Are Fibroids And Cysts The Same

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What is the different to fibroid and cyst?
    Normally, I saw people posted - fibroids in the uterus, cysts in the ovaries. Other than the location, are they the same things or different type of growing substances?

    • ANSWER:
      A cyst has fluid (pus) inside it and a fibroid is made up of tissue. Cysts & fibroids can occur anywhere in the body.

  2. QUESTION:
    Difference between a cyst lump, and cancer lump?
    What is the difference in feel of a cancer lump, and a fibroid?

    I have had the same lump in my breast for about a year, and my doctor says it's fibroid cyst. She did not run a biopsy, but did to a mammogram. The lump has not gotten bigger throughout the year.

    I did notice another lump in the same breast about 2 weeks ago.

    I'm a bit worried, as my breast has has had a dull pain in it for the past month. I have been drinking a lot of caffeine though.

    • ANSWER:
      A cyst has a round shape, whereas cancer will have an irregular shape. Also, a cyst will have what is called an "encapsulated" feel when you touch it...you can sort of move it around under your skin. Not so with cancer.

  3. QUESTION:
    Do most people ovulate from the same ovary every month or do I have a problem?
    I seem to be having a sharp pain on right side about 3x a month at different times and am concerned I might have a fibroid/cyst..or does this mean my right ovary is the one getting ready to ovulate?

    • ANSWER:
      Could be a cyst..you wouldn't be ovulatiing 3x's a month. I always got pain like that when I was ovulating... I've had cysts before and strong ovulation symptoms both felt somewhat similar.

  4. QUESTION:
    My doctor just found out that I have a large ovarian cyst and an enlarged uterus what do I do?
    I had surgery in February to remove a cyst however, when they got in there they found out that it was not actually a cyst it was a tumor so they removed my entire right ovary. He also tied my tubes when he did the surgery. Now I am having pain on the left side. My doctor did an ultrasound and found that there is another cyst now on my left ovary and I have an enlarged uterus. I am only 26 and I really don't want to start thinking about a hysterectomy. Do I really even have any other options?

    • ANSWER:
      I think, if you go to your doc. the same thing might happen.
      It all depends what kind of cyst you have & why your uterus is enlarged ( you might have fibroids). I would seek out a specialist & see, if your remaining ovary can be saved. I would also try to save your eggs, if you want children in the future. I would check in with your female relatives (mom, sister or aunt) & see if this is hereditary. Perhaps, you need to make some life style changes & find out why your body is producing the cysts.

  5. QUESTION:
    What causes a very short period all of a sudden?
    Last month i got my period a day early and it lasted a day and a half which for me is wierd because i usually get my period for about 5 days. And now the same thing this month. Why is it only lasting 1 or 2 days all of a sudden? What could cause this? I havent changed anything and im not on birth control pills or stressed.

    • ANSWER:
      This is actually much more common than you might think. Most irregular periods are benign - nothing to worry about. Missed periods, too frequent periods, spotting, light periods, or bouts of heavy clotting and bleeding are usually caused by an underlying hormonal imbalance that is easily treated.

      A wide variety of factors can be responsible for irregular periods, among them:

      Significant weight gain or loss
      Over-exercise
      Poor nutrition (or a diet too high in carbohydrates)
      Smoking
      Drug use
      Caffeine
      Excessive alcohol use (interfering with how the liver metabolizes estrogen and progesterone)
      Eating disorders
      Increased stress
      Polycystic ovarian syndrome/estrogen dominance
      Uterine abnormalities (fibroids/cysts/polyps/endometriosis)
      Hormonal imbalance related to perimenopause
      Medications
      Chemotherapy
      Recent childbirth, miscarriage, or D&C
      Breastfeeding

      Check here for more information.

      http://www.womentowomen.com/menstruation/irregularperiods.aspx

  6. QUESTION:
    What is wrong and or is there something wrong when you get your periods twice in one month?
    The first period was dark and longer than usual - but not longer than 7 days, 3 days after I started getting my period again ib the same month, 3 days after I stopped with my first period and it was just like I started again for 2 days and it stopped. There wasn't a lot of blood.

    • ANSWER:
      Periods that are too frequent (more often than every 28 days also called "metrorrhagia") can be related to several predisposing factors:

      If the periods are otherwise normal, then a short "luteal phase" or insufficient ovarian production of progesterone may be responsible. If the periods are inconsistent, then failure to ovulate and the resulting anovulatory bleeding may be responsible. If the periods are actually normal and once a month, but there are episodes of bleeding in between the periods, then mechanical factors such as fibroids or polyps may be responsible. Women with hyperthyroidism are classically described as experiencing frequent, heavy periods. They, in reality, rarely show that pattern, but we usually screen these patients for thyroid disease anyway.

      Early stages of pregnancy might be a possible cause as well, but it could happen if you change your eating habits, are stressed, have a lot on your mind, etc. Our emotions and hormones collide a lot.

      I've experienced frequent periods too in the past that was caused by ovarian cysts.

      There could be other causes for the frequent periods you are experiencing and I would recommend you see your doctor/gyno for further evaluation to see what they think could be causing this.

      Good luck :)

  7. QUESTION:
    Can your periods be different every month?
    for the past 6 or 7 months my period have been the same. starting at the very end of the month. but last month it came early. starting in the middle of the month. my question is, is it gonna start bein like that, or could it have just been that month? because i have not had a period this month yet and i don't know if im pregnant or not.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, here are some facts about irregular menstrual cycles. I hope this helps you to answer a few of your questions. Take care.
      Cycles between 23–35 days are very common. A woman may get her period only one to four times a year. Or she might have periods that occur two to three times in a month and involve spotting or extremely heavy flow. Alternatively, she may have heavy episodes of bleeding every two to three months. Irregular periods are simply what is irregular for you.

      For the most part, we don’t worry at the clinic about a missed period or two over the course of a year. More variation than that may indicate to us the beginning of perimenopause or a disruption of the natural chain of hormonal events that controls menstruation. A wide variety of factors can be responsible for irregular periods, among them:

      Significant weight gain or loss
      Over-exercise
      Poor nutrition (or a diet too high in carbohydrates)
      Smoking
      Drug use
      Caffeine
      Excessive alcohol use (interfering with how the liver metabolizes estrogen and progesterone)
      Eating disorders
      Increased stress
      Polycystic ovarian syndrome/estrogen dominance
      Uterine abnormalities (fibroids/cysts/polyps/endometriosis)
      Hormonal imbalance related to perimenopause
      Medications
      Chemotherapy
      Recent childbirth, miscarriage, or D&C
      Breastfeeding

      As you can see, there are many different ways a woman can be irregular for as many different reasons, and it can be very confusing when it happens.

      http://www.womentowomen.com/menstruation…

  8. QUESTION:
    Can I get a hysterectomy WHILE on my period?
    I'm scheduled for a hysterectomy the same time I'm scheduled for my period. Should I reschedule my hysterectomy?

    • ANSWER:
      No need; it should have no bearing on the surgery whatsoever. Many women undergo pelvic surgery for hysterectomy, fibroids, Endometriosis, cysts, etc. and do so while menstruation. While you might feel uncomfortable about it (though you shouldn't; gyn surgical teams see it all the time), it doesn't phase the surgical team at all. You will be given a pad in the pre-op and holding areas; once you get in the operating room, it will be removed and you will be prepped and draped. Don't give the whole thing a second thought. Good luck with your surgery.

  9. QUESTION:
    Bleeding on the pill during sex, worried about having my first smear test?
    I've been bleeding lately during sex, I've been on the same pill for nearly 5 year's. I know its stupid but im really scared about having a smear test. My sisters and mum all had irregular results. None of them ended up being anything major, but my Grandma recently died of ovarian cancer. Whats the test like, what should i expect?

    • ANSWER:
      Bleeding during or after sex is not considered normal and therefore should be evaluated at all times. The only time bleeding during or after sex is considered normal in some cases is if you are having sexual intercourse for the first time.

      Some causes of vaginal bleeding after sex, such as vaginal dryness after menopause or in some cases by the use of certain types of birth control pills are not serious and may be easily treated.

      However, in some cases, vaginal bleeding after sex can be a sign of a serious underlying problem, including:

      * Inflammation of the cervix (cervicitis).
      * Sexually transmitted diseases, such as chlamydia or gonorrhea.
      * Cervical polyps.
      * Cervical ectropion, a condition in which the cervical tissue is more susceptible to abrasion.
      * Endometriosis or ovarian cysts.
      * Pelvic inflammatory disease.
      * Uterine fibroids.
      * Cancer of the cervix, uterus or vagina.

      If you continue to experience bleeding during or after sex, I would recommend that you consult with your doctor/gynaecologist to see what they think could be causing this.

      Good luck :)

  10. QUESTION:
    Do ovarian cysts usually need to be surgically removed?
    I was told today after getting MRI results that I need to see an oncologist. I always thought that most ovarian cysts and fibroids are not cancer. I have no symptoms, no pain, no bleeding.
    Do you think I'll have to have that godd-awful test called a 'Hysterosonography?'
    the report mentioned that I should go for a transvaginal sonogram for more information.

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease or cancer related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman's childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain - constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that you discuss all the details such as the type of cyst, size of cyst etc with your doctor/gyno and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 10 years and have had to have surgery 2 times to the cysts removed (it wasn't anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  11. QUESTION:
    can they tell the differance between a fibroid tumor and cancer with a pelvic ultrasound?
    same with ovarian cysts....can they tell whether it is a cyst or cancer with the ultrasound?

    what tests am I facing next?

    • ANSWER:
      they can't really tell whether you have Cancer or not just from the ultrasound. they have to do a biopsy. when I had uterine fibroids, my OB had a biopsy done to send to the lab to see if they were cancerous. what they do is they take a sample of cells and tissue from the uterus, (they scrape a small sample of that from your uterus) then send it to the lab and get the results. then they take it from there. when I had mine done, I took a couple of ibuprofen to take the edge off of the pain before the procedure. Good luck and I hope things go well with you. you can e-mail me if you have questions.

  12. QUESTION:
    where can i find info about fibro adenoma?
    I have this disease since I was in high school and have had two surgeries to remove the fibroid adenomas but they continue to come back so I want to learn as much as I can as far as self education about the causes and if it can lead to breast cancer. Just wondered if any one else has experienced this and knows anything about it? Anything will be appreciated! Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      *I found this for you. The second paragraph talks about breast cancer. I hope this helps :)

      Fibroadenoma

      A fibroid adenoma is the most common cause for a lump in young women, often between the ages of 15-30. In contrast to a cyst a fibroadenoma is a solid lump comprising, as the name suggests, swirls of fibrous tissue with occasional compressed breast ducts. Fibroadenomas are entirely painless, and once again they probably arise due to hormonal changes in the breast. As a consequence, the lump may arise in an area of the breast were there is already more generalized hormonal breast pain and tenderness giving the false impression that the lump is causing the pain. Fibroadenomas tend to slowly grow to around 1-2cm in diameter and then stop growing. Most women will first become aware of a fibroadenoma when it is already around this size and it is therefore most common for fibroadenomas to seem to stay approximately the same size and not to grow noticeably. Since they are solid lumps fibroadenomas generally do not disappear, although during pregnancy they may undergo noticeable changes resulting in either their disappearance or their progressive enlargement.

      Fibroadenomas are entirely harmless and never turn into breast cancer. All fibroadenomas should however be carefully checked to prove their identity conclusively. Some fibroadenomas can feel very similar to small breast cancerous lumps, and although this is uncommon it is the reason why careful investigations, usually including an ultrasound and needle biopsy are very important. Once a lump has been shown to be definitely a fibroadenoma it is safe to leave. Alternatively a fibroadenoma can be removed by a small operation. A new treatment for fibroadenomas involves removal of the lump through a suction needle leaving only a pin point scar. Fibroadenomas that increase in size or that appear in any way abnormal on the ultrasound scan or needle test should be removed for safety sake.

  13. QUESTION:
    What could have cause a sharp pain in my lower stomach?
    For the last week or so I've been having dull cramps and this morning I was woken up to an extremely sharp pain, it felt like I was being stabbed, in my lower stomach but more towards the left side. I'm on birth control and I'm very good at taking it the same time everyday so I don't think I could be pregnant although I know it could be a possibility. What could have caused this??

    • ANSWER:
      Abdominal/pelvic pain that is similar to that of period cramping may indicate a problem in a reproductive organ (like the pain around your ovaries or uterus).

      This includes conditions such as endometriosis (when tissue from the uterus is displaced to somewhere else like the pelvic wall or ovaries), uterine fibroids (thick bands of muscular and fibrous tissue in the uterus), ovarian cysts, ovarian cancer (rare), or pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) infection of the reproductive organs, usually from a sexually transmitted disease.

      If you have pain in your ovary area, you might have an ovarian cyst. I have experienced that same type of pain whenever I have had an ovarian cyst. I was also diagnosed with endometriosis in 2007 which caused me severe pelvic pain and intense and painful period cramping.

      Based on your symptoms and what you wrote, I would recommend that you should see your doctor/gynaecologist, just to rule out any serious causes.

      Good luck :)

  14. QUESTION:
    How do you know if you are infertile?
    So I was wondering. How does a girl find out if she is infertile? And of course, this is with out having sex and not getting prego for a long time, because that is just obvious.

    What do doctors do to find out? Are there symptoms or something? Is it different for everyone or pretty much the same?

    Just curious...

    • ANSWER:
      There are many tests doctors can do to check. The first one they usually do is a simple blood test at a couple specific times of the month. This checks to make sure you ovulate. If that comes back positive, then they will check your ovaries and uterus to make sure that every thing is functioning normally.

      There are no symptoms relating to infertility, except for the obvious: more than 12 months of actively trying to conceive and having no luck.

      That being said, there are also certain illnesses that can contribute to infertility. Fibroids or uterine cysts, PCOS, irregular ovulation/periods and others can lead to problems.

  15. QUESTION:
    How do I go about being tested for infertility?
    I am 23 and married for a year and a half...We want to have a baby (my husband has a good job and I am in school) I want to know though how I go about getting fertility test done? Do I go to my primary care doctor and let her know my concerns or do I go to a different doctor? Will they want me to do anything on my own first?

    • ANSWER:
      First, you have to have reasons to believe you have fertility problems, or there is no reason to be tested. The doctors generally won't issue tests, and insurance won't cover them without reason. Most doctors won't test someone as young as you until you've been trying to conceive for one year. It can take a healthy couple up to a year to conceive, so unless it has been longer than that, or you're having other problems like irregular cycles or pains, keep on trying.

      Once you've done that, tell your doctor (your OBGYN, not your general doctor) how long you've been trying and that you want to start fertility testing. The first tests they will do are blood tests, testing your hormone levels, thyroid function, and other things. Then, your husband should have his sperm tested by dropping it off at a lab. They can test for motility & count to make sure he isn't the problem. If both of those tests go well, you'll be sent for a transvaginal ultrasound. That is an internal ultrasound using a wand (it doesn't hurt). They will look for any inflammation of the uterus or fallopian tubes, and look at your ovaries & uterine lining. If everything there looks normal, you'll be send for more invasive testing.

      The next test is generally an HSG. This is to test to see if your tubes are blocked, if you have fibroids, endometriosis or cysts. A catheter is inserted into your uterus, and fluid is inserted. If it flows through your tubes, they are clear. If not, they may be blocked. Another option for a test is laproscopy, where a small incision is made in your abdomen and a small camera is inserted. Doctors can see everything going on, and possibly clear out any scar tissue or adhesions.

      Many OBGYN's are fertility experts. If yours is not, they will refer you to a specialist who will talk to you about your history. They will establish which tests you need and in which order you'll need them. Most of the tests don't hurt, but they aren't really fun to get either. Most women will conceive within a year, so do try for that long before you put yourself through the stress of fertility testing. You're really young, and any doctor is going to encourage you to do the same thing prior to any testing.

      Make sure you regularly work out, avoid drinking & smoking, avoid caffeine, eat healthy, and take a daily multi-vitamin when trying to conceive. All of these things enhance your chances each cycle!

      Good luck!

  16. QUESTION:
    Both fallopian tubes are blocked with fibroid?
    Hi my friend has recently found that her fibroids are blocking her both the fallopian tubes. She wants to be mother she is around 27 yr of age with no child. She is open for any treatment like aurveda, homeopathy(Dr said its too big to be cured by homeopaty),surgery, meditation, reiki, anything anyone knows about it Pl. tell .

    • ANSWER:
      Enzymes....a product called viatlzym. It has an enzyme called serrapeptase that eats dead matter. Lot's of women use it for fibroids. Also nattokinase is used to do the same.

      There is an herbal combination called cinnamon and poria that is good for fibroids and cyst's. It is in chinese medicine.

      Both of these remedies need to be taken long term to work. It does not work overnight.

      tell your friend talk to her doctor about different alternatives available to her and the effects on your reproductive system for trying them. Talk to many doctors as possible and see if she can combine alternative and conventional means to heal her condition. Acupunture is also used for healing fibroids.

  17. QUESTION:
    Could menstual cramps that are way worse than normal be a sign of an std?
    I had a condom slip off once during sex, and duing my next period I had worse cramps than normal. Is this a possible sign of an std? If so, which ones?

    You don't need to tell me to get tested, I am planning on it. But I was just wondering if you know this to be a symptom or if there could be another cause.

    • ANSWER:
      Painful period cramps that are worse than normal may indicate a problem in a reproductive organ. This includes conditions such as endometriosis (when tissue from the uterus is displaced to somewhere else like the pelvic wall or ovaries), uterine fibroids (thick bands of muscular and fibrous tissue in the uterus), ovarian cysts, ovarian cancer (rare), or pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) which is an infection of the reproductive organs, usually from a sexually transmitted disease.

      The key is to know when you must seek medical care right away. In many cases you can simply wait to see whether it goes away in a few days or call your doctor at a later time if the symptoms persist. I would recommend however that if it doesn't go away within a couple of days you have to go see a doctor or a nurse at a clinic for further evaluation.

      I experienced the same painful menstrual like cramps before, during and after my period and 3 weeks ago through a laparoscopy found out that I have endometriosis.

      Good luck :)

  18. QUESTION:
    I've gotten my period twice for the past two months, whats goin on?
    I just turned 31 in August and I've never had issues with my cycle. However, this August I started and ended my cycle like normal, but three days after it ended I got it again only darker and not so heavy. The second time I got it it lasted about the same amount of time as my normal cycle which is 7 days. This month, which is September, the same thing happened. Is this something serious or does this happen to every woman at one point or another?

    • ANSWER:
      I've been having issues (not the same ones) so I've been asking a lot of questions recently. What I do know is this:
      #1. bleeding that much can make you anemic so I'd start iron pills immediately AND make an appointment to be tested for anemia
      #2. this can happen for a number of reasons - maybe you have a hemmorheagic cyst? Maybe you have fibroids or pollyps or some other problems in there. It is NOT usual...any varying from the norm they say is worth getting it looked into. Periods may change with age, but not comes twice in a row only days apart.
      #3. this happened to my friend in her thirties and she needed a hysterectomy...but hers was related to having been on The Pill (BC pill) for too long.

      DEFINITELY not normal. be checked!

      good luck!

  19. QUESTION:
    What is causing lower left abdominal cramping?
    This is the second day I've had it. This is gross, but there is a lot of gas associated with the pain as well. My lower left back hurts as well.

    I recently went off the pill 2 weeks ago. Could this be premenstrual symptoms? I forgot what they were like. It's been 7 years since I've had a real period.

    Thanks in advance for your help!

    • ANSWER:
      Abdominal/pelvic pain that is similar to that of period cramping may indicate a problem in a reproductive organ (like the pain around your ovaries or uterus).

      This includes conditions such as endometriosis (when tissue from the uterus is displaced to somewhere else like the pelvic wall or ovaries), uterine fibroids (thick bands of muscular and fibrous tissue in the uterus), ovarian cysts, ovarian cancer (rare), or pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) infection of the reproductive organs, usually from a sexually transmitted disease.

      If you have pain in your ovary area, you might have an ovarian cyst. I have experienced that same type of pain whenever I have had an ovarian cyst. I was also diagnosed with endometriosis last year which caused me severe pelvic pain and intense and painful period cramping.

      If a gynaecological reason cannot be found for the pain you are experiencing, then it could be a gastroenterology problem which could be caused by excessive gas, chronic constipation, viral gastroenteritis (stomach flu), IBS (Irritable bowel syndrome), heartburn or indigestion, gastroesophageal reflux, ulcers, cholecystitis (inflammation of the gallbladder) with or without gallstones, appendicitis (inflammation of the appendix), diverticular disease, including inflammation of small pouches that form in the large intestines (diverticulitis), bowel obstruction (in addition to pain, this causes nausea, bloating, vomiting, and inability to pass gas or stool), food allergies, food poisoning (salmonella, shigella), hernia, kidney stones, UTI’s (urinary tract infections), pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas) or dissecting abdominal aortic aneurysm (bleeding into the wall of the aorta).

      Based on your symptoms and what you wrote, I would recommend that you should see your doctor/gynaecologist, and if nothing is found that you see a gastroenterologist just to rule out any serious GI causes.

      Good luck :)

  20. QUESTION:
    How long after pains does your period start?
    My period isn't regular (well, it's kinda anywhere from 3-5 weeks each time)
    It has now been 3 weeks, and i have started getting very mild period pains. How long on average does your period start after getting mild pains? Only i desperately need it to wait until sunday as i kinda have 'plans' saturday! :L

    • ANSWER:
      Cramping But No Period: Why

      Cramping during menstruation period is quite normal. Contraction of uterine muscles discharge the uterine lining from the body. Muscular cramping causes abdominal cramps. The pain is quite normal and is a healthy sign of normal cycles. The two hormones, estrogen and progesterone start playing a key role. Once the menstrual cycle is over, your body starts preparing itself once again for ovulation. Thus, mild cramping during ovulation is a genuine symptom, unless it becomes severe.

      The most common reason behind cramping without period is delayed menstrual cycle. It normally happens if you are experiencing stress (physical and mental) or getting exposed to environmental changes. Your food habits and lifestyle also play an important role in controlling the activity of hormones. Delayed periods is one of the effects of disturbance in ovulation process and cramping takes place more often. It might also result from endometriosis or uterine fibroids. Both the conditions are extremely painful, marked by severe cramping.

      Period like symptoms or menstrual cramping without periods is also included under premenstrual syndrome. It's very irritating to experience the cramps without occurrence of periods. Other symptoms associated with PMS are nausea, dizziness, morning sickness, mood swings, lack of sexual activity, loss of appetite, etc. The cramps actually indicate that your periods are about to start within a day or two. However, when you get persistent cramps but no period, then some other factors might also be associated with it.

      Cramping like symptoms without periods is an early sign of pregnancy. Such conditions are often confused with periods. Cramping in early pregnancy occurs because the uterine muscles expands to implant the embryo. Expansion of muscles causes much pain around the abdominal region and this is once again normal. But what would be the reason if you get a negative pregnancy test and simultaneously experience cramping without periods? Negative pregnancy test, cramping and no periods if occur at the same time, then you need an immediate medical check up. Severe cramping could be due to internal complications. The most common being Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) or ovarian cyst. PCOS occurs due to rise in androgen levels. It leads to formation of multiple cysts in the ovary. PCOS if not diagnosed at early stages causes infertility. If you observe irregular periods and experience severe cramping, then get yourself diagnosed properly to rule out any underlying condition. Disturbances in periods also arise if you are suffering from thyroid gland disorders and indigestion problems.

      You can definitely wait a week or so if your periods are getting delayed but make sure you go for a medical check up if the condition prevails and your periods are missed. You should never neglect any internal health complications to avoid aggravation of the symptoms.

  21. QUESTION:
    How can I tell if I have hyperovulation?
    I've been on birth control for about five years now. Before I was on I used to have heavy periods lasting for about two weeks straight. My mother has the same problem, however, she was able to get pregnant with twins. Sadly they did not make it. I have had numerous cysts on both my uterus and ovaries. Is it possible to tell if I will get that gene from my mother? Could I have hyperovulation?
    i.e twins do not run in my family... Im thinking my mom just got lucky.

    • ANSWER:
      Excessive and long lasting periods aren't always correlated with dropping more than one egg each cycle. It's good to know you have a history of cysts, you need to keep an eye on that because the scar tissue could actually render an ovary useless by damaging the fallopian tubes. Excessive bleeding can be a sign of fibroids in the uterus, so just keep an eye out for that. If your mom only conceived twins once in her life, chances are she isn't a hyperovulator, it was probably just by chance. Do you know if the twins were identical? If so, it means only one egg dropped. If they were fraternal twins, that indicates two fertilized eggs.

      Do you have excessive pain during your period? Chances are, since your mom is the same way, you just inherited this from her and that it's natural. For instance, my periods only last 1.5 days (and I'm not on the pill), but my mom's were light too and she had 4 kids so it doesn't mean she under-ovulates. May just be your body's reaction to hormone levels. And, since you're on the pill and it seems to have calmed things down, I would assume that is the case -- you genetically just have a higher hormone release than the average woman.

  22. QUESTION:
    What can I do without going to a doctor?
    I've been really depressed lately. Especially at home. My hubby keeps asking me what's wrong and I just say nothing, or I don't know. I just feel down, and very easily aggravated. I don't want to see a doctor. I don't want to be put on meds. I just wish I could snap out of this.

    • ANSWER:
      Oh, I have experience in this one. Hope you have time to read this. First of all, I need to tell you I am not a doctor, but a nurse. What I am going to tell you is my opinion based on my personal experiences and knowledge I have learned in my 21 years of nursing. OK?? Here it goes.

      1. What is your age? Women’s hormones change as we get older especially if we have had children. These changes affect your moods. Women, starting in their 30's, begin having these mood changes.
      2. Medical conditions, especially female related, can also alter your moods. Are you having periods, are they regular, is there any unusual pain? Could be fibroid cysts on the ovaries causing the mood changes or lack of hormone regulation if the ovaries are non-existent or not producing enough.
      3. Look at you diet. Too much sugar and caffeine, like most Americans? Try decreasing the amounts. Drink more water to flush your system. Lots of fiber to keep things moving. Lots of fruit and green veggies for the needed vitamins and iron. You might want to start taking vitamins if you feel your diet is not adequate.
      4. Stress: our body can NOT live without it. (LOL) But look at any new/major stressors in your life: relationships, death, money, jobs, safety, and comfort. You may need to alter something there. Now I'm not saying quit your current job, move out of your home and dump the hubby. But maybe there is something there that needs to be addressed. It's hard to tell with just this email. But talking about your feelings to your hubby is a good idea, even if he is the source. If its safety as in an abusive relationship: GET OUT.
      5. Other medical related issues: allergy to food or medication, etc. Warning signs of something more serious. Lack of exercise or community involvement. Get involved either in a church, school or some type of activity outside the home.
      6. Now all these are just the basics I tried to hit on. As you can see this can be a very difficult and complicated problem or it can be very simple as some minor adjustments in your life.
      As we age our body changes. It’s not uncommon to have these moods you described. Speaking from experience: 10 years ago I went through the same thing. I did not want to take medication, and I still hate to but I feel good when I do. Of course, my situation may be different than yours.

      This is what I suggest: take a look at the things I listed. See if you can change anything, no drastic changes though, that is not good either. If you EVER feel threatened, thoughts of hurting yourself or others, then you need professional help person to person by someone more qualified than I. Those are warning signs that there is a serious problem that needs to be addressed.
      Again, if any of these things don't work you WILL need to see your doctor or find a family practice or intermedical MD. Not a PSY. MD at first. Let them know your feelings, what is going on with you and how you want to combat the depression without drugs. This MD most likely will try to treat you without medications first. If unable to solve your problem, the next step would be a referral to a more specialized MD: PSY, Surgeon, Endocrinologist (deals with glands), etc.
      If your spouse is not the problem, or is partly but not a threat, bring him with you or at least a trusted friend.

      I know this is a lot to take in. I hope this helps. You can also do some internet searches for depression but stick only to the reputable sites for medical persons because you can not always believe what you find on the internet. Here are some choices listed with the "source list".

      Good Luck, and take care.

      Pegasus, LPN

  23. QUESTION:
    Is it okay to get massages while on Clomid?
    I go to a massage therapist once a week or every other week. I get therapeutic massages on my back, neck, and shoulders. I know that taking some meds while getting massages can have negitive affects. Is this okay to do?

    • ANSWER:
      There is no indication that a regular massage would interact with the medication. Call and ask your doctor or call and speak to a nurse at your physician's office for accurate medical advice.

      Why is this medication prescribed?

      Clomiphene is used to induce ovulation (egg production) in women who do not produce ova (eggs) but wish to become pregnant (infertility). Clomiphene is in a class of medications called ovulatory stimulants. It works similarly to estrogen, a female hormone that causes eggs to develop in the ovaries and be released.

      How should this medicine be used?

      Clomiphene comes as a tablet to take by mouth. It is usually taken once a day for 5 days, beginning on or about day 5 of the cycle. To help you remember to take clomiphene, take it around the same time every day. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Take clomiphene exactly as directed. Do not take more or less of it or take it more often than prescribed by your doctor.

      Other uses for this medicine

      Clomiphene is also sometimes used to treat male infertility, menstrual abnormalities, fibrocystic breasts, and persistent breast milk production. Talk to your doctor about the possible risks of using this medication for your condition.

      This medication may be prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

      What special precautions should I follow?

      Before taking clomiphene,

      tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to clomiphene or any other medications.

      tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking.

      tell your doctor if you have or have ever had liver disease, ovarian cysts (except those from polycystic ovary syndrome), uterine fibroids, abnormal vaginal bleeding, a pituitary tumor, or thyroid or adrenal disease.

      tell your doctor if you are pregnant or breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while taking clomiphene, call your doctor immediately.

      you should know that clomiphene may cause blurred vision. Do not drive a car or operate machinery, especially in poor lighting, until you know how this medication affects you.

      you should know that clomiphene increases the chance of multiple pregnancy (twins or more). Talk to your doctor about the risks of multiple pregnancy.

      What special dietary instructions should I follow?

      Unless your doctor tells you otherwise, continue your normal diet.

  24. QUESTION:
    Is there a chance that I could be pregnant?
    I'm worried because i haven't had my period for 2 months already and when i took a home pregnancy test it came out to be negative. I took it twice and both times with different brands and different times. My period always comes every month regularly and around the same time. Could I be pregnant?

    • ANSWER:
      If you've had sex there is always a chance you could be pregnant. I'd advise you to make an appointment and see a doctor right away. Stress, illness, endometriosis, fibroids, cysts, etc. can all make your period late.

  25. QUESTION:
    Is it normal to have a irregular period?
    I have a few questions of these things:

    is it normal?
    does it occur only by age or just normal to any age to have it?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, first of all, it can be normal depending on you and your age.How old are you? What I have learned is that what is normal for you , is more important than what may or may not be normal for someone else, even the same age as you.
      If you are very young, and have not been having your period for very long, than it can take awhile to learn what is normal for you. What is more important is to note what is normal for you. If you have allways had periods that last 3-5 days and you bleed moderately for 3 days and lightly for the remainder and bleed every 25-33 days and that is normal for you , then change to something like; bleeding heavily for 10 days straight, and your periods are closer together, having your periods come every 21 days, then that is abnormal for you and you should see a dr. to have it checked out.
      Also if you have new symptons regarding your period, other than the how many days they last, and how far apart your periods last, these are other things to note.

      Do you bleed very heavily;( soaking through a pad, overnighter or heavy pad, one every hour or more often is heavy.) do you pass blood clots, large as a peach pit for example, with painful cramps at the same time?Do you have lower groin pain, more than the usual cramps , do you have fever, urinary symptons of a U.T.I or other problem at same time as your period?If you have any of these symptons, then you should see your dr. or gynecologist to have them check you for hormone problem, problems with cysts, fibroids, etc.
      Sometimes taking hormones, ( the pill, patch, etc. can be an alternative if problem is severe, or very troublings.)
      If your periods become the opposite of heavy, very light, scant or stop all together, then other things should be considered; have you recently lost weight, are you on new medications, have you been sick, or experienced a lot of stress, had a baby or stopped nursing, etc.Sometimes women who are athletes, or women who starve themselves or are very thin may have their periods stop altogether. There are also different medical conditions that can affect your period, hormone problems, thryoid, etc.

      At the other end of normal, is when your periods get farther and farther apart, or change amount, etc, or they can become very heavy, is if you are going through peri-menopause, the period of time that can be years before you actually go through Menopause. Like I said, what is important is to know what is Normal for you, and discuss your concerns with a dr. who can tell you if you have anything to be concened about. You know your body better than anyone, including a dr. There are lots of good websites that discuss the Menses and can give you help with further information before deciding if you need, or want to see your dr. Good luck.

  26. QUESTION:
    What is this pelvic pain - constant period like cramps?
    I've been getting period like cramps constantly for about 5 weeks now. I am really unsure what it could be but it is worrying me a little. I have done internet searches which come up with pelvic inflammatory disease. I don't think it is this as it isn't chronic pain. I don't really have any other symptoms apart from occasional dizziness. My periods are normal. It is just like mild period pains.

    • ANSWER:
      Abdominal/pelvic pain that is similar to that of period cramping may indicate a problem in a reproductive organ (like the pain around your ovaries or uterus).

      This includes conditions such as endometriosis (when tissue from the uterus is displaced to somewhere else like the pelvic wall or ovaries), uterine fibroids (thick bands of muscular and fibrous tissue in the uterus), ovarian cysts, ovarian cancer (rare), or pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) infection of the reproductive organs, usually from a sexually transmitted disease.

      If you have pain in your ovary area, you might have an ovarian cyst. I have experienced that same type of pain whenever I have had an ovarian cyst. I was also diagnosed with endometriosis in 2007 which caused me severe pelvic pain and intense and painful period cramping.

      If a gynaecological reason cannot be found for the pain you are experiencing, then it could be a gastroenterology problem which could be caused by excessive gas, chronic constipation, viral gastroenteritis (stomach flu), IBS (Irritable bowel syndrome), heartburn or indigestion, gastroesophageal reflux, ulcers, cholecystitis (inflammation of the gallbladder) with or without gallstones, appendicitis (inflammation of the appendix), diverticular disease, including inflammation of small pouches that form in the large intestines (diverticulitis), bowel obstruction (in addition to pain, this causes nausea, bloating, vomiting, and inability to pass gas or stool), food allergies, food poisoning (salmonella, shigella), hernia, kidney stones, UTI’s (urinary tract infections), pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas) or dissecting abdominal aortic aneurysm (bleeding into the wall of the aorta).

      Based on your symptoms and what you wrote, I would recommend that you should see your doctor/gynaecologist, and if nothing is found that you see a gastroenterologist just to rule out any serious GI causes.

      Good luck :)

  27. QUESTION:
    What does it mean if your ovaries are hurting but you are not on your period?
    I just had my period last week. I am on the birth control patch. It seems like it is in my ovaries but it also feels like the pain travels down to the top part of my thigh. It is not excruciating but it is a uncomfortable! Any ideas?
    It only seems to be on one side though, my left side. It just seems kind of painful down my whole leg. So I doubt it is ovarion cancer. It kind of feels like growning pains to be if that makes any sense??!! :/

    • ANSWER:
      Abdominal/pelvic pain that is similar to that of period cramping may indicate a problem in a reproductive organ (like the pain around your ovaries or uterus).

      This includes conditions such as endometriosis (when tissue from the uterus is displaced to somewhere else like the pelvic wall or ovaries), uterine fibroids (thick bands of muscular and fibrous tissue in the uterus), ovarian cysts, ovarian cancer (rare), or pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) infection of the reproductive organs, usually from a sexually transmitted disease.

      If you have pain in your ovary area, you might have an ovarian cyst. I have experienced that same type of pain whenever I have had an ovarian cyst. I was also diagnosed with endometriosis last year which caused me severe pelvic pain and intense and painful period cramping.

      Based on your symptoms and what you wrote, I would recommend that you should see your doctor/gynaecologist, just to rule out any serious causes.

      Good luck :)

  28. QUESTION:
    Is it normal to skip a period after breakthrough bleeding?
    I had experienced breakthrough bleeding after missing my pill twice this month, it lasted for About the past 10 days, however I'm no longer spotting but my menstrual is three days late leaving me wondering if it will come at all. Has anyone experienced anything similar? Please help

    • ANSWER:
      Hello Leslie,

      Birth Control Pills Side Effects
      Women with certain health complications may experience more health risks after taking birth control pills than healthy women. Some of the medical conditions that have been known to amplify birth control side effects are liver diseases, diabetes, breast cancer, reproductive problems and high blood pressure conditions. Smoking also increases the chances of poor health and pregnancy issues resulting from birth control pills. That's why doctors advise women who take birth control pills, to avoid smoking. Depending on the chemical hormones present in your birth control pill that may be estrogen and progesterone, the side effects may vary.

      Headache, Dizziness and Breast Tenderness
      These are the most common side effects resulting from birth control pills' usage. Doctors advise women experiencing these effects not to panic or feel nervous as these effects subside within a few hours after taking the pills. In case, a woman experiences the same effects after taking the pills occasionally, changing brands can help.

      Nausea
      Nausea may fade away within a few weeks to a few months. Women using skin patches and rings can also try switching brands if they feel nauseated with the use of a particular birth control pills' brand.

      Low Libido
      Since birth control contraceptives bring changes in hormone production and release, women may experience lack of sex drive, when on birth control pills. In case of such side effects, it is safer to go for other methods of birth control.

      Bleeding
      It is not uncommon for women to experience vaginal bleeding when they are on birth control. Vaginal bleeding (or breakthrough bleeding), is generally experienced during the first few months of taking contraceptives. Breakthrough bleeding when on birth control pills, occurs as a result of the body's attempts to adjust to the hormonal changes caused by the pill intake.

      Mood Swings
      Birth control methods have a common side effect of causing mood swings in women. Similar to how hormonal changes in the course of a woman's menstrual cycle cause mood swings, birth control can have the same effect on women, on account of the hormonal changes it leads to.

      A wide variety of factors can be responsible for irregular periods, among them:

      Significant weight gain or loss
      Over-exercise
      Poor nutrition (or a diet too high in carbohydrates)
      Smoking
      Drug use
      Caffeine
      Excessive alcohol use (interfering with how the liver metabolizes estrogen and progesterone)
      Eating disorders
      Increased stress
      Polycystic ovarian syndrome/estrogen dominance
      Uterine abnormalities (fibroids/cysts/polyps/endometriosis)
      Hormonal imbalance related to perimenopause
      Medications
      Chemotherapy
      Recent childbirth, miscarriage, or D&C
      Breastfeeding

      Take care.

  29. QUESTION:
    What would cause these sharp pains down below?
    i've had sharp pains up inside my vagina resently to the point i have to stop whatever im doing its soo bad. im 18 years old and been with the same guy for 4 years but it happened when i first started haveing sex and i though it was cuz i wasnt use to it but now its happening again... i do have a history of Ovarian Cysts but its worrying me im scared there might be something wrong. i have a Doctor appt next week.. Any suggestions???

    • ANSWER:
      Examples of conditions of the reproductive organs giving rise to pain include endometriosis, pelvic inflammatory disease, ovarian cysts, fibroids and problems related to the early stages of pregnancy such as miscarriage and ectopic pregnancy.

  30. QUESTION:
    I have a pain on both of my ovaries I want to know what it is?
    I have a sharp pain on both of my ovaries, the pain keeps on getting worst as the days pass. Can anyone help me?
    So if its a cyst why do both of my ovaries hurt?

    • ANSWER:
      Abdominal/pelvic pain that is similar to that of period cramping may indicate a problem in a reproductive organ (like the pain around your ovaries or uterus).

      This includes conditions such as endometriosis (when tissue from the uterus is displaced to somewhere else like the pelvic wall or ovaries), uterine fibroids (thick bands of muscular and fibrous tissue in the uterus), ovarian cysts, ovarian cancer (rare), or pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) infection of the reproductive organs, usually from a sexually transmitted disease.

      If you have pain in your ovary area, you might have an ovarian cyst. I have experienced that same type of pain whenever I have had an ovarian cyst. I was also diagnosed with endometriosis last year which caused me severe pelvic pain and intense and painful period cramping.

      Based on your symptoms and what you wrote, I would recommend that you should see your doctor/gynaecologist, just to rule out any serious causes.

      Good luck :)

  31. QUESTION:
    What causes sharp intense pains in the lower belly?
    (and I don't mean gas........) I mean, it's a BIG cramp..........like, a "charley horse" in the lower belly, then, it goes away.....plus, my overies feel "brused" and my lower back hurts..........by the way, I am 20 years old, so I am NOT a "little Kid" Asking this question, as I know it sounds "plain and simple"....thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi...I had the same problem for like 12 yrs. ,and finally found a doctor that diagnosed me as having ENDOMETRIOSIS- check it out on any health website- it causes all kinds of pelvic and abdominal pain, it also hurts when you have sex, it can double you over at times - It usually hurts more on 1 side than it does on the other- It could also be fibroid cysts- You need to be checked out by your OB/GYN asap!! Best of Luck to you!

  32. QUESTION:
    On a TRANSABDOMINAL PELVIC SONOGRAM - what organs should be mentioned on the result?
    I did a transabdominal pelvic exam and I received the result showing just the uterus and ovaries.
    What else should be on the examination?
    I would like to have an answer from a person that did had a sonogram of the pelvic area (transabdominal) only.
    I have seen many sites on the internet and still did not find a good one, to show diff. from transabdominal and trans-vag.

    • ANSWER:
      We can see the same things on both transabdominal and transvaginal pelvic ultrasound. The same organs are visualized, just in a different way.

      A pelvic ultrasound will document the uterus and ovaries. We measure the uterus, image the endometrial stripe (the lining of the uterus which sheds with your period) and measure the stripe. We document any fibroids within the uterus or on the uterine wall. We measure both ovaries, and document and measure ovarian cysts if they are present. Uterine tubes (Fallopian tubes) are not seen on ultrasound unless they are abnormal...meaning hydrosalpinx or excessive fluid in the tubes which are causing them to be enlarged. We document any free fluid within the pelvic cavity. The full bladder can be seen on transabdominal pelvic ultrasounds, but we usually don't document it specifically. A bladder is measured and documented when we do a renal or abdominal ultrasound study, but not a pelvic study.

      A transvag. u/s will show the same things, but sometimes in greater detail. Transabdominal imaging may not be sufficient, due to patient size, bowel gas or incomplete filling of the bladder. Best wishes.....

      EDIT: By the way, the intestinal tract cannot be seen with ultrasound. The intestines contain air/gas, which blocks the sound waves. Ultrasound cannot see through air, which is the main reason we use a gel on the skin.....to create an air free contact between you and the transducer (camera).

  33. QUESTION:
    Got off of birth control, now I have spotting after sex?
    I got off of birth control about a month and a half ago, only because my prescription lapsed, and I haven't really had a period since. However, when I was supposed to have started, and when I would have sex, I would spot. And the same thing happened again recently. Is this normal at all?

    • ANSWER:
      Bleeding during or after sex is not considered normal and therefore should be evaluated at all times. The only time bleeding during or after sex is considered normal in some cases is if you are having sexual intercourse for the first time and the first few times after having sex for the first time.

      Some causes of vaginal bleeding after sex, such as vaginal dryness after menopause or in some cases by the use of certain types of birth control pills are not serious and may be easily treated.

      However, in some cases, vaginal bleeding after sex can be a sign of a serious underlying problem, including:

      * Inflammation of the cervix (cervicitis).
      * Sexually transmitted diseases, such as chlamydia or gonorrhea.
      * Cervical polyps.
      * Cervical ectropion, a condition in which the cervical tissue is more susceptible to abrasion.
      * Endometriosis or ovarian cysts.
      * Pelvic inflammatory disease.
      * Uterine fibroids.
      * Cancer of the cervix, uterus or vagina.

      If you continue to experience bleeding during or after sex, I would recommend that you consult with your doctor/gynaecologist to see what they think could be causing this.

      Good luck :)

  34. QUESTION:
    I have been spotting for a month and I also had a period. I do have cysts but could that be it?
    I have been to the doctor but they said I had some cysts. I know at least one ruptured. They gave me an ultrasound and said I might have a septation so then they sent me for an MRI but found nothing. I still have shooting pains every now and then and sometimes it brings me to my knees. I just want to know what is wrong and to get some real answers since no one is helping me.

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, it's possible the cysts could have something to do with the spotting but fibroids, polyps (usually benign nodules), and infection (such as with the cervix) can also cause this bleeding.

      I would recommend getting a second opinion preferably from a dr that does not share the same office of the dr you currently see to see what they think could be going on.

  35. QUESTION:
    Im 24 years old and Ive been having extreme pain to the left of the vaginal area.?
    I was diagnosed with urinary tract infections and put on a dose of rowatinex, fluconazole and lasix. Im happy to say that the burning and pain during urination did go away, however Im stuck with this irritable pain centered to the lest of my vaginal area and pain to the left of my pelvic area. What do you think it could be. The pain is so intense sometimes I just wanna die.

    • ANSWER:
      Abdominal/pelvic pain that is similar to that of period cramping may indicate a problem in a reproductive organ (like the pain around your ovaries or uterus).

      This includes conditions such as endometriosis (when tissue from the uterus is displaced to somewhere else like the pelvic wall or ovaries), uterine fibroids (thick bands of muscular and fibrous tissue in the uterus), ovarian cysts, ovarian cancer (rare), or pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) infection of the reproductive organs, usually from a sexually transmitted disease.

      If you have pain in your ovary area, you might have an ovarian cyst. I have experienced that same type of pain whenever I have had an ovarian cyst. I was also diagnosed with endometriosis last year which caused me severe pelvic pain and intense and painful period cramping.

      Based on your symptoms and what you wrote, I would recommend that you should see your doctor/gynaecologist, just to rule out any serious causes.

      Good luck :)

  36. QUESTION:
    Anyone have any luck getting pregnant on Serophene?
    I had a moral pregnancy last January and I just found out I have endometriosis. I will be started Serophene next week. So far my husband and I have had no luck on our own :( Has anyone had any luck on getting pregnant on Serophene??? Also, what cycle day do you try to conceive on?

    • ANSWER:
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  37. QUESTION:
    Is having your period 2 times a month normal?
    I'm 24 years old with two kids, and this months I got my period 2 times this months. my period hasn't been coming the same time lately. should I be worried?

    • ANSWER:
      Periods that are too frequent (more often than every 28 days also called "metrorrhagia") can be related to several predisposing factors:

      If the periods are otherwise normal, then a short "luteal phase" or insufficient ovarian production of progesterone may be responsible. If the periods are inconsistent, then failure to ovulate and the resulting anovulatory bleeding may be responsible. If the periods are actually normal and once a month, but there are episodes of bleeding in between the periods, then mechanical factors such as fibroids or polyps may be responsible. Women with hyperthyroidism are classically described as experiencing frequent, heavy periods. They, in reality, rarely show that pattern, but doctors usually screen these patients for thyroid disease anyway.

      Early stages of pregnancy might be a possible cause as well, but it could happen if you change your eating habits, are stressed, have a lot on your mind, etc. Our emotions and hormones collide a lot.

      I've experienced frequent periods too in the past that was caused by ovarian cysts.

      There could be other causes for the frequent periods you are experiencing and I would recommend you see your doctor/gyno for further evaluation to see what they think could be causing this.

      Good luck :)

  38. QUESTION:
    Women - have you ever had to have a cyst removed from your ovary?
    I will have to go for an op to get a cyst (fibroid i think) removed from my ovary. Has anyone done this, and how bad was the pain afterwards? I have heard its harder to fall pregnant after, has anyone had a baby after having it removed? thanks, i hate the thought of going under anesthetic and have not ever been to the hospital for anything before, apart from labour. But i have been told to get it removed.

    • ANSWER:
      I have had a cyst removed from my ovary before. My doctor drained the cyst.

      I have a friend who has had a fibroid removed from her uterus before. I have talked to other women who have had this done and depending on how the doctor removed it (depending on the location) it didn't affect their ability to get pregnant, but everyone is different.

      I would recommend getting another opinion before having surgery, preferably from someone that does not share the same office of the doctor you currently go to, to see what they say.

      In the mean time here's the link to a site that may help you find even more information. The link is at:

      http://forums.obgyn.net/womens-health

  39. QUESTION:
    there is pain in my cervic i think the ovary area?
    this has been going on for a few months but its an on and off thing.. i heard of the medical condition cyst? or worst cancer

    i never had sex before and i never been to any women tests (eg pap smear) etc..

    should i see a doctor? i am very worried and nervous because it will be my first time.

    • ANSWER:
      Abdominal/pelvic pain that is similar to that of period cramping may indicate a problem in a reproductive organ (like the pain around your ovaries or uterus).

      This includes conditions such as endometriosis (when tissue from the uterus is displaced to somewhere else like the pelvic wall or ovaries), uterine fibroids (thick bands of muscular and fibrous tissue in the uterus), ovarian cysts, ovarian cancer (rare), or pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) infection of the reproductive organs, usually from a sexually transmitted disease.

      If you have pain in your ovary area, you might have an ovarian cyst. I have experienced that same type of pain whenever I have had an ovarian cyst. I was also diagnosed with endometriosis last year which caused me severe pelvic pain and intense and painful period cramping.

      Based on your symptoms and what you wrote, I would recommend that you should see your doctor/gynaecologist, just to rule out any serious causes.

      Good luck :)

  40. QUESTION:
    Is it bad if you have your period two times in the same month?
    usually i get cramps so i know when im gonna start but this time i didnt; and this is my second time this month. is this bad or what?

    • ANSWER:
      Periods that are too frequent (more often than every 28 days also called "metrorrhagia") can be related to several predisposing factors:

      If the periods are otherwise normal, then a short "luteal phase" or insufficient ovarian production of progesterone may be responsible. If the periods are inconsistent, then failure to ovulate and the resulting anovulatory bleeding may be responsible. If the periods are actually normal and once a month, but there are episodes of bleeding in between the periods, then mechanical factors such as fibroids or polyps may be responsible. Women with hyperthyroidism are classically described as experiencing frequent, heavy periods. They, in reality, rarely show that pattern, but doctors usually screen these patients for thyroid disease anyway.

      Early stages of pregnancy might be a possible cause as well, but it could happen if you change your eating habits, are stressed, have a lot on your mind, etc. Our emotions and hormones collide a lot.

      I've experienced frequent periods too in the past that was caused by ovarian cysts.

      There could be other causes for the frequent periods you are experiencing and I would recommend you see your doctor/gyno for further evaluation to see what they think could be causing this.

      Good luck :)

  41. QUESTION:
    Is a total hysterectomy (where uterus and cervix are removed) hurt as much when the tubes and ovaries are also?
    removed. It is an abdominal cut.

    • ANSWER:
      A total hysterectomy can be performed in several different ways, but most doc's nowadays prefer to do it through a laparoscopy, which means they will use 3 small holes in your abdomen (one through your belly button and two below your panty line) to look into your abdomen. It is usually recommended to leave the tubes and ovaries unless they are damaged or are part of the problem to which you're having your hysterectomy in the first place. The ovaries are vital in your hormone function and will help menopause. If you have fibroids (growth on your uterus or ovaries), cysts (small "balloons" with fluid growing on your uterus or ovaries) or adhesions (tissue in your abdomen making the uterus difficult to locate or remove) then the doc might opt for making a bigger horizontal opening along your bikini line. It does not hurt more or less if you have only your uterus removed as supposed to having it all taken out at the same time. Hope some of this helps.

  42. QUESTION:
    my penis is too big for my wife how can i make it smaller?
    I have an 8in penis erect and it hurts my wife to have sex. She wants me to be about half that (3-4 in erect)but i don't know what to do. She wants to be able to have sex on top also but cant because of said problem. If anyone can help please do i need it and please be serious.
    if there is surgery for this how much is it or where can i go for info?

    • ANSWER:
      When a woman is fully aroused her vagina increases in length from about 4 inches to about 7 or 8 inches. So most penis sizes can be accomodated quite comfortably. Perhaps your wife needs more time and more stimulation to become aroused to the extent necessary. Maybe even a good hour of foreplay beforehand.
      Sometimes the penis can hit the cervix when the man thrusts deeply. That is uncomfortable. Perhaps when you are inside her your wife could hold your penis at the base therefore making it a couple of inches 'smaller'. There are also things you can buy that have the same function, fitting around the base of your penis so that it does not go in as far, while also feeling good for you. I forget what they are called but I'm sure some investigating on the internet should let you know.
      Sorry, just remembered! Its called 'come close'.
      Also try different positions where you are not going in so deeply. On top should be good for your wife because she can then control the depth of penetration herself.
      Lastly, you really are not so big that your wife should be in pain during sex. That really would just apply to someone freakishly large. Sex should never be painful and if it is then your wife should get checked out by a gynaecologist because it is a symptom of a number of medical problems that women can suffer from. For example, fibroids, endometriosis, ovarian cysts etc.
      Hope I helped a little. There is no way to make your penis smaller and really there is no need for it to be 3-4 inches in order for a woman to find it comfortable. Please make sure your wife gets checked out.

      EDIT - Please stop thinking about surgery! It is completely unneccessary as you are totally normal! It is NOT normal for a woman to want her husband to have surgery on his penis! The problem here really is nothing to do with the size of your penis and much more to do with your wife who seems to either have medical problems down below or psychological problems about sex and penetration in general.

  43. QUESTION:
    Alternating light and heavy periods, what could cause this?
    I have noticed for about the past year that my periods have been alternating extremely light one month and then the next month extremely heavy. I am wondering what causes this? It didnt use to be this way for me (they used to all be pretty much the same flow) but now I know everytime I have a light period next month I get a very heavy period. I have been on the same birth control for years. (I am a female - just on my husbands yahoo account).

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, here are some facts about irregular menstrual cycles. I hope this helps you to answer a few of your questions. Take care.
      Cycles between 23–35 days are very common. A woman may get her period only one to four times a year. Or she might have periods that occur two to three times in a month and involve spotting or extremely heavy flow. Alternatively, she may have heavy episodes of bleeding every two to three months. Irregular periods are simply what is irregular for you.

      For the most part, we don’t worry at the clinic about a missed period or two over the course of a year. More variation than that may indicate to us the beginning of perimenopause or a disruption of the natural chain of hormonal events that controls menstruation. A wide variety of factors can be responsible for irregular periods, among them:

      Significant weight gain or loss
      Over-exercise
      Poor nutrition (or a diet too high in carbohydrates)
      Smoking
      Drug use
      Caffeine
      Excessive alcohol use (interfering with how the liver metabolizes estrogen and progesterone)
      Eating disorders
      Increased stress
      Polycystic ovarian syndrome/estrogen dominance
      Uterine abnormalities (fibroids/cysts/polyps/endometriosis)
      Hormonal imbalance related to perimenopause
      Medications
      Chemotherapy
      Recent childbirth, miscarriage, or D&C
      Breastfeeding

      As you can see, there are many different ways a woman can be irregular for as many different reasons, and it can be very confusing when it happens.

      http://www.womentowomen.com/menstruation…

  44. QUESTION:
    I have pain in my lower left side by the ovary is. I had surgery about 1 yr ago to remove polyps. What is it?
    The pain is like dull achy but comes and goes. can anyone clarify this for me.

    • ANSWER:
      Abdominal/pelvic pain that is similar to that of period cramping may indicate a problem in a reproductive organ (like the pain around your ovaries or uterus).

      This includes conditions such as endometriosis (when tissue from the uterus is displaced to somewhere else like the pelvic wall or ovaries), uterine fibroids (thick bands of muscular and fibrous tissue in the uterus), ovarian cysts, ovarian cancer (rare), or pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) infection of the reproductive organs, usually from a sexually transmitted disease.

      If you have pain in your ovary area, you might have an ovarian cyst. I have experienced that same type of pain whenever I have had an ovarian cyst. I was also diagnosed with endometriosis last year which caused me severe pelvic pain and intense and painful period cramping.

      Based on your symptoms and what you wrote, I would recommend that you should see your doctor/gynaecologist, just to rule out any serious causes.

      Good luck :)

  45. QUESTION:
    Will I need a pelvic exam for birth control?
    I'm 16 and not sexually active. I have horrible, terrible, almost paralyzing menstrual cramps.
    Nothing helps, and I'm sick of it.
    I want to go on birth control because I heard it will help. I've discussed it with my mom and she's fine with it.

    I'm scared to get a pelvic exam though. Is it likely that I will? Or can I just get a prescription with out any type of checkup.

    Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      They checked me when I went in for the same reason. I was 23 when I had my 1st exam (I'm only 24 now) & was terrified but it really wasn't as bad as I thought it would be. They like to be sure that its nothing like endometriosis, cysts, polyps or anything like that causing the pain before putting you on any medicines. All they found with me is a few small fibroids that didn't need any attention. Birth control helped me soooooo freakin much! I do not recommend the shots though. After I got the shots & lost hair, gained weight. It can also lessen your bone density if you use it for long periods of time & will make you not have a prd until a year after your last shot. But yeah, you will get examined but I promise its worth it in the long run.

  46. QUESTION:
    Could a cyst on the ovary cause a miscarriage?
    Im 18 and I'm 4 weeks and 4 days pregnant 2day and I have a really bad cold and when I cough I have pain in my right ovary and I'm wonderign if I do have a cyst could that result of me losing my baby???

    • ANSWER:
      Is it a fibroid cyst? I'm currently pregnant also and I have a fibroid near my right ovary as well. The doctor said that my baby is healthy right now. I know that fibroids have caused complications and have caused some women to be infertile. I'm due at the end of January and I'm having a C section. At that time they are going to take the baby out then take the fibroid out. If this is what you have, then maybe you will go through the same thing. I don't have pain when I cough, but I do have pain when I'm walking sometimes in that area. Go to your doctor and see what he or she says about the pain when you cough. I hope that everything will be okay and I wish the best for you. Oh, I just reread your details. I'm 18 too!

  47. QUESTION:
    Anyone else have these kind of problems with ovarian cysts?
    I have had problems with this for quite a few years. Cysts i mean. But not like this. Normally when i have a cyst i can always tell on what side it is. But this time the cramping comes from the middle, but not bad, its more mild. But this time its bad in the lower back. Which i have never had with cysts. And the bloating is horrid. It looks like l'm around 2-3 months pregnant. I've spotted for 2 days here a couple of days ago. Everything points towards pregnancy but i took a test lastnight and it is negative. If I am, and with the belly that i do have, it should have been possitive. So the only other thing i can think it is, is ovarian cysts. But i've never experianced this before with them. So that is why I'm on here, just wondering if anyone else has these same symptoms, mainly the bloating this bad, with cysts?
    I have also been losing weight, everywhere but the belly. I just don't understad. I am waiting to go to the doc because our health ins. hasn't kicked in yet.
    I am really confussed here, i have no pain during intercourse, i'm not constipated, nothing like that. I've checked out every possible thing i can find on the internet about different reproductive system problems, and nothing is adding up here. If there is a doc or a nurse on here to help. Plz do. Oh and thank you so far for the answers.

    • ANSWER:
      I have had ovarian cysts in the past. I have also experienced bloat like you are describing. I went to the doctor and was told my uterus was enlarged. I was not pregnant. I had developed fibroids..... there is really no way to know for sure what is causing your condition with out medical test being ran.. I would suggest that once your insurance kicks in.. to go get checked out to put your mind at ease and try to get something to help you allevate the symptoms.

      Good luck

  48. QUESTION:
    My cycles been kinda outta wack, wondering if any body has any idea y?
    Ive had the same partner for a year and a half now. But I have been having unprotected sex. I had a period on the 23rd of november and than on october 6th that only lasted 3 days. than 15 dayslater i hada6 day period. its now november the 18th. Since every things been so outta wack for me im kind been use to it that way and expecting my period. I dont know why every things outta wack any ideas?

    • ANSWER:
      Significant weight gain or loss
      Over-exercise
      Poor nutrition (or a diet too high in carbohydrates)
      Smoking
      Drug use
      Caffeine
      Excessive alcohol use (interfering with how the liver metabolizes estrogen and progesterone)
      Eating disorders
      Increased stress
      Polycystic ovarian syndrome/estrogen dominance
      Uterine abnormalities (fibroids/cysts/polyps/endometriosis)
      Hormonal imbalance related to perimenopause
      Medications
      Chemotherapy
      Recent childbirth, miscarriage, or D&C
      Breastfeeding

  49. QUESTION:
    Why do I spot blood after sex?
    I am 26 years old and I am not a virgin, but i don't have sex often at all; perhaps once every three months (same partner every time). I am not on the pill, and I use protection every time.

    This is the third time that this has happened: just a few red spots when i urinate after sex. I know its not cancer as i just had my yearly cancer tests, but this is really freaking me out! can anyone give me some kind of advice.

    • ANSWER:
      Bleeding during or after sex is not considered normal and therefore should be evaluated at all times. The only time bleeding during or after sex is considered normal in some cases is if you are having sexual intercourse for the first time and the first few times after having sex for the first time.

      Some causes of vaginal bleeding after sex, such as vaginal dryness after menopause or in some cases by the use of certain types of birth control pills are not serious and may be easily treated.

      However, in some cases, vaginal bleeding after sex can be a sign of a serious underlying problem (using all these as examples only, even though you had recent checks done), including:

      * Inflammation of the cervix (cervicitis).
      * Sexually transmitted diseases, such as chlamydia or gonorrhea.
      * Cervical polyps.
      * Cervical ectropion, a condition in which the cervical tissue is more susceptible to abrasion.
      * Endometriosis or ovarian cysts.
      * Pelvic inflammatory disease.
      * Uterine fibroids.
      * Cancer of the cervix, uterus or vagina.

      If you continue to experience bleeding during or after sex, I would recommend that you consult with your doctor/gynaecologist to see what they think could be causing this.

      Good luck :)

  50. QUESTION:
    I have a few questions about the birth control Mirena?
    1. Can I get it if I've never had sex (I wanna get it next year. I'll be a sophomore then and I want to be safe.)

    2. After the 5 years, can you get a new one?

    3. Would it interfere at all with sex?

    4. Are there any side effects?

    Please don't give me crap for wanting birth control at 15. I just want to be prepared if something happens. At least I'm being responsible about it.

    • ANSWER:
      Birth Control

      Mirena IUD (inter-uterine device)
      Mirena is a unique type of IUD that contains low doses of progestin: the same hormone used in some birth control pills. Like other IUDs, the Mirena is a small T-shaped device placed into the uterus by your health care provider. Because the hormones are released directly into the uterus, only low doses are necessary to prevent pregnancy, about 1/7 of that in a birth control pill. Mirena is about 99 percent effective in preventing pregnancy, similar to the birth control pill. This is significantly higher than a conventional copper IUD, which is 96-98 percent effective. Mirena does not protect you and your partner against sexually transmitted infections.
      Copper IUDs are not recommended for women with heavy menstrual periods, because they often make the bleeding heavier. However Mirena will reduce a woman's periods, and may be a useful treatment for women with small to moderate fibroids or heavy menstrual bleeding.

      Using Mirena
      Mirena must be inserted in a doctor's office or clinic. It is often inserted during your period or shortly after having an abortion or giving birth when your caregiver can be sure that you are not pregnant. The insertion takes about five minutes. It is inserted into the uterus so that thin strings attached to the base of the T hang down through the cervical opening. These strings are trimmed so they are just long enough for you to check that the IUD is in place and so that a health care provider can use them to remove the IUD at a later date. Most women have some cramps when the IUD is being inserted.

      You may want to use another method of birth control as back-up for a month in case the IUD moves or comes out. After six weeks, return to your doctor or clinic for a check-up then continue to have your regular check-ups. The Mirena can remain in place for 5 years and can be easily and quickly removed by a health care provider.

      Changes to your Menstrual Cycle and other Side Effects
      Mirena will change your menstrual cycle and eventually make your periods much lighter. However, in the first three months of use, many women experience unpredictable bleeding, and about 20 percent have prolonged periods that last more than 8 days. After three months bleeding becomes more regular and may stop altogether. In studies of Mirena, women's periods were reduced by 85 percent after three months and 97 percent after a year. Although bleeding is much lighter, some women who use Mirena have difficulty predicting when their period will occur.

      Beyond these menstrual irregularities, Mirena has few side effects because it contains such a small amount of hormone. Some women do experience mild side effects related to the hormones such as headaches, water retention, breast tenderness or acne. Often these resolve after the first two months of use.

      Advantages
      very effective
      neither partner can feel an IUD during sex
      the woman controls this method of birth control
      can remain in place for many years

      Disadvantages
      cost
      does not protect against sexually transmitted infections
      unpredictable bleeding and other side effects particularly in the first few months
      increased risk of pelvic infection mainly associated with insertion
      increased risk of benign ovarian cysts
      may be difficult to insert in some women
      rarely an IUD may puncture the wall of the uterus

      Hope This Helps?

are fibroids and cysts the same

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