Bleeding Fibroids While Pregnant

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Is it possible to become pregnant while undergoing on chemotherapy for breast cancer?
    Its just really happened while on chemotherapy, to be delayed on monthly period?

    • ANSWER:
      Chemo will likely interfere with your periods, and it doesn't mean you are pregnant. Mine completely stopped for many months while under chemo treatment. My doc only warned me after chemo treatment that pregnancy was possible, so be careful. Bleeding came back with a vengeance due to fibroids I didn't know I had, so I had it all ripped out including ovaries per my oncologist b/c I was very estrogen positive. It hurt but was so worth it!

  2. QUESTION:
    How does birth control regulate your period?
    I thought it was supposed to stop you getting pregnant, so then it should stop your period altogether! Why do doctors prescribe this to girls who have irregular periods.

    • ANSWER:
      Well in actuality when you get a period when taking the pill it's not actually a real period. What happens is you take the pills with hormones in them for 21 days and then you stop taking them for 7 days and take the sugar pills and then you get a dip in hormones at that time and that signals your uterus to bleed. Which is similar to a regular period your hormones go up and down through the month and when your hormones dip naturally that's when you get a real period. So by using the pill you can control this so you only bleed during that time when you are not taking the pills with hormones in them.

      I actually took the pill continuously for a few years only taking a break every few months because of constant bleeding. It stopped working after a while though because I had many many as in 100 small fibroid tumors all over the inside and outside of my uterus which I had a hysterectomy for but that's a whole other story.

  3. QUESTION:
    What are other cases of having a missed or a late period.?
    Insted of insisting that you are pregnant when you miss a period, is there any other occasions that may happen in result of missing your period or having it late?

    • ANSWER:
      Hello, I found an article on the internet in regards to irregular periods and their reasons for being late, early, heavy, abnormally long and heavy bleeding. I hope this helps you to answer a few of your questions. Take care.

      Hormonal Imbalance One of the prime reasons for periods to go irregular is hormonal imbalance. In a female's body, in order to produce a period, the body creates hormones such as estrogen and progesterone. Various parts of the body need to send signals to each other in order to trigger menstruation. However, due to hormonal imbalance, many a time, these signals are missed or skipped, thus, resulting in irregular periods.

      Sudden Weight Gain or Loss Have you gained or lost a lot of weight lately? If yes, you've got an answer. When your body works at a constant pace, the hormones learn to process in similar manner. However, the moment you start doing rigorous workout, or eat a lot, your body takes a while to adjust to it. Hence, hormones become imbalanced, and lead to irregularity in periods. However, this is not a tense situation as it happens with every woman who has lost or gained weight quickly.

      Stress Workload? Job issues? Relationship turmoil? Mental dissatisfaction? Reduce your stress, female, for it's affecting the regularity of your periods. Yes, stress contributes to the most common reasons for a late period. With increasing stress, you are affecting the hormonal balance of your body, and hence, not only do your periods become irregular, but they also result in excessive weight gain, and anxiety.

      Polycystic Ovarian Disease So, you aren't pregnant, but you're still worried. Well, if your pregnancy test result came out to be negative, get a check up done, for chances, even though very less, are that you are suffering from Polycystic Ovarian Disease which is caused due to irregular ovulation as a result of hormonal imbalance. With proper treatment, your gynecologist will help you get your periods back to regular. However,

      Medications
      The Mayo Clinic advises that certain medications and result in excess bleeding including anti-coagulants that prevent blood clots and anti-inflammatory medicines. Not only can these medications result in heavy bleeding but they can also prolong your bleeding. If you are improperly taking hormone medication, this can also result in menorrhagia

      Anovulation, Fibroids
      When a woman fails to ovulate, this is called Anovulation. You can have a menstrual period but not ovulate. When this happens, the hormones may become unbalanced, resulting in excess bleeding.

      Cervical polyps are small, fragile growths that begin in either the mucosal surface of the cervix, or the endocervical canal and protrude through the opening of the cervix.

      Endometrial polyps are typically non-cancerous, growths that protrude from the lining of the uterus.

      Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is an infection of one or more organs that affects the uterus, fallopian tubes, and cervix. PID is, most often, a sexually transmitted disease; however, it sometimes occurs following childbirth, abortion, or other gynecological procedures.

      Cervical cancer is a type of cancer that occurs when cells in the cervix become abnormal, multiply out of control, and damage healthy parts of the body. The human papillomavirus, or HPV, is the cause of over ninety percent of all cervical cancers.

      Endometrial cancer occurs when abnormal cells in the uterus or the endometrium (the lining of the uterus) multiply out of control and damage to the uterus and other organs. While the cause of endometrial cancer is unknown, it is known that women diagnosed with this type of cancer tend are usually over fifty.

      IUDs or intrauterine devices used for contraception are a potential cause of heavy menstrual bleeding or menorrhagia. Women who experience prolonged or heavy periods while using the IUD should have the device removed and choose an alternate method of birth control.

      Bleeding disorders occur when it is hard for a person to stop bleeding. While there are several types of bleeding disorders, the most common type in women is von Willebrand Disease or VWD.

      Source(s):
      http://www.buzzle.com/articles/reasons-f…
      http://womenshealth.about.com/od/abnorma…

  4. QUESTION:
    Does anyone get a period while on Lybrel?
    I have been on Lybrel for 1 month. I have had some breakthrough/spotting bleeding but now I am getting my usual heavy/clotting period. This period is just a bad as it was before the Lybrel. I also know that this is not breakthrough/spotting bleeding. Does anyone know why?

    • ANSWER:
      Every woman's body is different, but I would wait another month before I get too concerned, because with Lybrel this breakthrough bleeding is very common, especially during the first 3 months. Tell your doctor if this bleeding continues past several months or starts to get real heavy. Has he/she rulled out fibroids?

      I know the heavy periods are such a pain. Hang in there and keep bugging your doc if you're not satisfied with how it's working. I ended up having a hysterectomy after years of the heavy 'chunky' type bleeding due to fibroids and it has been wonderful ever since. Best of luck to you.

      (I'm sure you know that Lybrel can cause birth defects, so don't use if you think you are pregnant. Tell your doctor right away if you miss two periods in a row. Also, don't smoke while using it, especially if you are older than 35. Smoking can increase your risk of blood clots, stroke, or heart attack when on birth control pills).

  5. QUESTION:
    Did anyone of you ladies get their period while pregnant?
    If so could you explain was it like your normal one ?
    Or any changes? Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      As several have already said, you don't get a true period when you are pregnant....even if it seems like it- same type of bleeding, same time of the month, etc.

      A period is the shedding of the endometrium of the uterus when there is no implanted egg....what women that have benign bleeding experience during pregnancy have is called dysfunctional uterine bleeding and it's main cause is small, benign fibroids that are not near the site of implantation. Certain hormonal changes in pregnancy can cause these to act up and bleed...simulating what may appear to be a period.
      It's important to let your practitioner know about this if you have it and also to remind her/him after you have the baby that you had bleeding throughout your pregnancy....often they will want to do a hysteroscopy (take a look at your uterus) to make sure it's only benign fibroids and not something more serious.

  6. QUESTION:
    Is it healthy for a women to clot so much when she has her period?
    I am 31 have 3 kids and got my tubes tied after my last child which was there years ago...I didn't have my period for 2 months and just started 2 days ago. I have been bleeding really really bad(so much that I change every half an hour) I have huge clots and am a bit worried. It the weekend so I haven't went to the Dr's.

    • ANSWER:
      I'm sorry you have been dealing with this. How long have you been bleeding like this? I went for about two years but before my hysterectomy at 29 I was going through super plus tampons and a pad in 20 minutes. I also passed clots. The term for heavy bleeding is menorrhagia and it applies to women who go through stuff in an hour or less.

      I didn't have my tubes tied cause after the third baby I just resorted to barrier methods since I was previously diagnosed with endometriosis. I went to my gyn one year and told him about my heavy bleeding but I didn't go into detail. He did say my only options at the time were the depo shot or a hysterectomy. The following year before my visit I was away during the summer and I called about three months before my well woman visit. He was able to give me vicodin for the pain since the Tyelenol #3 wasn't helping as much. I wrote down some things and had questions on paper. I basically handed him the paper of what I went through and listed things such as passing clots, severe pain, bleeding up to two weeks every month, going through supplies in 20 minutes, and so on. He said that he wanted to do an ultrasound and mentioned that my uterus was enlarged to about the size of a 6 week pregnancy size. He thought I had adenomyosis and two fibroids. The ultrasound I had in the office the following week looked as if I did have adenomyosis (endometriosis in the uterine muscle). There really is no cure except a hysterectomy for this. I think you should see your dr. when you are able to. Lots of women have passed huge clots before resorting to a hysterectomy. I'm not saying you will need one as you only listed a couple of months bleeding this way unless it's been longer. You can call your dr. and ask him/her what you need to do and if he/she thinks it's necessary then you can go to an urgent care center or E.R. If you are not dizzy, anemic, or in severe pain he/she may tell you to come in next week. How big are the clots? Mine were the size of grapes with some being the size of a strawberry. I was so sick of bleeding and being inconveinienced for so long. If it only happened a few months and then got better I wouldn't have resorted to a hysterectomy. You may have an underlying cause for this. If it continues after you see your dr. and nothing helps that he gives you then you may want to discuss what kind of options you want. I was put on a certain pill and bled the entire time and got headaches so I stopped it). I had tried different forms of pills to see if it would help and no available thing.

      I've heard of something called uterine artery ablation, Thermachoice for heavy periods, uterine artery embolization, depo shot (which I didn't even want to try), and that was about it.

      You could just be having a weird period this time around especially since you went two months without having one. Maybe your body is playing catch up sort of like when women bleed for a long time after having a baby cause the uterine lining was there to help protect and nourish the baby is not needed anymore after the birth.

      I don't know if it's possible but since you missed your period for two months and just started clotting like this, do you think there may be a chance that you got pregnant even with your tubes tied? It's not common but I've heard of women who have gotten pregnant after their tubes have been tied. If you don't think that is the cause I would just contact your dr. and see what he/she wants you to do. If you feel dizzy or about to pass out don't drive yourself. I hope you feel better. Also don't worry about seeing a dr. while you are bleeding. I had to unfortunately go for my yearly while bleeding cause it wouldn't stop. I did cancel before I had my second child three times for a physical and I was very inconvenienced by it. Finally I just said no I'll keep the appointment so he can see how bad it was. I heard that seeing a dr. while bleeding is the best time a pelvic exam can be done. Some people would say that I was so young to have a hysterectomy but it's now more common for dr's to help women out if they are suffering rather than waiting till they are older. I needed a better quality of life and was so much healthier after my surgery. My dr. never said I was to young for this and if anyone dared to say anything I just said that age doesn't have anything to do with it and it was medically necessary for me to have the surgery. It was one of the best things I did.

      I have seen that Playtex makes all sorts of absorbency from lite, regular, super, super plus, ultra, and with an Always infinity pad overnight that may help. If you are already doing this you may want to try looking up the Instead menstrual cup. I was able to go two hours wearing one when they can usually be worn for up to 12 hours with very little to no risk of TSS. Here's a link for it. http://www.softcup.com/

      Anyway I hope you find some answers. Feel free to email me.

  7. QUESTION:
    Why do you have a break when taking the combined pill but not the POP?
    Ive tried both and know that with the combined pill you have a 7 day break after reach pack but not with the POP. Does anyone know why you have the break with one but not the other?

    • ANSWER:
      The combined birth control pills have 2 hormones: estrogen and progestin (a synthetic version of the naturally-occurring hormone progesterone). Taking the combined oral contraceptive pill continuously is not currently recommended, as the combined pill contain estrogen which stimulate thickening of the lining of the endometrium and this tends to worry doctors, as excessive stimulation from continuous estrogen can lead to cancer.

      The progestin-only contraceptive has only progestin in it. Lacking the estrogen of combined pills, they are not associated with increased risks of DVT or endometrial involvement.

      It is a common myth that menstruation is necessary to shed “toxins” from the body. In fact, the bleeding that women experience while on the birth control pill is not really a true period, but rather what is called a “withdrawal bleed”. This is caused by the body’s withdrawal from the hormones in the active pills during the pill-free week or the week on placebo pills.

      Originally, birth control pills 21 day cycle with 7 days placebo/sugar pills were developed this way to reassure women that we were still having a normal cycle, and that we would still be able to use our “period” as a sign that we were not pregnant. Now, the continuous-use birth control pills (POP) are developed for women who choose not to have periods for a variety of medical or quality of life reasons such as maintaining beast milk production for breastfeeding or preventing pain from endometrosis, fibroids and PID, etc.

      My honest advice would be to discuss this question further with your preferred doctor.

  8. QUESTION:
    My wife is having pain in her stomach since her last period?
    My wife is having pain in her stomach since her last period?
    My wife had an early period last time. When the period ended, a Light pain started in her stomach. The pain is still going on. What could be the reason? It has been 20 days and the pain still exist. She also puke these days.

    • ANSWER:
      Most abdominal pain is linked to common problems such as emotional distress, overeating, or the flu. However, it can also point to more serious illness. The type and location of the pain often gives a clue to its cause.

      In women, abdominal discomfort may signal a problem with the reproductive system. Pelvic pain that occurs each month just before a woman’s period suggests endometriosis. Tenderness in the lower abdominal area may mean pelvic inflammatory disease. For women of childbearing age, an *ectopic pregnancy can produce a sudden sharp, stabbing abdominal pain along with vaginal bleeding, a history of missed or light periods, or pain radiating to the shoulder. Ovarian cysts and uterine fibroids can also cause abdominal pain in women.

      Other conditions that can cause abdominal pain include ulcers,
      irritable bowel syndrome, gallbladder disease, diverticulitis, appendicitis, urinary tract infections, food poisoning, food allergy, hernia, kidney stones, and lactose intolerance.

      *Symptoms of an ectopic pregnancy:

      Ectopic pregnancies are usually discovered when a woman has symptoms at about six or seven weeks, though you may notice symptoms as early as four weeks. In some cases, there are no symptoms and the ectopic is discovered during a first trimester ultrasound.

      Symptoms can vary greatly from person to person, and depending on how far along you are and whether the ectopic pregnancy has ruptured — a true obstetric emergency. To prevent rupture, it's critical to get diagnosed and treated as soon as there's even a hint of a problem, although sometimes rupture occurs without much advance warning. Ectopic pregnancies don't always register on home pregnancy tests, so if you suspect there's a problem, don't wait for a positive pregnancy test to contact your caregiver.

      Call your practitioner immediately if you have any of the following symptoms:

      • Abdominal or pelvic pain or tenderness. It can be sudden, persistent, and severe but may also be mild and intermittent early on. You may feel it only on one side, but the pain can be anywhere in your abdomen or pelvis and is sometimes accompanied by nausea and vomiting.

      • Vaginal spotting or bleeding. If you're not sure you're pregnant yet, you may think you're getting a light period at first. The blood may look red or brown like the color of dried blood, and may be continuous or intermittent, heavy or light.

      • Pain that gets worse when you're active or while moving your bowels or coughing.

      • Shoulder pain. Cramping and bleeding can mean many things, but pain in your shoulder, particularly when you lie down, is a red flag for a ruptured ectopic pregnancy and it's critical to get medical attention immediately. The cause of the pain is internal bleeding, which irritates nerves that go to your shoulder area.

      • If a fallopian tube has ruptured, you may also have signs of shock, such as a weak, racing pulse; pale, clammy skin; and dizziness or fainting. In that case, call 911 without delay.

      Goodluck to you and your wife. I hope it's nothing serious.

  9. QUESTION:
    Can I get pregnant while taking medroxypr?
    My doctor prescribed this to me to help me stop the bleeding. I have been continuously bleeding for 3 months straight which seems to be due to a fibroid.

    • ANSWER:

  10. QUESTION:
    Is it safe for a girl to get pregnant when she is having a fibroid inside her uterus? Help, OB-GYN pls advise?
    My friend consult an Ob-gyn. Her laboratory proved she has fibroid 6.4cm. inside her uterus. She is scared of having operation to remove her fibroid. Wud she still get pregnant while having fibroid? Is it safe? Wud d operation be dangerous? She had been married for almost 2 yrs already.

    • ANSWER:
      yes she can still become pregnant. The fibroid has nothing to do with her ovulating. The only hindrance would be if the fibroid is located at the opening of the cervix thus preventing the sperm from reaching the egg if elsewhere in the uterus yes she can become pregnant. If her OB advising her to remove fibroid I strongly suggest she have it removed. Fibroid cause alot of bleeding I would hate to see her become pregnant just lose the baby from heavy fibroid bleeding. Surgery to remove fibroid is very common and after she would have very little pain and it would make getting pregnant easier, safer and her periods would have less pain and less bleeding. This would be a same day surgery in in the morning out by afternoon, Please reassure your friend that this is a very common women's problem and if left the fibroid will continue to grow.

  11. QUESTION:
    What can cause mulitple periods in one month?
    Im 19 years old and ive had my period since i was 12 and this has never happened before... This month ive had THREE period all with like three to four days between them. Ive tried researching it but nothing so far has helped me. Can someone please tell me what may cause multiple periods monthly? or a link to a medical page that can help me out?

    • ANSWER:
      Hello, I found an article on the internet in regards to irregular periods and their reasons for being late, early, heavy, abnormally long and heavy bleeding. I hope this helps you to answer a few of your questions. Take care.

      Hormonal Imbalance One of the prime reasons for periods to go irregular is hormonal imbalance. In a female's body, in order to produce a period, the body creates hormones such as estrogen and progesterone. Various parts of the body need to send signals to each other in order to trigger menstruation. However, due to hormonal imbalance, many a time, these signals are missed or skipped, thus, resulting in irregular periods.

      Sudden Weight Gain or Loss Have you gained or lost a lot of weight lately? If yes, you've got an answer. When your body works at a constant pace, the hormones learn to process in similar manner. However, the moment you start doing rigorous workout, or eat a lot, your body takes a while to adjust to it. Hence, hormones become imbalanced, and lead to irregularity in periods. However, this is not a tense situation as it happens with every woman who has lost or gained weight quickly.

      Stress Workload? Job issues? Relationship turmoil? Mental dissatisfaction? Reduce your stress, female, for it's affecting the regularity of your periods. Yes, stress contributes to the most common reasons for a late period. With increasing stress, you are affecting the hormonal balance of your body, and hence, not only do your periods become irregular, but they also result in excessive weight gain, and anxiety.

      Polycystic Ovarian Disease So, you aren't pregnant, but you're still worried. Well, if your pregnancy test result came out to be negative, get a check up done, for chances, even though very less, are that you are suffering from Polycystic Ovarian Disease which is caused due to irregular ovulation as a result of hormonal imbalance. With proper treatment, your gynecologist will help you get your periods back to regular. However,

      Medications
      The Mayo Clinic advises that certain medications and result in excess bleeding including anti-coagulants that prevent blood clots and anti-inflammatory medicines. Not only can these medications result in heavy bleeding but they can also prolong your bleeding. If you are improperly taking hormone medication, this can also result in menorrhagia

      Anovulation, Fibroids
      When a woman fails to ovulate, this is called Anovulation. You can have a menstrual period but not ovulate. When this happens, the hormones may become unbalanced, resulting in excess bleeding.

      Cervical polyps are small, fragile growths that begin in either the mucosal surface of the cervix, or the endocervical canal and protrude through the opening of the cervix.

      Endometrial polyps are typically non-cancerous, growths that protrude from the lining of the uterus.

      Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is an infection of one or more organs that affects the uterus, fallopian tubes, and cervix. PID is, most often, a sexually transmitted disease; however, it sometimes occurs following childbirth, abortion, or other gynecological procedures.

      Cervical cancer is a type of cancer that occurs when cells in the cervix become abnormal, multiply out of control, and damage healthy parts of the body. The human papillomavirus, or HPV, is the cause of over ninety percent of all cervical cancers.

      Endometrial cancer occurs when abnormal cells in the uterus or the endometrium (the lining of the uterus) multiply out of control and damage to the uterus and other organs. While the cause of endometrial cancer is unknown, it is known that women diagnosed with this type of cancer tend are usually over fifty.

      IUDs or intrauterine devices used for contraception are a potential cause of heavy menstrual bleeding or menorrhagia. Women who experience prolonged or heavy periods while using the IUD should have the device removed and choose an alternate method of birth control.

      Bleeding disorders occur when it is hard for a person to stop bleeding. While there are several types of bleeding disorders, the most common type in women is von Willebrand Disease or VWD.

      Source(s):
      http://www.buzzle.com/articles/reasons-f…
      http://womenshealth.about.com/od/abnorma…

  12. QUESTION:
    Why are my periods irregular since having intercourse?
    It has been a while since I had sex. I started having sex in September. I didn't get my period so I thought I was pregnant. I took plenty of test all negative. In October my period came on the 10th. In November my period came on the 2. Now I am bleeding again am I having two periods in one month? Ever since I started having sex again my periods have been weird. Has any woman been through this? Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Irregular Periods/ Vaginal disorders
      The main reasons irregular periods are
      1 .Blockage of blood circulation to the lower abdomen area due to lack of physical exercise.
      2. Functioning of the pituitary thyroid glands are not fair.
      3. Fibroid in the uterus and/ or cyst in the ovaries
      4. Poor health condition and / or lack of exercise
      5. Hormonal imbalance due to artificial and hormone added food and medicine
      6. Psychological reasons such as anxiety neurosis stress tension etc.

      Periods during adolescent stage will be generally irregular. It is normal. It may become regular by the age of 18 or 19.
      All bleeding from the vagina are not menstrual bleeding or period. Heavy bleeding or irregular bleeding in between periods should be brought to the attention of a doctor and get treatment soon.
      The span of monthly period may differ ie total days of gap for next period may differ. Sometimes it may go up to 36 or 40 days.

  13. QUESTION:
    Is Endometriosis the same as Uterine fibroids?
    Any and all information on either subject (if they are not the same thing) would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.
    What causes the scaring in endometriosis?

    • ANSWER:
      Here's the deal with endo: you have these little cells in your body called endometrial cells. they're supposed to live in the wall of your uterus. Hormones in your body send signals to these little cells to fill up with blood. If you don't get pregnant that month, hormones send signals to those cells to detach from the wall and start to move downward. Then they release that blood and your period starts. After your period is over, more hormones tell those little cells it's time to go home. Sometimes those cells don't listen and wind up attaching themselves to places they shouldn't be. Lots of people get them on their ovaries, their bowel, etc. There are even documented cases of these little cells in the throat area. Talk about getting lost!
      Well, those little cells, although they're not where they're supposed to be, still receive those signals from the hormones telling them to fill up with blood. Since they're not where they belong, lots of times that means they're pressing up against an organ as they fill with blood - and that hurts like crazy. Then again when they get the signal to release the blood, they do it, and THAT hurts even more. It's sort of like you're bleeding internally. Somehow instead of getting the signal to move around like the other cells do, they stick themselves to their new home. Idk how or why, it just happens.
      The only way to get rid of it is through surgery. Most doctors remove it by burning the cells off, just because they're in a delicate region of your body. However, this menthod isn't quite effective because the burning doesn't always get the entire cell. Little microscopic pieces can be left behind, and they grow back - sometimes in the very next month. If your doctor CUTS out the cells, studies have shown the cells don't come back. However, sometimes it's not possible to cut out all of the cells depending on where they are. It's also not possible to see all of the endometriosis in your body - much of it is microscopic, but that doesn't mean it isn't there & it also doesn't mean it isn't painful.
      Birth control regulates your periods and many times helps with the pain. The biggest benefit is lighter periods because most people with endo tend to have heavy periods. Less flow means less pain. There is a drug called Meclomen, it's an NSAID like Aleve or Advil but it actually helps people with endo by making your periods super light - I barely had one while taking it. You just start taking the pill at the first sign of pain and continue through your period and it does wonders. It's also not habit forming unlike a lot of the narcotics most women with endo have to take.
      I've had endo for probably 10 years now, but it took nearly 5 years to diagnose it because many doctors don't really believe endometriosis really exists - don't ask me why. Since then, I've had surgery twice, and will continue to need regular surgeries to deal with the pain. I keep in close contact with my doctor, letting him know everything I htink might be helpful because endo can cause problems getting pregnant and I want to avoid that as much as possible. Unfortunately, other than that, the only thing doctors can offer us is birth control. Well, they could try Lupron depot, but that basically puts you in a state of menopause for a year or two, but has been shown to cause remission of endo for as long as 5 years. I've opted against that route, because the shots are nearly 0 and need to be taken every 3 months, plus there are chances for unwanted side effects - and I'm not so sure I want that risk either.
      This is pretty much what I know about endo, although I can't really tell you much more about fibroids other than to say they're not the same as endo. I hope this helps!

  14. QUESTION:
    how can uncontrollable uterine bleed lead to death in pregnancy?
    what gets affected?
    how does it happen?
    can it be prevented?

    • ANSWER:
      Many different things can cause abnormal uterine bleeding. Pregnancy is a common cause. Polyps or fibroids (small and large growths) in the uterus can also cause bleeding. Rarely, a thyroid problem, infection of the cervix or cancer of the uterus can cause abnormal uterine bleeding. 


      In most women, abnormal uterine bleeding is caused by a hormone imbalance. When hormones are the problem, doctors call the problem dysfunctional uterine bleeding, or DUB. Abnormal bleeding caused by hormone imbalance is more common in teenagers or in women who are approaching menopause.

      These are just a few of the problems that can cause abnormal uterine bleeding. These problems can occur at any age, but the likely cause of abnormal uterine bleeding usually depends on your age.

      Women in their teens, 20s and 30s

      A common cause of abnormal bleeding in young women and teenagers is pregnancy. Many women have abnormal bleeding in the first few months of a normal pregnancy. Some birth control pills or the intrauterine device can also cause abnormal bleeding.

      Some young women who have abnormal uterine bleeding do not release an egg from their ovaries (called ovulation) during their menstrual cycle. This is common for teenagers who have just started getting their periods. This causes a hormone imbalance where the estrogen in your body makes the lining of your uterus (called the endometrium) grow until it gets too thick. When your body gets rid of this lining during your period, the bleeding will be very heavy. A hormone imbalance may also cause your body not to know when to shed the lining. This can cause irregular bleeding (“spotting”) between your periods.The tests your doctor orders may depend on your age. If you could be pregnant, your doctor may order a pregnancy test. If your bleeding is heavy, in addition to other tests, your doctor may want to check your blood count to make sure you don't have anemia (low iron) from the blood loss.

      An ultrasound exam of your pelvic area shows both the uterus and the ovaries. It may also show the cause of your bleeding.

      Your doctor may want to do an endometrial biopsy. This is a test of the uterine lining. It's done by putting a thin plastic tube (called a catheter) into your uterus. A tiny piece of the uterine lining is taken out and sent to a lab for testing. The test will show if you have cancer or a change in the cells. A biopsy can be done in the doctor's office and causes only mild pain.

      Another test is a hysteroscopy. A thin tube with a tiny camera in it is put into your uterus. The camera lets your doctor see the inside of your uterus. If anything abnormal shows up, your doctor can get a biopsy.A D&C, or dilatation and curettage, is a procedure in which the opening of your cervix is stretched just enough so a surgical tool can be put into your uterus. The tool is used to scrape away the lining of your uterus. The removed lining is checked in a lab for abnormal tissue. A D&C is done under general anesthesia (while you're in a sleep-like state).

      If you're having heavy bleeding, a D&C may be done both to find out the problem and to treat the bleeding. The D&C itself often makes heavy bleeding stop. Your doctor will decide if this procedure is necessary.

      Hysterectomy. This type of surgery removes the uterus. If you have a hysterectomy, you won’t have any more periods and you won’t be able to get pregnant. Hysterectomy is major surgery that requires general anesthesia and a hospital stay. It may require a long recovery period. Talk to your doctor about the risks and benefits of hysterectomy.

      Endometrial ablation is a surgical procedure that destroys the lining of the uterus. Unlike a hysterectomy, it does not remove the uterus. Endometrial ablation may stop all menstrual bleeding in some women. However, some women still have light menstrual bleeding or spotting after endometrial ablation. A few women have regular menstrual periods after the procedure. Women who have endometrial ablation still need to use some form of birth control even though, in most cases, pregnancy is not likely after the procedure.

      Your doctor can do endometrial ablation in several different ways. Newer endometrial ablation techniques do not require general anesthesia or a hospital stay. The recovery time after this procedure is shorter than recovery time after a hysterectomy.

      Good luck !!

  15. QUESTION:
    What is the cause of my cramps?
    Before anyone asks no it is not from my menstrual cycle neither is it because I'm pregnant. I've been getting these cramps since I was about 6 and they happen a couple times a year. It is in the ribcage area, usually on the right side or so I remember. I'm 15 now and these cramps still happen when I'm not even doing anything at all, just watching TV or on the computer etc. I don't know how long they last as I have never really kept track but it is slightly difficult to breathe without pain when I do get them. Does anybody have an idea? They could be normal I guess but I would like to have an idea. Thanks.
    No...I said I was NOT pregnant. Not trying to be rude just making in caps to make what I said earlier clear. I am way too young. I said the cause was neither from my menstrual cycle or pregnancy.
    Another detail, sorry, but as I said above I've been having these cramps since I was 6 so it is impossible for it to be from cramps or pregnancy. I shall see about seeing a doctor.
    ...There was a mistake above when I said impossible to be from cramps I meant menstrual cramps.

    • ANSWER:
      Menstrual cramps are contractions of the uterus. When a female menstruates, special hormones are released. These hormones, called prostaglandins, work to stimulate the muscular contractions necessary for shedding the uterine lining. As prostaglandins trigger menstrual cramps, they also take the heat for the pain that so often accompanies them.

      Though menstrual contractions are not as strong as the contractions experienced during labor and childbirth, they do involve the same muscles. Some women experience menstrual cramps with every menstrual cycle, while others experience them only occasionally. Menstrual cramps can be uncomfortable, ranging in intensity from mildly irritating to debilitating.

      It is important to note that menstrual cramps can occur without pain. Some women experience uterine contractions without noticing or with very little discomfort. Many, however, deal with pain each month, caused by long-lasting and intense contractions. The pain of menstrual cramps is experienced when these powerful contractions cut the blood supply to the uterus, leading to a lack of oxygen to the related muscles. Fortunately, the oxygen deprivation, as well as the pain, is only temporary.

      In some cases, menstrual cramps seem far too intense to be normal. Sometimes, other conditions can exacerbate or mimic menstrual cramping. For example, a condition called endometriosis causes extreme abdominal pain, as well as severe menstrual cramping. Fibroids can also cause painful periods and heavy menstrual bleeding. Likewise, pelvic inflammatory disease can cause intense pain during menstruation.

      In most cases, menstrual cramps are an unfortunate, but normal, part of life for women. Treatment is typically aimed at reducing discomfort. Over-the-counter pain medications are frequently used to neutralize menstrual pain. Massage, heat application, and other home remedies are often used as well. Some women find relief from physical exercise or stretching.

      For a woman who experiences debilitating menstrual cramps, a trip to a doctor is in order. A doctor or other healthcare provider can examine the woman and review her medical history, ruling out potentially serious causes of menstrual pain. If secondary conditions are not discovered, the doctor may be able to prescribe prescription medications for dealing with discomfort or preventing cramps altogether. For example, some women are able to avoid menstrual pain while taking birth control pills. Hormone treatments may be helpful for treating painful menstrual cramps as well.

  16. QUESTION:
    Has anyone had a chemical pregnancy? How long did you bleed for?
    My friend bled for 3 weeks after a miscarriage at 5 weeks. I have just had a chem and i was only registering as pregnant for one day so I am wondering if I am meant to bleed for a while as well? My bleeding seems to have pretty much died down after 2 days

    • ANSWER:
      A chemical pregnancy you don't bleed, it is your period, that is why you are bleeding. A chemical pregnancy is where everything happens but it doesnt implant. Many people miss a period or test a few days before, get a positive and then get their period that day or a few after. I had one 7-8 weeks ago.

      What is a chemical pregnancy?
      A chemical pregnancy is the clinical term used for a very early miscarriage. In many cases, the positive pregnancy test was achieved before the woman's period was due but a miscarrige occured before a heartbeat was able to be seen on an ultrasound.

      With the ultra sensitive pregnancy tests on the market today, it is easier than ever to get a positive result 3 or 4 days before your period is due. It is wonderful for those who NEED to know, but does have it's down side. Early testing shows chemical pregnancies which would not have been detected had the woman waited for her period to arrive.

      Chemical pregnancies are unfortunately very common. 50 to 60% of first pregnancies end in miscarriage very early in pregnancy. Most occur without the woman even knowing that she was pregnant.

      What Causes a Chemical Pregnancy
      Most chemical pregnancies are due to chromosomal problems in the developing fetus. Other possible causes are inadequate uterine lining, uterine abnormalities both congenital or acquired like fibroids, low hormone levels, luteal phase defect or certain infections.
      How can I Prevent Chemical Pregnancies
      Most chemical pregnancies can not be prevented. If you have recurring chemical pregnancies, your doctor should be able to investigate and help you formulate a treatment which is best for you. Potential treatments include vitamin B6 (at least 50mg a day), progesterone cream, and baby asprin. Be sure to discuss potential treatments with your doctor.

      If infection is the cause, antibiotics prescribed by your Doctor can help.

  17. QUESTION:
    I have been bleeding for about 45 days what can I do to stop the bleeding other than birth control pills?

    I've had my period for 45 days, and I've been to my school clinic twice and they just gave me birth control pills. When I told them I'm still bleeding after three weeks they told me to just keep taking the pills.
    Of course I've been to the doctor, I'm not stupid.

    • ANSWER:
      Firstly, you should have gone to the doctor by now, because this could be serious and he needs to diagnose you with something.
      Here is some information and please be sure to contact your doctor as soon as possible! Good luck!

      Common Causes:
      *cervical or endometrial polyps
      *lupus
      *pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)
      *cervical cancer
      *endometrial cancer.

      Women using intrauterine devices (IUDs) for birth control, may also experience excessive or prolonged periods. If you experience menorrhagia while using an IUD, the IUD should be removed and replaced with an alternative birth control method.

      Usually detected soon after menstruation begins, platelet disorders are the most common blood disorder which causes excessive bleeding; the most common platelet disorder is von Willebrand's disease. Women with von Willebrand's disease commonly will experience not only heavy menstrual bleeding, but nosebleeds, easy bruising, and blood in the stool.

      A pelvic exam is the first step to determine the cause of menorrhagia, including a Pap smear and lab tests to check for any underlying causes, as well as a pregnancy test when appropriate. An ultrasound is often performed to check for any abnormalities, such as fibroids and an endometrial biopsy, D&C, or hysteroscopy may also be performed to further evaluate the condition of your uterus.
      Treatment of Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

      Relief from abnormal uterine bleeding or menorrhagia is usually found by treating the either medical or physical (as in the case of an IUD) cause. Abnormal bleeding which does not appear to be related to another underlying disease or condition is often successfully treated with progesterone or a combination of progesterone with estrogen, many times given in the form of an oral contraceptive.

      Women who experience menorrhagia on a regular basis should be monitored closely for anemia and treatment with iron supplementation may be necessary.

      Often, severe bleeding is treated with non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen and naproxen. These drugs sometimes help reduce bleeding, as well as menstrual cramps.

      Endometrial ablation, once commonly used to treat excessive bleeding in women past child bearing who wanted to avoid hysterectomy, has now been replaced by a new therapy called thermal balloon ablation. In most cases, thermal ballon ablation ends bleeding by destroying the lining of the uterus. Only women no longer desiring to bear children are treated in this manner because this treatment usually results in infertility. However, this procedure does not guarantee infertility and women who do not desire children should continue using their preferred birth control method.

      Unless you're pregnant when you experience abnormal uterine bleeding, a single episode of heavy menstrual bleeding usually does not require treatment. The exception to this, however, is when excessive uterine bleeding continues for over 24 hours women should contact their gynecologists.

      Contact your gynecologist any time you're unsure about any reproductive health symptom you experience.

  18. QUESTION:
    Has anyone had placenta previa-if so what did the doctor tell you your chances were of having it again?

    Thanks MIchelle for your thoughtful answer. I actually had this with my son, he was born at 33 weeks, so I know the horrors that you go through. I was wondering if you went on to having any more children, and if so did those pregnanies involve placenta previa as well?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi - were you recently diagnosed with a previa? If so, was it marginal or a complete? The good news is most previas resolve by the time of delivery. It's important to get regular ultrasounds to determine the location of the placenta. As far a However, my circumstances were a little different. I had a complete placenta previa diangosed at 20 weeks. At 28 weeks I had a small bleed (kinda scary) it's where you have a sudden gush of bright red blood but no pain. They put me on bed rest and pelvic rest, no sex and no internal vaginal exams. Unfortunately, I had 2 more bleeds and at 31 weeks I had to have an emergency C-section. My son was born last year at 3lbs and spent 37 days in the NICU. He is a happy healthy one year old now. While most previas do resolve later on in pregnancy some do NOT. I just get angry when I see that doctors minimize the risks and yet I ended up watching my baby fight for his life..I had no idea it could be serious.
      Take care.

      Here are some risk factors for placenta previa

      Most women who develop placenta previa have no apparent risk factors. But if any of the following apply to you, you're more likely to have this complication:
      • You had placenta previa in a previous pregnancy.

      • You're pregnant with twins or higher-order multiples.

      • You've had c-sections before. (The more c-sections you've had, the higher the risk.)

      • You've had some other uterine surgery (such as a D&C or fibroid removal).

      • You're a cigarette smoker.

      • You use cocaine.

      Also, the more babies you've had and the older you are, the higher your risk

  19. QUESTION:
    Is it normal to have 4 periods a year when I'm 19 and not on birth control? Should I see a doctor?
    I started today (April 27th) and my last period was Jan. 25th. I'm 19 and not on birth control.

    • ANSWER:
      Hello Daphne, Many women experience months of missed periods. There were a few times I had to take a pill that jump started them again. I don't feel anything is wrong but I found an article on the internet in regards to irregular periods and their reasons for being late, early, heavy, abnormally long and heavy bleeding. I hope this helps you to answer a few of your questions. Take care.

      Hormonal Imbalance One of the prime reasons for periods to go irregular is hormonal imbalance. In a female's body, in order to produce a period, the body creates hormones such as estrogen and progesterone. Various parts of the body need to send signals to each other in order to trigger menstruation. However, due to hormonal imbalance, many a time, these signals are missed or skipped, thus, resulting in irregular periods.

      Sudden Weight Gain or Loss Have you gained or lost a lot of weight lately? If yes, you've got an answer. When your body works at a constant pace, the hormones learn to process in similar manner. However, the moment you start doing rigorous workout, or eat a lot, your body takes a while to adjust to it. Hence, hormones become imbalanced, and lead to irregularity in periods. However, this is not a tense situation as it happens with every woman who has lost or gained weight quickly.

      Stress Workload? Job issues? Relationship turmoil? Mental dissatisfaction? Reduce your stress, female, for it's affecting the regularity of your periods. Yes, stress contributes to the most common reasons for a late period. With increasing stress, you are affecting the hormonal balance of your body, and hence, not only do your periods become irregular, but they also result in excessive weight gain, and anxiety.

      Polycystic Ovarian Disease So, you aren't pregnant, but you're still worried. Well, if your pregnancy test result came out to be negative, get a check up done, for chances, even though very less, are that you are suffering from Polycystic Ovarian Disease which is caused due to irregular ovulation as a result of hormonal imbalance. With proper treatment, your gynecologist will help you get your periods back to regular. However,

      Medications
      The Mayo Clinic advises that certain medications and result in excess bleeding including anti-coagulants that prevent blood clots and anti-inflammatory medicines. Not only can these medications result in heavy bleeding but they can also prolong your bleeding. If you are improperly taking hormone medication, this can also result in menorrhagia

      Anovulation, Fibroids
      When a woman fails to ovulate, this is called Anovulation. You can have a menstrual period but not ovulate. When this happens, the hormones may become unbalanced, resulting in excess bleeding.

      Cervical polyps are small, fragile growths that begin in either the mucosal surface of the cervix, or the endocervical canal and protrude through the opening of the cervix.

      Endometrial polyps are typically non-cancerous, growths that protrude from the lining of the uterus.

      Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is an infection of one or more organs that affects the uterus, fallopian tubes, and cervix. PID is, most often, a sexually transmitted disease; however, it sometimes occurs following childbirth, abortion, or other gynecological procedures.

      Cervical cancer is a type of cancer that occurs when cells in the cervix become abnormal, multiply out of control, and damage healthy parts of the body. The human papillomavirus, or HPV, is the cause of over ninety percent of all cervical cancers.

      Endometrial cancer occurs when abnormal cells in the uterus or the endometrium (the lining of the uterus) multiply out of control and damage to the uterus and other organs. While the cause of endometrial cancer is unknown, it is known that women diagnosed with this type of cancer tend are usually over fifty.

      IUDs or intrauterine devices used for contraception are a potential cause of heavy menstrual bleeding or menorrhagia. Women who experience prolonged or heavy periods while using the IUD should have the device removed and choose an alternate method of birth control.

      Bleeding disorders occur when it is hard for a person to stop bleeding. While there are several types of bleeding disorders, the most common type in women is von Willebrand Disease or VWD.

      Source(s):
      http://www.buzzle.com/articles/reasons-f…
      http://womenshealth.about.com/od/abnorma…

  20. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know if there is a treatment for a tumor in the fibroid while 13 weeks pregnant? ?
    Re: cervical growth. Is there a way to slow this growth down besides removal ?

    • ANSWER:
      It is extremely rare that uterine fibroid tumors are cancerous.. But during pregnancy, fibroid tumors often grow extremely fast due the extra estrogen produced by the body during pregnancy.The baby is rarely affected unless there is substantial bleeding or the myoma's growth or separation causes placental abruption or tearing// removing the tumor AFTER the baby is born is the best way to do it.. if u have any other problems like bleeding and severe abdominal pain you should see your doctor right away!!!

  21. QUESTION:
    What causes abnormal vaginal bleeding?
    My friend stop taking the pill after her last cycle (June 8th). On June 13th she said that she and her boyfriend had unprotected sex. Although he did the pull out method, she did have some bleeding afterwards. Now she is spotting. Could she be pregnant or is she trying to get her cycle again since coming off the pill.

    • ANSWER:
      She is not pregnant. She is just trying to get her cycle back on track. It takes a while to get pregnant after you get off of any kind of birth control.I know, It happen to me. Sometimes what cause abnormal vaginal bleeding is fibroid. If there was any pain while they had sex or after, that is one of the signs of a fibroid. See just needs to go to OBGYN clinic just to make sure.

  22. QUESTION:
    Why is my period longer and heavier?
    Last year at this time my period was about 6 days, and then when the summer came it was for about 4 days and much lighter. Could it be because i was swimming everyday? And then when the winter came it got longer and heavier, not it's 6 almost 7 days and heavier, could it be because of inactivity and because i gained about 2-3 pounds during winter?
    What can i do to make them a little bit shorter and lighter?

    • ANSWER:
      Hello, I found an article on the internet in regards to irregular periods and their reasons for being late, early, heavy, abnormally long and heavy bleeding. I hope this helps you to answer a few of your questions. Take care.

      Hormonal Imbalance One of the prime reasons for periods to go irregular is hormonal imbalance. In a female's body, in order to produce a period, the body creates hormones such as estrogen and progesterone. Various parts of the body need to send signals to each other in order to trigger menstruation. However, due to hormonal imbalance, many a time, these signals are missed or skipped, thus, resulting in irregular periods.

      Sudden Weight Gain or Loss Have you gained or lost a lot of weight lately? If yes, you've got an answer. When your body works at a constant pace, the hormones learn to process in similar manner. However, the moment you start doing rigorous workout, or eat a lot, your body takes a while to adjust to it. Hence, hormones become imbalanced, and lead to irregularity in periods. However, this is not a tense situation as it happens with every woman who has lost or gained weight quickly.

      Stress Workload? Job issues? Relationship turmoil? Mental dissatisfaction? Reduce your stress, female, for it's affecting the regularity of your periods. Yes, stress contributes to the most common reasons for a late period. With increasing stress, you are affecting the hormonal balance of your body, and hence, not only do your periods become irregular, but they also result in excessive weight gain, and anxiety.

      Polycystic Ovarian Disease So, you aren't pregnant, but you're still worried. Well, if your pregnancy test result came out to be negative, get a check up done, for chances, even though very less, are that you are suffering from Polycystic Ovarian Disease which is caused due to irregular ovulation as a result of hormonal imbalance. With proper treatment, your gynecologist will help you get your periods back to regular. However,

      Medications
      The Mayo Clinic advises that certain medications and result in excess bleeding including anti-coagulants that prevent blood clots and anti-inflammatory medicines. Not only can these medications result in heavy bleeding but they can also prolong your bleeding. If you are improperly taking hormone medication, this can also result in menorrhagia

      Anovulation, Fibroids
      When a woman fails to ovulate, this is called Anovulation. You can have a menstrual period but not ovulate. When this happens, the hormones may become unbalanced, resulting in excess bleeding.

      Cervical polyps are small, fragile growths that begin in either the mucosal surface of the cervix, or the endocervical canal and protrude through the opening of the cervix.

      Endometrial polyps are typically non-cancerous, growths that protrude from the lining of the uterus.

      Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is an infection of one or more organs that affects the uterus, fallopian tubes, and cervix. PID is, most often, a sexually transmitted disease; however, it sometimes occurs following childbirth, abortion, or other gynecological procedures.

      Cervical cancer is a type of cancer that occurs when cells in the cervix become abnormal, multiply out of control, and damage healthy parts of the body. The human papillomavirus, or HPV, is the cause of over ninety percent of all cervical cancers.

      Endometrial cancer occurs when abnormal cells in the uterus or the endometrium (the lining of the uterus) multiply out of control and damage to the uterus and other organs. While the cause of endometrial cancer is unknown, it is known that women diagnosed with this type of cancer tend are usually over fifty.

      IUDs or intrauterine devices used for contraception are a potential cause of heavy menstrual bleeding or menorrhagia. Women who experience prolonged or heavy periods while using the IUD should have the device removed and choose an alternate method of birth control.

      Bleeding disorders occur when it is hard for a person to stop bleeding. While there are several types of bleeding disorders, the most common type in women is von Willebrand Disease or VWD.

      Source(s):
      http://www.buzzle.com/articles/reasons-f…
      http://womenshealth.about.com/od/abnorma…

  23. QUESTION:
    why is my period late and am not pregnant?
    i have not yet seen my period for two months and am not pregnant in any way,what meant be the cause.

    • ANSWER:
      Hello, sorry to read about your health issues, I know that irregular periods are a huge hassle. I found and article on the internet regarding reasons for irregular periods. I hope this information can help you with a few questions. Take care.

      Reasons for an Abnormal Menstrual Cycle

      Hormonal Imbalance One of the prime reasons for periods to go irregular is hormonal imbalance. In a female's body, in order to produce a period, the body creates hormones such as estrogen and progesterone. Various parts of the body need to send signals to each other in order to trigger menstruation.

      Pregnancy Well, to a certain extent, pregnancy could also be one of the most significant reasons behind an irregular menstrual cycle after marriage. If at all you're a sexually active female, you must be using contraceptives to prevent pregnancy. However, it is recommended you get a checkup done, for chances are, the contraceptive might have failed, and you could experience a late period on birth control.

      Medications
      The Mayo Clinic advises that certain medications and result in excess bleeding including anti-coagulants that prevent blood clots and anti-inflammatory medicines. Not only can these medications result in heavy bleeding but they can also prolong your bleeding. If you are improperly taking hormone medication, this can also result in menorrhagia.

      Sudden Weight Gain or Loss Have you gained or lost a lot of weight lately? If yes, you've got an answer. When your body works at a constant pace, the hormones learn to process in similar manner. However, the moment you start doing rigorous workout, or eat a lot, your body takes a while to adjust to it. Hence, hormones become imbalanced, and lead to irregularity in periods.

      Stress Workload? Job issues? Relationship turmoil? Mental dissatisfaction? Reduce your stress, female, for it's affecting the regularity of your periods. Yes, stress contributes to the most common reasons for a late period. With increasing stress, you are affecting the hormonal balance of your body, and hence, not only do your periods become irregular, but they also result in excessive weight gain, and anxiety.

      Polycystic Ovarian Disease So, you aren't pregnant, but you're still worried. Well, if your pregnancy test result came out to be negative, get a checkup done, for chances, even though very less, are that you are suffering from Polycystic Ovarian Disease which is caused due to irregular ovulation as a result of hormonal imbalance. With proper treatment, your gynecologist will help you get your periods back to regular.

      Anovulation, Fibroids
      When a woman fails to ovulate, this is called Anovulation. You can have a menstrual period but not ovulate. When this happens, the hormones may become unbalanced, resulting in excess bleeding.

      IUD, Adenomyosis
      One of the frequently documented side effects of using a non-hormonal IUD (intrauterine device) as a mean of birth control if Menorrhagia, according to the Mayo Clinic. If you believe an IUD is the cause your excess bleeding perhaps you should switch to a different form of birth control.

      Source(s):
      http://www.buzzle.com/articles/reasons-f…
      Read more: Reasons for Heavy Menstrual Bleeding | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/about_5369333_reason…

  24. QUESTION:
    im pregnant and been having really bad stomach pains is that bad?
    im 8 weeks pregnant and have been having really bad nightsickness and pains....is there something i can do about this

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Faith,
      Is this your first pregnancy? we'll based on my experienced, me too had that abdominal pain but that not that bad, especially during my first pregnancy. i just always try not to expose much myself, i mean my tummy not to expose much. i always wear clothes that covered my tummy because usually if you are pregnant you have a delicate part around your tummy and your belly button. so if you are wearing clothes that is expose your tummy there is a tendency that plenty wind would go inside around your belly button and that's why you have a severe pain in the stomach. but if the pain is somewhere in the lower part or upper part of the abdominal, please don't neglect it, go and see your doctor asap. because it could be something else. hope this help.

      just read this article for your info.

      Is it normal to have some abdominal pain during pregnancy?

      Occasional abdominal discomfort is a common pregnancy complaint, and while it may be harmless, it can also be a sign of a serious problem. (Severe or persistent abdominal pain should never be ignored.)

      Below we'll describe the most common causes of abdominal pain and discomfort during pregnancy, but don't try to diagnose yourself. If you experience abdominal pain or cramping along with spotting, bleeding, fever, chills, vaginal discharge, faintness, discomfort while urinating, or nausea and vomiting, or if the pain doesn't subside after several minutes of rest, call your practitioner.
      What serious problems can cause abdominal pain during pregnancy?

      Ectopic pregnancy
      An ectopic pregnancy occurs when a fertilized egg implants outside the uterus, typically in one of the fallopian tubes. It may cause some cramping and other symptoms in early pregnancy.

      If left untreated, an ectopic pregnancy can be life-threatening. Call your practitioner immediately if you have any of the following symptoms: abdominal or pelvic pain or tenderness, vaginal spotting or bleeding (can be red or brown, copious or scant, continuous or intermittent), pain that gets worse during physical activity or while moving your bowels or coughing, or pain in your shoulder.

      Other causes
      Many other conditions can cause abdominal pain, whether you're pregnant or not. Some of the most common causes of abdominal pain that your practitioner will consider are a stomach virus, food poisoning, appendicitis, kidney stones, hepatitis, gallbladder disease, pancreatitis, fibroids, and bowel obstruction.

      Both gallbladder disease and pancreatitis are often a result of gallstones, which are more common during pregnancy. Fibroids may grow during pregnancy and cause discomfort. And the pressure of the growing uterus on previously scarred intestinal tissue may cause bowel obstruction, which is most likely to occur in the third trimester.

  25. QUESTION:
    Can your period be regulated by stress?
    I started my freshman year in college this August. My first semester was August 25th to December 15th and between that time I only had two periods. More recently my periods are regular, which excites me because I've never really had regularity. I'm not anemic, because I donate blood (you can't if you're anemic). I've always thought stress effected me physically, so I'm just wondering has anyone else out there had a similar experience?

    • ANSWER:
      I found and article on the internet regarding reasons for irregular periods. I hope this information can help you with a few questions. Take care.

      Reasons for an Abnormal Menstrual Cycle

      Hormonal Imbalance One of the prime reasons for periods to go irregular is hormonal imbalance. In a female's body, in order to produce a period, the body creates hormones such as estrogen and progesterone. Various parts of the body need to send signals to each other in order to trigger menstruation.

      Pregnancy Well, to a certain extent, pregnancy could also be one of the most significant reasons behind an irregular menstrual cycle after marriage. If at all you're a sexually active female, you must be using contraceptives to prevent pregnancy. However, it is recommended you get a checkup done, for chances are, the contraceptive might have failed, and you could experience a late period on birth control.

      Medications
      The Mayo Clinic advises that certain medications and result in excess bleeding including anti-coagulants that prevent blood clots and anti-inflammatory medicines. Not only can these medications result in heavy bleeding but they can also prolong your bleeding. If you are improperly taking hormone medication, this can also result in menorrhagia.

      Sudden Weight Gain or Loss Have you gained or lost a lot of weight lately? If yes, you've got an answer. When your body works at a constant pace, the hormones learn to process in similar manner. However, the moment you start doing rigorous workout, or eat a lot, your body takes a while to adjust to it. Hence, hormones become imbalanced, and lead to irregularity in periods.

      Stress Workload? Job issues? Relationship turmoil? Mental dissatisfaction? Reduce your stress, female, for it's affecting the regularity of your periods. Yes, stress contributes to the most common reasons for a late period. With increasing stress, you are affecting the hormonal balance of your body, and hence, not only do your periods become irregular, but they also result in excessive weight gain, and anxiety.

      Polycystic Ovarian Disease So, you aren't pregnant, but you're still worried. Well, if your pregnancy test result came out to be negative, get a checkup done, for chances, even though very less, are that you are suffering from Polycystic Ovarian Disease which is caused due to irregular ovulation as a result of hormonal imbalance. With proper treatment, your gynecologist will help you get your periods back to regular.

      Anovulation, Fibroids
      When a woman fails to ovulate, this is called Anovulation. You can have a menstrual period but not ovulate. When this happens, the hormones may become unbalanced, resulting in excess bleeding.

      IUD, Adenomyosis
      One of the frequently documented side effects of using a non-hormonal IUD (intrauterine device) as a mean of birth control if Menorrhagia, according to the Mayo Clinic. If you believe an IUD is the cause your excess bleeding perhaps you should switch to a different form of birth control.

      Source(s):
      http://www.buzzle.com/articles/reasons-f…
      Read more: Reasons for Heavy Menstrual Bleeding | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/about_5369333_reason…

  26. QUESTION:
    irregular period mid cycle with black blood?
    My cycle is usually pretty regular, every 28-32 days but this month my period was a little late and then yesterday at day 16 I got another period but with very dark red/brown, almost black blood. I don't have any pain but it is flowing like a real period not just spotting. Has anyone had something similar? I'm worried it could be a cyst, polyp or something else. Any ideas?

    • ANSWER:
      Hello, I found an article on the internet in regards to irregular periods and their reasons for being late, early, heavy, abnormally long and heavy bleeding. I hope this helps you to answer a few of your questions. Take care.

      Hormonal Imbalance One of the prime reasons for periods to go irregular is hormonal imbalance. In a female's body, in order to produce a period, the body creates hormones such as estrogen and progesterone. Various parts of the body need to send signals to each other in order to trigger menstruation. However, due to hormonal imbalance, many a time, these signals are missed or skipped, thus, resulting in irregular periods.

      Sudden Weight Gain or Loss Have you gained or lost a lot of weight lately? If yes, you've got an answer. When your body works at a constant pace, the hormones learn to process in similar manner. However, the moment you start doing rigorous workout, or eat a lot, your body takes a while to adjust to it. Hence, hormones become imbalanced, and lead to irregularity in periods. However, this is not a tense situation as it happens with every woman who has lost or gained weight quickly.

      Stress Workload? Job issues? Relationship turmoil? Mental dissatisfaction? Reduce your stress, female, for it's affecting the regularity of your periods. Yes, stress contributes to the most common reasons for a late period. With increasing stress, you are affecting the hormonal balance of your body, and hence, not only do your periods become irregular, but they also result in excessive weight gain, and anxiety.

      Polycystic Ovarian Disease So, you aren't pregnant, but you're still worried. Well, if your pregnancy test result came out to be negative, get a check up done, for chances, even though very less, are that you are suffering from Polycystic Ovarian Disease which is caused due to irregular ovulation as a result of hormonal imbalance. With proper treatment, your gynecologist will help you get your periods back to regular. However,

      Medications
      The Mayo Clinic advises that certain medications and result in excess bleeding including anti-coagulants that prevent blood clots and anti-inflammatory medicines. Not only can these medications result in heavy bleeding but they can also prolong your bleeding. If you are improperly taking hormone medication, this can also result in menorrhagia

      Anovulation, Fibroids
      When a woman fails to ovulate, this is called Anovulation. You can have a menstrual period but not ovulate. When this happens, the hormones may become unbalanced, resulting in excess bleeding.

      Cervical polyps are small, fragile growths that begin in either the mucosal surface of the cervix, or the endocervical canal and protrude through the opening of the cervix.

      Endometrial polyps are typically non-cancerous, growths that protrude from the lining of the uterus.

      Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is an infection of one or more organs that affects the uterus, fallopian tubes, and cervix. PID is, most often, a sexually transmitted disease; however, it sometimes occurs following childbirth, abortion, or other gynecological procedures.

      Cervical cancer is a type of cancer that occurs when cells in the cervix become abnormal, multiply out of control, and damage healthy parts of the body. The human papillomavirus, or HPV, is the cause of over ninety percent of all cervical cancers.

      Endometrial cancer occurs when abnormal cells in the uterus or the endometrium (the lining of the uterus) multiply out of control and damage to the uterus and other organs. While the cause of endometrial cancer is unknown, it is known that women diagnosed with this type of cancer tend are usually over fifty.

      IUDs or intrauterine devices used for contraception are a potential cause of heavy menstrual bleeding or menorrhagia. Women who experience prolonged or heavy periods while using the IUD should have the device removed and choose an alternate method of birth control.

      Bleeding disorders occur when it is hard for a person to stop bleeding. While there are several types of bleeding disorders, the most common type in women is von Willebrand Disease or VWD.

      Source(s):
      http://www.buzzle.com/articles/reasons-f…
      http://womenshealth.about.com/od/abnorma…

  27. QUESTION:
    Pregnant with Fibroids in my uterine wall?
    Has anyone been in the same situation as I am right now - I'm 7 weeks pregant and I have fibroid tumors inside my uterus - Please someone tell me if they have been in the same boat as me and if every thing turned out ok? Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      My friend had a 3cm fibroid while she was pregnant. She had a lot of complications, lots of visits to the ER, lots of OB appointments and lots of bleeding came with it too. She has a beautiful 2yo now. Everything went fine, however every time she felt like something was wrong she would not hesitate, she would just go to the ER and labor and delivery later on into the pregnancy. Her baby was born 3 weeks early, he was 5lb and some oz, I don't remember how many oz but, even when he was a preemie, he was eating on his own and everything was just fine and they left them take the baby home. She always took care of herself pretty good, ate well and healthy, after 3 months of pregnancy her fibroid stopped growing. See that is what your doctor will do, make sure they don't grow, because if they do, they will take the blood that should be going to your baby and that is not good. But you make sure your doctor keep an eye on you and monitor you constantly.

  28. QUESTION:
    If you keep bleeding after your period ends, can that cause death?
    My mother said her period was supposed to end a week ago, but she's still bleeding. She went to the hospital and the doctor gave her a prescription for some medicine (what it is, I don't know). My mom told me that the doctor said if she keeps bleeding, she could die. Can that really happen and if it can, what's the chances of it?
    My mother is 38 years old. Could she have been pregnant? Maybe, but I really wouldn't know.

    And I would love to help my mom, but I can't. I don't live with her anymore (I'm 16).

    • ANSWER:
      Hi - bleeding to the point of death is called exsanguination. Bleeding copiously from the womb COULD cause death, but it is unlikely in your mother's case as she has seen her doctor and he is aware of her situation now.

      What your mom needs to do now is to find out WHY she is bleeding so much, and to speak with the doctor in order to find that out, and arrange permanent steps to get it stopped. I expect she will do this.

      When people bleed a lot, they lose iron from their blood. Your mom will need to take care of her diet for a while. Iron-rich foods include roast beef, baked beans, boiled eggs, spring greens, canned sardines, fortified breakfast cereal and cashew nuts. Mom will also need a glass of fresh fruit juice in order to process the iron properly.

      Try not to worry too much, my own mother was JUST like this, too. She had a lot of fibroids (non-malignant growths) in her womb, and she bled constantly and copiously. In the end, she had to have a hysterectomy, although nowadays there is much that the medical profession can do before they do that; I'm sure she will be fine.

      Good luck to you both.
      ----------------
      re your update: yes, she could have been pregnant, and this bleeding was down to a miscarriage. Equally, she could have had an abortion. At 38, she would normally still be fertile. However, it could equally be down to hormonal problems that caused extensive bleeding, or fibroids as I mentioned.

      Sorry you don't live with your mom; maybe you could send her a text or email advising her on what foods to eat to keep her blood healthy?

      All the best.

  29. QUESTION:
    ive had brown discharge every once in a while?
    i havent had my period since july but lately ive been getting brown discharge every once in a while. And then the other day when my boyfriend and i were having sex, if bled alot like i started, butthe mext day i wasnt bleeding. This was not the first time ive had sex either. I went to the doctor and im not pregnant. is this normal, bleeding during sex???

    • ANSWER:
      Bleeding during or after sex is not considered normal and therefore should be evaluated at all times. The only time bleeding during or after sex is considered normal in some cases is if you are having sexual intercourse for the first time.

      Some causes of vaginal bleeding after sex, such as vaginal dryness after menopause or in some cases by the use of certain types of birth control pills are not serious and may be easily treated.

      However, in some cases, vaginal bleeding after sex can be a sign of a serious underlying problem, including:

      * Inflammation of the cervix (cervicitis).
      * Sexually transmitted diseases, such as chlamydia or gonorrhea.
      * Cervical polyps.
      * Cervical ectropion, a condition in which the cervical tissue is more susceptible to abrasion.
      * Endometriosis or ovarian cysts.
      * Pelvic inflammatory disease.
      * Uterine fibroids.
      * Cancer of the cervix, uterus or vagina.

      If you continue to experience bleeding during or after sex, I would recommend that you consult with your doctor/gynaecologist to see what they think could be causing this.

      Good luck :)

  30. QUESTION:
    No offence pls, serious answers, I had my period on the 1st of august and was supposed to have andother on?
    the 27 but still nothing,,but feel pain in one side of my abdomen the pains comes on and off,.
    I am as well trying to conceive
    I am some time 26 or 28 days circle

    • ANSWER:
      you aren't even late yet. give your self a window of about 4 days or count from the last day of your last period. It isn't all that scientific some people have a cycle a little longer than others. mine is 30 days. and it used to be more than that when I was young. it will also fluctuate with how much you exercise and I am not sure if it's scientifically proven or not but I know that when women spend alot of time with other women they tend to all adjust towards having their periods at the same or similar time. stressing over it can also make it late.
      Pregnancy isn't painful itself but the constipation was awfully painful for me nearly from the beginning....

      Now to the pain in your abdomen, if it is intense see a doctor or go to an emergency room, and if you have a fever over 101 see or call a doctor. These can be appendisitis symptoms or gall bladder symptoms.
      Don't panic about the late period unless you have a reason to. and I wouldn't even count it as late for about a week after the expected date.
      Here is info on ectopic pregnacies:What is an ectopic pregnancy?
      If a fertilized egg implants outside the uterus, it's called an ectopic pregnancy. One in 50 pregnancies ends this way.

      Here's how it happens: After conception, the fertilized egg travels down your fallopian tube on its way to your uterus. If the tube is damaged or blocked and fails to propel the egg toward your womb, the egg may become implanted in the tube and continue to develop there. Because almost all ectopic pregnancies occur in one of the fallopian tubes, they're often called "tubal" pregnancies.

      Much less often, an egg implants in an ovary, in the cervix, directly in the abdomen, or even in a c-section scar. In rare cases, a woman has a normal pregnancy in her uterus and an ectopic pregnancy at the same time. This is called a heterotopic pregnancy and it's more likely to happen if you've had fertility treatments, such as in-vitro fertilization.

      There's no way to transplant an ectopic (literally, "out of place") pregnancy into your uterus, so ending the pregnancy is the only option. In fact, if an ectopic pregnancy isn't recognized and treated, the embryo will grow until the fallopian tube ruptures, resulting in severe abdominal pain and bleeding. It can cause permanent damage to the tube or loss of the tube, and if it involves very heavy internal bleeding that's not treated promptly, it can even lead to death. Fortunately, the vast majority of ectopic pregnancies are caught in time. How can I tell if I'm at risk for an ectopic pregnancy?
      An ectopic pregnancy can happen to any sexually active woman, but certain women are more at risk than others. Your odds of having an ectopic pregnancy are higher if:
      • You get pregnant despite having had a tubal ligation (surgical sterilization).

      • You've had surgery on your fallopian tubes to correct a problem or to reverse a tubal ligation. (Your risk is also higher, though to a much smaller degree, if you've had other pelvic or abdominal surgery, such as the removal of an ovarian cyst or fibroids, an appendectomy, or a cesarean section.)

      • You had a previous ectopic pregnancy.

      • Your mother took the drug DES while pregnant with you.

      • You have an intrauterine device (IUD) in place when you get pregnant. Although IUDs are close to 99 percent effective at preventing pregnancy, if you do get pregnant while using one, it's more likely that the pregnancy will be ectopic. An IUD doesn't cause an ectopic pregnancy, it's just better at preventing an egg from implanting in your uterus than outside it. (Having used an IUD in the past won't raise your risk for ectopic pregnancy.)

      • You're taking progestin-only hormonal contraceptives when you get pregnant. As with an IUD, taking these pills doesn't increase your risk for an ectopic pregnancy, but if you do get pregnant while taking them, the likelihood that it will be ectopic is higher than usual.

      • Your tubes were damaged by an infection in your upper reproductive tract (this is called pelvic inflammatory disease or PID). PID is often caused by untreated sexually transmitted infections (STIs) such as gonorrhea or chlamydia. It sometimes has no symptoms, so having had either of these STIs also increases your risk for an ectopic, even if you don't think you've had PID.

      • You're being evaluated or treated for infertility. Infertility is often caused by damaged tubes, and if you get pregnant while being treated for infertility, there's a higher than average chance that the pregnancy will be ectopic.

      Older women also have higher rates of ectopic pregnancy. And a few studies suggest you may also have a slightly increased risk for ectopic pregnancy if you smoke cigarettes or douche regularly.

      Goodluck.

  31. QUESTION:
    why have my periods been so close together lately?
    ive been having them every 2 weeks the last 2 months. im 23 and have had a baby and am not on any birth control (if any of those factors make a difference) what could be causing this??????

    • ANSWER:
      The menstrual cycle is a very sensitive thing and can become irregular for a number of reasons. Irregular periods aren’t unusual as they affect about 30% of women in their reproductive years.

      An irregular period is any type of bleeding that is abnormal when compared to your usual menstrual cycle. This can include a late period, an early period or bleeding between periods. It can also appear as particularly heavy bleeding (menorrhagia) or scanty bleeding. Many women also experience irregular periods in the form of a missed period, continuous periods, or periods that occur twice in one cycle.

      Irregular menstrual periods are usually the result of hormonal signals that have been thrown out of sync. In order to produce a period, your body makes hormones, like estrogen and progesterone. These hormones are kept in the hypothalamus, pituitary gland, and ovaries inside your body. In order to trigger ovulation and menstruation, these parts of the body need to send signals to one another. Sometimes, these signals get crossed or skipped, causing irregular periods.

      But what causes these hormone signals to get out of whack? Well, there are actually a number of things that can easily cause your hormone levels to change.

      * Pregnancy: If you are pregnant, your body will begin producing different levels of hormones. This will cause numerous pregnancy symptoms, including an end to your period.

      * Conditions of the reproductive organs giving rise to pain include endometriosis, pelvic inflammatory disease, ovarian cysts, fibroids and problems related to the early stages of pregnancy such as miscarriage and ectopic pregnancy.

      * Stress: Stress is a common cause of irregular periods. If you are fatigued, worried, or anxious this can cause your hormones to become unbalanced.

      * Diet: A poor diet or extreme weight loss or gain can also affect your hormones. Women with anorexia or bulimia often have no period or irregular periods.

      * Exercise: Intense exercise can wreak havoc on your body, often causing irregular periods.

      * Menarche: the cycles after a girl’s first period may be irregular for some time. It can take up to 3 years to get regular periods.

      * Menopause: Menopause causes changes in your hormone levels, and is often signaled by irregular periods.

      * Hormonal Birth Control: Birth control pills and irregular periods sometimes go hand in hand. It can take a while for your body to adjust to the new levels of hormones delivered by hormonal birth control.

      For most women, an irregular period is nothing to be worried about as the majority of women will eventually develop a regular cycle with regular periods. Sometimes though, underlying complications can be the cause of these period problems. If you are noticing particularly irregular periods, or have gone a year or more with missed periods, see your doctor. If you experience extreme cramping, heavy period bleeding, dizziness, nausea, or fainting you should also visit with your doctor.

      I would recommend that if this continues that you see your doctor/gyneacologist to have them evaluate the situation further.

      I hope this helped answer your question. Good luck :)

  32. QUESTION:
    Why is my period late? Everytime I have intercourse I use protection please help me I'm so scared?

    • ANSWER:
      Hello, I found an article on the internet in regards to irregular periods and their reasons for being late, early, heavy, abnormally long and heavy bleeding. I hope this helps you to answer a few of your questions. Take care.

      Hormonal Imbalance One of the prime reasons for periods to go irregular is hormonal imbalance. In a female's body, in order to produce a period, the body creates hormones such as estrogen and progesterone. Various parts of the body need to send signals to each other in order to trigger menstruation. However, due to hormonal imbalance, many a time, these signals are missed or skipped, thus, resulting in irregular periods.

      Sudden Weight Gain or Loss Have you gained or lost a lot of weight lately? If yes, you've got an answer. When your body works at a constant pace, the hormones learn to process in similar manner. However, the moment you start doing rigorous workout, or eat a lot, your body takes a while to adjust to it. Hence, hormones become imbalanced, and lead to irregularity in periods. However, this is not a tense situation as it happens with every woman who has lost or gained weight quickly.

      Stress Workload? Job issues? Relationship turmoil? Mental dissatisfaction? Reduce your stress, female, for it's affecting the regularity of your periods. Yes, stress contributes to the most common reasons for a late period. With increasing stress, you are affecting the hormonal balance of your body, and hence, not only do your periods become irregular, but they also result in excessive weight gain, and anxiety.

      Polycystic Ovarian Disease So, you aren't pregnant, but you're still worried. Well, if your pregnancy test result came out to be negative, get a check up done, for chances, even though very less, are that you are suffering from Polycystic Ovarian Disease which is caused due to irregular ovulation as a result of hormonal imbalance. With proper treatment, your gynecologist will help you get your periods back to regular. However,

      Medications
      The Mayo Clinic advises that certain medications and result in excess bleeding including anti-coagulants that prevent blood clots and anti-inflammatory medicines. Not only can these medications result in heavy bleeding but they can also prolong your bleeding. If you are improperly taking hormone medication, this can also result in menorrhagia

      Anovulation, Fibroids
      When a woman fails to ovulate, this is called Anovulation. You can have a menstrual period but not ovulate. When this happens, the hormones may become unbalanced, resulting in excess bleeding.

      Cervical polyps are small, fragile growths that begin in either the mucosal surface of the cervix, or the endocervical canal and protrude through the opening of the cervix.

      Endometrial polyps are typically non-cancerous, growths that protrude from the lining of the uterus.

      Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is an infection of one or more organs that affects the uterus, fallopian tubes, and cervix. PID is, most often, a sexually transmitted disease; however, it sometimes occurs following childbirth, abortion, or other gynecological procedures.

      Cervical cancer is a type of cancer that occurs when cells in the cervix become abnormal, multiply out of control, and damage healthy parts of the body. The human papillomavirus, or HPV, is the cause of over ninety percent of all cervical cancers.

      Endometrial cancer occurs when abnormal cells in the uterus or the endometrium (the lining of the uterus) multiply out of control and damage to the uterus and other organs. While the cause of endometrial cancer is unknown, it is known that women diagnosed with this type of cancer tend are usually over fifty.

      IUDs or intrauterine devices used for contraception are a potential cause of heavy menstrual bleeding or menorrhagia. Women who experience prolonged or heavy periods while using the IUD should have the device removed and choose an alternate method of birth control.

      Bleeding disorders occur when it is hard for a person to stop bleeding. While there are several types of bleeding disorders, the most common type in women is von Willebrand Disease or VWD.

      Source(s):
      http://www.buzzle.com/articles/reasons-f…
      http://womenshealth.about.com/od/abnorma…

  33. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know what a Blood Disorder is?
    My mother just found out that she has a blood disorder (menorrhagia) and I was on the web and I did find out some information however, I would like to know if anyone has had this before? Or does anyone knows someone who has had a blood disorder and what happened? I know that there is know cure however, I am just curious because I have never heard of a blood disorder before until my mother is diagnosed with it.

    Thank you for reading..

    • ANSWER:
      Hi there! I'm sorry your mother has a blood disorder. The previous poster is correct, that there are many diff. blood disorders. I had a blood disorder myself, known as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and my cousin had one known as idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). I suspect that others in my family also have diff. bleeding disorders, but they are undiagnosed.

      I could tell you what happened to me when I had TTP, but my story is not only very diff. than those of others with TTP, it's EXTREMELY different than the stories of people who have totally different blood disorders! Different blood disorders affect people differently.

      I believe what your mother has is really heavy, prolonged menstrual periods. I have family members who have the same problem. If the doctors have not found the cause of it, there may be more tests to pinpoint what's causing it. It's possible that this bleeding symptom/disorder is caused by an underlying clotting or bleeding disorder of another name. In the case of my family members it seems to be caused by cysts on their ovaries (not sure if they have polycystic ovarian syndrome or not), rather than a bleeding or clotting disorder, though in the case of at least one of them, I think it's a combination of a bleeding disorder and ovarian cysts, since she's a pretty free bleeder. At least I assume ovarian cysts are to blame. While most ovarian cysts apparently do not bother women, four of my cousins experience very painful, heavy periods, and at least one of them has extremely prolonged periods (but they are also very irregular so she may not bleed for months, although she is not pregnant and tests negative for pregnancy, and then bleed for over a month). All of these women, except for one, have shown to have ovarian cysts, and I am not sure if the other one was even checked for cysts. Also, the one who didn't bleed for months and then started bleeding for months (this is NOT an exaggeration- she has bled for at least over a month and it only stopped then due to a heavy dose of hormones recieved at the doctors) did show polyps, and the doctors seemed satisfied for this as the cause of her issues.

      The cousin who bled for over a month has had to have blood transfusions twice due to prolonged and heavy menstruation (her case reminds me a lot of the lady who posted above me- bleeding up to a month, ovarian cysts, and anemia), so if your mother bleeds badly enough, she may eventually require the same, but I do not know the extent of her bleeding and am not a dr. Therefore, I couldn't say for sure. That cousin also takes iron pills, and an extremely heavy dose of bc (I dunno if they said 2 or if they said 4 times as much as the usual dose) to balance out her hormone levels enough to allow her not to bleed this much. Another takes the pills to ease the pain. Your mother may or may not wish to take them, but if she does, likely the dose would depend on her own hormone levels. Also, iron pills may be suggested if she has heavy bleeding.

      Besides the ovarian cysts, there's also endometriosis as a possible cause, as well as bleeding and clotting disorders like VWD. VWD is something I've read about before called von willebrand disease. I just did a web search for your mother's issue and came across an article concerning the top 10 causes of heavy menstrual bleeding. The first listed was hormonal imbalance. PCOS (polycystic ovarian syndrome, by the way, involves hormonal imbalance), but isn't mentioned in the article. Instead, the article talks about women during their adolescent years, and during menopause, may have heavier bleeding than at other times. You do not mention your mother's age, but if she's nearing menopause (peri-menopausal) she may be having some hormonal fluctuations that are to blame. The article also mentions uterine fibroids, cervial polyps, endometrial polyps, Lupus, pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), cervical cancer (don't freak out- cervical cancer is pretty rare, from what I've heard), Endometrial cancer, IUDs or intrauterine birth control devices, and bleeding disorders. It also mentions that VWD is the most likely culprit if it is a bleeding disorder.

      http://womenshealth.about.com/od/abnormalbleeding/a/causemenorrhagi.htm

      Okay, ironically, I was looking up endometriosis and heavy bleeding because I was pretty sure it was a symptom of it- and it is- when I came across a site that said injectable contraception (depo provera) can cause heavy or prolonged bleeding, which makes me question the ability and competancy of my one cousin's doctors, since they are giving her depo provera shots to prevent this very thing.

      Anyway, this other page lists these causes: Unexplained (it says about half the cases have unexplained causes), contraceptive coil (IUD), injectable contraceptive (depo provera), pelvic disorders- ex. listed are fibroids, polyps, pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), endometriosis, Endometrial hyperplasia (thickening of uterine lining), endometrial cancer, hormonal imbalance, hypothyroidism, blood clotting disorders, and anticoagulant drugs.

      Here's the link: http://www.womenshealthlondon.org.uk/leaflets/bleeding/bleeding.html

      I also found out that vitamin K deficiancy can even be a culprit. See here. http://www.womentowomen.com/menstruation/menorrhagia.aspx
      This article also mentions the importance of iron supplements and hormonal support.

      This bleeding disorder I had- TTP- can cause heavy menstrual bleeding as well as spotting and alternatively, it can cause less bleeding due to intense clotting/ Yet, it is highly unlikely your mother has this disease. It's rare, and the doctors would prob. have noticed it during her blood work up.

      The heavy and prolonged menstrual bleeding is a bleeding condition which may or may not have a bleeding disorder as the underlying cause. Your mother will likely need to take iron supplements, she may be given medicines to help deal with her hormones if they are found to be the problem, and she could opt for a hysterectomy, BUT that carries with it, its own issues, and your mother may not want to go that route. I'd personally want to avoid that if I could, but it's an individual choice, based on individual situations. Your mother's treatment will also be based on the root cause of her heavy, prolonged bleeding.

  34. QUESTION:
    How common are ectopic pregnancies?
    I went to my Dr today and he's refered me to get an u/sound tomorrow morning. I'm 6 weeks pregnant and have sometimes sharp and sometimes aching pain on one side I'm not experiencing any other pain anywhere else, having said that 5 days ago I had cramping all down the lower area for most of the day that felt like period pain and made me flinch a few times then for two days nothing, but for the last two days I have had the pain on 1 side that can run down my leg at times. I can't elevate my knee to high on that side, so my dr has made the referal. I just wanted to know how common they are and I would have thought I would have been in so much pain but I'm still doing LIGHT housework and getting around, it's more discomfort with light pain but only on one side. He also mentioned it could be a cyst, I have had simiar pain that often ocurrs in the exact spot when I have period pain

    • ANSWER:
      What is an ectopic pregnancy?
      If a fertilized egg implants outside the uterus, it's called an ectopic pregnancy. One in 50 pregnancies ends this way.

      Here's how it happens: After conception, the fertilized egg travels down your fallopian tube on its way to your uterus. If the tube is damaged or blocked and fails to propel the egg toward your womb, the egg may become implanted in the tube and continue to develop there. Because almost all ectopic pregnancies occur in one of the fallopian tubes, they're often called "tubal" pregnancies.

      Much less often, an egg implants in an ovary, in the cervix, directly in the abdomen, or even in a c-section scar. In rare cases, a woman has a normal pregnancy in her uterus and an ectopic pregnancy at the same time. This is called a heterotopic pregnancy and it's more likely to happen if you've had fertility treatments, such as in-vitro fertilization.

      There's no way to transplant an ectopic (literally, "out of place") pregnancy into your uterus, so ending the pregnancy is the only option. In fact, if an ectopic pregnancy isn't recognized and treated, the embryo will grow until the fallopian tube ruptures, resulting in severe abdominal pain and bleeding. It can cause permanent damage to the tube or loss of the tube, and if it involves very heavy internal bleeding that's not treated promptly, it can even lead to death. Fortunately, the vast majority of ectopic pregnancies are caught in time.

      How can I tell if I'm at risk for an ectopic pregnancy?
      An ectopic pregnancy can happen to any sexually active woman, but certain women are more at risk than others. Your odds of having an ectopic pregnancy are higher if:
      • You get pregnant despite having had a tubal ligation (surgical sterilization).

      • You've had surgery on your fallopian tubes to correct a problem or to reverse a tubal ligation. (Your risk is also higher, though to a much smaller degree, if you've had other pelvic or abdominal surgery, such as the removal of an ovarian cyst or fibroids, an appendectomy, or a cesarean section.)

      • You had a previous ectopic pregnancy.

      • Your mother took the drug DES while pregnant with you.

      • You have an intrauterine device (IUD) in place when you get pregnant. Although IUDs are close to 99 percent effective at preventing pregnancy, if you do get pregnant while using one, it's more likely that the pregnancy will be ectopic. An IUD doesn't cause an ectopic pregnancy, it's just better at preventing an egg from implanting in your uterus than outside it. (Having used an IUD in the past won't raise your risk for ectopic pregnancy.)

      • You're taking progestin-only hormonal contraceptives when you get pregnant. As with an IUD, taking these pills doesn't increase your risk for an ectopic pregnancy, but if you do get pregnant while taking them, the likelihood that it will be ectopic is higher than usual.

      • Your tubes were damaged by an infection in your upper reproductive tract (this is called pelvic inflammatory disease or PID). PID is often caused by untreated sexually transmitted infections (STIs) such as gonorrhea or chlamydia. It sometimes has no symptoms, so having had either of these STIs also increases your risk for an ectopic, even if you don't think you've had PID.

      • You're being evaluated or treated for infertility. Infertility is often caused by damaged tubes, and if you get pregnant while being treated for infertility, there's a higher than average chance that the pregnancy will be ectopic.

      Older women also have higher rates of ectopic pregnancy. And a few studies suggest you may also have a slightly increased risk for ectopic pregnancy if you smoke cigarettes or douche regularly.

      What symptoms may indicate an ectopic pregnancy?
      Ectopic pregnancies are usually discovered when a woman has symptoms at about six or seven weeks, though you may notice symptoms as early as four weeks. In some cases, there are no symptoms and the ectopic is discovered during a first trimester ultrasound.

      Symptoms can vary greatly from person to person, and depending on how far along you are and whether the ectopic pregnancy has ruptured — a true obstetric emergency. To prevent rupture, it's critical to get diagnosed and treated as soon as there's even a hint of a problem, although sometimes rupture occurs without much advance warning. Ectopic pregnancies don't always register on home pregnancy tests, so if you suspect there's a problem, don't wait for a positive pregnancy test to contact your caregiver.

      Call your practitioner immediately if you have any of the following symptoms:

      • Abdominal or pelvic pain or tenderness. It can be sudden, persistent, and severe but may also be mild and intermittent early on. You may feel it only on one side, but the pain can be anywhere in your abdomen or pelvis and is sometimes accompanied by nausea and vomiting.

      • Vaginal spotting or bleeding. If you're not sure you're pregnant yet, you may think you're getting a light period at first. The blood may look red or brown like the color of dried blood, and may be continuous or intermittent, heavy or light.

      • Pain that gets worse when you're active or while moving your bowels or coughing.

      • Shoulder pain. Cramping and bleeding can mean many things, but pain in your shoulder, particularly when you lie down, is a red flag for a ruptured ectopic pregnancy and it's critical to get medical attention immediately. The cause of the pain is internal bleeding, which irritates nerves that go to your shoulder area.

      • If a fallopian tube has ruptured, you may also have signs of shock, such as a weak, racing pulse; pale, clammy skin; and dizziness or fainting. In that case, call 911 without delay.

      How is it diagnosed?
      Ectopic pregnancy can be tricky to diagnose. If your symptoms suggest this type of pregnancy, your caregiver will do several tests to try to confirm the diagnosis:
      • A blood test to check your level of the pregnancy hormone human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). If it's high enough to suggest pregnancy, but not as high as it should be at your stage, the pregnancy may be ectopic. If you're not in pain and there's still some question about the diagnosis, the test may be repeated in two to three days. If your hCG level doesn't increase as it's supposed to, this probably indicates either an ectopic pregnancy or a miscarriage.

      • A vaginal exam. If the vaginal area is very tender or your caregiver detects a mass or an enlarged fallopian tube, an ectopic is likely the cause.

      • An ultrasound. If the sonographer can see an embryo in the fallopian tube, you definitely have an ectopic pregnancy. But in most cases, the embryo will have died early in the process and be too small for the sonographer to find. Instead, she may notice that a fallopian tube is swollen, and may see blood clots as well as tissue that remains from the embryo.

      If a pregnancy test is positive but the embryo (or evidence of an embryo) can't be found, you may have an ectopic pregnancy — but it's also possible that the pregnancy is still in the very early stages or that you have miscarried. As long as you're not in pain, your caregiver will continue to monitor you very closely through hormone tests and ultrasounds until she can confirm the diagnosis or your symptoms become more severe.

      If the diagnosis remains unclear, your tubes may be examined more closely by using laparoscopic surgery, a procedure that may also be used to treat an ectopic pregnancy and remove the embryo (see below).

      How is it treated?
      That depends on how clear the diagnosis is, how big the embryo is, and what techniques are available.

      If the pregnancy is clearly ectopic and the embryo is still relatively small, you may be given the drug methotrexate. The drug is injected into a muscle and reaches the embryo through your bloodstream, where it ends the pregnancy by stopping the cells of the placenta from growing. (Over time, the tiny embryo is reabsorbed into your body.) As the drug begins to work you may have some abdominal pain or cramps and possibly nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea.

      You'll need to avoid alcohol and sex for a while, as well as any multivitamins or supplements that contain folic acid, which can interfere with the action of the methotrexate. And you'll need to come back in for blood testing to make sure that the pregnancy has really been terminated because it doesn't always work. If you experience any signs of rupture (such as severe abdominal pain, heavy bleeding, or signs of shock) during this process, call 911 right away.

      If you're too far along for methotrexate to be used, you're in severe pain or bleeding internally, or you're breastfeeding or have certain health conditions that make the medication a bad choice, you'll need surgery. (If you're bleeding heavily you may need a blood transfusion as well.)

      If you're in stable condition and the embryo is small enough, it can be removed through a procedure called laparoscopic surgery. An ob-gyn can examine your tubes with a tiny camera inserted through a small cut in your navel and can often remove the embryo or remaining tissue while preserving your tube. (However, if there's extensive damage to the tube or you're bleeding profusely, the tube may need to be removed.) Laparoscopic surgery requires general anesthesia, special equipment, and a surgeon experienced in the technique, and you'll need about a week to recuperate.

      In some cases — for example, if you have extensive scar tissue in the abdomen or heavy bleeding, or the embryo is too large — it may not be possible or expedient to use laparoscopic technology. If this is the case, you'll need major abdominal surgery. You'll be given general anesthesia and an ob-gyn will open your abdomen and remove the embryo. (As with laparoscopic surgery, your tube may be preserved or may need to be removed, depending on the situation.) Afterward, you'll need about six weeks to recuperate. You may feel bloated, and have abdominal pain or discomfort as you heal.

      Note: If your blood is Rh-negative, you'll need a shot of Rh immunoglobulin after being treated for an ectopic pregnancy (unless the baby's father is also Rh negative).

      Can I have a successful pregnancy after I've had an ectopic one?
      Yes. The earlier you end an ectopic pregnancy, the less damage you'll have in that tube and the greater your chances will be of carrying another baby to term. And even if you do lose one of your tubes, you can still have a normal pregnancy as long as your other tube is normal. If and when you do conceive again, call your health practitioner as soon as you suspect that you might be pregnant so that she can schedule you for an early sonogram and monitor you closely.

      If, on the other hand, you're unable to conceive because of ectopic pregnancies or damaged tubes, the good news is that you're likely to be an excellent candidate for fertility treatments such as in vitro fertilization (IVF), in which your healthy embryos are implanted directly in your uterus.

      What are my chances of having another ectopic pregnancy?
      Overall, your chances of having another ectopic pregnancy are about 10 to 15 percent, depending on what caused the first one and what type of treatment you had. That means that your overall chances of having a normal pregnancy next time are still very high — about 85 to 90 percent. However, if your first ectopic pregnancy was the result of damage to the tube from an infection, tubal ligation, or DES exposure, there's a greater chance that the other tube is damaged as well. This may reduce your chances of conceiving and increase your chances of another ectopic.

      How can I deal with my sense of loss?
      You may feel devastated by your experience. You've just lost a pregnancy and it may now be more difficult for you to conceive again. You may also be recovering from major surgery, which can leave you exhausted and numb, or suffering from hormonal ups and downs that can leave you feeling depressed and vulnerable. You'll need time to recuperate emotionally and physically before trying for another baby. Most caregivers will advise you to wait at least three months after major abdominal surgery for your body to heal. (Your risk of having another ectopic is also higher while you're healing.) You may be eager to try again, or you may be frightened and wary.

      Your partner may also be feeling sad or helpless and may have trouble figuring out how to express those feelings or how to be supportive. This experience may bring you closer together or it may strain your relationship. It's perfectly okay to seek counseling if you think it will help you or your partner recover

  35. QUESTION:
    Why does my period come early/late?
    My period has been crazy for the past couple of months and I want to know why!

    • ANSWER:
      Hello, I found an article on the internet in regards to irregular periods and their reasons for being late, early, heavy, abnormally long and heavy bleeding. I hope this helps you to answer a few of your questions. Take care.

      Hormonal Imbalance One of the prime reasons for periods to go irregular is hormonal imbalance. In a female's body, in order to produce a period, the body creates hormones such as estrogen and progesterone. Various parts of the body need to send signals to each other in order to trigger menstruation. However, due to hormonal imbalance, many a time, these signals are missed or skipped, thus, resulting in irregular periods.

      Sudden Weight Gain or Loss Have you gained or lost a lot of weight lately? If yes, you've got an answer. When your body works at a constant pace, the hormones learn to process in similar manner. However, the moment you start doing rigorous workout, or eat a lot, your body takes a while to adjust to it. Hence, hormones become imbalanced, and lead to irregularity in periods. However, this is not a tense situation as it happens with every woman who has lost or gained weight quickly.

      Stress Workload? Job issues? Relationship turmoil? Mental dissatisfaction? Reduce your stress, female, for it's affecting the regularity of your periods. Yes, stress contributes to the most common reasons for a late period. With increasing stress, you are affecting the hormonal balance of your body, and hence, not only do your periods become irregular, but they also result in excessive weight gain, and anxiety.

      Polycystic Ovarian Disease So, you aren't pregnant, but you're still worried. Well, if your pregnancy test result came out to be negative, get a check up done, for chances, even though very less, are that you are suffering from Polycystic Ovarian Disease which is caused due to irregular ovulation as a result of hormonal imbalance. With proper treatment, your gynecologist will help you get your periods back to regular. However,

      Medications
      The Mayo Clinic advises that certain medications and result in excess bleeding including anti-coagulants that prevent blood clots and anti-inflammatory medicines. Not only can these medications result in heavy bleeding but they can also prolong your bleeding. If you are improperly taking hormone medication, this can also result in menorrhagia

      Anovulation, Fibroids
      When a woman fails to ovulate, this is called Anovulation. You can have a menstrual period but not ovulate. When this happens, the hormones may become unbalanced, resulting in excess bleeding.

      Cervical polyps are small, fragile growths that begin in either the mucosal surface of the cervix, or the endocervical canal and protrude through the opening of the cervix.

      Endometrial polyps are typically non-cancerous, growths that protrude from the lining of the uterus.

      Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is an infection of one or more organs that affects the uterus, fallopian tubes, and cervix. PID is, most often, a sexually transmitted disease; however, it sometimes occurs following childbirth, abortion, or other gynecological procedures.

      Cervical cancer is a type of cancer that occurs when cells in the cervix become abnormal, multiply out of control, and damage healthy parts of the body. The human papillomavirus, or HPV, is the cause of over ninety percent of all cervical cancers.

      Endometrial cancer occurs when abnormal cells in the uterus or the endometrium (the lining of the uterus) multiply out of control and damage to the uterus and other organs. While the cause of endometrial cancer is unknown, it is known that women diagnosed with this type of cancer tend are usually over fifty.

      IUDs or intrauterine devices used for contraception are a potential cause of heavy menstrual bleeding or menorrhagia. Women who experience prolonged or heavy periods while using the IUD should have the device removed and choose an alternate method of birth control.

      Bleeding disorders occur when it is hard for a person to stop bleeding. While there are several types of bleeding disorders, the most common type in women is von Willebrand Disease or VWD.

      Source(s):
      http://www.buzzle.com/articles/reasons-f…
      http://womenshealth.about.com/od/abnorma…

  36. QUESTION:
    Fibroid while pregnant?
    I was told that at my last ultrasound they found a fibroid while checking out the baby. What does this mean and how dangerous is it? I am currently 20 weeks along. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Once you’re pregnant, most doctors will monitor you conservatively, with a “let’s-wait-and-see” attitude. If pain develops, or if there is any bleeding or suspicion of premature labor, medication and bed rest may be advised. If the pain becomes severe or a uterine fibroid seems to be growing rapidly, your doctor may recommend a myomectomy (fibroid removal), even during the pregnancy.

  37. QUESTION:
    My period is late, help me?
    I have been on medication for a UTI for 9 days and now my period is 2 days late. I have never had sex but I have done oral sex. Is it possible for me to pregnant or am I just late because of the antibiotics?
    No like he might of fingered me with sperm on his finger or something, is that possible?

    • ANSWER:
      Hello, I found an article on the internet in regards to irregular periods and their reasons for being late, early, heavy, abnormally long and heavy bleeding. I hope this helps you to answer a few of your questions. Take care.

      Hormonal Imbalance One of the prime reasons for periods to go irregular is hormonal imbalance. In a female's body, in order to produce a period, the body creates hormones such as estrogen and progesterone. Various parts of the body need to send signals to each other in order to trigger menstruation. However, due to hormonal imbalance, many a time, these signals are missed or skipped, thus, resulting in irregular periods.

      Sudden Weight Gain or Loss Have you gained or lost a lot of weight lately? If yes, you've got an answer. When your body works at a constant pace, the hormones learn to process in similar manner. However, the moment you start doing rigorous workout, or eat a lot, your body takes a while to adjust to it. Hence, hormones become imbalanced, and lead to irregularity in periods. However, this is not a tense situation as it happens with every woman who has lost or gained weight quickly.

      Stress Workload? Job issues? Relationship turmoil? Mental dissatisfaction? Reduce your stress, female, for it's affecting the regularity of your periods. Yes, stress contributes to the most common reasons for a late period. With increasing stress, you are affecting the hormonal balance of your body, and hence, not only do your periods become irregular, but they also result in excessive weight gain, and anxiety.

      Polycystic Ovarian Disease So, you aren't pregnant, but you're still worried. Well, if your pregnancy test result came out to be negative, get a check up done, for chances, even though very less, are that you are suffering from Polycystic Ovarian Disease which is caused due to irregular ovulation as a result of hormonal imbalance. With proper treatment, your gynecologist will help you get your periods back to regular. However,

      Medications
      The Mayo Clinic advises that certain medications and result in excess bleeding including anti-coagulants that prevent blood clots and anti-inflammatory medicines. Not only can these medications result in heavy bleeding but they can also prolong your bleeding. If you are improperly taking hormone medication, this can also result in menorrhagia

      Anovulation, Fibroids
      When a woman fails to ovulate, this is called Anovulation. You can have a menstrual period but not ovulate. When this happens, the hormones may become unbalanced, resulting in excess bleeding.

      Cervical polyps are small, fragile growths that begin in either the mucosal surface of the cervix, or the endocervical canal and protrude through the opening of the cervix.

      Endometrial polyps are typically non-cancerous, growths that protrude from the lining of the uterus.

      Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is an infection of one or more organs that affects the uterus, fallopian tubes, and cervix. PID is, most often, a sexually transmitted disease; however, it sometimes occurs following childbirth, abortion, or other gynecological procedures.

      Cervical cancer is a type of cancer that occurs when cells in the cervix become abnormal, multiply out of control, and damage healthy parts of the body. The human papillomavirus, or HPV, is the cause of over ninety percent of all cervical cancers.

      Endometrial cancer occurs when abnormal cells in the uterus or the endometrium (the lining of the uterus) multiply out of control and damage to the uterus and other organs. While the cause of endometrial cancer is unknown, it is known that women diagnosed with this type of cancer tend are usually over fifty.

      IUDs or intrauterine devices used for contraception are a potential cause of heavy menstrual bleeding or menorrhagia. Women who experience prolonged or heavy periods while using the IUD should have the device removed and choose an alternate method of birth control.

      Bleeding disorders occur when it is hard for a person to stop bleeding. While there are several types of bleeding disorders, the most common type in women is von Willebrand Disease or VWD.

      Source(s):
      http://www.buzzle.com/articles/reasons-f…
      http://womenshealth.about.com/od/abnorma…

  38. QUESTION:
    Is this normal while waiting for results of your pregnancy to see if your miscarrying? more details...
    I was 8 weeks pregnant exactly on the day I had my D&C Procedure. I had been bleeding for a week, cramps for 2 days, finally i went to the ER on Wednesday. The situation is that I had gone 2 times(before I started to bleed) for an ultrasound, and there was an empty sac. On the 3rd time that I went, I had been bleeding for a week and a lot so I was sure that I had miscarried there to mine and everyones surprise there was a baby measuring right at 7 weeks and 6 days with a heart beat! So, when i was at the ER with my hubby we thought that everything would be okay since 2 days before there was a baby. I thought that maybe I could get some medicine for the bleeding to stop. After waiting, taking tests(blood, cervix, ultrasounds) doctors wouldnt tell me anything, then finally around midnight a doctor comes in & tells me that in 10 minutes him & other doctors will talk to me, so I'm not really nervous neither is my hubby. Then a nurse comes in, and tells me she's going to put me 2 sleep, my hubby and I are freaking out. Then 5 minutes later, 4 doctors come in, give me a form to sign for D&C procedure. To this day I am still very hurt, but I keep getting flashbacks of that part, cause how come they didn't sit down and tell me "look you are miscarrying, we think you should do this..." finally after all doctors come in, and i'm like "whats going on?" they tell me I'm miscarrying, I just started crying, I mean couldn't they talk to me b4? all day i think about it(it just happened 2 days ago) I mean I don't think I'm wrong at all, the way they would just barge in and not let me know. Finally they said sorry for doing that.

    • ANSWER:
      Honey,

      I am so sorry this happened to you. I feel worse because I work in the health field and I have seen, and heard things like this happen alot. communicaiton is always the best way to get any kind of emotion across, information.........what ever. Of course you would have still felt bad, but when they first thought it could be possible, they should have told you it would be very possible that you would miscarry in a matter of days., and since you are in the ER, they could do the D&C, to prevent you bleeding to death at home, which can happen at 8wks, and worse if its later stage pregnancy.

      They could have/should have given you time to yourselves, if its only for a few moments. You shouldn't have been treated like that, and of course your not wrong.

      and yes you can check to see if one is miscarrying before a D&C if performed. Thats what technology is for. and they could have also manually check your cervix to see how far it was dialating by placing there fingers there, and if you were on a monitor, it would have shown activity of contractions, that early................yes it could've been done.

      My experience was a little different, I miscarried at about 10 wks, I was at home. was taken to the ER, and admitted, but they spoke with me the whole time. and explanied everything, they asked alot of questions, and i was able to have alot of questions answered. I still had to get the procedure done, to remove all of the pregnancy, and i had to get a blood transfusion because i lost lots of blood, to where I was looking pale(ish).........i am black, how can a black person look pale, but now that i am in the healthfield, i know what they mean.

      This is still new to you, if you can/ and if you feel up to it, go and talk with your OB, to see if a report was sent to him/her, and try to get some answers, as far as what they think was the problem to miscarry.
      Lots of things can cause you to miscarry before the completion of your first trimester which is 13 wks(actually)., anywhere from horemones, your lifestyle, week uterus, stress, anything, so please don't blame yourself either............also I was under the impression that you could have been carrying twins, and one miscarried, or the empty sac you saw could have been a cyst, or fibroid, causing them not to be able to see the baby at first?

      Who knows, but try to get some questions answered, and most important, try to get some rest.
      Take your time, if you were trying to have a baby,,,,,,,,,,,,,I am sure you will have another one, just take your time.

      Good luck to you.and your husband.
      Keep talking it over with him, and go to him for support/ for each other.

      Honeychild.

  39. QUESTION:
    Has anyone had implantation bleeding that resembled a period? or lasted as long?
    I think it was implantation bleeding-it was not a "normal" period for me. Started pink -then stopped -then started red/with discharge mucus not as heavy as usual. I normally last 7 days heavy the first 3, then brown to light brown days 4-7. It stayed light the six days that I bled and never turned brown as it has for the last 18 years! I read that implantation bleeding only lasts a day and other woman have said that it looked like a normal period. I have heard of people having a "period" while pregnant- meaning they were bleeding from the vagina. Took a blood test and hcg 4 (negative.) I was just wondering if anyone found out they were pregnant and had some bleeding that resembled a period? Personal experience please? Thank you -- All advice is appreciated:)
    I am very regular-every 28 days (7 days) ALWAYS! the pink blood came 5 days before my period was due.

    • ANSWER:
      Pregnancy is so embellished in our culture; everybody has to have it live up to something, whether good or bad.

      It is not possible to have menstrual bleeding, or anything close to it, while pregnant. The hormone released from a fertilized ovum, hCG, sends signals to the ovaries to continue producing progesterone and estrogen, so that there in no decline in hormone levels that trigger menstruation, and the uterine lining stays intact. Beside the scientific explaination, it plain doesn't make sense; endometrium builds up to cushion and protect an embryo, so why would it shed during pregnancy?

      More likely, what these women are experiencing is vaginal bleeding due other causes, like ovarian cysts,uterine fibroids, or an untreated infection. Women who have vaginal bleeding in early pregnancy can expect to miscarry in about half of cases; more women report maintaining healthy pregnancies with vaginal bleeding than is statistically possible.

  40. QUESTION:
    what is good about mirena ?
    I am 28 and haven't had kids yet, but i suffer heavy bleeding, and I have fibroids and ovarian cyst, my doctor wants me to use mirena. I'm not sure i want to, i need some good advice please.

    • ANSWER:
      I used it for 2 years, and I loved it as far as birth control goes. You dont have to worry about getting pregnant or forgetting a pill everyday. However, I couldnt lose weight while I have the iud, and neither could a few of my friends. I have heard from many people it makes you gain weight or unable to lose any. However, my doctor told me that this was rare, but it happened to me!

  41. QUESTION:
    Period lasting more than 7 days?
    I got my period on the 15th and it was regular. During that week it was really light, then during the past week it has been really heavy. It is now the 26th and I still have my period. I usually skip periods like I get one every few months. But in March I had it and it was really light. What is going on with me?

    • ANSWER:
      Hello, I found an article on the internet in regards to irregular periods and their reasons for being late, early, heavy, abnormally long and heavy bleeding. I hope this helps you to answer a few of your questions. Take care.

      Hormonal Imbalance One of the prime reasons for periods to go irregular is hormonal imbalance. In a female's body, in order to produce a period, the body creates hormones such as estrogen and progesterone. Various parts of the body need to send signals to each other in order to trigger menstruation. However, due to hormonal imbalance, many a time, these signals are missed or skipped, thus, resulting in irregular periods.

      Sudden Weight Gain or Loss Have you gained or lost a lot of weight lately? If yes, you've got an answer. When your body works at a constant pace, the hormones learn to process in similar manner. However, the moment you start doing rigorous workout, or eat a lot, your body takes a while to adjust to it. Hence, hormones become imbalanced, and lead to irregularity in periods. However, this is not a tense situation as it happens with every woman who has lost or gained weight quickly.

      Stress Workload? Job issues? Relationship turmoil? Mental dissatisfaction? Reduce your stress, female, for it's affecting the regularity of your periods. Yes, stress contributes to the most common reasons for a late period. With increasing stress, you are affecting the hormonal balance of your body, and hence, not only do your periods become irregular, but they also result in excessive weight gain, and anxiety.

      Polycystic Ovarian Disease So, you aren't pregnant, but you're still worried. Well, if your pregnancy test result came out to be negative, get a check up done, for chances, even though very less, are that you are suffering from Polycystic Ovarian Disease which is caused due to irregular ovulation as a result of hormonal imbalance. With proper treatment, your gynecologist will help you get your periods back to regular. However,

      Medications
      The Mayo Clinic advises that certain medications and result in excess bleeding including anti-coagulants that prevent blood clots and anti-inflammatory medicines. Not only can these medications result in heavy bleeding but they can also prolong your bleeding. If you are improperly taking hormone medication, this can also result in menorrhagia

      Anovulation, Fibroids
      When a woman fails to ovulate, this is called Anovulation. You can have a menstrual period but not ovulate. When this happens, the hormones may become unbalanced, resulting in excess bleeding.

      Cervical polyps are small, fragile growths that begin in either the mucosal surface of the cervix, or the endocervical canal and protrude through the opening of the cervix.

      Endometrial polyps are typically non-cancerous, growths that protrude from the lining of the uterus.

      Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is an infection of one or more organs that affects the uterus, fallopian tubes, and cervix. PID is, most often, a sexually transmitted disease; however, it sometimes occurs following childbirth, abortion, or other gynecological procedures.

      Cervical cancer is a type of cancer that occurs when cells in the cervix become abnormal, multiply out of control, and damage healthy parts of the body. The human papillomavirus, or HPV, is the cause of over ninety percent of all cervical cancers.

      Endometrial cancer occurs when abnormal cells in the uterus or the endometrium (the lining of the uterus) multiply out of control and damage to the uterus and other organs. While the cause of endometrial cancer is unknown, it is known that women diagnosed with this type of cancer tend are usually over fifty.

      IUDs or intrauterine devices used for contraception are a potential cause of heavy menstrual bleeding or menorrhagia. Women who experience prolonged or heavy periods while using the IUD should have the device removed and choose an alternate method of birth control.

      Bleeding disorders occur when it is hard for a person to stop bleeding. While there are several types of bleeding disorders, the most common type in women is von Willebrand Disease or VWD.

      Source(s):
      http://www.buzzle.com/articles/reasons-f…
      http://womenshealth.about.com/od/abnorma…

  42. QUESTION:
    Why does my uterus hurt?
    I havent had sex for the past month and I cant be pregnant. Only the right side hurts. It hurts more when I pee. Can anyone help??? Im starting to worry!!! Also im not do for my period for about 1 to 2 weeks im never set to one day.

    • ANSWER:
      While gynecological factors, such as endometriosis and uterine fibroids, cause pelvic pain, there are other reasons for the condition. Gastrointestinal problems, such as irritable bowel syndrome, also cause women extreme abdominal pain, as can urological conditions like interstitial cystitis, which affects the bladder. It is important to check your symptoms to see which specialist can help you.

      This painful condition occurs when tissue from the endometrium grows outside of the uterus. These tissue implants thicken and bleed during menstruation, but because it is occurring outside the normal realm of the uterus, the blood cannot flow outside of the vagina, causing build up in the pelvic area. This can trigger painful cysts and lesions on the pelvic region, including on the uterus, ovaries, the fallopian tubes and bladder. See the Resources section for a link.

      Uterine Fibroids
      Many women often get these noncancerous growths during their childbearing years. They may have some pain in the pelvic region, or may feel that their stomach is full. Rarely is the pain severe unless the fibroid becomes deprived of nutrients and begins to die. That may trigger an acute pain and a fever.

      Irritable bowel syndrome, the painful syndrome of constipation and diarrhea, can cause pelvic pain with the excess gas, bloating and cramping that is associated with it. Sufferers often experience cramping shortly after eating meals, causing discomfort and heaviness in the pelvic region. See the Resources section for a link.

      Interstitial Cystitis
      Interstitial cystitis refers to the pelvic pain and discomfort in the bladder, related to urinary frequency and urgency, when an infection is not present. In severe cases, sufferers may have to urinate up to 60 times each day, and feel pain unless they relieve themselves immediately. They also may experience some pain in the pelvic area and in the vagina, as well as find sexual intercourse painful and uncomfortable. See the Resources section for a link.

      Pelvic Inflammatory Disease
      Pelvic inflammatory disease refers to an infection of the female reproductive organs, which happens when sexually transmitted bacteria extends from the vagina to the uterus and other genital regions. It can cause pain to the lower pelvic regions, as well as painful intercourse. Sufferers may also experience heavier menstrual cycles and painful urination.

      Read more: Causes of Pelvic Pain | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/about_5066435_causes-pelvic-pain.html#ixzz1vEGnHxrZ

  43. QUESTION:
    two periods in one month could i possibly be pregnant?
    ok well, i was on my period and then i was taking birth control pills for bout one week and then i stopped taking them and then it threw me into another period right after the first. A month later i usually start around the second but now im late could i be pregnant or is it just messed up because of the bc pills?

    • ANSWER:
      The most common reason for bleeding twice in one calendar month occurs when a normal period begins on the first or second day of the month, and then another arrives at the very end; because the normal cycle length (from the first day of one to the first day of the next) ranges from 23 to 35 days, this can allow two perfectly normal periods to arrive in the same calendar month. Most of the time, however, when women talk about having two periods in a month, they are not referring to this circumstance. Often they mean they are starting a period every two weeks or so -- certainly less than the 23-day interval that is considered within the normal range.

      Anything that can disrupt the delicate hormonal dance that produces ovulation can lead to either skipped periods or periods that come too often. Hormonal imbalance as a cause of frequent periods is often seen as a woman nears menopause. Thyroid dysfunction may also be a factor.

      Another reasons for twice-a-month periods is abnormal thickening of the uterine lining. This thickening can be due to hormonal imbalance or to taking estrogen without a progesterone medication as well; estrogen causes the uterine lining to proliferate and become thick and lush, while progesterone thins out the lining; a balance between these two hormones is necessary to ensure regular, moderate periods.

      Polyps (projections of tissue that protrude into the uterine cavity) or fibroids that impinge on the uterine cavity may also cause irregular periods. In this case, the uterine lining tissue that overlies these projections is less stable, increasing the chance that it will be shed at an inappropriate time. Also, fibroids and polyps increase the surface area of the uterine lining, often leading to prolonged and heavier bleeding.

      If your periods are coming less than 23 days apart (counted from the beginning of one to the beginning of the next), then you should see your gynecologist. A biopsy may be necessary to rule out an abnormal thickening of the uterine lining. Blood tests may be done to assess hormone levels. Most of the time the reason for frequent bleeding is benign, but occasionally the problem can be more serious; for this reason, and because excess bleeding can lead to anemia, too-frequent periods must be investigated.

  44. QUESTION:
    A question for ladies who have/ or known someone who had "period" like bleeding while pregnant??
    Right I know it not physically to hve a period while pregnant naming the expelling of a unfertilised egg and all that technical jargon I'm not interested in smart Alics righting about . . .

    I'm interested in all ladies out there who had "period" like bleeding throughout their pregnancy

    if so . . .

    What was it like
    was it monthly when a normal period was due
    was it heavy Like a normal cycle bleeding
    did u have cramping was it like your normal AF cramping

    and when n how did u find out you were infact pregnant
    and sidi u hav pregnancy symptoms if so what were they

    • ANSWER:
      You typically can/could bleed twice when you are pregnant. Once during implantation (4-8 days after conception). This will be just a stain. The second potential time is around your 10 to 14 week mark (varies). The is the time the baby's placenta completely takes over and there is a hormonal trade off between mother and child. During this phase hormones can dip and not remain level causing bleeding. This can last a few days and is not at the same level/stength as a normal menstruation. You should always see your healthcare provider if this happens to rule out a potential miscarriage but most of the time it is fine. Starting in the second trimester (14 weeks) you have a very low chance of miscarriage because this sensitive period is over and the baby has a full functioning placenta. After this all bleeding is considered abnormal and should be taken seriously.

      This situation is based on a healthy mother and child with no other OBGYN issues such as fibroids, endometriosis, etc.

  45. QUESTION:
    Pregnancy, fibroids and bleeding. Anyone else?
    I am 14 weeks pregnant and was diagnosed with a uterine fibroid tumor at 9 weeks, after some light spotting. Last Saturday evening while making dinner i started bleeding.. heavily. Hubby and I rushed to ER to basically be told "it happens to some women with fibroids. Go home and come back if it continues for too long". At my regular doctors that Monday he called the bleeding "worrysome" and and told me to take it easy and that the bleeding means the baby my be trying to miscarry. My question is: I heard women say they had the periods throughout there whole pregnany, but technically it can not have been a real period... so were you bleeding from a fibroid? How often did you bleed? And did the baby live full term? How about delivery? C-section? Please keep in mind I have a uterine fibriod.. one near my cervix.

    • ANSWER:
      I was recently diagnoised as having a fibroid tumor about a month ago but I am not pregnant. During my first pregnancy I did start bleeding. It was heavy like a regular period and even some clotting. I went to the er convinced that I had miscarried but the baby's heartbeat was fine. I bled for the first 3 months of that pregnancy and I did carry to full term and have a healthy 16 year old son now. So don't worry especially if there is no cramping. Just stay off of your feet as much as possible during the bleeding. Oh, and congratulations.

  46. QUESTION:
    effects of a complete hysterectomy?
    I am fourty seven and my doc is suggesting removing my uterus due to fibroids. I am considering having my ovaries removed also. Can any woman give me their feed back on their similar experience?

    • ANSWER:
      I don't think it's a good choice. Besides why would you remove your ovaries as well, it can kill your sexlife permanently if you do (as well as the hysterectomy that cause many othe rproblems as well)/

      Dr Mercola about unnecessary hysterecomy: "It is widely recognized that many hysterectomies are unnecessary. Well over half of them are done for uterine fibroids. Obstet Gynecol February 2000;95(2):199-205. This is usually due to estrogen excess, which can be balanced by a number of simple strategies including the following:

      Optimize your diet by lowering your insulin levels. Over two-thirds of the U.S. is overweight. This extra weight increases insulin levels, causing estrogen excess to increase. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord July 2002;26(7):883-96 Reducing your grain intake and following the eating plan is one of the best ways to help rebalance your hormonal system.
      Natural progesterone can be used while your system is rebalancing. If you use natural progesterone, it is important to avoid using the cream unless you plan on monitoring your levels by saliva testing."

      "The percentage of hysterectomies which are truly necessary is subject to some debate. According to Dr. West, " more than 90 percent of hysterectomies are unnecessary. Worse still, the surgery can have long-lasting physical, emotional and sexual consequences that may seriously undermine a woman's health and well-being".5 All authorities agree agree, however, that 90 percent of the procedures are "elective", that there are alternatives in at lest 90 percent of cases and that less than 10 percent of the operations are in fact medically necessary."

      "Fibroids: Fibroids are the primary reason women in their thirties and forties are recommended hysterectomies and occur in some 30-50 percent of women. Fibroids are benign, non-cancerous lumps of the muscular wall of the uterus, composed of smooth muscle and connective tissue. They are rarely solitary. and never life threatening although at times they can become uncomfortable and problematic. Most, however cause no problems and shrink at menopause when oestrogen levels decrease. Fibroids are a product of oestrogen dominance: oestrogen stimulates their growth and lack of oestrogen causes them to atrophy

      Dr. John Lee, author of What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Menopause , has successfully stopped the growth of fibroids and, in some cases, eliminated them completely by using natural progesterone creams which counter the oestrogen dominant effect.

      Dietary changes are also quite effective. Dr. Christianne Northrup has found that, "A woman who...(adopts) a low-fat, high fibre, mostly vegetarian diet will often experience decreased bleeding, bloating and even decrease in t he size of her fibroids. The diet she recommends eliminates dairy products, red meat, chicken and refined sugar. It is advised to eat organically grown food as much as possible to eliminate the oestrogenic effects from pesticides and herbicides. Dr. Northrup reports that "The vast majority of women who treat fibroids though diet get rid of their pain and heavy bleeding within three to six months".27

      Surgery is usually only appropriate when women have heavy bleeding or pain that cannot be alleviated in any other way, if they want to become pregnant and the fibroids are a significant hindrance or if the fibroids are interfering with the function of other organs. Even when surgery is required, however, there is usually a better choice than hysterectomy. A procedure called myomectomies which removes the fibroids while leaving the uterus intact does not cause the multitude of problems and symptoms associated with "post-hysterectomy syndrome". However, myomectomies require more skill of the surgeon."
      source:http://www.rense.com/health3/hyster.htm

  47. QUESTION:
    Will small fibroid cause me problems during labour? Pls answer ?
    I have been told before I have a small
    uterine fibroid which is behind my
    womb... I would like to know if this could
    cause me problems during labour ....I'm
    currently 29 weeks pregnant.. I don't
    wanna go through c section... Anyone else been through this before? Pls answer

    • ANSWER:
      When I had my 2nd baby I found out that I have uterine fibroids as well. I had to have a c-section because my first baby was born via c-section. The only thing it caused me was extra bleeding after I had her. I had a pump, drain type thing hanging out of my incision while I was in the hospital.
      I don't know how that would affect a vaginal delivery, though. Unless your doctor tells you about any problems that would be brought about by a vaginal delivery you shouldn't have to worry about a c-section just because of the fibroids.

  48. QUESTION:
    I'm worried that I may have cervical cancer or another type, roughly around the time of my periods I had?
    a very heavy bleeding (clots and stuff) sorry for being very graphic. Then straight after that had lasted for a week, I had severve pains below my navel around my cervix etc, the pain has gone now but I feel tingling sensations

    I thought I was pregnant (as I have the IUD)but a doctor who was not helpful said no, he said I had an urine infection and gave me antibiotics, but I had no real symptoms for that, plus another doctor said that was not right.

    I no I'm dooming and glooming but think its cancer, or could it be fibroids as this was nearly a problem with my last child shes a todddler.

    • ANSWER:
      It sounds very much like fibroid. I had the same thing and had a hysterectomy. There is another procedure called Thermo Ablation, it is where they burn the lining of your uterus. I also had this done at first and it worked for a while , but every person is different and I developed some more problems. See a Gyn ASAP. Ask around and find one with a good rep in your area. You may also could take Birth control; pills, some times they work wonders. Just see a Dr., you will soon feel better.

  49. QUESTION:
    Bleeding while pregnant?
    Hello All,

    I am 17weeks pregnant with my 2nd child and have had brown bleeding. I went in at 15 weeks for an ultra sound and everything came out great. I do have Fibroids and had them with my 1st child. They were very painful but I had NO bleeding with him. I was just put on a 2 weeks pelvic rest by my doctor to see if the bleeding would go away. It went away for about a week and then it came back. The bleeding is not in the amount that you would need like a big pad but enough to ruin my underwear. I am just really confused and my doctor is acting like it really isn't a concern because it is brown. I just would like to know if anyone else has or is experiencing this. And if so what is it caused from.
    FYI my 1st child is 2 and is about 30lbs, I do not lift him hardly at all only when I have to. Like going to get in the car into the bathtub ect. Please only serious answers...:)

    • ANSWER:

  50. QUESTION:
    I've missed my period but i keep finding spotted bits of blood... help?
    I've had my period more then a year now, but it's not even (or however you would say it) I've had sex multiple times once was quite recent, i missed my period last month, and i still don't have it now. I'm vegetarian so mum thinks that could be affecting my cycle in the past week I've found spots of blood.. Someone wanna fill me in with why its happening maybe? haha thanks, preciate it <3

    • ANSWER:
      A missed or late period is usually considered as the first sign of pregnancy by most women of childbearing age or who are trying to conceive. While for women who are not trying to conceive or are not ready to take on the responsibilities of motherhood, it can be a sign of worry or panic. However, unlike this common belief that missing a period means a woman is pregnant, there are various other factors besides pregnancy that can lead to a late or missed period. Basically, period or menstrual cycle is caused by the uterus shedding the lining it builds every month in which a fertilized egg can implant itself after which a woman is considered to be pregnant. If there's no fertilization, the egg and uterine wall get shed, leading to bleeding and clots that a woman experiences at least once a month. Whereas if the egg gets fertilized by a sperm, it implants itself in to the uterine wall, the uterus does not shed lining and there will be no monthly period. Hence, if a woman is pregnant she will instantly start missing her periods. But this is not always the case, as sometimes a woman can have late a period, which is much lighter than the normal spotting that one experiences even after getting pregnant. However, as I said before pregnancy can't be only the reason for late period or delayed period spotting. There are various other reasons as well that may result in such a condition.

      Implantation Bleeding
      Often mistaken for period, implantation bleeding is considered to be one of the most common cause for late period spotting which occurs when the fertilized egg or embryo implants itself in the uterus. The bleeding is usually lighter than the normal period bleeding and occurs nearly at the same time or a few days after your expected period would occur. The spotting appears light pink or brown in color and normally lasts just for a couple of days.

      Birth Control Pill
      Irregular period spotting or bleeding is common if a woman begins her first cycle of birth control pills or if pills are either missed or taken late. However, the bleeding usually subsides by the end of the third cycle of birth control pills but it is a bit heavier than spotting.

      Stress
      Another reason for late period brown spotting is stress. Basically if a woman is under stress, the adrenal glands release a hormone called cortisol that directly affects the production and functioning of reproductive hormones like estrogen, progesterone and DHEA in the body. Hence, stress can delay your menstrual cycle and can also cause spotting in some cases.

      Other Causes
      Poor diet, strenuous exercise, sudden weight gain, emotional trauma, illness, smoking, medications, caffeine, alcohol, uterine abnormalities like fibroids, cysts, polyps, endometriosis, etc., are some other probable causes that may affect your regular menstrual cycle and lead to late period spotting.

      Although late period spotting in most cases is not a sign to panic or to get worried about, if you are sexually active and trying to conceive, it is better to clear your doubts by performing a home pregnancy test. Besides this, by making some healthy changes in your lifestyle like quitting drinking and smoking, doing yoga or meditation and eating a healthy and balanced diet you can surely overcome this problem. However, if the problem persists for more than one menstrual cycle, it is recommended to consult a doctor to elucidate the case.

bleeding fibroids while pregnant

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