Breast Fibroid Symptoms Women

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What are the symptoms of a thyroid problem?
    I've already asked a thyroid question, but the only answer i got was that i didn't list enough symptoms. My mother wants me to get checked out by a doctor and i would like to know if i have any symptoms i didn't know was associated with a thyroid problem. thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Low energy and fatigue or tiredness, especially in the morning, difficulty losing weight, a sensation of coldness--especially of the hands and feet, depression, slowness of thought processes, headaches, swelling of the face or fluid retention in general, dry coarse skin, brittle nails, stiffness of joints, muscular cramps, shortness of breath on exertion, and chest pain, and chronic constipation are common. In women, menstrual problems--such as PMS and menstrual irregularities including heavy periods and fertility problems are further signs and symptoms. Disorders associated with hypothyroidism include headaches, migraines, sinus infections, post-nasal drip, visual disturbances, frequent respiratory infections, difficulty swallowing, heart palpitations, indigestion, gas, flatulence, constipation, diarrhea, frequent bladder infections, infertility, reduced libido and sleep disturbances, with the person requiring 12 or more hours of sleep at times. Other conditions include intolerance to cold and/or heat, poor circulation, Raynaud's Syndrome, which involves the hands and feet turning white in response to cold, allergies, asthma, heart problems, benign and malignant tumors, cystic breasts and ovaries, fibroids, dry skin, acne, fluid retention, loss of memory, depression, mood swings, fears, and joint and muscle pain.

      The physical examination often reveals the hair to be dry, brittle and thinning. The outer third of the eyebrows is often missing. One often finds swelling under the eyes. The tongue is often thick and swollen. The skin may be rough, dry and flaky and show evidence of acne. The skin may also have a yellowish tinge due to high carotene in it. Nails tend to be brittle and break easily. The thyroid gland may be enlarged. The patient is more often overweight, but may also be underweight. Hands and feet are frequently cold to the touch. Reflexes are either slow or absent. The pulse rate is often slow even though the patient is not a well-trained athlete.

      If the average temperature is below 97.8 Fahrenheit, then the diagnosis of a low functioning thyroid system is likely. An average temperature above 98.2 is considered high and might reflect a hyperthyroid condition.

      Need testing for ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH should be .3 – 3 but would not matter if antibodies are present. Indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis…main cause of HypOthyroid & is worse ...OR Graves Disease (hypER).

      WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find thyroid disease. May have to go to more than one before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

      Ck these:
      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html

      God bless

  2. QUESTION:
    is it possible to have Fibrocystic Breasts under the age of 21?
    one of my breasts is in a lot of pain! i have these symptoms and i researched Fibrocystic Breasts but it said that its more common among older women!
    helpp!

    • ANSWER:
      There are millions of other reasons why your breasts may be in a lot of pain. The pill, certain medications, particular times in your cycle, sleeping on it wrong, I mean, you name it, it could happen. I had a fibroid in my breast when I was 18 but it was non-cancerous.

      If your entire breast is turning into a big lump of scar tissue, then I'd go to the doctor because there's something horribly wrong.

  3. QUESTION:
    What are the signs and symptoms of endometriosis?
    What are the side effects without treatment, and what is the treatment, and how do they diagnose it. Does it always affect fertility.

    • ANSWER:
      From the Endo Research Center (www.endocenter.org):

      "About Endometriosis:

      With Endometriosis, tissue like that which lines the uterus (the endometrium) is found outside the womb in other areas of the body. Normally, the endometrium is shed each month through menses; however, with Endometriosis, these implants have no way of leaving the body. The implants still break down and bleed, but result is far different than in women and girls without the disease: internal bleeding, degeneration of blood and tissue shed from the growths, inflammation of the surrounding areas, and formation of scar tissue result. In addition, depending on the location of the growths, interference with the normal function of the bowel, bladder, intestines and other areas of the pelvic cavity can occur. Endometriosis has also been found lodged in the skin - and even the brain.

      Symptoms include chronic or intermittent pelvic pain, dysmenorrhea (painful menstruation is not normal!), infertility, miscarriage(s), ectopic (tubal) pregnancy, dyspareunia (pain associated with intercourse), nausea / vomiting / abdominal cramping, diarrhea / constipation (particularly with menses), painful bowel movements, painful or burning urination, urinary frequency, retention, or urgency; fatigue, chronic pain, allergies and immune system-related illnesses are also commonly reported complaints of women who have Endo. It is quite possible to have some, all, or none of these symptoms. Endo symptoms are varied and often nonspecific, so they can easily masquerade as several other conditions, including adenomyosis ("Endometriosis Interna"), appendicitis, ovarian cysts, bowel obstructions, colon cancer, diverticulitis, ectopic pregnancy, fibroid tumors, gonorrhea, inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, ovarian cancer, and PID.

      Despite today's age of medical advances, researchers remain unsure as what causes of Endometriosis. There is NO CURE, despite the continued propagation of such myths by the uninformed who still mistakenly believe that hysterectomy, pregnancy and/or menopause can "cure" the disease. Invasive surgery remains the gold standard of diagnosis, and current therapies continue to remain extremely limited, often carrying side effects.

      Mistakenly minimized as "painful periods," Endometriosis is more than just "killer cramps." It is a leading cause of female infertility, chronic pelvic pain and gynecologic surgery, and accounts for more than half of the 500,000 hysterectomies performed in the US annually. Despite being more prevalent than breast cancer, Endometriosis continues to be treated as an insignificant ailment. Recent studies have even shown an elevated risk of certain cancers and other serious illnesses in those with the disease, as well as malignant changes within the disease itself.

      Research has shown that genetics, immune system dysfunction, and exposure to environmental toxins like Dioxin may all be contributing factors to the development of the disease. Endometriosis knows no racial or socioeconomic barriers, and can affect women ranging from adolescence to post-menopause. The disease can be so painful as to render a woman or teen unable to care for herself or her family, attend work, school, or social functions, or go about her normal routine. It can negatively affect every aspect of a woman's life; from her self-esteem and relationships, to her capacity to bear children, to her ability to be a contributing member of society.

      The disease can currently only be diagnosed through invasive surgery, and the average delay in diagnosis is a staggering 9 years. A patient may seek the counsel of 5 or more physicians before her pain is adequately addressed.

      Once diagnosed, it is not unusual for a patient to undergo several pelvic surgeries and embark on many different hormonal and medical therapies in an attempt to treat her symptoms. None of the current treatments are entirely effective, and virtually all synthetic therapies carry significantly negative side effects; some lasting far beyond cessation of therapy. The exception to this is excision; see www.centerforendo.com to learn more about excision as the leading treatment.

      Though Endometriosis is one of the most prevalent illnesses affecting society today, awareness is sorely lacking and disease research continues to remain significantly under funded. For instance, in fiscal year 2000, the National Institutes of Health planned to spend .5 billion on research. Of that funding, only .7 million was earmarked for Endometriosis - amounting to approximately $.40/patient. This is in stark contrast to other illnesses such as Alzheimer's and Lupus, which received approximately 5.00 and .00 per patient, respectively. American businesses lose millions of dollars each year in lost productivity and work time because of Endometriosis. The cost of surgery required to diagnose the disease in each patient alone adds greatly to the financial burden of both consumers and companies alike.

      Once erroneously believed to be a disease of “Caucasian career women who have delayed childbearing,” we know that in fact, Endometriosis affects women of all ages, races and
      socioeconomic status. Endometriosis also can and does exist in the adolescent female population. Far from the “rare” incidence once believed, studies have found that as many as 70% of teenagers with chronic pelvic pain had Endometriosis proven by laparoscopy. Other reports indicate that as many as 41% of patients experienced Endometriosis pain as an adolescent. The illness can be quite disruptive and cause significant dysfunction, especially at a time in life when self-esteem, school attendance and performance, and social involvement are all critical. Many adolescents with Endometriosis find themselves unable to attend or participate in classes, social functions, extracurricular activities, and sports due to significant pain and other symptoms of Endometriosis. Sometimes, teens and young women lack support and validation from both the home and the school; told the pain is “in their head,” that they are “faking it,” that their debilitating cramps are “normal” and “a part of womanhood,” that they are merely suffering from “the curse,” or that they should just “grin and bear it.” Their symptoms may also be dismissed as a sexually transmitted disease, which Endometriosis absolutely is not. Failure to acknowledge and address symptoms early in the disease process can lead to significant delays in diagnosis and necessary, subsequent treatments. Lack of support from family and loved ones can also add to the patient’s pain and fear - at any age.

      Recent studies have also shown that Endometriosis may in fact have an even bigger impact on younger patients than older women. One such study discovered that in patients under 22 years of age, the rate of disease recurrence was
      double that of older women (35% versus 19%). The study also revealed that the disease behaves differently in
      younger women; leading some researchers to believe it is a
      different form of Endometriosis altogether. Surgery, considered necessary to accurately diagnose and
      effectively treat the disease, is often withheld from younger patients based on the injudicious belief that early surgery somehow negatively influences a young woman’s fertility. Extensive, cumulative research has shown this concern to be unfounded. What can impact fertility, however,
      is neglecting effective treatment of the disease. Some
      researchers also feel that symptomatic, adolescent-onset
      Endometriosis is most often a lifelong problem that will
      progress to severe fibrotic disease.

      While it is possible to become pregnant with Endometriosis, the key is to obtain early, effective treatment such as that offered by specialty treatment centers like the Center for Endo Care (see www.centerforendo.com to learn about the success of excision as treatment). Hysterectomy is not a cure for Endometriosis. Any disease left behind by the surgeon (whether by design because he or she 'couldn't get it all' or accident because they don't recognize the disease in all manifestations) will continue to thrive and cause pain and symptoms. It does not matter if the ovaries are removed or if HRT is withheld; Endo produces its own estrogen-synthesizing enzyme known as aromatase. Thus, it enables it's own vicious life cycle and sustains the disease process. You would be better off getting all disease truly excised from all locations at a specialty center like the CEC (www.centerforendo.com).

      Due in part to the efforts of foundations like the ERC, research is ongoing in some places as to the causes of Endometriosis and potential cures for the disease. Our organization will continue to push for more widespread research into the many facets of the disease, and ultimately, a cure.

      For more information:

      http://www.endocenter.org/

      Endo Self Test:

      Not sure if you have Endometriosis? While pelvic surgery is the only current way to definitively diagnose it, symptoms can lead you and your doctor to suspect the disease. Review the following and consider if any of these common symptoms apply to you. Review your answers with your gynecologist for further discussion.

      Do you experience so much pain during or around your period that you find yourself unable to work, attend school or social functions, or go about your normal routine? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have any relatives diagnosed with Endometriosis? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you find yourself with painful abdominal bloating, swelling or tenderness at any time in your cycle? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have a history of painful ovarian Endometriomas ("chocolate cysts")? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have a history of miscarriage, infertility or ectopic pregnancy? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you experience gastrointestinal symptoms during your cycle, such as nausea or vomiting and/or painful abdominal cramping accompanied by diarrhea and/or constipation? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have a history of fatigue and/or a lowered immunity (i.e., "sick and tired" all the time)? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have a history of allergies, which tend to worsen around your periods? _____YES / _____ NO

      If sexually active, do you experience pain during sexual activity? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you suffer from autoimmune diseases or other conditions (i.e., thyroid disease, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, fibromyalgia, multiple sclerosis, chronic migraines)? _____YES / _____ NO

      Have you ever undergone pelvic surgery like a laparoscopy, in which Endometriosis was suspected but not definitively diagnosed?
      _____YES / _____ NO

      If you have answered "yes" to one or more of these questions, you may have Endometriosis. Talk to your doctor about getting an accurate diagnosis and effective treatment today. Dull aching and cramping can occur during menstruation in many women and teens, due to uterine contractions and the release of various hormones including those known as prostaglandins. However, period pain that becomes so debilitating it renders you unable to go about your normal routine is not ordinary or typical! Pain is your body's way of signaling that something is WRONG. If you are suffering from pelvic pain at any point in your cycle, an Endometriosis diagnosis should be considered.

      Know the Facts:

      - Endometriosis can affect women and teens of all ages, even those as young as 10 or as old as 85!
      - Hysterectomy, menopause and pregnancy are NOT cures for Endometriosis; in fact, there is no definitive cure!
      - Delayed childbearing is NOT what causes Endometriosis; in fact, no one really knows for sure what causes the disease, but research points to multi-factorial origins like heredity, immunology and exposure to environmental toxicants!
      - Endometriosis can only be accurately diagnosed via surgery; diagnostic tests like MRIs and ultrasounds are not definitive!
      - GnRH therapies like Lupron should never be administered in those patients younger than 18 yrs. of age or before a surgical diagnosis!
      - You CAN live well in spite of Endometriosis. WE ARE HERE TO HELP!" ~ www.endocenter.org

  4. QUESTION:
    What were your hypothyroidism symptoms?
    I know what websites like Web MD and Mayo Clinic say about the typical symptoms, but I was wondering if anyone has any details about their specific process of experiencing symptoms & getting diagnosed?

    • ANSWER:
      Low energy and fatigue or tiredness, especially in the morning, difficulty losing weight, a sensation of coldness--especially of the hands and feet, depression, slowness of thought processes, headaches, swelling of the face or fluid retention in general, dry coarse skin, brittle nails, stiffness of joints, muscular cramps, shortness of breath on exertion, and chest pain, and chronic constipation are common. In women, menstrual problems--such as PMS and menstrual irregularities including heavy periods and fertility problems are further signs and symptoms. Disorders associated with hypothyroidism include headaches, migraines, sinus infections, post-nasal drip, visual disturbances, frequent respiratory infections, difficulty swallowing, heart palpitations, indigestion, gas, flatulence, constipation, diarrhea, frequent bladder infections, infertility, reduced libido and sleep disturbances, with the person requiring 12 or more hours of sleep at times. Other conditions include intolerance to cold, poor circulation, Raynaud's Syndrome, which involves the hands and feet turning white in response to cold, allergies, asthma, heart problems, benign and malignant tumors, cystic breasts and ovaries, fibroids, dry skin, acne, fluid retention, loss of memory, depression, mood swings, fears, and joint and muscle pain.

      The hair tends to be dry, brittle and thinning. The outer third of the eyebrows is often missing. One often finds swelling under the eyes. The tongue is often thick and swollen. The skin may be rough, dry and flaky and show evidence of acne. The skin may also have a yellowish tinge due to high carotene in it. Nails tend to be brittle and break easily. The thyroid gland may be enlarged. The patient is more often overweight. Hands and feet are frequently cold to the touch. Reflexes are either slow or absent. The pulse rate is often slow.

      The average temperature is below 97.8 Fahrenheit.

      Have you had your thyroid tested? You need testing for ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but would not matter if antibodies are present. Indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis…main cause of HypOthyroid & is worse (...OR Graves Disease - HypERthyroid).

      WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

      Ck these:
      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html

      God bless

  5. QUESTION:
    What is the difference between perimenopause, menopause, and post menopause?
    What are the differences between these and what are some symptoms of them?

    • ANSWER:
      The most common symptom of perimenopause, menopause signs symptoms associated with it is menstrual irregularity and spotting during the monthly cycle. Frequent periods for too long and heavy bleeding or light bleeding occur during peri menopause. While osteoporosis has now become common among women whose calcium intake is less, it also happens to women prior to entering this state.

      As women grow older they tend to lack in calcium that weakens the bones and osteoporosis settles in. Taking 1500 mg calcium daily can prevent this from happening. Elevated cholesterol levels are also one of the symptoms. With age, the good cholesterol decreases and bad cholesterol will increases leading to coronary disease.

      A rigid dietary control is essential during this period. The transition varies for each woman. Some experience it according to a mother’s or elder sister’s transition and changes at that time. With the decrease in the Estrogen hormone, some physical changes like hair loss, facial hair and weight gain are some problems that upset a woman.

      A good diet and regular exercises will help in maintaining a balanced metabolism. This includes flushing out the system by drinking water which should be at least 8 glasses a day. Natural herbs can be taken after consulting a doctor.
      Menopause Signs Symptoms:

      * Endometriosis
      * Bloating
      * Aching joints and muscles
      * Unexplained weight gain, especially in hips, waist and stomach
      * Cold or tingling hands or feet
      * Spotting, light bleeding
      * Hair loss, thinning hair
      * Depression, anxiety and mood swings
      * Craving sweets,
      * Craving for caffeine
      * Hot flashes
      * Facial hair growth
      * Unstable blood sugar levels
      * Allergy symptoms
      * Chronic fatigue
      * Sluggishness
      * Breast tenderness
      * Dizziness,
      * Lightheadedness
      * Dry wrinkly skin
      * Fibrocystic breasts
      * Headaches
      * Migraines
      * Heart palpitations
      * Heavy periods
      * Irregular periods
      * Uterine fibroids
      * Incontinence
      * Inability to handle stress
      * Irritability
      * Urinary tract and yeast infections
      * Lack of concentration
      * Memory lapses
      * Ringing or buzzing in ears (tinnitus)
      * Night sweats
      * Leg cramps
      * Low metabolism
      * Lower sex drive
      * Loss of sex drive
      * PMS and menstrual cramping
      * Sleep disturbances
      * Insomnia
      * Osteoporosis
      * Symptoms of hypothyroidism with normal T3 and T4 levels

  6. QUESTION:
    Are there any options for fibroid treatment?
    I am working on my research on fibroid; how does it effect women and what are the sign/symptoms. But the question is: what type of treatment that can be much safer and curable for women when recover from a fibroid.

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroids can be treated with medication or surgery.

      Treating fibroids with medication

      GnRHA

      GnRHA (gonadotropin released hormone agonist), administered by injection. GnRHAs make the woman's body produce much lower quantities of estrogen, which makes the fibroids shrink. GnRHA stops the woman's menstrual cycle. It is important to remember that GNRHAs are not contraceptives, and they do not affect a woman's fertility when she stops treatment.

      GNRHAs are also very helpful for women who have heavy periods and discomfort in their abdomen. GNRHAs may have menopause-like symptoms as their main side-effect, this might include hot flashes (UK: flushes), a tendency to sweat more, and vaginal dryness. Although thinning of the bones (osteoporosis) is also a possible side-effect, it is rare.

      GnRHAs may be administered to the patient before surgery in order to shrink the fibroids. GNRHAs are for short-term, not long-term use.

      GNRHAs combined with HRT (hormone replacement therapy) are sometimes prescribed to prevent menopause-like symptoms.

      Other drugs may be used to treat fibroids; however, they are less effective for larger fibroids. These include:

      Tranexamic acid - they are presented in tablet form and are taken by the patient from the day pre menstrual period starts for up to 4 days. This is done each month. If symptoms do not improve within three months the patient should stop taking this medication. Tranexamic acid helps blood in the uterus clot, which reduces bleeding. A woman's fertility will not be affected by this treatment as soon as it is over.

      Anti-inflammatory drugs - these medications are taken for a few days during the patient's menstrual period. They may include such drugs as mefanamic and ibuprofen. Anti-inflammatory medications reduce the amount of prostaglandins the body produces. Prostaglandins are hormones which are associated with heavy periods. These drugs are also painkillers. They do not affect a woman's fertility.

      The contraceptive pill - these are used to stop menstruation from occurring.

      LNG-IUS (Levonorgestrel intrauterine system) - this is a plastic device which is placed inside the uterus. LNH-IUS releases levonorgestrel (progestogen hormone). This hormone stops the lining of the uterus from growing too fast, which effectively reduces bleeding. One of the side-effects of this treatment is irregular bleeding for up to six months, headaches, breast tenderness, and acne. In very rare cases it can stop the woman's periods.

      Surgery to treat fibroids

      When medications have not worked, the patient may have to undergo surgery to cure the Fibroids. The following surgical procedures may be considered:

      Hysterectomy - removing the uterus. This is only ever considered if the fibroids are very large, or if the patient is bleeding too much. Hysterectomies are sometimes considered as an option to stop recurrences of fibroids (stop them coming back). Hysterectomies have two possible side-effects: 1. Reduced libido. 2. Early menopause.

      Myomectomy - the fibroids are surgically removed from the wall of the uterus. This option is more popular for women who want to get pregnant (as opposed to a hysterectomy). Women with large fibroids, as well as those whose fibroids are located in particular parts of the uterus may not be able to benefit from this procedure.

      Endometrial ablation - this involves removing the lining of the uterus. This procedure may be used if the patient's fibroids are near the inner surface of the uterus. This procedure is considered as an effective alternative to a hysterectomy.

      UAE (Uterine Artery Embolization) - this treatment stops the fibroid from getting its blood supply. UAE is generally used for women with large fibroids. UAEs effectively shrink the fibroid. A chemical is injected through a catheter into a blood vessel in the leg - it is guided by X-ray scans.

      Magnetic-resonance-guided percutaneous laser ablation - an MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan is used to locate the fibroids. Then very fine needles are inserted through the patient's skin and pushed until they reach the targeted fibroids. A fiber-optic cable is inserted through the needles. A laser light goes through the fiber-optic cable, hits the fibroids and shrinks them.

      Magnetic-resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery -" an MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan locates the fibroids, and then sound waves are aimed at them. This procedure also shrinks the fibroids.

      Most experts say Magnetic-resonance-guided percutaneous laser ablation and Magnetic-resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery are both effective - however, there is some uncertainty regarding their benefits vs. risks.

  7. QUESTION:
    What are symptoms of high levels of estrogen in women?
    What are symptoms of high levels of estrogen in women?

    • ANSWER:
      When estrogen levels are high in relation to our progesterone we experience many severe symptoms, among them anxiety, breast tenderness, cyclical headaches or migraines, irregular bleeding, water retention, weight gain and more. (Note that a number of these symptoms are also indicative of the exact opposite condition - a deficiency of estrogen - another example of why the concept of estrogen dominance is too simplistic.)

      If estrogen levels stay unopposed, women may develop infertility, endometriosis, amenorrhea (skipped periods), hypermenorrhea (heavy bleeding), fibroids, uterine cancer, stroke, and decreased cognitive ability, among other conditions.

      I would recommend that you consult with your doctor for a blood test as they can test your hormone levels to see whether you have high estrogen levels and your doctor will be able to give you further advise as to how to go about it.

      Hope this helps give some insight to your question. Good luck :)

  8. QUESTION:
    Is it possible to get pregnancy symptoms even if there is no relation?
    I recently discoverd that my coworkers which happens to be a good friend of mine is pregnant. I have never experience heartburn or light headedness since I was pregnant with my son. And there is NO possible way that I could be pregnant.

    • ANSWER:
      Yes. It is called "Pseudocyesis"

      Read up:

      Pseudocyesis also known as false pregnancy, can cause many of the signs and symptoms associated with pregnancy, and can resemble the condition in every way except for fetal presence. Other names include - spurious pregnancy, feigned pregnancy, imaginary pregnancy, hysterical pregnancy, wind in the bowels, phantom pregnancy and grossesse nerveuse ("mental pregnancy"). John Mason Good coined the term pseudocyesis from the Greek words pseudes (false) and kyesis (pregnancy) in 1923. False pregnancy is common in many mammals and is a method of providing milk for the group's offspring, most often cats, dogs, and rabbits.

      [edit] History
      Cases of pseudocyesis have been documented since antiquity. Hippocrates gives us the first written account around 300 B.C. when he recorded 12 different cases of women with the disorder. Mary Tudor (1516-1558), Queen of England, was perhaps the most famous of western historical examples, who believed on several occasions that she was pregnant, when she was in fact not. Some even attribute the violence that gave her the nickname "Bloody Mary" to be a reaction to her disappointment on realising she was without child. Other medical historians believe that the queen's physicians mistook fibroid tumors in her uterus for a pregnancy.

      [edit] Signs and symptoms
      The symptoms of pseudocyesis are similar to the symptoms of true pregnancy and are often hard to distinguish from it. Such natural signs as amenorrhoea, morning sickness, tender breasts, and weight gain may all be present. Many health care professionals can be deceived by the symptoms associated with pseudocyesis. Research shows that 18% of women with pseudocyesis were at one time diagnosed as pregnant by medical professionals.

      The hallmark sign of pseudocyesis that is common to all cases is that the affected patient is convinced that she is pregnant. Abdominal distension is the most common physical symptom of pseudocyesis (60– 90%). The abdomen expands in the same manner as it does during pregnancy, so that the affected woman looks pregnant. This phenomenon is thought to be caused by buildup of gas, fat, feces, or urine. These symptoms often resolve under general anesthesia and the woman's abdomen returns to its normal size.

      The second most common physical sign of pseudocyesis is menstrual irregularity (50–90%). Women are also reported to experience the sensation of fetal movements known as quickening (medical), even though there is no fetus present (50%-75%).Other common signs and symptoms include: gastrointestinal symptoms, breast changes or secretions, labor pains, uterine enlargement, and softening of the cervix. One percent of women eventually experience false labor.

      [edit] Causes
      There are various explanations, none of which are universally accepted. Psychodynamic theories attribute the false pregnancy to emotional conflict. It is thought that an intense desire to become pregnant, or an intense fear of becoming pregnant, can create internal conflicts and changes in the endocrine system, which may explain some of the symptoms of pseudocyesis. Another theory concerns wish-fulfillment. It holds that if a women desires pregnancy badly enough she may interpret minor changes in her body as signs of pregnancy.

      Biological mechanisms proposed include the effect of stress on the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis, constipation, weight gain and the movement of intestinal gas.

      [edit] Demographics
      This article does not cite any references or sources.
      Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. (help, get involved!)
      Unverifiable material may be challenged and removed.
      This article has been tagged since May 2007.
      The rate of pseudocyesis in the United States has declined significantly in the past century. In the 1940s there was one occurrence for approximately every 250 pregnancies. This rate has since dropped to between one and six occurrences for every 22,000 births. The average age of the affected woman is 33, though cases have been reported for women as young as 6-1/2 and as old as 79. More than two-thirds of women who experience pseudocyesis are married, and about one-third have been pregnant at least once. Women who have been victims of incest may be at greater risk for developing pseudocyesis.

      [edit] Treatment
      Because pseudocyesis is not known to have a direct underlying physical cause, there are no general recommendations regarding treatment with medications. In some cases, however, the patient may be given medications for such symptoms as the cessation of menstruation. Because most patients with pseudocyesis have underlying psychological problems, they should be referred to a psychotherapist for the treatment of these problems. It is important at the same time, however, for the treating professional not to minimize the reality of the patient's physical symptoms.

      The treatment that has had the most success is demonstrating to the patient that she is not really pregnant by the use of ultrasound or other imaging techniques.

      [edit] Alternative therapies
      There have been reports of patients being cured of pseudocyesis by hypnosis, purgatives, massage, opioids, or after nine months of symptoms, by experiencing "hysterical childbirth," but there are few data available on the effectiveness of these or similar procedures.

  9. QUESTION:
    What is a good way to lower estrogen/ or increase testerone in men?
    Is lifting weights the only way to increase testerone in males and taking Zinc? Are there other ways?

    Also, what are some ways to decrease estrogen in the male body?

    • ANSWER:
      There is a product called DIM Di-indole-methane which is an estrogen antagonist used by body builders and women with estrogen excess symptoms like fibroids , some breast cancers etc
      We are all at risk from xeno estrogens in the environment....
      One capsule = a bucket of broccoli

  10. QUESTION:
    How to tell when a woman is going through menopause?
    what are signs of menapause?

    • ANSWER:
      The most common symptom of perimenopause, menopause signs symptoms associated with it is menstrual irregularity and spotting during the monthly cycle. Frequent periods for too long and heavy bleeding or light bleeding occur during peri menopause. While osteoporosis has now become common among women whose calcium intake is less, it also happens to women prior to entering this state.

      As women grow older they tend to lack in calcium that weakens the bones and osteoporosis settles in. Taking 1500 mg calcium daily can prevent this from happening. Elevated cholesterol levels are also one of the symptoms. With age, the good cholesterol decreases and bad cholesterol will increases leading to coronary disease.
      A rigid dietary control is essential during this period. The transition varies for each woman. Some experience it according to a mother’s or elder sister’s transition and changes at that time. With the decrease in the Estrogen hormone, some physical changes like hair loss, facial hair and weight gain are some problems that upset a woman.

      A good diet and regular exercises will help in maintaining a balanced metabolism. This includes flushing out the system by drinking water which should be at least 8 glasses a day. Natural herbs can be taken after consulting a doctor.
      Menopause Signs Symptoms:

      * Endometriosis
      * Bloating
      * Aching joints and muscles
      * Unexplained weight gain, especially in hips, waist and stomach
      * Cold or tingling hands or feet
      * Spotting, light bleeding
      * Hair loss, thinning hair
      * Depression, anxiety and mood swings
      * Craving sweets,
      * Craving for caffeine
      * Hot flashes
      * Facial hair growth
      * Unstable blood sugar levels
      * Allergy symptoms
      * Chronic fatigue
      * Sluggishness
      * Breast tenderness
      * Dizziness,
      * Lightheadedness
      * Dry wrinkly skin
      * Fibrocystic breasts
      * Headaches
      * Migraines
      * Heart palpitations
      * Heavy periods
      * Irregular periods
      * Uterine fibroids
      * Incontinence
      * Inability to handle stress
      * Irritability
      * Urinary tract and yeast infections
      * Lack of concentration
      * Memory lapses
      * Ringing or buzzing in ears (tinnitus)
      * Night sweats
      * Leg cramps
      * Low metabolism
      * Lower sex drive
      * Loss of sex drive
      * PMS and menstrual cramping
      * Sleep disturbances
      * Insomnia
      * Osteoporosis
      * Symptoms of hypothyroidism with normal T3 and T4 levels

  11. QUESTION:
    What are your experiences with depot lupron?
    I have had horrible side effects from the Depot Lupron shot (3-months doasage), now I am not talking about depot provera, this is a stronger shot to treat endometriosis. It has helped with the pain and lessened the growths, but I have bad hot flashes, weight gain, dryness, the list goes on. Anyone have better experience with it? Can anyone suggest an alternative treatment?? BCPs don't work, i tried them already.

    • ANSWER:
      Stay FAR away from Lupron!!!!!

      Endo is an estrogen dominance disease. You need to replace the progesterone that your body is missing with a NATURAL PROGESTERONE CREAM! Email me and I can tell you more.

      This is some very nasty stuff. :(
      Here is an article I found....

      Be Careful of Lupron for Endometriosis, It Could Be the Kiss of Death
      By Nicholas Regush

      This particular saga began a decade ago with an injection of a powerful prescription drug called Lupron. Lynne Millican took the shot for endometriosis, a condition in which pieces of the lining of the uterus are found in other parts of the body, especially in the pelvic cavity.

      Ten years later, Millican believes she is still suffering from the effects of that injection. Her many symptoms have included the development of a noncancerous tumor, breast cysts, cardiac arrythmias, dizziness, swelling and fatigue.

      Millican is a registered nurse (and paralegal) living in the Boston area who has become deeply involved in a grass-roots movement to force the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and Members of Congress to take a close look at Lupron.

      The FDA first approved Lupron in 1985 for treatment of men with advanced prostate cancer, and then approved it for treatment of endometriosis in 1990 and uterine fibroids in 1995.

      "There are thousands in the United States who say they have been victimized by this drug," Millican said, emphasizing that symptoms can be severe, such as tremors, seizures and memory loss.

      "Many women I know say their symptoms didn't stop when they stopped taking the drug."

      The FDA has received a wide range of reports of serious side-effects, including death, suspected to be associated with the use of Lupron, but the agency, which holds that the drug's benefits outweigh the risks, does not believe there is sufficient proof to blame Lupron.

      TAP Pharmaceuticals Inc., jointly owned by Abbott Laboratories and Takeda Chemical Industries of Japan, has steadfastly maintained that Lupron is safe.

      Millican, who feels that the FDA has been very slow on the draw with Lupron, is also frustrated by the lack of response from almost all of the many senators and representatives in Congress to whom she has written. She has even submitted written testimony to various committee hearings - but to no avail.

      "It seems that no one but the people who suffer from Lupron are interested in looking into this drug," she said.

      Millican cannot even recall anyone with an MD degree who has voiced strong concern about Lupron.

      At the very least, she feels Lupron's safety should be an issue because doctors use it for purposes that were never approved by the FDA. While legal under federal law - once approved for an indication, a drug can be used for other purposes - unapproved use often occurs without the benefit of appropriate safety and efficacy studies.

      One of Millican's main concerns is Lupron's unapproved use in fertility clinics. The drug is essentially used to suppress female hormones which produce a mature egg. This allows fertility doctors to then induce "controlled" stimulation of multiple eggs.

      "I am concerned that women who undergo these procedures are not being sufficiently informed about Lupron's side-effects," Millican said.

      There is even much more at stake, according to Millican. On September 5, she provided testimony to congressional committee hearings on stem cell research, pointing out that the use of Lupron in the process of creating embryos may cause "the very diseases that are being claimed as those
      diseases necessitating embryonic stem cell research for a cure."

      Millican finds it hard to swallow that the debate over stem cell research has totally ignored Lupron.

      Redflagsweekly January 25, 2002

      Dr. Mercola's Comment:

      Folks, Lupron is a disaster drug that in no way shape or form treats the cause of the problem.

      I have seen it absolutely devastate many women's lives. It is one of the few drugs that I actually cringe when patients tell me that they have taken it.

      It is my experience and belief that this drug causes permanent neurological damage.

      This drug needs to be avoided at all costs.

      It is usually used for endometriosis, which is an estrogen dominance problem and is typically treated quite nicely with natural progesterone, a dietary program, and addressing the emotional stresses which cause the adrenal glands to become impaired

      Since the adrenals is the main biological of estrogen and progesterone, it is important to restore the proper functioning of this gland.

      One could take adrenal glandulars, or DHEA and pregnenolone, but those tend to be natural band-aids that don't address the reasons the adrenal became impaired.

  12. QUESTION:
    What are the odds that I have breast cancer and cervical cancer?
    I had 2 fibroid adenomas removed from my left breast in Feb of 2003 (1 at 6:00 & 1 behind nipple). Only a little more than a year after surgery I had a lump in the same 6:00 position. I had a mamo & ultrasound and was told that they were inconclusive and I needed a biopsy. Not wanting to go through surgery for every lump I was going to get, I chickened out and neglected to go back to the dr. About 3mos ago, I started having pain in my left breast that went from my armpit to my nipple. I went back to the dr who ordered another mamo & us. Same results except that now I have lymph nodes in both breasts as well as an inconclusive solid mass. I NEED to schedule a biopsy and will. However, the gyno also gave me the bad news that my Pap came back abnormal with low-grade cell changes. I'm a 33 yr old pretty healthy woman - so what are the odds or chances that I have breast and/or cervical cancer? Any information on these symptoms, conditions, tests, diagnosis, procedures, etc would be greatly appreciated. I'm on pins and needles worrying because I'm the mother of 4 children. Please help.

    • ANSWER:
      I am a CMA and the Granddaughter of a Breast Cancer Survivor

      I am sorry to say that your chance of developing Breast or Cervical Cancer are pretty high.. The pap may have been abnormal due to hormonal changes or if you just came off or was getting ready to start your period... Do the pap over again and Please have the biopsy

      I am sorry that people think that I should pussy foot around the question and answer and tell a person that every thing is going to come up kittens and roses..
      I work with cancer patients I know the reality I also have cancer survivors in my family so I am not sorry for telling the truth

  13. QUESTION:
    what are the symptoms of thyroid disease?
    how can one find out if she/he has thyroid disease?

    • ANSWER:
      Well here are some...............
      Low energy and fatigue or tiredness, especially in the morning, difficulty losing weight, a sensation of coldness--especially of the hands and feet, depression, slowness of thought processes, headaches, swelling of the face or fluid retention in general, dry coarse skin, brittle nails, stiffness of joints, muscular cramps, shortness of breath on exertion, and chest pain, and chronic constipation are common. In women, menstrual problems--such as PMS and menstrual irregularities including heavy periods and fertility problems are further signs and symptoms. Disorders associated with hypothyroidism include headaches, migraines, sinus infections, post-nasal drip, visual disturbances, frequent respiratory infections, difficulty swallowing, heart palpitations, indigestion, gas, flatulence, constipation, diarrhea, frequent bladder infections, infertility, reduced libido and sleep disturbances, with the person requiring 12 or more hours of sleep at times. Other conditions include intolerance to cold, poor circulation, Raynaud's Syndrome, which involves the hands and feet turning white in response to cold, allergies, asthma, heart problems, benign and malignant tumors, cystic breasts and ovaries, fibroids, dry skin, acne, fluid retention, loss of memory, depression, mood swings, fears, and joint and muscle pain.

      The hair tends to be dry, brittle and thinning. The outer third of the eyebrows is often missing. One often finds swelling under the eyes. The tongue is often thick and swollen. The skin may be rough, dry and flaky and show evidence of acne. The skin may also have a yellowish tinge due to high carotene in it. Nails tend to be brittle and break easily. The thyroid gland may be enlarged. The patient is more often overweight. Hands and feet are frequently cold to the touch. Reflexes are either slow or absent. The pulse rate is often slow.

      The average temperature is below 97.8 Fahrenheit.

      For second question - you have to find a doctor that is knowledgeable about the thyroid...this is not easy.

      WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

      You need testing for ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but would not matter if antibodies are present. Indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis…main cause of HypOthyroid & is worse (...OR Graves Disease - HypERthyroid).

      Ck these:
      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html

      God bless

  14. QUESTION:
    My periods lately are much lighter than I usually experience. Is this perimenopause?
    I have noticed that the past few months my periods are a little bit irregular as they sometimes start a few days earlier than anticipated, they are lighter, and last shorter than what I usually have. I also have been noticing more irritable moods and some brief blurry vision from out of nowhere. I'm wondering if I'm starting the transition into menopause...I'm 41 in case you're wondering.

    • ANSWER:
      The most common symptom of perimenopause, menopause signs symptoms associated with it is menstrual irregularity and spotting during the monthly cycle. Frequent periods for too long and heavy bleeding or light bleeding occur during peri menopause. While osteoporosis has now become common among women whose calcium intake is less, it also happens to women prior to entering this state.

      As women grow older they tend to lack in calcium that weakens the bones and osteoporosis settles in. Taking 1500 mg calcium daily can prevent this from happening. Elevated cholesterol levels are also one of the symptoms. With age, the good cholesterol decreases and bad cholesterol will increases leading to coronary disease.
      A rigid dietary control is essential during this period. The transition varies for each woman. Some experience it according to a mother’s or elder sister’s transition and changes at that time. With the decrease in the Estrogen hormone, some physical changes like hair loss, facial hair and weight gain are some problems that upset a woman.

      A good diet and regular exercises will help in maintaining a balanced metabolism. This includes flushing out the system by drinking water which should be at least 8 glasses a day. Natural herbs can be taken after consulting a doctor.
      Menopause Signs Symptoms:

      * Endometriosis
      * Bloating
      * Aching joints and muscles
      * Unexplained weight gain, especially in hips, waist and stomach
      * Cold or tingling hands or feet
      * Spotting, light bleeding
      * Hair loss, thinning hair
      * Depression, anxiety and mood swings
      * Craving sweets,
      * Craving for caffeine
      * Hot flashes
      * Facial hair growth
      * Unstable blood sugar levels
      * Allergy symptoms
      * Chronic fatigue
      * Sluggishness
      * Breast tenderness
      * Dizziness,
      * Lightheadedness
      * Dry wrinkly skin
      * Fibrocystic breasts
      * Headaches
      * Migraines
      * Heart palpitations
      * Heavy periods
      * Irregular periods
      * Uterine fibroids
      * Incontinence
      * Inability to handle stress
      * Irritability
      * Urinary tract and yeast infections
      * Lack of concentration
      * Memory lapses
      * Ringing or buzzing in ears (tinnitus)
      * Night sweats
      * Leg cramps
      * Low metabolism
      * Lower sex drive
      * Loss of sex drive
      * PMS and menstrual cramping
      * Sleep disturbances
      * Insomnia
      * Osteoporosis
      * Symptoms of hypothyroidism with normal T3 and T4 levels

  15. QUESTION:
    What is the best home remedy for dysmenorrhea. I have PMS and often bloated and have loss of bowel movement.?
    It is commonly associated with severe abdominal pain and cramps and often relieved when i induce vomiting. There are times when i have loss of consciousness. Health experts, i hope you can enlighten me by an advice and best home remedy.

    • ANSWER:
      Dysmenorrhoea
      Period pains, or dysmenorrhoea, affect 40-70% of women of reproductive age.
      For about one in 10 women the discomfort and pain is bad enough to interfere with their daily lives.
      A certain amount of discomfort around the time of ovulation and menstruation is normal and it has been proposed that it is related to the movements of the womb and the hormones and chemicals that circulate around the body at that time of the month.
      However, sometimes dysmenorrhoea is a sign of an underlying disease.
      The pain typically occurs in the lower abdomen and/or pelvis and can radiate to the back and along the thighs, lasting somewhere between eight and 72 hours.
      It can occur before or during menstruation or both. Headaches, diarrhoea, nausea and vomiting may accompany it.
      When there is no underlying cause, simple analgesia with a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug such as ibuprofen might be all that is needed.
      Some women find that going on the combined oral contraceptive pill lessens the discomfort.
      Others have reported being helped by acupuncture, TENS therapy (a painless way of stimulating the nerves using pulsed energy) or a hot water bottle applied locally to the area of discomfort.
      If there is an underlying disease causing the dysmenorrhoea then this should be treated.
      Often there will be other symptoms too, such as heavy bleeding or pain or bleeding after intercourse.
      The most common diseases associated with dysmenorrhoea are endometriosis and fibroids.
      Endometriosis is a condition where the cells that make up the lining of the womb are also found in places other than the womb.
      With each menstruation, this tissue outside of the womb responds to the same hormones that control periods and therefore builds up and breaks down and bleeds in the same way as the womb lining.
      This can lead to inflammation and pain. Endometriosis can be treated with hormones or surgery to shrink or remove the problematic tissue.
      Fibroids are non-cancerous or benign growths in the uterus.
      A fifth of women develop them in their lifetime. They can be very small or as big as a melon.
      Some cause no problems while others cause significant pain and heavy periods.
      Treatment options include hormonal therapy and surgery.
      Other less common causes of dysmenorrhoea are previous pelvic surgery and a pelvic infection.
      Premenstrual syndrome (PMS)
      Many women experience physical and mood changes around the time of their period, but for some it can be a particularly difficult time.
      There are more than 150 symptoms associated with premenstrual syndrome (PMS), but the common ones include low mood and irritability, breast tenderness and bloating.
      Typically PMS symptoms appear before in the days before period and cease once menstruation begins.
      It is not known what causes PMS but hormonal changes are thought to be involved. PMS severity often increases around hormonal surges, such as puberty and pregnancy.
      Women aged 30-45 often experience the most severe PMS.
      Treatments are available to ease the symptoms. These include hormonal contraceptives and more potent hormonal drugs.
      Some may prefer to try non-hormonal alternatives such as vitamin B6 and evening primrose oil.

  16. QUESTION:
    How is "pressure" supposed to feel when the baby has engaged?
    I've been having preterm signs for 1 month now, no cervical change as of now....

    I don't think I have felt pressure low down..

    But i do feel pressure in my low abdomen when I'm having a Braxton hicks contraction..

    How is pressure supposed to be felt?

    • ANSWER:
      Risks for Preterm Labor
      Women diagnosed with incompetent cervix, uterine abnormalities, or uterine fibroids
      Women with a history of previous preterm labor and/or birth
      Any second trimester bleeding
      Women diagnosed with placenta previa
      If baby has excessive amniotic fluid
      Poor prenatal care
      Poor nutrition or low weight gain during pregnancy
      Smoking, alcohol, or drug use
      Symptoms of preterm labor
      Menstrual like cramps with or without diarrhea - may be constant or intermittent
      Dull backache - may be constant or intermittent
      Leaking or rupture of membranes (i.e., your water breaks)
      Pelvic pressure - feeling like the baby is pressing down
      Any abdominal cramping
      Change in vaginal discharge (i.e., more watery discharge or a change to pinkish discharge, etc.)
      Contractions every 10 minutes or less with or without pain
      If you are at risk for preterm labor, you should be aware of how to monitor for contractions. Contractions are not always painful. Feel your stomach for hardening or tightening. Some women describe this as a balling up sensation. In other words, the baby feels as if it is curling up into a ball. For others contractions may feel more like cramps. During a contraction your belly will feel firm and hard. If you experience contractions every 10 minutes or less or any of the above symptoms of labor contact your health care provider for further instructions.

      Although not all preterm labor can be prevented, there are some steps you can take to prevent preterm labor. Drink plenty of water - 8 to 10 glasses a day. Dehydration can cause contractions so staying well hydrated can help prevent contractions. Empty your bladder frequently, about every 2 to 3 hours. A full bladder can irritate your uterus and therefore cause contractions. Avoid lifting heavy objects and overexertion. If you have other children have them sit on your lap instead of carrying them. Take frequent rest periods throughout the day, preferably laying on your left side. Laying on your left side provides the best blood flow to your baby. Avoid breast stimulation if you are at risk for preterm labor. Sexual activity may need to be avoided by certain women at risk for preterm labor.

  17. QUESTION:
    Is there such a thing as hormonal imbalance?
    I asked the people at Planned Parenthood and they said no. However, throughout the month at various times I have muscle tension, emotional aggravation, lethargy, or sleepiness (like waking out of a drunken sleep) alternately. I've been to EVERY specialist and have been checked for everything, and nobody knows what to tell me. Thanks for your answers
    I do take BC pills.

    • ANSWER:
      Symptoms of hormone imbalance in women tend to increase as a woman ages, especially if ignored in the earlier years. Hormone imbalance symptoms can be any one or more of the following:

      • Allergy symptoms

      • Depression, fatigue and anxiety

      • Endometriosis

      • Fibrocystic breasts

      • Hair loss and facial hair growth

      • Headaches, dizziness and foggy thinking

      • Low sex drive

      • Osteoporosis

      • PMS

      • Urinary tract infections and incontinence

      • Uterine fibroids

      • Weight gain, water retention and bloating

      • Wrinkly skin

      Symptoms of hormone imbalance are caused primarily by the incorrect relationship between progesterone and estrogen levels in the body. The two female hormones, estrogen and progesterone, exist in a delicate balance. Variations in that balance can have a dramatic effect on your health, resulting in symptoms of hormone imbalance. The amounts of these hormones that the woman's body produces from month to month can vary, depending on factors such as stress, nutrition, exercise and most importantly -- ovulation or the lack of ovulation.

  18. QUESTION:
    does an ovarian cyst make you eligible for dla?
    looking for advice pls so only answer if you know thanks!!! i have a large fibroid tumour and an ovarian cyst, both cause me to bleeding stop and pain walking, i don't want to waste an ones time if i claim disability living allowance at he high rate, pls help. thanks all.

    • ANSWER:
      Why suffer with this problem?

      PCOS is NOT the result of a DRUG DEFICIENCY. Let's start with that. Many women suffer with this problem for years because of doctors prescribing drugs to treat the symptoms. That is not real health, it is "MAKE BELIEVE HEALTH." Please, do yourself a huge favor and deal with the PCOS problem in a nutritional way and solve the problem.

      When doctors try to juggle hormones, they are attempting to play GOD with out the credentials. Birth control pills are dangerous and have no studies showing long term safety. The synthetic ethinyl estradiol used in those pills is the most stimulating to breast tissue and is 1,000 times more potent in it's effects on breast tissue as estriol (natural estrogen made in the body that helps breast tissue). Estrogens tend to promote cell division, particularly in hormone-sensitive tissue such as the breast. Studies from two decades ago clearly found that overexposure to estradiol increases one's risk of breast cancer. The synthetic ethinyl estradiol is even more of a breast cancer risk because it is efficiently absorbed by mouth and slow to be metabolized and excreted. The longer a synthetic estrogen stays in the body, the more opportunity it has to do damage. NOT A GOOD SOLUTION FOR PCOS! ! ! 1 in 7 women now get breast cancer!

      "Normalizing" hormones by simply giving you synthetic hormone pills violates the basic principle of healing. Instead, whenever possible, you should strive to normalize the hormones using your body's innate intelligence. In your case, by changing your diet, you can start on the road to healing.

      A diet based on the principles of "Nourishing Traditions," a book by Sally Fallon and Mary G. Enig, Ph.D. is the first step in the therapy of PCOS. Your ovaries need the animal fats, and yes, even the cholesterol found in food in order to make estrogen and progesterone, the correct female hormones.

      Swollen ovaries is a condition analogous to goiter, when the thyroid swells in response to iodine deficiency. Goiters often also result in a hormonal imbalance leading to hypothyroidism. In the case of PCOS, the starvation of the ovaries causes them to become cystic, swollen and eventually unable to regulate the synthesis of their hormones.

      The other main dietary trigger for this imbalance is that when the proper dietary fats are missing, they are inevitably replaced by excessive carbohydrate consumption. This results in excessive insulin production, weight gain, abdominal bloating, and eventually will itself cause hormonal shifts. The biochemistry of this process is well described in the book, "The Schwarzbein Principle" which also suggests a diet based on the principles in the book, "Nourishing Traditions," along with a restriction to about 75 grams of carbohydrates per day. More good fats and fewer carbohydrate foods should help in restoring your hormones to their proper balance.

      In addition to the dietary program, there are many natural nutrients that I have been shown in the medical literature to help PCOS. The first is the protomorphogen extract from Standard Process called Symplex F. This is a mixture of specially processed glandular extracts from the four organs that make up the so-called pituitary axis--the pituitary, thyroid, adrenal glands and the ovaries. We now know that these glands compensate for each other, and that they all get ill as a group. I usually recommend taking 1-2 tablets per day for one whole year to help normalize the function of these important organs. You should be able to get the Symplex F from your local pharmacy.

      The final therapy that I recommend for PCOS is a 50/50 mixture of the herbal extracts of Peony lactiflora and Glycyrrhiza uralensis (commonly known as licorice). There have been three studies in the literature showing that this combination of herbs can result in a complete remission in PCOS, and that it does so by normalizing adrenal function and reducing testosterone levels. It is important to use the correct amounts that were also indicated in these studies. I recommend the Mediherb extracts and suggest 1/2 to 1 teaspoon of the mixture, 2-3 times per day. I usually suggest using this mixture for six months with breaks of a week or two every 4-6 weeks."

      Birth control pills are the worst way to deal with PCOS. All that does is give you the "make believe health" and demonstrating very clearly that doctors have NO clue about what they are doing in regard to nutrition and how the body works in regard to nutrition that nourishes the body and does NOT abuse it with drugs.

      good luck to you

  19. QUESTION:
    Did you get really pale skin with hypothyroidism?
    I recently found out I have hypothyroidism I noticed my skin has recently (last 6 months) got really really pale. You can see a lot of my veins especially in my thighs and legs, did anyone else notice this? I know the "common" symptoms and signs of hypo but what were some uncommon ones you noticed? Thanks :)

    • ANSWER:
      Yes!

      Here are some of the possibles:
      Low energy and fatigue or tiredness, especially in the morning, difficulty losing weight, a sensation of coldness--especially of the hands and feet, depression, slowness of thought processes, headaches, swelling of the face or fluid retention in general, dry coarse skin, brittle nails, stiffness of joints, muscular cramps, shortness of breath on exertion, and chest pain, and chronic constipation are common. In women, menstrual problems--such as PMS and menstrual irregularities including heavy periods and fertility problems are further signs and symptoms. Disorders associated with hypothyroidism include headaches, migraines, sinus infections, post-nasal drip, visual disturbances, frequent respiratory infections, difficulty swallowing, heart palpitations, indigestion, gas, flatulence, constipation, diarrhea, frequent bladder infections, infertility, reduced libido and sleep disturbances, with the person requiring 12 or more hours of sleep at times. Other conditions include intolerance to cold, poor circulation, Raynaud's Syndrome, which involves the hands and feet turning white in response to cold, allergies, asthma, heart problems, benign and malignant tumors, cystic breasts and ovaries, fibroids, dry skin, acne, fluid retention, loss of memory, depression, mood swings, fears, and joint and muscle pain.
      The hair tends to be dry, brittle and thinning. The outer third of the eyebrows is often missing. One often finds swelling under the eyes. The tongue is often thick and swollen. The skin may be rough, dry and flaky and show evidence of acne. The skin may also have a yellowish tinge due to high carotene in it. Nails tend to be brittle and break easily. The thyroid gland may be enlarged. The patient is more often overweight. Hands and feet are frequently cold to the touch. Reflexes are either slow or absent. The pulse rate is often slow.
      The average temperature is below 97.8 Fahrenheit.

      There are even more than these....the thyroid, like the heart, effects everything in your body!

      TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but, for diagnosis, would not matter if ANTIBODIES are present. Indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between hyper & hypo at start)…main cause of HypOthyroid & is worse (...OR Graves Disease - HypERthyroid).

      WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

      Ck these:
      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html
      http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

      God bless

  20. QUESTION:
    Is it possible to want ot be pregnant so badly that you begin to exhibit the signs and symptoms of an actual?
    pregnant person? i know a girl who is not pregnant, but she has gained 10 pounds, her stomach is completely round, and she is always throwing up. She has been told that she cannot have children, and she has never been pregnant in her life. I told her to go to a doctor but she wont listen to me .Comments?

    • ANSWER:
      There is a condition known as "false pregnancy" or in medical terms pseudocyesis. I have included information below.

      She should definately see a doctor. Her symptoms could be from something else. There are also some serious illnesses that have the same symptoms. I would hate to find out she has some type of cancer and other serious condition and is allowing it to get worse by not seeing treatment. Her symptoms also match ovarian cancer or some type of inflammation or cancer of the intestines. Or perhaps a blockage that is causing the bloating, weight gain, and throwing up. Ovarian cancer has very few symptoms and it doesn't show up on a pap smear. It is aggressive and should be checked out. The best scenario is that it is just false pregnancy and not something serious!

      I wish you all the best in getting her to the doctor.

      Cases of pseudocyesis have been documented since antiquity. Hippocrates gives us the first written account around 300 B.C. when he recorded 12 different cases of women with the disorder. Mary Tudor (1516-1558), Queen of England, was perhaps the most famous of western historical examples, who believed on several occasions that she was pregnant, when she was in fact not. Some even attribute the violence that gave her the nickname "Bloody Mary" as a reaction to her disappointment on realising she was without child. Other medical historians believe that the queen's physicians mistook fibroid tumors in her uterus for a pregnancy.

      The symptoms of pseudocyesis are similar to the symptoms of true pregnancy and are often hard to distinguish from such natural signs as amenorrhoea, morning sickness, tender breasts, and weight gain may all be present. Many health care professionals can be deceived by the symptoms associated with pseudocyesis. Research shows that 18% of women with pseudocyesis were at one time diagnosed as pregnant by medical professionals.

      The hallmark sign of pseudocyesis that is common to all cases is that the affected patient is convinced that she is pregnant. Abdominal distension is the most common physical symptom of pseudocyesis (60– 90%). The abdomen expands in the same manner as it does during pregnancy, so that the affected woman looks pregnant. This phenomenon is thought to be caused by buildup of gas, fat, feces, or urine. These symptoms often resolve under general anesthesia and the woman's abdomen returns to its normal size.

      The second most common physical sign of pseudocyesis is menstrual irregularity (50–90%). Women are also reported to experience the sensation of fetal movements known as quickening (medical), even though there is no fetus present (50%-75%).Other common signs and symptoms include: gastrointestinal symptoms, breast changes or secretions, labor pains, uterine enlargement, and softening of the cervix. One percent of women eventually experience false labor.

  21. QUESTION:
    what causes women to be unable to reproduce?
    /symptoms.

    i tried googling it, but nothing came up.

    • ANSWER:
      The most common causes of female infertility:

      Tubal damage: Inflammation of the fallopian tube from an STD makes the fertilized egg unable to make its way through the fallopian tube to implant in the uterus (ectopic pregnancy).

      Endometriosis: the uterine tissue grows outside of the uterus like on the fallopian tubes. The tissue acts like the period and bleeds in sync with the lining of the uterus each month, which can lead to scarring and inflammation.

      Sometimes infertility is caused by ovulation disorders. Disruption in the part of the brain that regulates ovulation can cause low levels hormones. That could be caused from injury, tumors, excessive exercise and starvation.

      High prolactin (the hormone that stimulates breast milk production) in women who aren't pregnant or nursing may affect ovulation. This can be from a pituitary tumor or some drugs can elevate levels of prolactin.

      Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) your body produces too much testoserone which affects ovulation. PCOS is associated with insulin resistance and obesity.

      Early menopause (the absence of periods and the early dying of ovarian follicles before age 35) Certain conditions are associated with early menopause, including immune system diseases (AIDS), radiation or chemotherapy treatment, and smoking.

      Benign uterine fibroids are common in women in their 30s. They may cause infertility by blocking the fallopian tubes.

      Pelvic adhesions are scar tissue that bind organs after pelvic infection, appendicitis, or abdominal or pelvic surgery.

      Medications.

      Thyroid problems.

      Cancer

      Excessive caffeine consumption reduces fertility in the female.

      I know all this because my husband and I have been trying for 4 years.

  22. QUESTION:
    Any one using progesterone cream , does it make you feel tired and sleepy?
    I started on 2.1.07 and since I have been very tired and sleepy, but not until I use the cream that morning within 2 hours I am exhausted. I have been sleeping very well since the use of the cream , my breast pain is totally gone and my face is even clearing up. 43 old female Don't know if this is a normal side effect until my body adjusts.

    • ANSWER:
      Q: What is progesterone?

      A: Progesterone is a steroid hormone made by the corpus luteum of the ovary at ovulation, and in smaller amounts by the adrenal glands. Progesterone is manufactured in the body from the steroid hormone pregnenolone, and is a precursor to most of the other steroid hormones, including cortisol, androstenedione, the estrogens and testosterone.

      In a normally cycling female, the corpus luteum produces 20 to 30 mg of progesterone daily during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle.

      Q: Why do women need progesterone?

      A: Progesterone is needed in hormone replacement therapy for menopausal women for many reasons, but one of its most important roles is to balance or oppose the effects of estrogen. Unopposed estrogen creates a strong risk for breast cancer and reproductive cancers.

      Estrogen levels drop only 40-60% at menopause, which is just enough to stop the menstrual cycle. But progesterone levels may drop to near zero in some women. Because progesterone is the precursor to so many other steroid hormones, its use can greatly enhance overall hormone balance after menopause. Progesterone also stimulates bone-building and thus helps protect against osteoporosis.

      Q: Why not just use the progestin Provera as prescribed by most doctors?

      A: Progesterone is preferable to the synthetic progestins such as Provera, because it is natural to the body and has no undesirable side effects when used as directed.

      If you have any doubts about how different progesterone is from the progestins, remember that the placenta produces 300-400 mg of progesterone daily during the last few months of pregnancy, so we know that such levels are safe for the developing baby. But progestins, even at fractions of this dose, can cause birth defects. The progestins also cause many other side effects, including partial loss of vision, breast cancer in test dogs, an increased risk of strokes, fluid retention, migraine headaches, asthma, cardiac irregularities and depression.

      Q: What is estrogen dominance?

      A: Dr. Lee has coined the term "estrogen dominance," to describe what happens when the normal ratio or balance of estrogen to progesterone is changed by excess estrogen or inadequate progesterone. Estrogen is a potent and potentially dangerous hormone when not balanced by adequate progesterone.

      Both women who have suffered from PMS and women who have suffered from menopausal symptoms, will recognize the hallmark symptoms of estrogen dominance: weight gain, bloating, mood swings, irritability, tender breasts, headaches, fatigue, depression, hypoglycemia, uterine fibroids, endometriosis, and fibrocystic breasts. Estrogen dominance is known to cause and/or contribute to cancer of the breast, ovary, endometrium (uterus), and prostate.

      Q: Why would a premenopausal woman need progesterone cream?

      A: In the ten to fifteen years before menopause, many women regularly have anovulatory cycles in which they make enough estrogen to create menstruation, but they don't make any progesterone, thus setting the stage for estrogen dominance. Using progesterone cream during anovulatory months can help prevent the symptoms of PMS.

      We now know that PMS can occur despite normal progesterone levels when stress is present. Stress increases cortisol production; cortisol blockades (or competes for) progesterone receptors. Additional progesterone is required to overcome this blockade, and stress management is important.

      Q: What is progesterone made from?

      A: The USP progesterone used for hormone replacement comes from plant fats and oils, usually a substance called diosgenin which is extracted from a very specific type of wild yam that grows in Mexico, or from soybeans. In the laboratory diosgenin is chemically synthesized into real human progesterone. The other human steroid hormones, including estrogen, testosterone, progesterone and the cortisones are also nearly always synthesized from diosgenin.

      Some companies are trying to sell diosgenin, which they label "wild yam extract" as a medicine or supplement, claiming that the body will then convert it into hormones as needed. While we know this can be done in the laboratory, there is no evidence that this conversion takes place in the human body.

      Q: Where should I put the progesterone cream?

      A: Because progesterone is very fat-soluble, it is easily absorbed through the skin. From subcutaneous fat, progesterone is absorbed into capillary blood. Thus absorption is best at all the skin sites where people blush: face, neck, chest, breasts, inner arms and palms of the hands.

      Q: What is the recommended dosage of progesterone?

      A: For premenopausal women the usual dose is 15-24 mg/day for 14 days before expected menses, stopping the day or so before menses.

      For postmenopausal women, the dose that often works well is 15 mg/day for 25 days of the calendar month.

      Q: What amount of progesterone do you recommend in a cream?

      A: Dr. Lee recommends the creams that contain 450-500 mg of progesterone per ounce, which is 1.6% by weight or 3% by volume. This means that about ¼ teaspoon daily would provide about 20 mg/day.

      Q: How safe is progesterone cream?

      A: During the third trimester of pregnancy, the placenta produces about 300 mg of progesterone daily, so we know that a one-time overdose of the cream is virtually impossible. If you used a whole jar at once it might make you sleepy. However, Dr. Lee recommends that women avoid using higher than the recommended dosage to avoid hormone imbalances. More is not better when it comes to hormone balance.

      Q: Wouldn't it be easier to just take a progesterone pill?

      A: Dr. Lee recommends the transdermal cream rather than oral progesterone, because some 80% to 90% of the oral dose is lost through the liver. Thus, at least 200 to 400 mg daily is needed orally to achieve a physiologic dose of 15 to 24 mg daily. Such high doses create undesirable metabolites and unnecessarily overload the liver.

      Q: Where can I get more information on progesterone and natural hormone balance?

      A: For a detailed explanation of women's hormone balance issues, a hormone balance program, as well as detailed descriptions of how to use natural progesterone, the following books by John R. Lee, M.D. are recommended:

      What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Menopause

      What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About PREmenopause

      What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Breast Cancer

      Click here for more about these books including sample chapters and purchase information

  23. QUESTION:
    Can a hormone inbalance cause insomnia and anxiety and tension?

    • ANSWER:
      Symptoms of hormone imbalance in women may begin as early as the late 20's to the 40's. Symptoms of hormone imbalance in women tend to increase as a woman ages, especially if ignored in the earlier years. Hormone imbalance symptoms can be any one or more of the following:

      • Allergy symptoms

      • Depression, fatigue and anxiety

      • Endometriosis

      • Fibrocystic breasts

      • Hair loss and facial hair growth

      • Headaches, dizziness and foggy thinking

      • Low sex drive

      • Osteoporosis

      • PMS

      • Urinary tract infections and incontinence

      • Uterine fibroids

      • Weight gain, water retention and bloating

      • Wrinkly skin

  24. QUESTION:
    What is having high Thyroid problems?
    What causes it? What are the symptoms? What do you do to cure it? What did I do to get it in the first place?

    • ANSWER:
      'high thyroid'? What do you mean? I will assume you mean high TSH meanig low producing thyroid ... HypOthyroidism, as it is by far, the most common of the two. There is no cure.

      These are just possibles and you would not have to have all of them:
      Low energy and fatigue or tiredness, especially in the morning, difficulty losing weight, a sensation of coldness--especially of the hands and feet, depression, slowness of thought processes, headaches, swelling of the face or fluid retention in general, dry coarse skin, brittle nails, stiffness of joints, muscular cramps, shortness of breath on exertion, and chest pain, and chronic constipation are common. In women, menstrual problems--such as PMS and menstrual irregularities including heavy periods and fertility problems are further signs and symptoms. Disorders associated with hypothyroidism include headaches, migraines, sinus infections, post-nasal drip, visual disturbances, frequent respiratory infections, difficulty swallowing, heart palpitations, indigestion, gas, flatulence, constipation, diarrhea, frequent bladder infections, infertility, reduced libido and sleep disturbances, with the person requiring 12 or more hours of sleep at times. Other conditions include intolerance to cold, poor circulation, Raynaud's Syndrome, which involves the hands and feet turning white in response to cold, allergies, asthma, heart problems, benign and malignant tumors, cystic breasts and ovaries, fibroids, dry skin, acne, fluid retention, loss of memory, depression, mood swings, fears, and joint and muscle pain.
      The hair tends to be dry, brittle and thinning. The outer third of the eyebrows is often missing. One often finds swelling under the eyes. The tongue is often thick and swollen. The skin may be rough, dry and flaky and show evidence of acne. The skin may also have a yellowish tinge due to high carotene in it. Nails tend to be brittle and break easily. The thyroid gland may be enlarged. The patient is more often overweight. Hands and feet are frequently cold to the touch. Reflexes are either slow or absent. The pulse rate is often slow.
      The average temperature is below 97.8 Fahrenheit.

      You need testing for thyroid ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but, for diagnosis, may not mean much if ANTIBODIES are present which is indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between HYPER & HYPO at start)…it is the main cause of eventual HypOthyroidism but worse (...OR Graves Disease - HypERthyroid).

      WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

      Ck these:
      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html
      http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

      ALWAYS GET COPIES OF YOUR LABS.

      God bless you

  25. QUESTION:
    Every month Since December I have two days where I am constantly being sick. What could it be? I?
    I have also noticed my hair falling out. I have a medium sized bald patch at the back of my head. Im 27. I am a veggie but apart from this I am pretty fit, I regularly exercise.

    • ANSWER:
      Causes of Hormonal Imbalance in Women

      Estrogen and progesterone are the two most important female hormones. A hormonal imbalance occurs when the ratio of these two hormones deviate from their normal levels. Most commonly, estrogen is the one that tends to increase and this is known as 'estrogen dominance'. This may cause hormonal imbalance in teenage girls as well. So, what causes hormonal imbalance in young women? Hormonal imbalance in young women is caused due to the following reasons -
      •Over nutrition
      •Malnutrition
      •Erratic lifestyle
      •Early onset of menopause
      •Phytoestrogens present in food
      •Use of birth control and contraceptive pills
      •Stress and tension
      •Thyroid problems
      •Ovarian failure
      •Environmental chemicals
      In older women, hormonal imbalance is caused mainly due to menopause and can be identified on the onset of menopausal symptoms.

      Women may start experiencing hormonal imbalance when they are in their 30s or 40s.

      Symptoms and Effects of Hormonal Imbalance in Young Women

      Listed below are some of the symptoms and effects of hormonal imbalance in young women and hormone imbalance symptoms teenagers.
      •Uterine fibroids
      •Water retention/bloating
      •Irregular periods
      •PMS
      •Atherosclerosis
      •Polycystic ovary syndrome or ovarian cysts
      •Fibrocystic breasts
      •Endometriosis
      •Night sweats
      •Vaginal dryness
      •Diminished sex drive
      •Mood swings
      •Irritability
      •Cyclical migraine headaches
      •Obesity or sudden weight gain
      •Chronic fatigue syndrome
      •Premenstrual asthma
      •Hormonal headache
      •Hair loss
      •Short-term memory loss
      •Lack of concentration
      Identifying Hormonal Imbalance in Young Women

      Apart from the above symptoms of hormonal imbalance in young women, an accurate way to diagnose hormonal imbalance is a basic blood test. You should look for follicle stimulating hormone levels, estradiol, thyroxine and thyrotropin levels in the blood test reports.

      Treatment of Hormonal Imbalance in Young Women

      It is possible to treat hormonal imbalance and the associated disorders of hormonal imbalance in young women. Treatment needs to be administered, depending upon the cause of hormonal imbalance. The cause needs to be treated along with the hormonal imbalance. Hormonal imbalance caused due to thyroid malfunctioning, is treated by administering a daily dose of natural or synthetic hormones. These hormones regulate the thyroid gland which then produces the appropriate levels of hormones. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is another form of treatment used to treat hormonal imbalance, caused due to ovarian failure.

      Other alternative treatments include consuming nutritional supplements, inculcating healthy lifestyle habits like, avoiding alcohol and smoking, consuming a healthy diet and incorporating exercise into the daily routine. It is also essential to maintain optimum weight levels to treat hormonal imbalance. Many lifestyle changes and going for a natural hormone imbalance treatment for teen girls or young women can help.

  26. QUESTION:
    How to relieve breast soreness, and tenderness? Probably relating to hormone therapy.?
    Began using Prempro for menapausal symtoms approximately 3 weeks ago. For the last 2 weeks, have had terrible sorness in the breast and nipples. Very uncomfortable!

    • ANSWER:
      Whoa - STOP THE PREMPRO!!!!

      Premarin (also called conjugated estrogens) is a word composed from Pregnant Mare's Urine. This horse estrogen is the most commonly prescribed estrogen in the world. It is also the form of estrogen most commonly used in research, including taxpayer funded research.

      This means that most of what we think we know about "estrogen replacement" in women is actually about horse estrogen "replacement" in humans. It is as yet unclear why studies aren't being done on the inexpensive and easily available bio-indentical human estrogen.

      The Problems with Premarin:
      heavy menstrual bleeding, cramping
      breast tenderness
      fluid retention, edema, weight gain, increased fat
      headache, migraine
      depression, anxiety
      glucose intolerance, insulin resistance
      estrogen dominance
      stimulates growth of fibroids
      worsens endometriosis
      nausea, vomiting, cramping, bloating
      leg cramps
      eye problems
      high blood pressure
      increased blood clotting
      venous thromboembolism
      increased risk of endometrial and breast cancer
      loss of scalp hair, growth of facial and body hair
      gall bladder disease
      pancreatitis

      The composition of horse estrogen is vastly different from human estrogen.

      The metabolic breakdown products of Premarin are biologically stronger and more active than the original equine estrogens. Various studies have shown that these breakdown products can produce DNA damage that is cancer-causing. So, for example, the incidence of breast cancer increases when women take Premarin.

      Premarin, like all conventional HRT, is prescribed in standard dosages and not tailored to individual requirements. This usually means women are often taking more "estrogen" that they need.

      It takes about eight weeks to clear Premarin out of the body. In contrast, natural hormones are completely metabolized and cleared in 6-12 hours.

      Premarin can easily, and usually does, throw a woman into Estrogen Dominance.

      Provera (medroxyprogesterone acetate) is the most common progestin. It is also used in PremPro, which is Premarin and Provera in combination.

      Most progestins are made by taking natural progesterone and altering the chemical structure so it can be patented.

      Problems with progestins:
      They suppress production of natural progesterone in the body.

      They disrupt the steroid hormone pathways, which can cause both immediate and/or insidious undermining of both adrenal and gonadal function.

      Since a steroid hormone pathway is fundamental to energy and vitality, these drugs are usually a prescription for chronic fatigue(and probably fibromyalgia). This is not conventionally recognized.

      Side Effects of Progestins:
      depression
      anxiety, nervousness
      fatigue, leading to chronic fatigue over time
      fluid retention and breast tenderness, weight gain
      migraine
      coronary artery spasm
      angina, palpitations
      menstrual irregularities, spotting
      glucose intolerance; promotes insulin resistance
      general edema
      nausea
      insomnia, sleepiness
      skin rashes, acne
      hair loss on scalp, facial hair growth
      Coronary spasm
      Stroke
      Pulmonary embolism
      Implicated in causing breast cancer
      sudden or partial loss of vision.
      Liver disease
      Increases the risk of birth defects(remember, progestins are in all oral contraceptives).
      Gall bladder disease

      Progestin and progesterone are NOT the same thing.
      Natural Progesterone has NO SIDE EFFECTS! And it will get rid of all the symptoms above. :)

  27. QUESTION:
    What are the odds that I have breast and/or cervical cancer?
    I had 2 fibroid adenomas removed from my left breast in Feb of 2003 (1 at 6:00 & 1 behind nipple). Only a little more than a year after surgery I had a lump in the same 6:00 position and my nipple inverted again like before the surgery. I had a mamo & ultrasound and was told that they were inconclusive and I needed a biopsy. Not wanting to go through surgery for every lump I was going to get, I chickened out and neglected to go back to the dr. About 3mos ago, I started having pain in my left breast that went from my armpit to my nipple. I went back to the dr who ordered another mamo & us. Same results except that now I have lymph nodes in both breasts as well as an inconclusive solid mass. I NEED to schedule a biopsy and will. However, the gyno also gave me the bad news that my Pap came back abnormal with low-grade cell changes. I'm a 33 yr old pretty healthy woman - so what are the odds or chances that I have breast and/or cervical cancer? Any information on these symptoms, conditions, tests, diagnosis, procedures, etc would be greatly appreciated. I'm on pins and needles worrying because I'm the mother of 4 children. Please help.

    • ANSWER:
      I have just had surgery for breast cancer. PLEASE, please, I know you're scared....PLease go get a biopsy. I caught it early enough to get help and now Have a future. It's intimidating, frightening and you feel out of control. Here's the answer. I promise it will empower you. If there is cancer then you will be armed for bear and you can fight. Fight for your kids and for yourself. ACS has so many answers. I did this and I was so deathly afraid, but at least if you know you can choose before you have no options. There is a very good chance you have a solid mass, period. My symptoms were a lump. No pain, no anything, I found a lump. I have no history in my family and I don't smoke. I'm here, I'm fine and btw, I have kids, a husband, family and friends, plus I own my own successful business and have for many years. None of it matters if you aren't there. I had a mammogram, 2 ultrasounds, and a biopsy after I found my lump, and then surgery 4 days ago. My insurance is not helping with anything but the hospital.....Oh well, I will worry about payment later. Go. Please?! Now since I'm not worried about me, I will be worried about you. Good luck, and feel free to email me if you need more shoving. ;)

  28. QUESTION:
    Can birth control increase your breast size?
    I'm on birth control, im 14 and a 32 A. I'm fine with my size, but i was just wondering because someone told me that. Is that true?
    I'm only on birth control because of my VERY heavy bleeding, no other reason... It's a very low dose

    • ANSWER:
      At 14, you should definitely NOT be on birth control. That is simply incredible that this is being done, but I'm not surprised at all because the way medicine is being handled today.

      Birth control contains synthetic estrogen called ethinyl estradiol that is 1,000 times more potent in its affect on breast tissue than estriol (estrogen made naturally in the body). Studies two decades ago clearly found that over exposure to estradiol increases one's risk of breast cancer, whereas estriol is protective.

      Synthetic ethinyl estradiol is even more of a breast cancer risk because it is efficiently absorbed by mouth and slow to be metabolized and excreted. The longer a synthetic estrogen stays in the body, the more opportunity it has to do damage.

      I know you are 14 and not experienced with things that happen in the world, but these drug companies are NOT nice people and do not care about your health, only profit. If you believe your doctor understands how to make you healthy, you need to get educated and realize that doctors are NOT trained in nutrition and are only concerned about treating symptoms, not root causes of disease.

      The birth control Pill has never been studied for long term affects such as cancer and other degenerative diseases. You are on your own. We do know that fibroids have increased astronomically since the pill has been introduced and breast cancer is now 1 in 7 women.

      I would seriously evaluate your risk factors and make a decision based on facts, not some drug company propaganda or doctor that is relying on drug company literature for his facts.

      good luck to you

  29. QUESTION:
    I feel hopeless, depressed, exhausted and nauseous could it be my period?
    My boyfriend says every month I become extremely moody but it sometimes happens during my period not before. I also have bad fibroids, a lot of them and some that are very big. Sometimes it feels like someone is sticking a knife in my anus. But the moods are worse of all. I feel depressed often but like now I feel suicidal and guilty for missing work.

    • ANSWER:
      The most common signs and symptoms associated with premenstrual syndrome include:

      Emotional and behavioral symptoms

      Tension or anxiety
      Depressed mood
      Crying spells
      Mood swings and irritability or anger
      Appetite changes and food cravings
      Trouble falling asleep (insomnia)
      Social withdrawal
      Poor concentration
      Physical signs and symptoms

      Joint or muscle pain
      Headache
      Fatigue
      Weight gain related to fluid retention
      Abdominal bloating
      Breast tenderness
      Acne flare-ups
      Constipation or diarrhea
      Although the list of potential signs and symptoms is long, most women with premenstrual syndrome experience only a few of these problems.

  30. QUESTION:
    My past 5 or 6 periods have been very irregular. What's going on?
    I've have very regular 28-day cycles my entire life, but for the past 5 or 6 months my cyles have ranged from 30 days to 38 days. Does this mean anything serious could be wrong with me?

    • ANSWER:
      Because I have the same issue, I know that there could be a number of problems. The only sure way to find out what is wrong is to go to a doctor, however, it could be, BUT NOT LIMITED TO...

      1. A hormone imbalance - Being over-weight can add to this problem because fat stores estrogen.

      2. Pregnancy - Sometimes women still have cycles (sometimes regular, sometimes not) even after conceiving. When you go to the doctor, if you're sexually active, this will be one of the first tests they will perform.

      3. Gonnorhea - This STD is known to cause irregular bleeding. Other symptoms include vaginal discharge and pain during sex. Again, contact your doctor immediately.

      4. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome - This is a very common ailment (the one I suffer from) in which you have cysts growing on your uterus and/or ovaries. It is more prevalent in obese women and increases one's risk for diabetes, obesity, acne, increased body hair, and may cause dark patches of skin in between the thighs, armpits and under the breasts. Also, you may develop skin tags too. Hormone therapy helps (like birth-control) but it treatment depends on the severity of your condition.

      5. Stress - Sometimes being extremely stressed out can throw your body off. Maybe you need to find some ways to relax and deal with life's issues.

      6. Uterine fibroids - Although not extemely serious, this is a condition in which fibriods have developed inside the uterine walls. An ultrasound needs to be performed in order to confirm this.

  31. QUESTION:
    Is this a hormonal imbalance or what?
    I get mad and emotional at things that most pepole won't understand why. An example would be when two different friends threw something dirty to wipe the taable with at my face. I know they were joking but I just found it disrespectful and got all mad about it. Stuff liike that would really annoy me and make me emotional and none of my friends or family members would undersand it. Is this an example of horomanal imbalance???

    • ANSWER:
      Any problems that women face is somehow related to hormonal imbalance. There are many symptoms of hormonal imbalcance like:

      •Uterine fibroids
      •Water retention/bloating
      •Irregular periods
      •PMS
      •Atherosclerosis
      •Polycystic ovary syndrome or ovarian cysts
      •Fibrocystic breasts
      •Endometriosis
      •Night sweats
      •Vaginal dryness
      •Diminished sex drive
      •Mood swings
      •Irritability
      •Cyclical migraine headaches
      •Obesity or sudden weight gain
      •Chronic fatigue syndrome
      •Premenstrual asthma
      •Hormonal headache

      The problem of you getting angry I can say is probably most closely related to modd swings . SO I think yes you may have hormonal imbalance.

  32. QUESTION:
    What are some signs of a hormone imbalance?

    • ANSWER:
      Symptoms of hormone imbalance in women may begin as early as the late 20's to the 40's. Symptoms of hormone imbalance in women tend to increase as a woman ages, especially if ignored in the earlier years. Hormone imbalance symptoms can be any one or more of the following:

      - Allergy symptoms
      - Depression, fatigue and anxiety
      - Endometriosis
      - Fibrocystic breasts
      - Hair loss and facial hair growth
      - Headaches, dizziness and foggy thinking
      - Low sex drive
      - Osteoporosis
      - PMS
      - Urinary tract infections and incontinence
      - Uterine fibroids
      - Weight gain, water retention and bloating
      - Wrinkly skin

      Symptoms of hormone imbalance are caused primarily by the incorrect relationship between progesterone and estrogen levels in the body. The two female hormones, estrogen and progesterone, exist in a delicate balance. Variations in that balance can have a dramatic effect on your health, resulting in symptoms of hormone imbalance. The amounts of these hormones that the woman's body produces from month to month can vary, depending on factors such as stress, nutrition, exercise and most importantly -- ovulation or the lack of ovulation.

      In the first 10-12 days of the menstrual cycle, only estrogen is produced in the female body. If ovulation occurs, then progesterone is produced by the ovaries. On day 28 or so, levels of both hormones drop, resulting in menstruation. However, if ovulation did not occur, you can still have the menstrual period, but the estrogen is never "balanced" by progesterone, which needed ovulation to trigger its production. And this results in symptoms of hormone imbalance appearing -- you have estrogen but progesterone production drops to very low levels.

      In the industrialized countries, women take birth control pills, are exposed to household chemicals at home, car exhaust and other environmental xenoestrogens. In addition, women often have stressful lives, eat processed foods or skip meals, take synthetic estrogen HRT (hormone replacement therapy) and have hysterectomies. All these factors can add more estrogen to the female body, resulting in excess estrogen which will cause hormone imbalance symptoms.

      I would recommend that if you have any concerns or any of the above symptoms that you consult with your doctor/gyno for further evaluation.

      Good luck :)

  33. QUESTION:
    I'm 44 yrs old and in a new relationship. I do not have any children and am interested in having a baby?
    What I would like to know is, and perhaps I need to hear from some professional sources, is; just because i'm still having my period does that mean that I will get pregnant? In other words, it is possible to still have a period but something be wrong with me that would prevent pregnancy?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, my sister has had normal menstruation, but has been trying to conceive for two years with no success.

      Causes of female infertility
      The most common causes of female infertility include fallopian tube damage or blockage, endometriosis, ovulation disorders, elevated prolactin, polycystic ovary syndrome, early menopause, benign uterine fibroids and pelvic adhesions:

      Fallopian tube damage or blockage. This condition usually results from inflammation of the fallopian tube (salpingitis). Chlamydia is the most frequent cause. Tubal inflammation may go unnoticed or cause pain and fever.

      Tubal damage with scarring is the major risk factor of a pregnancy in which the fertilized egg is unable to make its way through the fallopian tube to implant in the uterus (ectopic pregnancy). One episode of tubal infection may cause fertility difficulties. The risk of ectopic pregnancy increases with each occurrence of tubal infection.

      Endometriosis. Endometriosis occurs when the tissue that makes up the lining of the uterus grows outside of the uterus. This tissue most commonly is implanted on the ovaries or the lining of the abdomen near the uterus, fallopian tubes and ovaries. These implants respond to the hormonal cycle and grow, shed and bleed in sync with the lining of the uterus each month, which can lead to scarring and inflammation. Pelvic pain and infertility are common in women with endometriosis.

      Infertility in endometriosis also may be due to:

      Ovarian cysts (endometriomas). Ovarian cysts may indicate advanced endometriosis and often are associated with reduced fertility. Endometriomas can be treated with surgery.
      Scar tissue. Endometriosis may cause rigid webs of scar tissue between the uterus, ovaries and fallopian tubes. This may prevent the transfer of the egg to the fallopian tube.
      Ovulation disorders. Some cases of female infertility are caused by ovulation disorders. Disruption in the part of the brain that regulates ovulation (hypothalamic-pituitary axis) can cause deficiencies in luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). Even slight irregularities in the hormone system can affect ovulation.

      Specific causes of hypothalamic-pituitary disorders include:

      Direct injury to the hypothalamus or pituitary gland
      Pituitary tumors
      Excessive exercise
      Anorexia nervosa
      Elevated prolactin (hyperprolactinemia). The hormone prolactin stimulates breast milk production. High levels in women who aren't pregnant or nursing may affect ovulation. An elevation in prolactin levels may also indicate the presence of a pituitary tumor. In addition, some drugs can elevate levels of prolactin. Milk flow not related to pregnancy or nursing (galactorrhea) can be a sign of high prolactin.

      Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). An increase in androgen hormone production causes PCOS. In women with increased body mass, elevated androgen production may come from stimulation by higher levels of insulin. In lean women, the elevated levels of androgen may be stimulated by a higher ratio of luteinizing hormone (LH). Lack of menstruation (amenorrhea) or infrequent menses (oligomenorrhea) are common symptoms in women with PCOS.

      In PCOS, increased androgen production prevents the follicles of the ovaries from producing a mature egg. Small follicles that start to grow but can't mature to ovulation remain within the ovary. A persistent lack of ovulation may lead to mild enlargement of the ovaries.

      Without ovulation, the hormone progesterone isn't produced and estrogen levels remain constant. Elevated levels of androgen may cause increased dark or thick hair on the chin, upper lip or lower abdomen as well as acne and oily skin.

      Early menopause (premature ovarian failure). Early menopause is the absence of menstruation and the early depletion of ovarian follicles before age 35. Although the cause is often unknown, certain conditions are associated with early menopause, including:

      Autoimmune disease. The body produces antibodies to attack its own tissue, in this case the ovary. This may be associated with hypothyroidism (too little thyroid hormone).
      Radiation or chemotherapy for the treatment of cancer.
      Tobacco smoking.
      Benign uterine fibroids.Fibroids are benign tumors in the wall of the uterus and are common in women in their 30s. Occasionally they may cause infertility by interfering with the contour of the uterine cavity, blocking the fallopian tubes.

      Pelvic adhesions. Pelvic adhesions are bands of scar tissue that bind organs after pelvic infection, appendicitis, or abdominal or pelvic surgery. They may limit the functioning of the ovaries and fallopian tubes and impair fertility. Scar tissue formation inside the uterine cavity after a surgical procedure may result in a closed uterus and ceased menstruation (Asherman's syndrome). This is most common following surgery to control uterine bleeding after giving birth.

      Other causes. A number of other causes can lead to infertility in women:

      Medications. Temporary infertility may occur with the use of certain medications. In most cases, fertility is restored when the medication is stopped.
      Thyroid problems. Disorders of the thyroid gland, either too much thyroid hormone (hyperthyroidism) or too little (hypothyroidism), can interrupt the menstrual cycle and cause infertility.
      Cancer and its treatment. Certain cancers — particularly female reproductive cancers — often severely impair female fertility. Both radiation and chemotherapy may affect a woman's ability to reproduce. Chemotherapy may impair reproductive function and fertility more severely in men than in women.
      Other medical conditions. Medical conditions associated with delayed puberty or amenorrhea, such as Cushing's disease, sickle cell disease, HIV/AIDS, kidney disease and diabetes, can affect a woman's fertility.

  34. QUESTION:
    How long untill you get ANY first signs of pregnancy?
    3 days? 1 week? a month? ANY symptoms....nausea, morning sickness, etc

    • ANSWER:
      There are possible signs of pregnancy and then there are proof positives. Some women experience symptoms right away and others don't have many at all for a long time. Basically, this is how it works. 14 days after the first day of your last period if you have 28 day cycles - there is a 3 day window of prime opportunity to become pregnant. If you had sex on or near those days and you noticed that little bit of white ovulation discharge - and you had sex at that time - there is a higher likelihood of a pregnancy occuring. The ph in the vagina naturally kills sperm, so when that ovulation discharge comes out - it protects sperm coming in so that they can survive and make it to the egg. When the egg is fertilized and then implants your body begins to produce HCG - pregnancy hormone. The level of hormone doubles every few days. You can begin to experience some symptoms right away - or you could just be having gas, fibroids or a myriad of other things that can cause pregnancy like symptoms. Some home pregnancy tests boast and early result and I've found that you can get false negatives and false positives. The proof positive is the HPT - I recommend having a doctor do one for you to ensure the correct result. But, wait until at least 2 weeks after your missed period or you could get a false negative because you're hormones are not high enough yet. If you have no idea how you timed this - then get to your doctor and have them do a blood test 2 weeks after your missed period if you've had one. Most women tend to start getting some lightheadedness and nausea right away. Tenderness in the breast is the most common first sign. Some women are totally pregnant and have little to no signs other than the hpt. If you think you're pregnant - see your doctor - you want to make sure it's not ectopic, blighted ovum or other gynecological issue requiring a doctor's assistance. There's nothing worse than the shock of thinking you might be pregnant - not knowing and ending up with a miscarriage or ectopic pregnancy because you had to run to the ER in pain. Proof positive for pregnancy is really the ultrasound - they can usually detect a heartbeat at about 5-6 weeks gestation.

  35. QUESTION:
    What are the early signs of menopause in women 37 to 41?

    • ANSWER:
      When you have had no periods for a year, this is considered being in menopause. Menopause symptoms include fatigue, stress, weight gain, headaches, loss of sex drive, tender and fibrocystic breasts, uterine fibroids, fluid retention, depression, irritability, hot flashes, and night sweats.

  36. QUESTION:
    What are the benefits of Chinese vitex?

    • ANSWER:
      Biological Name: Vitex agnus-castus, Vitex rotundifolia, Vitex trifolia, Fructus viticis
      Verbenaceae

      Other Names: Chaste Berry, Vitex, Chasteberry, Monk's pepper, Cloister pepper, Agnus Castus, Man jing zi

      Parts Used: The fruit

      Remedies For:
      Diaphoretic, antipyretic, regulatory, Uterine Tonic

      Useful for the treatment of:

      • Fibrocystic Breast Disease
      • Infertility (Female)
      • Menopause
      • Menorrhagia (Heavy Menstruation)
      • Menstrual Difficulties (Secondary Amenorrhea)
      • Premenstrual Syndrome

      Chasteberry has the effect of stimulating and normalizing pituitary gland functions, especially its progesterone function. It may be called an amphoteric remedy, as it can produce apparently opposite effects though in truth it is simply normalizing. It will usually enable what is appropriate to occur. The greatest use of Chasteberry lies in normalizing the activity of female sex hormones and it is thus indicated for dysmenorrhoea, premenstrual stress and other disorders related to hormone function. Beneficial during menopausal changes. May be used to aid the body to regain a natural balance after the use of the birth control pill.

      Vitex helps restore a normal estrogen-to-progesterone balance. It can not only ease but, with time, actually cure premenstrual syndrome, which has been linked to abnormally high levels of estrogen, especially if symptoms tend to disappear when menstruation begins. Vitex can also help with irregular menstruation (especially if accompanied by endometriosis). Vitex also helps resolve hormonally-related constipation. Vitex may help cure fibroid cysts that occur in the smooth muscle tissue.

      Vitex may also help reduce some of the undesirable symptoms of menopause such as hot flashes associated with the reduction in the production of progesterone. Vitex can stabilize the cycle after withdrawal from progesterone birth control pills.

      Several studies indicate that vitex can help control acne in teenagers, young women and men.

      For women who are trying to get pregnant, vitex may be helpful to help regulate the ovulatory cycle. It may be taken throughout the end of the third month of pregnancy, which may help prevent miscarriage, according to German research. After the third month it is still safe to take but is not recommended, because it may bring on the flow of milk too early.

      Traditional Chinese Medicine:

      Relieves wind heat, clears heat from the liver channel. The Chinese variety is particularly useful for headache, dizziness, eye pain, and muscular aches and pains. The Western variety has a somewhat different usage-as a female hormonal regulator.

      Description:
      Vitex grows in the Mediterranean countries and Central Asia. The dried fruit, which has a pepper- like aroma and flavor, is used.

      Dosage:
      Infusion: pour a cup of boiling water onto l teaspoonful of the ripe berries and leave to infuse for l0-l5 minutes. This should be drunk three times a day.

      Tincture: take 1 ml of the tincture three times a day.

      Clinical research shows that vitex may start working to treat imbalances after about 10 days, but for full benefit it should be taken up to 6 months or longer. With PMS, a positive result may be felt by the second menstruation, but permanent improvement may take up to a year or longer.

      Safety:
      Vitex should be used with caution by those who are weak or anemic.

      Side effects of using vitex are rare. Minor gastrointestinal upset and a mild skin rash with itching have been reported in less than 2% of the women monitored while taking vitex. Vitex is not recommended for use during pregnancy

  37. QUESTION:
    Im going to make my question a little more clear since people seem to think im like 12 asking this question, I?
    Am 20 years old, and me and my bf are sexually active, and we dont use protection, I have been cramping for 2 weeks and was supposed to start my period the 5th, well today is the 13th and still no period.. Maybe I can get better more helpful answers by specifying more. Thank you

    • ANSWER:
      Early Symptom of Pregnancy: Spotting and Cramping

      A few days after conception, the fertilized egg attaches itself to the uterine wall. This can cause one of the earliest signs of pregnancy -- spotting and, sometimes, cramping. Known as implantation bleeding, this early symptom occurs anywhere from six to 12 days after the egg is fertilized.
      The cramps resemble menstrual cramps, and some women mistake them and the bleeding for the start of their period. The bleeding and cramps, however, are slight.

      In addition to bleeding, you may notice a white, milky discharge from your vagina. This is related to the fact that, almost immediately after conception, the vaginal walls begin to thicken. It is the increased growth of cells lining the vagina that causes the discharge. This discharge can continue throughout your pregnancy.

      Early Symptom of Pregnancy: Breast Changes
      Changes in your breasts are another very early sign of pregnancy. When you conceive, your body undergoes a rapid change in hormone levels. Because of the changes in hormones, you may notice in one to two weeks that your breasts have become swollen, sore, or tingly. Or they may feel heavier or fuller or feel tender to the touch. In addition, the area around the nipples, called the areola, may darken.

      Early Symptom of Pregnancy: Fatigue
      Feeling unusually fatigued is an early pregnancy symptom that can occur as soon as one week after you conceive. The excessive tiredness is often related to a high level of progesterone in your system, although other things such as lower levels of blood sugar, lower blood pressure, and increased blood production can all contribute.

      Early Symptom of Pregnancy: Nausea (Morning Sickness)
      The elevated levels of estrogen in your system can slow the emptying of your stomach. This contributes to another early symptom of pregnancy, nausea, or what many women call morning sickness.

      Early symptom of pregnancy- Missed Period

      The most obvious early symptom of pregnancy -- and the one that prompts most women to get a
      pregnancy test -- is a missed period.

      CAUSES OF IRREGULAR PERIODS:

      Significant weight gain or loss
      Over-exercise
      Poor nutrition (or a diet too high in carbohydrates)
      Smoking
      Drug use
      Caffeine
      Excessive alcohol use (interfering with how the liver metabolizes estrogen and progesterone)
      Eating disorders
      Increased stress
      Polycystic ovarian syndrome/estrogen dominance
      Uterine abnormalities (fibroids/cysts/polyps/endometriosis)
      Hormonal imbalance related to perimenopause
      Medications
      Chemotherapy
      Recent childbirth, miscarriage, or D&C
      Breastfeeding

      http://www.womentowomen.com/menstruation…

  38. QUESTION:
    i have a sharp pain in my left breast?
    im 20 years old and every few months i get a sharp pain in my left breast. it last for about 20 minutes then goes away does anyone know what it could be.

    • ANSWER:
      There are numerous causes for pains in the left breast:
      1) Mastitis & Clogged Ducts
      Mastitis is the inflammation of the breast tissue that may be caused due to an infection, or a clogged milk duct or may be brought on by some kind of an injury and usually happens to lactating women. This is usually seen in women who are breastfeeding and the various mastitis symptoms include redness, swelling and sharp pain in left breast when breathing. There may also be systemic symptoms like fever and chills, malaise and other symptoms that may even mimic the flu. The mastitis treatment will entail treating the underlying cause or infection in the body.

      2) Ulcer and GI Related Conditions
      There are many important structures that are present in the vicinity of the breast area. The area just under the left breast is what houses the stomach. Hence, if a person is suffering from pain under left breast, then this could be due to a stomach ulcer or even due to heartburn. A stomach ulcer will typically cause pain after eating, especially, after eating a heavy meal that contained spicy food. However, due to the proximity of the stomach to the left breast, it may be difficult for the woman to differentiate between pain in left breast/chest area and pain in the upper abdominal area. A few tests, like a CT scan or a barium swallow can help diagnose this condition correctly. Ulcer treatment will consist of taking antacids and in cases of severe conditions, it may end up being an emergency condition requiring surgical intervention.

      3) Fibrocystic Breast Disease and Breast Cancer
      There are many different conditions that can lead to the formation of a painful lump in the breast. Not all breast cancers are malignant. There are many benign conditions that could lead to the formation of a lump in the breast. These include fibroid breast tumors, fibroadenomas, intraductal papillomas, etc. In fact, sometimes, what may appear as a lump may in fact be a cyst in the breast. All of these conditions can lead to sharp pain in left breast area. A malignant breast cancer can especially be diagnosed by identifying the early symptoms of breast cancer, like breast tenderness, pain, dimpling of skin, swollen and tender nipples, etc. Breast cancer treatment will range from surgical removal of the lump to radiation and chemotherapy, depending on the type of breast cancer.

      Other Causes
      There are many other causes of pain in left breast area. Muscle pain, especially pectoral muscle pain may be wrongly interpreted as breast pain. However, at times, breast pain may even be physiological. This may occur due to hormonal changes in the body of a woman, like it may be one of the early pregnancy symptoms before missed period. Some women may experience breast pain and breast tenderness before period. If a person experiences left breast pain in the morning, then it may be due to sleeping in an improper position. In such cases, there is no need for any kind of treatment for breast pain, as the pain resolves on its own after a while.

  39. QUESTION:
    Is there Estrogen in birth control pills?
    I'm 14 and my periods are super heavy so I'm going to take Birth control pills. Is there alot of estrogen in them? If so, what will be the effects? I don't care about my boobs getting bigger or anything, but what are the good & Bad effects? Thanks. (:

    • ANSWER:
      There is estrogen in the combined pill (estrogen and progesterone)

      Advantages:

      * Doesn’t interrupt sex
      * Usually makes your bleeds regular, lighter and less painful
      * May help with premenstrual symptoms
      * Reduces the risk of cancer of the ovary, womb and colon
      * Reduces acne in some women
      * May protect against pelvic inflammatory disease
      * May reduce the risk of fibroids, ovarian cysts and (non-cancerous) breast disease

      Disadvantages:

      Temporary side-effects at first may include:

      * Headaches, nausea, breast tenderness and mood changes
      * Breakthrough bleeding (unexpected bleeding on pill-taking days) and spotting

      If these do not stop within a few months, changing the type of pill may help.

      The pill can have some serious side-effects, but these are not common. They may include:

      * Raised blood pressure
      * A very small number of women may develop a blood clot which can block a vein (venous thrombosis) or an artery (arterial thrombosis, heart attack or stroke)
      * A small increase in risk of being diagnosed with breast cancer
      * A small increase in the risk of cervical cancer if the pill is used continuously for more than five years.

  40. QUESTION:
    Is the women-related disease endometriosis a cause for infertility ?
    Will it contribute to any further deterioration in health (other than infertility)?

    • ANSWER:
      Visit the Endometriosis Research Center @ www.endocenter.org. Their literature states:

      "About Endometriosis:

      With Endometriosis, tissue like that which lines the uterus (the endometrium) is found outside the womb in other areas of the body. Normally, the endometrium is shed each month through menses; however, with Endometriosis, these implants have no way of leaving the body. The implants still break down and bleed, but result is far different than in women and girls without the disease: internal bleeding, degeneration of blood and tissue shed from the growths, inflammation of the surrounding areas, and formation of scar tissue result. In addition, depending on the location of the growths, interference with the normal function of the bowel, bladder, intestines and other areas of the pelvic cavity can occur. Endometriosis has also been found lodged in the skin - and even the brain.

      Symptoms include chronic or intermittent pelvic pain, dysmenorrhea (painful menstruation is not normal!), infertility, miscarriage(s), ectopic (tubal) pregnancy, dyspareunia (pain associated with intercourse), nausea / vomiting / abdominal cramping, diarrhea / constipation (particularly with menses), painful bowel movements, painful or burning urination, urinary frequency, retention, or urgency; fatigue, chronic pain, allergies and immune system-related illnesses are also commonly reported complaints of women who have Endo. It is quite possible to have some, all, or none of these symptoms. Endo symptoms are varied and often nonspecific, so they can easily masquerade as several other conditions, including adenomyosis ("Endometriosis Interna"), appendicitis, ovarian cysts, bowel obstructions, colon cancer, diverticulitis, ectopic pregnancy, fibroid tumors, gonorrhea, inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, ovarian cancer, and PID.

      Despite today's age of medical advances, researchers remain unsure as what causes of Endometriosis. There is NO CURE, despite the continued propagation of such myths by the uninformed who still mistakenly believe that hysterectomy, pregnancy and/or menopause can "cure" the disease. Invasive surgery remains the gold standard of diagnosis, and current therapies continue to remain extremely limited, often carrying side effects.

      Mistakenly minimized as "painful periods," Endometriosis is more than just "killer cramps." It is a leading cause of female infertility, chronic pelvic pain and gynecologic surgery, and accounts for more than half of the 500,000 hysterectomies performed in the US annually. Despite being more prevalent than breast cancer, Endometriosis continues to be treated as an insignificant ailment. Recent studies have even shown an elevated risk of certain cancers and other serious illnesses in those with the disease, as well as malignant changes within the disease itself.

      Research has shown that genetics, immune system dysfunction, and exposure to environmental toxins like Dioxin may all be contributing factors to the development of the disease. Endometriosis knows no racial or socioeconomic barriers, and can affect women ranging from adolescence to post-menopause. The disease can be so painful as to render a woman or teen unable to care for herself or her family, attend work, school, or social functions, or go about her normal routine. It can negatively affect every aspect of a woman's life; from her self-esteem and relationships, to her capacity to bear children, to her ability to be a contributing member of society.

      The disease can currently only be diagnosed through invasive surgery, and the average delay in diagnosis is a staggering 9 years. A patient may seek the counsel of 5 or more physicians before her pain is adequately addressed.

      Once diagnosed, it is not unusual for a patient to undergo several pelvic surgeries and embark on many different hormonal and medical therapies in an attempt to treat her symptoms. None of the current treatments are entirely effective, and virtually all synthetic therapies carry significantly negative side effects; some lasting far beyond cessation of therapy. The exception to this is excision; see www.centerforendo.com to learn more about excision as the leading treatment.

      Though Endometriosis is one of the most prevalent illnesses affecting society today, awareness is sorely lacking and disease research continues to remain significantly under funded. For instance, in fiscal year 2000, the National Institutes of Health planned to spend .5 billion on research. Of that funding, only .7 million was earmarked for Endometriosis - amounting to approximately $.40/patient. This is in stark contrast to other illnesses such as Alzheimer's and Lupus, which received approximately 5.00 and .00 per patient, respectively. American businesses lose millions of dollars each year in lost productivity and work time because of Endometriosis. The cost of surgery required to diagnose the disease in each patient alone adds greatly to the financial burden of both consumers and companies alike.

      Once erroneously believed to be a disease of “Caucasian career women who have delayed childbearing,” we know that in fact, Endometriosis affects women of all ages, races and
      socioeconomic status. Endometriosis also can and does exist in the adolescent female population. Far from the “rare” incidence once believed, studies have found that as many as 70% of teenagers with chronic pelvic pain had Endometriosis proven by laparoscopy. Other reports indicate that as many as 41% of patients experienced Endometriosis pain as an adolescent. The illness can be quite disruptive and cause significant dysfunction, especially at a time in life when self-esteem, school attendance and performance, and social involvement are all critical. Many adolescents with Endometriosis find themselves unable to attend or participate in classes, social functions, extracurricular activities, and sports due to significant pain and other symptoms of Endometriosis. Sometimes, teens and young women lack support and validation from both the home and the school; told the pain is “in their head,” that they are “faking it,” that their debilitating cramps are “normal” and “a part of womanhood,” that they are merely suffering from “the curse,” or that they should just “grin and bear it.” Their symptoms may also be dismissed as a sexually transmitted disease, which Endometriosis absolutely is not. Failure to acknowledge and address symptoms early in the disease process can lead to significant delays in diagnosis and necessary, subsequent treatments. Lack of support from family and loved ones can also add to the patient’s pain and fear - at any age.

      Recent studies have also shown that Endometriosis may in fact have an even bigger impact on younger patients than older women. One such study discovered that in patients under 22 years of age, the rate of disease recurrence was
      double that of older women (35% versus 19%). The study also revealed that the disease behaves differently in
      younger women; leading some researchers to believe it is a
      different form of Endometriosis altogether. Surgery, considered necessary to accurately diagnose and
      effectively treat the disease, is often withheld from younger patients based on the injudicious belief that early surgery somehow negatively influences a young woman’s fertility. Extensive, cumulative research has shown this concern to be unfounded. What can impact fertility, however,
      is neglecting effective treatment of the disease. Some
      researchers also feel that symptomatic, adolescent-onset
      Endometriosis is most often a lifelong problem that will
      progress to severe fibrotic disease.

      While it is possible to become pregnant with Endometriosis, the key is to obtain early, effective treatment such as that offered by specialty treatment centers like the Center for Endo Care (see www.centerforendo.com to learn about the success of excision as treatment). Hysterectomy is not a cure for Endometriosis. Any disease left behind by the surgeon (whether by design because he or she 'couldn't get it all' or accident because they don't recognize the disease in all manifestations) will continue to thrive and cause pain and symptoms. It does not matter if the ovaries are removed or if HRT is withheld; Endo produces its own estrogen-synthesizing enzyme known as aromatase. Thus, it enables it's own vicious life cycle and sustains the disease process. You would be better off getting all disease truly excised from all locations at a specialty center like the CEC (www.centerforendo.com).

      Due in part to the efforts of foundations like the ERC, research is ongoing in some places as to the causes of Endometriosis and potential cures for the disease. Our organization will continue to push for more widespread research into the many facets of the disease, and ultimately, a cure.

      For more information:

      http://www.endocenter.org/

      Endo Self Test:

      Not sure if you have Endometriosis? While pelvic surgery is the only current way to definitively diagnose it, symptoms can lead you and your doctor to suspect the disease. Review the following and consider if any of these common symptoms apply to you. Review your answers with your gynecologist for further discussion.

      Do you experience so much pain during or around your period that you find yourself unable to work, attend school or social functions, or go about your normal routine? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have any relatives diagnosed with Endometriosis? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you find yourself with painful abdominal bloating, swelling or tenderness at any time in your cycle? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have a history of painful ovarian Endometriomas ("chocolate cysts")? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have a history of miscarriage, infertility or ectopic pregnancy? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you experience gastrointestinal symptoms during your cycle, such as nausea or vomiting and/or painful abdominal cramping accompanied by diarrhea and/or constipation? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have a history of fatigue and/or a lowered immunity (i.e., "sick and tired" all the time)? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have a history of allergies, which tend to worsen around your periods? _____YES / _____ NO

      If sexually active, do you experience pain during sexual activity? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you suffer from autoimmune diseases or other conditions (i.e., thyroid disease, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, fibromyalgia, multiple sclerosis, chronic migraines)? _____YES / _____ NO

      Have you ever undergone pelvic surgery like a laparoscopy, in which Endometriosis was suspected but not definitively diagnosed?
      _____YES / _____ NO

      If you have answered "yes" to one or more of these questions, you may have Endometriosis. Talk to your doctor about getting an accurate diagnosis and effective treatment today. Dull aching and cramping can occur during menstruation in many women and teens, due to uterine contractions and the release of various hormones including those known as prostaglandins. However, period pain that becomes so debilitating it renders you unable to go about your normal routine is not ordinary or typical! Pain is your body's way of signaling that something is WRONG. If you are suffering from pelvic pain at any point in your cycle, an Endometriosis diagnosis should be considered.

      Know the Facts:

      - Endometriosis can affect women and teens of all ages, even those as young as 10 or as old as 85!
      - Hysterectomy, menopause and pregnancy are NOT cures for Endometriosis; in fact, there is no definitive cure!
      - Delayed childbearing is NOT what causes Endometriosis; in fact, no one really knows for sure what causes the disease, but research points to multi-factorial origins like heredity, immunology and exposure to environmental toxicants!
      - Endometriosis can only be accurately diagnosed via surgery; diagnostic tests like MRIs and ultrasounds are not definitive!
      - GnRH therapies like Lupron should never be administered in those patients younger than 18 yrs. of age or before a surgical diagnosis!
      - You CAN live well in spite of Endometriosis. WE ARE HERE TO HELP!" ~ www.endocenter.org

  41. QUESTION:
    How can you tell if your thyroid.....?
    isn't working properly what are the signs and symptoms?

    • ANSWER:
      Low energy and fatigue or tiredness, especially in the morning, difficulty losing weight, a sensation of coldness--especially of the hands and feet, depression, slowness of thought processes, headaches, swelling of the face or fluid retention in general, dry coarse skin, brittle nails, stiffness of joints, muscular cramps, shortness of breath on exertion, and chest pain, and chronic constipation are common. In women, menstrual problems--such as PMS and menstrual irregularities including heavy periods and fertility problems are further signs and symptoms. Disorders associated with hypothyroidism include headaches, migraines, sinus infections, post-nasal drip, visual disturbances, frequent respiratory infections, difficulty swallowing, heart palpitations, indigestion, gas, flatulence, constipation, diarrhea, frequent bladder infections, infertility, reduced libido and sleep disturbances, with the person requiring 12 or more hours of sleep at times. Other conditions include intolerance to cold, poor circulation, Raynaud's Syndrome, which involves the hands and feet turning white in response to cold, allergies, asthma, heart problems, benign and malignant tumors, cystic breasts and ovaries, fibroids, dry skin, acne, fluid retention, loss of memory, depression, mood swings, fears, and joint and muscle pain.
      The hair tends to be dry, brittle and thinning. The outer third of the eyebrows is often missing. One often finds swelling under the eyes. The tongue is often thick and swollen. The skin may be rough, dry and flaky and show evidence of acne. The skin may also have a yellowish tinge due to high carotene in it. Nails tend to be brittle and break easily. The thyroid gland may be enlarged. The patient is more often overweight. Hands and feet are frequently cold to the touch. Reflexes are either slow or absent. The pulse rate is often slow.
      The average temperature is below 97.8 Fahrenheit.

      These are POSSIBLES for HypOthyroidism.

      You need testing for thyroid ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but would not matter if ANTIBODIES are present. Indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between hyper & hypo at start)…main cause of HypOthyroid & is worse (...OR Graves Disease - HypERthyroid).

      WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

      Ck these:
      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html
      http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

      God bless

  42. QUESTION:
    birth control pill and weight gain?
    I've been on the pill lutera-28 since july and I've gained 10 pounds so far. Is this normal? I've also gained a larger appetite. I have another question, is it safe to take a mulitvitamin while on the pill? Such as one a day women's.

    • ANSWER:
      Anytime you take a birth control that contains synthetic estrogen, you are essentially putting yourself into menopause. Weight gain is a symptom of excess estrogen and menopause, along with all the others - like breast cancer, ovarian cancer, endometrial cancer, fibroids, endometriosis, high blood pressure, stroke.

  43. QUESTION:
    Question about sex on the pill?
    I had sex last night and I missed my pill on Monday. I've been taking it at the right time etc since then. I've been on the pill (micronor) for over 4 months now and that is the first time I've missed it. He didn't ejaculate into me but could I be pregnant?

    • ANSWER:
      Hello, I do feel you are safe. Here are early symptoms of pregnancy and reasons for irregular periods.

      Early Symptom of Pregnancy: Spotting and Cramping

      A few days after conception, the fertilized egg attaches itself to the uterine wall. This can cause one of the earliest signs of pregnancy -- spotting and, sometimes, cramping. Known as implantation bleeding, this early symptom occurs anywhere from six to 12 days after the egg is fertilized.
      The cramps resemble menstrual cramps, and some women mistake them and the bleeding for the start of their period. The bleeding and cramps, however, are slight.

      In addition to bleeding, you may notice a white, milky discharge from your vagina. This is related to the fact that, almost immediately after conception, the vaginal walls begin to thicken. It is the increased growth of cells lining the vagina that causes the discharge. This discharge can continue throughout your pregnancy.

      Early Symptom of Pregnancy: Breast Changes
      Changes in your breasts are another very early sign of pregnancy. When you conceive, your body undergoes a rapid change in hormone levels. Because of the changes in hormones, you may notice in one to two weeks that your breasts have become swollen, sore, or tingly. Or they may feel heavier or fuller or feel tender to the touch. In addition, the area around the nipples, called the areola, may darken.

      Early Symptom of Pregnancy: Fatigue
      Feeling unusually fatigued is an early pregnancy symptom that can occur as soon as one week after you conceive. The excessive tiredness is often related to a high level of progesterone in your system, although other things such as lower levels of blood sugar, lower blood pressure, and increased blood production can all contribute.

      Early Symptom of Pregnancy: Nausea (Morning Sickness)
      The elevated levels of estrogen in your system can slow the emptying of your stomach. This contributes to another early symptom of pregnancy, nausea, or what many women call morning sickness.

      Early symptom of pregnancy- Missed Period

      The most obvious early symptom of pregnancy -- and the one that prompts most women to get a
      pregnancy test -- is a missed period.

      CAUSES OF IRREGULAR PERIODS:

      Significant weight gain or loss
      Over-exercise
      Poor nutrition (or a diet too high in carbohydrates)
      Smoking
      Drug use
      Caffeine
      Excessive alcohol use (interfering with how the liver metabolizes estrogen and progesterone)
      Eating disorders
      Increased stress
      Polycystic ovarian syndrome/estrogen dominance
      Uterine abnormalities (fibroids/cysts/polyps/endometriosis)
      Hormonal imbalance related to perimenopause
      Medications
      Chemotherapy
      Recent childbirth, miscarriage, or D&C
      Breastfeeding

      TAKE CARE! Mama Bear

      http://www.womentowomen.com/menstruation…

  44. QUESTION:
    What are the causes of this?
    What causes a woman to miss her period for a month or more? She has had sexual intercourse and protected.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Daniel,

      RANDOM REASONS FOR IRREGULAR PERIODS:

      Significant weight gain or weight loss is one of the reasons for irregular periods. Even though low body weight is the most common cause of irregular periods, obesity also causes various irregularities in your menstrual cycle.

      If you are a victim of severe emotional stress, then you can possibly experience irregular or missed periods. This is due to the reason that stress will have very serious impact on your reproductive health. So, if you are aware you experience severe emotional stress, you may suffer from irregular periods.

      Various eating disorders such as anorexia or bulimia nervosa can also have influence on your regular menstrual cycle. So, if you have any kind of eating disorder, you can certainly experience irregular periods.

      Excessive exercising or body straining activities can also lead to irregular menstrual cycle. This is the reason why most of athletes encounter missed periods.

      Many new mothers do not resume their regular periods until they have completed their breast feeding. So, they can possibly have irregular menstrual cycle.

      Alcohol consumption can also disturb your hormonal metabolism. As a result, you’ll certainly end up with irregular or missed periods.

      Certain uterine abnormalities such as cervical polyps, uterine fibroids and endometriosis also cause irregular periods, too.

      Certain STDs also show irregular periods as a symptom.

      One of the common causes is stress. It is one of the main culprits for this problem. If you have been worried, over worked or angry before your period, chances are that you will experience an irregular menstrual cycle.

      Girls who have just begun menstruation, experience irregular menstruation for up to one year or more. Missed periods after menarche are nothing to worry about, it's part of the normal body process.

      Pregnancy can be another reason for a missed period. So if you missed a period after sexual intercourse, its best to first rule out pregnancy. To prevent unplanned pregnancy, it is wise to use contraceptives. There can be changes in the menstrual cycle after pregnancy.

      These are quite a few reasons that may cause you to experience irregular periods. So, if you are really concerned about your missed periods, make sure you consult any experienced gynecologist and find out the root cause of it.

      And remember to always consider healthy liquid intake such as beverages, natural fruit juices, and herbal teas. These can also help to cleanse and regulate or relieve lower abdominal pains. Always see a professional if there are serious complications.

      Womenshealthzone
      buzzle

  45. QUESTION:
    My breasts hurt a little when I touch them.....?
    I'm in my early 20s and a virgin. Both sides of my breasts kind of hurt when I touch them. They feel hard also. I'm not sure if those are lumps. Is this normal?

    • ANSWER:
      It could be something as simple as wearing the wrong size of bra (some women believe that wearing bra's can lead to breast cancer and other diseases - http://brafree.org/faq.html) or something as painful as Breast fibroids (http://uterinefibroidstreatment.org/breast-fibroids/). Since you are having pain, even if it's a little bit, it's worth a trip to the doctor, just to get it checked out. I think it's better to be safe than sorry.

      There is a Dr. that believes women in developed countries, due to the toxins that are in our environment, are having more and more (female problems). The products we use every day contain estrogens and xenoestrogens. We find the estrogen in plastic water bottles, plastic wrap we use for food, preservatives, pesticides used on non-organic foods, and so many other places. This causes an excess of estrogen to be in our bodies. Excess estrogen causes breast pain, breast fibroids, uterine fibroids, ovarian cysts, endometriosis, PCOS, breast, ovarian, and uterine cancer, and many other female issues. He suggests ways of how we can feel better. http://www.johnleemd.com/store/estrogen_dom.html. If you're interested you can go to that web site and browse around.

      In short here are my suggestions:
      1. Go see a Dr. to get checked out
      2. If you're having any of the other symptoms (as well as the breast pain) that are listed at the Dr. John Lee web site then I highly recommend that you give natural Progesterone cream a try.
      3. I know you said you were a virgin, but some women take birth control for many other medical reasons. Birth control contains a fake Progesterone called "progestrin". It is NOT the same as natural progesterone that you can find in the cream. Profestrin found in birth control can cause breast pain, stroke, heart attack, and other serious health problems.
      4. I recommend an herb called DIM, this can help rid your body of excess estrogen and may also alleviate your breast pain. http://www.dimfaq.com/

      I hope this helped a little and that you get feeling better soon! :)

  46. QUESTION:
    what is a fibrous tumor?
    I asked about having breast cancer because there is a small purple bumb on the side of my left breast. A breast specialist on this site, told me that it probably is a fibrous tumor. What is that? Is it severe? What cures it? Is it uncureable?

    • ANSWER:
      A fibroid (fibrous) tumor is a solid tumor and is usually benign. It is made of the fibrous tissue, hence its name. They tend to grow slowly and don't usually cause any symptoms, and are found most frequently in the uterus. It is unknown why they tend to form but there is a link between the growth of a fibroid tumor and estrogen. Pregnant women with high levels of estrogen tend to have fast-growing fibroid tumors, and women in menopause without estrogen secretion rarely get fibroid tumors. It is not very serious unless it is causing you symptoms, such as pain or heavy bleeding during your period. Your doctor can diagnose the bump and treat it, and very rarely, surgery is required to remove the tumor. Go see your doctor about it, but this post and your previous post don't sound like it is anything too serious.

  47. QUESTION:
    ovarian questioning i have been thinking a lot about lately?
    i was pondering about this question. what does it mean when a girls ovaries produce too many hormones? can it be stopped by any chance? any idea of the time frame it will take to be fixed if possible? someone please help!!!!!!

    • ANSWER:
      Symptoms of Hormone Imbalance in Females
      The symptoms of imbalance in female hormone differ from one woman to the other.
      •Allergies
      •Breast tenderness
      •Irregular periods
      •Craving sweets
      •Fatigue
      •Depression
      •PMS
      •Dizziness
      •Infertility
      •Endometriosis
      •Fibroids
      •Anxiety
      •Incontinence
      •Mood swings
      •Leg cramps
      •Night sweats
      •Thyroid dysfunction
      •Urinary tract infections
      •Weight gain
      •Yeast infections
      This is not an exhaustive list and women can experience several other signs and symptoms of hormonal imbalance. Sometimes, it is observed that the symptoms of hormone imbalance caused due to menopause subside by themselves as time passes, while, sometimes they can cause a lot of discomfort. If a woman observes any of the above mentioned symptom, she should consult the doctor as early as possible to treat the symptoms and avoid further discomfort.

      Treating Hormone Imbalance in Women
      Hormonal imbalance can be effectively treated with several methods. In case it is caused due to deficiency of certain hormones, the doctor prescribes hormone precursors as they help in treating the hormone deficiency. On the other hand, if imbalance is caused due to excess production of certain hormones, drugs known as hormone blockers are prescribed as they obstruct the normal functioning of the excess hormones. Secondly, if imbalance is caused due to abnormal functioning of any endocrine gland, the doctor may prescribe medication or even advise surgery (in extreme cases).

      The hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is another effective treatment that is extensively used these days for treating female hormone imbalance. In this therapy, the hormone that are deficient or lacking are artificially injected in the body. Although expensive, the hormone replacement therapy is one of the most effective treatment for treating imbalance of hormones. However, one should be aware of the several side effects associated with this technique. As an alternative treatment, women are advised to consume soy and vitamin E containing products for the prevention of hormonal imbalance.

      Hormone imbalance can be prevented by changing lifestyle and having a balanced diet. If suffering from stress, women should undertake stress management techniques like meditation and yoga to get relief from it. Lastly, starting any treatment methods and bringing any changes in diet after menopause should be done only after consulting the doctor.

  48. QUESTION:
    Pros and cons of birth control pills?
    What are some good things and bad things about taking birth control pills and what are some other options for birth control?

    • ANSWER:
      Good;
      - Reliable.
      - Doesn't interrupt sex.
      - Usually makes your bleeds regular, lighter and less painful.
      - May help with premenstrual symptoms.
      - Reduces the risk of cancer of the ovary, womb and colon.
      - Reduces acne in some women.
      - May protect against pelvic inflammatory disease.
      - May reduce the risk of fibroids, ovarian cysts and (non-cancerous) breast disease.

      Bad;
      - Used as 'quick-fix' for menstrual and hormonal problems so causes are covered up.
      - Suppresses menstrual cycles reducing your ability to care for sexual health long-term.
      - Breakthrough bleeding (you don't get periods on the pill) and spotting.
      - Side-effects; low sex drive, weight gain, headaches, nausea, breast tenderness and mood changes, raised blood pressure, blood clots (thrombosis), heart attack, stroke, and increased risk of breast cancer and cervical cancer if used long-term, can also make bleeding heavier and more painful - side-effects vary greatly from one pill to another.
      - Can take time to find type/brand that works for you, doctors often unhelpful.
      - irregular hormones/menstrual cycles when coming off the pill.

  49. QUESTION:
    Ladies!Please tell Can Heavy Periods control your life Or can you control them?

    • ANSWER:
      A common, treatable problem
      If you have heavy periods, you're not alone. Heavy periods or menorraghia (pronounced men-or-ah-jah) affects 1 in 5 women of reproductive age, causing excessive menstruation that regularly interferes with daily activities.
      You may be hesitant to discuss your symptoms with a doctor. What you may not realize, however, is that treatment can bring relief.
      Next: What are Heavy Periods?

      Causes of Heavy Periods
      Several medical conditions may cause or contribute to heavy periods. It's also possible to experience heavy periods with no known cause.

      Hormonal imbalance: An imbalance of the female hormones estrogen and progesterone. Hormonal imbalance can also be signs of early menopause (also known as perimenopause), which can lead to irregular or heavy periods.

      Fibroids: Benign (noncancerous) growths in the smooth muscle tissue of the walls of the uterus, or womb. They can be as small as a pea or grow larger than a grapefruit. Pressure from fibroids may build with each menstrual cycle and cause heavy periods. Learn more about fibroids.

      Medication: Some drugs, such as anticoagulants (drugs that prevent the clotting of blood) or anti-inflammatory medications, can cause heavy or prolonged periods.

      Infection or Disease: Heavy periods can also be a sign of more serious conditions like certain types of cancer or infections in the uterus.

      Treatments for Heavy Periods
      Medical experts often treat heavy periods with less invasive methods first, such as birth control pills or global endometrial ablation (GEA), and reserve hysterectomy for specific circumstances.

      Birth control pillsBirth control pills can help reduce menstrual flow by up to 60%, but it may not be the best option for all women.

      For some women, birth control pills are simply ineffective in reducing heavy periods. For others, the potential side effects of weight gain, mood swings and breast tenderness may be too undesirable.

      Global endometrial ablation (GEA)If birth control pills have not been a successful treatment for you, GEA may offer an effective, nonhormonal option.

      During an endometrial ablation procedure, your doctor inserts a catheter into the uterus (womb) to treat the endometrium, the lining of the uterus. Over the next week or so after treatment, the uterine lining sheds, much like it would during menstruation, resulting in lighter periods.

      Ablation treatments may be performed in a doctor’s office or in a hospital. Learn more about GEA.

      HysterectomyIf birth control pills or endometrial ablation have not been effective or are not advised for you, your doctor may recommend a hysterectomy. In fact, about 30-35% of hysterectomies are performed annually to treat heavy periods.

      Before you commit to having a hysterectomy, however, you should know that it is a major surgery. Explore your hysterectomy options, To learn about less invasive treatments with shorter recovery times.

      You don’t have to live with heavy periods, and you do have options. Find a doctor who can help.

  50. QUESTION:
    Are canerous lumps usually painful?
    I have a few lumps in my right breast, one towards the bottom and I think two near the right top. They are painful to the touch and feel like they have hard nodule on them. I have heard the breast cancer lumps are usually not painful, is that true? Are these most likely cysts?

    • ANSWER:
      No, most likely they are fibroids which are smooth muscle growths that occur during a woman's reproductive years (usually between the ages of 16 and 50). During this time the levels of estrogen and progesterone are at their highest. They are usually painful to the touch. If you have any other symptoms, see your doctor.

breast fibroid symptoms women

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