bowel habit usually identifies the pain as coming from the bowel. Pain from the bowel is often described as colicky in nature. This means that the pain or discomfort comes in waves with little or no discomfort in between the pain.

      Bloating or swelling of the lower abdomen may be present in many intestinal (bowel) conditions including irritable bowel syndrome.

      The passing of fresh blood or altered blood (black motions) from the back passage should be reported to your doctor as investigation is usually necessary.

      Type of pain arising from conditions of the reproductive organs

      Pain might originate from the uterus (womb), Fallopian tubes or ovaries. It is usually felt in the middle of the lower abdomen, above the line of pubic hair as far up as the navel. Occasionally, the pain is more to one side, which is more typical of a pain coming from an ovary.

      There might be discomfort or even pain during intercourse (called dyspareunia) felt deep within the pelvis.

      Pain originating from the uterus is usually worse at the time of a woman's period (dysmenorrhoea).

      Examples of conditions of the reproductive organs giving rise to pain include endometriosis, pelvic inflammatory disease, ovarian cysts, fibroids and problems related to the early stages of pregnancy such as miscarriage and ectopic pregnancy.

      In any case of sudden, severe, unexplained abdominal pain your doctor should be contacted.

      Sorry gave you a novel, but these are a few of the possibilities!!!

  49. QUESTION:
    Pregnant or not?
    HELP Please! During spring break, my boyfriend and I had unprotected sex the last day of my period (Tuesday) and the day after as well (Wednesday). I know that precum only has so much sperm....But what really concerns me is that when we had sex in the morning, he came but not inside of me, then he reinserted again. We had unprotected sex later on that night too.... The next day I went to a gynecologist for a checkup and blood test. She gave me samples for birth control pills. I did not start my BC until i got back to school on that Sunday. I only took the pills for two days then stopped. Shortly after I had gotten a heavy period, which i know was probably from stopping the BC. Lately, my lower stomach--in the uterus and abdomen area--has been hurting ALOT, like a pressure feel. I have also had some ovarian pain on my right side. I dont know what is going on with me. My hunger has increased and my feet have been swollen at times. So..could i possibly b pregnant? Thanx peeps.

    • ANSWER:
      It's unlikely. You didn't specify a time frame, but you wouldn't be feeling pregnancy symptoms until a few weeks after conception. Most women ovulation two weeks before their next period is due. Sperm can live for 5 days in your body. Depending on the length of your periods, you are probably safe. Say your period was 5 days. You had sex on day 5 and 6. You probably ovulated on day 14. So that means there is not much of a chance of pregnancy.

      I think the fact that you stopped taking your birth control messed up your body. The pills release hormones in your body and some of the side effects mimic pregnancy symptoms. You should go back to your doctor, get a pregnancy test just to be sure, and talk about why you stopped taking your pills. Pain in your ovaries could be a few things, one of them is ovulation. Some women can feel when they ovulate.Another thing is fibroids. Some women get fibroids on their ovaries and they can cause pain and changes in your cycle. But you should get back to the doctor and back on your pills.

  50. QUESTION:
    Cancer or Not Cancer?
    Ok, my mom has had a history of overexaggerating things. She has said that she has had cancer twice that I could remember. Her first occurence of cancer happened after a small car accident. She was in the front passenger seat and we were lightly rear-ended. Shortly after that, she was having problems moving her right arm. I went to her house for the weekend (my dad has custody of me), and she was lying in bed sick. She informed me that she had a tumour in her right shoulder. Several times after that, she said that she was undergoing chemotherapy, but the strange thing is, she wasn't exhausted, her hair wasn't falling out, but she was slowly recovering as if she was going through chemo. What do you think of this scenario?
    Next, about a year later, at one of my dance recitals, her right arm was completely locked, she had no use of her fingers, they were locked into a position as if she were holding a pencil or something. Shortly after that, she had went to the hospital to be diagnosed with a rare disease called CRPS (Chronic Regional Pain Syndrome). I'm not sure if you have heard of this disease seeing as though it is fairly new, but every nerve in her body that registers pain multiplies by 1000, and if it hurts too much, that part of your body will shut down and lock and you will have no use of it. A few months later, she was (supposively) diagnosed with Chron's Disease. However, instead of having diarrhea like a typical person with Chron's, she is constipated! So bad to the point where her bowel tore open and she had to be flushed out and her colon sewn back together. The medication that she is on are Percassettes(Oxycodone), Morphine(30's, 60's and 100's, she sometimes takes them all at the same time), Amitriptilene, Clonazepam, Zantac, Dillodid (I think that is how you spell it), and a few others that I don't know (hey, it's pretty bad when you're her only, 15-year-old teenage pharmacist and I know almost exactly what her meds are! However, I do plan on taking a career in drug research). She was just put on the Dillodid a few weeks ago. She was diagnosed with CRPS on July 3rd two years ago and the Chron's about 4 months after that. Anyways, just after school started in September, on my way to Air Cadets, I was informed that my mom had Uterine Cancer and that it was in it's 3rd or 4rth stage, until my mom told me that she was only at stage 2 yesterday. Again, she has been going through chemotherapy, but she is showing HUGE signs of exhaustion, to the point where she sleeps all day and you can't get a hold of her to say hi, lol. But still, no hair loss, and that is the biggest sign of undergoing chemo (I did a speech on cancer and it's treatments in Grade 8). She is still constipated, she goes about once or twice every couple of weeks. Sometimes I wonder of it the medication that is making her constipated, because Morphine will do that to you, but she supposedly has Chron's. which makes you have constant diarrhea. Which one is it? Anyways, Since her CRPS, her legs have swollen up to the size of a ventillation pipe, and you can't tell where her ankle is or her knee. This happens on and off, but more frequently nowadays. She is also in a lot more pain. She also has Fibroids in her Uterus that are eating away at her insides. Another thing, she was diagnosed with cancer 4 months ago, and she always says that she has to have a hystorectomy, but they only want to take out 1 ovary! Usually if there's cancer all throughout your Uterus, they wouldn't hesitate to remove something! She was supposed to have surgery in October, but they changed her surgery date and my mom still "Doesn't know when it is, they are discussing it when I have another MRI or Ultrasound". If she really has Cancer, they wouldn't change the date of her surgery, they would make her have it ASAP. If she does have cancer, it would be getting worse and worse, and the doctors aren't doing anything about it! Anyways, what my major questions are, 1: do you think that she has cancer if the doctors are putting it off this long and she is only showing a few of the symptoms? 2: About her medication, Oxycodone and Morphine are both addictive drugs, do you think the reason she is showing more pain nowadays is because she is addicted to them? Be honest please, I must have someone's opinion. and 3: Do you think she has Chron's Disease if she is constipated and she is not having flare-ups? Please answer to the best of your ability, I am not only starting to worry about my mothers health and wellness, but I am also questioning her honesty. Thank you, your help is greatly appreciated

    • ANSWER:
      My opinion: I think your mom was injured in a car accident, and took painkillers for it, and then became addicted to the painkillers, and since then has been making up one disease after another in order to get more painkillers. She may have some underlying psychological problems too, that existed before the drug problems or other physical problems. Does she drink too much alcohol? One of the reasons she says she has cancer is to gain sympathy and an explanation to others for her behavior, which she is ashamed and embarrassed about. Combined with this, being on so many pills has caused other problems, like the awful constipation. That kind of constipation is typical of those who abuse oxycodone (Percoset), Dilaudid and morphine (all are opiates). Clonazepan (Klonipin) is a common thing for people to be addicted to, too--it is a tranquilizer. Amitriptyline is an anti-depressant. She's probably depressed from all the downers she's taking (percoset, morphine, dilaudid and klonipin are downers). Zantac isn't an addictive drug--it's for stomach acid. Taking all these downers and tranquilizers together is going to make you want to sleep all the time, so that is why she always seems exhausted.

      Fibroids don't "eat away at your insides," as your mother said. They are annoying and can cause irregular and heavy bleeding, but are not usually too dangerous. They're also very very common. They usual treatment is hysterectomy. My guess about what is really going on: your mom has fibroids, and due to her dramatic nature, she has told people that it's uterine cancer, to gain more sympathy, instead of scorn for her lying around doing nothing all day. If she did have uterine cancer, she'd be having surgery like immediately. With fibroids, they often recommend surgery, but they are more casual about it since they're not usually dangerous (FYI: uterine cancer is one of the less dangerous cancers, so if your mom really does have it, then she'll probably be OK as long as she is receiving treatment. But they can't stage cancer before surgery, so there's no way that they'd say she was "stage 2" without ever having operated!). They might postpone a hysterectomy for fibroids. These MRIs or ultrasounds she's mentioned are probably for the fibroids, if there's any truth to what she is saying. She doesn't want to have them because she wants to milk the docs for as many of the pills she's addicted to as she can. She might also be worried that she won't get enough of the pills she wants while in the hospital for the fibroid surgery.

      When you are addicted to painkillers, it is very painful to not have those painkillers. So you can be in agony during withdrawal. But then when withdrawal is over, the pain is gone. So the CRPS could be part of this whole cycle of addiction, withdrawal, and more addiction.

      I don't know about whether or not she has Crohn's, but the timing of the diagnosis is suspicious. The constipating effects of the opiates could outweigh the diarrheal effects of Crohn's. But I bet it's just impossible to tell what's really going on right now.

      I'm sorry, I know that the possibility that what I am saying is true must be very painful. And let's face it--I'm a random person on the internet, I don't know you or your mom. I do know addicts whose story sounds just like your mom's, though.

      Here are my recommendations:
      1) Go to a local meeting of Alateen (http://www.al-anon.alateen.org/alateen.html )
      This is a group for teens who have friends or family who are addicts. At this meeting, you will find information that will help you to better gauge if your mother is an addict or not, and help you to get support from other teens who are going through the same things you are going through. If there's no local Alateen meeting, go to an Al-Anon meeting, which is like Alateen but for everyone, not just teens.
      2) Go into your mom's drug cabinet and write down all the drugs she's on, dosage, date she got the drug, name of doctor. Then, is there any doctor, pharmacist, or drug counselor you know and trust who you can ask about these drugs? Like if it seems excessive, or strange that that's what she's taking? This list will also help you I think figure out if I'm full of sh!t in what I'm saying about what I think is going on, and whether or not your mom has cancer and/or Crohn's. Like, if she had cancer, there would be certain drugs she'd have there, especially anti-nausea drugs which they generally put anyone having chemo on.

      Good luck!

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